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1

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

2

Lunar Laser Ranging Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data provides science results: gravitational physics and ephemeris information from the orbit, lunar science from rotation and solid-body tides, and Earth science. Sensitive tests of gravitational physics include the Equivalence Principle, limits on the time variation of the gravitational constant G, and geodetic precession. The equivalence principle test is used for an accurate determination of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter \\beta. Lunar ephemerides are a product of the LLR analysis used by current and future spacecraft missions. The analysis is sensitive to astronomical parameters such as orbit, masses and obliquity. The dissipation-caused semimajor axis rate is 37.9 mm/yr and the associated acceleration in orbital longitude is -25.7 ''/cent^2, dominated by tides on Earth with a 1% lunar contribution. Lunar rotational variation has sensitivity to interior structure, physical properties, and energy dissipation. The second-degree lunar Love numbers are detected; k_2 has an accuracy of 11%. Lunar tidal dissipation is strong and its Q has a weak dependence on tidal frequency. A fluid core of about 20% the Moon's radius is indicated by the dissipation data. Evidence for the oblateness of the lunar fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary is getting stronger. This would be independent evidence for a fluid lunar core. Moon-centered coordinates of four retroreflectors are determined. Station positions and motion, Earth rotation variations, nutation, and precession are determined from analyses. Extending the data span and improving range accuracy will yield improved and new scientific results. Adding either new retroreflectors or precise active transponders on the Moon would improve the accuracy of the science results.

James G. Williams; Dale H. Boggs; Slava G. Turyshev; J. Todd Ratcliff

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Collaborative, Data-Intensive Science Key to Science & Commerce Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article coincides with the release of "Data-Intensive Science," co-edited by Dr. Kerstin Kleese van Dam. In the piece, Dr. Kleese van Dam explains how data-intensive science has the potential to transform not only how we do science but how quickly we can translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, decisions and, ultimately, economic success. In the article, she states it is clear that nations that can most effectively transform tons of scientific data into actionable knowledge are going to be the leaders in the future of science and commerce and how creating the required new insights for complex challenges cannot be done without effective collaboration. Because many science domains already are unable to explore all of the data they collect (or which is relevant to their research), progress in collaborative, data-intensive science is crucial toward unlocking the potential of big data.

Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program DOE Researchers Eligible to Apply for Resources, Expertise April 12, 2012...

5

The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Key, M.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M.H.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Intense laser field ionization of atom and molecular ion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In order to understand how does the intense laser interact with matter we first of all study the ionization process. In this highly nonlinear region (more)

Long, Zi Jian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Data-Intensive Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exasxale Science July 23, 2013 Darshan: HPC IO Characterization Tool January 17, 2013 DIY: Do-it-Yourself Analysis May 10, 2013 ESG: Earth System Grid January 17, 2013 GLEAN: In...

10

Intensity clamping in the filament of femtosecond laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

We have studied numerically the evolution of the light field intensity and induced refractive index of a medium upon filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in air. It is shown that the intensity clamping results from the dynamic balance of optical powers of nonlinear lenses, induced by radiation due to the Kerr nonlinearity of air, and laser plasma produced during photoionisation. We have found the relation between the peak values of the light field intensity and the electron density in laser-produced plasma, as well as the transverse sizes of the filament and the plasma channel. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

Kandidov, V P; Fedorov, V Yu; Tverskoi, O V; Kosareva, O G; Chin, S L

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Intense transient magnetic-field generation by laser plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a laser system, the return current of a laser generated plasma is conducted near a target to subject that target to the magnetic field thereof. In alternate embodiments the target may be either a small non-fusion object for testing under the magnetic field or a laser-fusion pellet. In the laser-fusion embodiment, the laser-fusion pellet is irradiated during the return current flow and the intense transient magnetic field is used to control the hot electrons thereof to hinder them from striking and heating the core of the irradiated laser-fusion pellet.

Benjamin, R.F.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Free-Electron Lasers Free-Electron Lasers Free-Electron Lasers absorb and release energy at any wavelength and can be controlled more precisely than conventional lasers by producing intense powerful light in brief bursts with extreme precision. This innovative technology has opened doors to a vast array of possibilities for manufacturing and for basic research. Read more in the white paper In OSTI Collections: Free-Electron Lasers by Dr. William Watson, Physicist, OSTI staff. Free-Electron Lasers Results in DOE Databases Science.gov Ciencia.Science.gov (Español) WorldWideScience.org Energy Citations Database DOE Information Bridge Relevant Subject Clusters FREE ELECTRON LASERS PARTICLE ACCELERATORS ENGINEERING LASERS ELECTRON BEAMS ACCELERATORS WIGGLER MAGNETS EQUIPMENT ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION

13

Simulations Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser Lab cielo equip Fig. 1. Cielo is a 1.37 petaflops capability-class supercomputer installed at LANL, funded by the US DOE NNSA...

14

Quantitative Interpretation of Laser Ceilometer Intensity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used a commercially available laser ceilometer to measure vertical profiles of the optical extinction in rain. This application requires special signal processing to correct the raw data for the effects of receiver noise, high-...

R. R. Rogers; M-F. Lamoureux; L. R. Bissonnette; R. M. Peters

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Laser guiding at relativistic intensities and wakefield particle accleration in plasma channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefieldfirst time in a high gradient laser wakefield accelerator byguiding the drive laser pulse. Channels formed by

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dependence of terahertz power from laser-produced plasma on laser intensity  

SciTech Connect

Power of terahertz radiation from plasma which is generated from air irradiated by coupled ({omega}, 2{omega}) femtosecond laser pulses is analyzed for high laser intensities, for which non-linear plasma effects on the pulse propagation become essential, with multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations including the self-consistent plasma kinetics. The growth rate of THz power becomes slower as the laser intensity increases. A reason of such a lowering of efficiency in THz emission is found to be ionization of air by the laser pulse, which results in poor focusing of laser pulses.

Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Jin, Z.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Japan Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka (Japan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Alliances Annual 2011 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Annual Banner photo: The Texas Petawatt laser bay at the University of Texas, Center for High Intensity Laser Science...

18

Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

Stafford, D

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser  

SciTech Connect

A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Center for Optics, Photonics, and Laser, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Center for Optics, Photonics, and Laser, Laval University, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an intense ultrashort laser pulse, Science, vol. 298,generated from intense laser-plasma interactions, Appl.monochromatic x-rays in the laser synchrotron source

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atomic processes in plasmas under ultra-intense laser irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lasers delivering subpicosecond pulses with energies of a fraction of a Joule have made it possible to generate irradiance levels approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. We presently operate two such systems, a KrF based excimer laser capable of producing a few 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} at 248 nm with a repetition rate of 3--5 Hz and a XeCl based excimer laser capable of producing mid 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at 308 nm and 1 Hz. We will discuss some experimental results and the theory and modeling of the interaction of such intense laser pulses with aluminum. Because of a small ASE prepulse the high intensity interaction is not at the solid surface but rather at the n{sub e} = 2 {times} 10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3} critical density of the blowoff plasma generated by the ASE. The transient behavior of the plasma following the energy deposition by the intense subpicosecond pulse can be viewed as the energy-impulse response of the plasma. Experimental results and modeling of the x-ray emission from this plasma will be presented. 15 refs., 8 figs.

Schappert, G.T.; Casperson, D.E.; Cobble, J.A.; Comly, J.C.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; LaGattuta, K.J.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Olson, G.L.; Taylor, A.J.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Slow Electrons Generated by Intense High-Frequency Laser Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very slow electron is shown to emerge when an intense high-frequency laser pulse is applied to a hydrogen negative ion. This counterintuitive effect cannot be accounted for by multiphoton or tunneling ionization mechanisms. We explore the effect and show that in the high-frequency regime the atomic electron is promoted to the continuum via a nonadiabatic transition caused by slow deformation of the dressed potential that follows a variation of the envelope of the laser pulse. This is a general mechanism, and a slow electron peak should always appear in the photoelectron spectrum when an atom is irradiated by a high-frequency pulse of finite length.

Toyota, Koudai; Watanabe, Shinichi [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1, Chofu-ga-oka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Tolstikhin, Oleg I. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov Square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Morishita, Toru [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1, Chofu-ga-oka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated that conversion efficiencies of 30-40% are possible at intensities of 600-800 GW/cm2, which is the operating level of the Petawatt laser at LLNL. The main limiting factors are phase modulation and material damage.

Banks, P S

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project.

Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Baranovski, A.; Diesburg, M.; Garzoglio, G.; /Fermilab; Kurca, T.; /Lyon, IPN; Mhashilkar, P.; /Fermilab

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

Haines, N. (ed.)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Data-intensive e-science frontier research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale e-science, including high-energy and nuclear physics, biomedical informatics, and Earth science, depend on an increasingly integrated, distributed cyberinfrastructure serving virtual organizations on a global scale.

Harvey B. Newman; Mark H. Ellisman; John A. Orcutt

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Lasers without Mirrors, Designed by Supercomputer - NERSC SCience News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lasers without Lasers without Mirrors, Designed by Supercomputer Lasers without Mirrors, Designed by Supercomputer October 14, 2009 | Tags: Lasers, Life Sciences, Materials Science Contact: Ji Qiang | Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | JQiang@lbl.gov John Corlett | Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Center for Beam Physics | JNCorlett@lbl.gov Sometimes it takes a big machine to understand the tiniest details. That's the case with free electron lasers (FELs). The powerful X-rays they generate can probe matter directly at the level of atomic interactions and chemical-bond formation, letting scientists observe such phenomena as chemical reactions in trace elements, electric charges in photosynthesis and the structure of microscopic machines. FELs have the potential to

29

System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Short, Robert W. (Rochester, NY); Craxton, Stephen (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments at the Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT MINERvA MiniBooNE MINOS NOvA LBNE Cosmic Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments ArgoNeuT ArgoNeut detector at Proton Assembly Building Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT The Argon Neutrino Teststand or ArgoNeuT detector, nicknamed for Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, is a liquid argon neutrino detector at Fermilab. Argon is a noble, non-toxic element that in its gaseous form constitutes about 1 percent of air. It exists as a colorless liquid only in the narrow temperature range of minus 186 to minus 189 degrees Celsius. Neutrinos passing through a large volume of argon can interact with an argon atom, producing secondary particles such as muons and protons, which then ionize other argon atoms. An electric field within the detector causes

31

Intensity Frontier | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

more detail may lead to the answers to a number of big questions in particle physics. Quantum mechanics is what allows Intensity Frontier research to answer these questions by...

32

Intensity Frontier: More Information | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Intensity Frontier » Intensity Frontier: More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier: More Information Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Experiments at the Intensity Frontier aim to transform our understanding of

33

CRC handbook of laser science and technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser action has been observed in all forms of matter and spans a spectrum ranging from radiowaves to X-rays. This book provides a concise, readily accessible source of critically evaluated data for workers in all areas of laser research an development. The emphasis is on the presentation of tubular and graphical data compiled by recognized authorities. Definitions of properties and references to the original data sources and to supplementary reviews and surveys are also provided, as appropriate.

Clark, D.E. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (US)); White, W.B. (The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US)); Machiels, A.J. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means. 3 figs.

Wilcox, R.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam  

SciTech Connect

An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means. 3 figs.

Wilcox, R.B.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental data of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser. These measurements were made using a CCD-based magnetic spectrometer. We present details on the distinct effective temperatures that were obtained for a wide variety of targets as a function of laser intensity. It is found that as the intensity increases from 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, a 0.4 dependence on the laser intensity is found. Between 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} and 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, a gradual rolling off of temperature with intensity is observed.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W L; Moon, S; Patel, N; Patel, P K; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

Qiu, Rui

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nonlinear reflection of high intensity picosecond laser pulse from overdense plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of 1.5 ps FWHM laser pulses with solid targets at intensity 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} and contrast ratio 10{sup 6} is studied. Red shift of a 'mirror' reflected fundamental wave and its second harmonic depending on the incident laser pulse energy and angle of incidence are observed. They are associated with Doppler shift corresponding to inward movement of the critical density surface from laser pondermotive pressure. Back scattered light has nonlinear dependence from laser intensity connected with SBS and changing of plasma surface.

Andreev, A. A.; Bayanov, V. I.; Vankov, A. B.; Kozlov, A. A.; Kurnin, I. V.; Platonov, K. Y.; Solovyev, N. A.; Chizhov, S. A.; Yashin, V. E. [Research Institute for Laser Physics, SC 'Vavilov State Optical Institute', 12, Birzhevaya line, St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation)

1998-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nonlinear reflection of high intensity picosecond laser pulse from overdense plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of 1.5 ps FWHM laser pulses with solid targets at intensity 10 15 10 17 ? W/cm 2 and contrast ratio 10 6 is studied. Red shift of a mirror reflected fundamental wave and its second harmonic depending on the incident laser pulse energy and angle of incidence are observed. They are associated with Doppler shift corresponding to inward movement of the critical density surface from laser pondermotive pressure. Back scattered light has nonlinear dependence from laser intensity connected with SBS and changing of plasma surface.

A. A. Andreev; V. I. Bayanov; A. B. Vankov; A. A. Kozlov; I. V. Kurnin; K. Y. Platonov; N. A. Solovyev; S. A. Chizhov; V. E. Yashin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Experiments at the Intensity Frontier | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Facility Ops Experiments at the Energy Frontier Experiments at the Intensity Frontier Experiments at the Cosmic Frontier Projects, Missions, and Status HEP User Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Facilities Experiments at the Intensity Frontier Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Intensity Frontier, accessed with a combination of intense particle beams and highly sensitive detectors, offers a second, unique investigation

42

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier MiniBooNE Researchers initiated the Booster Neutrino Experiment, BooNE, to verify definitively the results of the Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector experiment. In 1995, the Los Alamos experiment presented strong evidence for the oscillation of muon anti-neutrinos into electron anti-neutrinos. Jasmine Ma inspects one of the phototubes that detects light from neutrino interactions. (Courtesy: Peter Ginter) Jasmine Ma inspects one of the phototubes that detects light from neutrino interactions. (Courtesy: Peter Ginter) The 800-ton detector, called MiniBooNE, searches for neutrino oscillations. The detector is located 500 meters from Fermilab's second neutrino source, the Booster Neutrino Beam or BNB. The presence of neutrinos can only be inferred by detecting the charged

43

Intensity-resolved Above Threshold Ionization Yields of Atoms with Ultrashort Laser Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The above threshold ionization (ATI) spectra provide a diversity of information about a laser-atom ionization process such as laser intensity, pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and atomic energy level spacing. However, the spatial distribution of intensities inherent in all laser beams reduces the resolution of this information. This research focuses on recovering the intensity-resolved ATI spectra from experimental data using a deconvolution algorithm. Electron ionization yields of xenon were measured for a set of laser pulse intensities using a time of flight (TOF) setup. Horizontally polarized, unchirped, 50fs pulses were used in the ionization process. All laser parameters other than the radiation intensity were held constant over the set of intensity measurements. A deconvolution algorithm was developed based on the experimental parameters. Then the deconvolution algorithm was applied to the experimental data to obtain the intensity-resolved total yield probability and ATI spectra. Finally, an error analysis was performed to determine the stability and accuracy of the algorithm as well as the quality of the data. It was found that the algorithm produced greater contrast for peaks in the ATI spectra where atom specific resonant behavior is observed. Additionally, the total yield probability showed that double ionization may be observed in the ionization yield. The error analysis revealed that the algorithm was stable under the experimental conditions for a range of intensities.

Hart, Nathan Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development and applications of compact high-intensity lasers* G. Mourou+ and D. Umstadter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'ttnt*t' ' 't**Bd ' 'r'"& lOi 10'4 lOiS lo'! 10" Laser intensity (W/cm') 1 oio :0 109 z g lo8 3 N `ij 10

Umstadter, Donald

45

High-Intensity Laser Diagnostics for OMEGA EP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OMEGA EP is a new high-energy petawatt laser system under construction at the University of Rochesters Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EPs mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EPs off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from petawatt laser at full energy.

Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Junquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

Todd Ditmire

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect

In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

Williams, E A

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Narrow Energy Spread Protons and Ions from High-Intensity, High-Contrast Laser Solid Target Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent simulations show that an idealized, high intensity, short pulse laser can generate quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies over 100 MeV in an interaction with a thin film. However, most short pulse laser facilities with sufficient intensity have difficulty controlling the nanosecond and picosecond contrast necessary to realize such a regime. Experiments were performed to investigate proton and ion acceleration from a high contrast, short pulse laser by employing dual plasma mirrors along with a deformable mirror at the HERCULES laser facility at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Sciences, University of Michigan. Plasma mirrors were characterized, allowing a 50% throughput with an intensity contrast increase of 105. The focal spot quality was also exceptional, showing a 1.1 micron full width at half maximum (FWHM) focal diameter. Experiments were done using temporally cleaned 30 TW, 32 fs pulses to achieve an intensity of up to 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2} on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mylar targets with thicknesses ranging 50 nm to 13 microns. Proton beams with energy spreads below 2 MeV were observed from all thicknesses, peaking with energies up to 10.3 MeV and an energy spread of 0.8 MeV. Similar narrow energy spreads were observed for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at the silicon nitride thickness of 50 nm with energies up to 24 MeV with an energy spread of 3 MeV, whereas the energy spread is greatly increased at a larger thickness. Maximum energies were confirmed with CR39 track detectors, while a Thomson ion spectrometer was used to gauge the monoenergetic nature of the beam.

Dollar, Franklin; Matsuoka, Takeshi; McGuffey, Christopher; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Thomas, Alec G. R.; Willingale, Louise; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, Univ. Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Davis, Jack; Petrov, George [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Asymmetric explosion of clusters in intense laser fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine asymmetric expansion of argon clusters illuminated by 800 nm laser pulses of duration Almost-Equal-To 23fs, using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. For this short pulse duration, laser energy absorption by cluster electrons is dominated by the nonlinear resonance (NLR) absorption process [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)]. In this work, we concentrate, particularly, on the ionic outcome in the NLR regime and show that higher charge states of argon ions are produced along the laser polarization than in the transverse directions leading to the anisotropy (asymmetry) in the ion energy distribution. This anisotropy already established during the short pulse duration (or in the early duration of a long pulse) may contribute to the anisotropic ion emission reported in cluster experiments with pulse duration longer than 100 fs. Our PIC results are compared with a charged-sphere model showing that cluster explosion is mainly due to Coulomb repulsion between the cluster ions.

Kundu, M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ultrahigh-intensity laser: physics of the extreme on a tabletop  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the development of ultrahigh-intensity laser technology from the early 1960`s to the present, explaining the obstacles to each increase in intensity and the technical means used to overcome them. These included the shortening of pulses, mode locking, and chirped pulse amplification (CPA). The particular technical advances that make CPA possible included the invention of matched pulse stretchers and compressors and the development of ultrabroadband gain media. The paper then discusses the generation of ultrashort pulses and their characteristics. It then moves on to the Petawatt laser, which incorporates the CPA technology. It then addresses the question of whether it is possible to forecast the ultimate peak power that can be achieved by a laser system of a given size. Applications of ultrahigh-intensity lasers in different physical regimes are discussed.

Mourou, G.A.; Barty, C.P.; Perry, M.D.

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in vacuum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of a short duration intense axial magnetic field has been studied. Resonance occurs between the electrons and the laser field for an optimum magnetic field leading to effective energy transfer from laser to electrons. The value of optimum magnetic field is independent of the laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy. The electrons rotate around the axis of the laser pulse with small angle of emittance and small energy spread. Acceleration gradient increases with laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy.

Singh, K. P. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Science, Technology and Mission Design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the Einstein's general theory of relativity in the most intense gravitational environment available in the solar system -- the close proximity to the Sun. By using independent time-series of highly accurate measurements of the Shapiro time-delay (laser ranging accurate to 1 cm) and interferometric astrometry (accurate to 0.1 picoradian), LATOR will measure gravitational deflection of light by the solar gravity with accuracy of 1 part in a billion, a factor ~30,000 better than currently available. LATOR will perform series of highly-accurate tests of gravitation and cosmology in its search for cosmological remnants of scalar field in the solar system. We present science, technology and mission design for the LATOR mission.

Slava G. Turyshev

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

Comoving acceleration of overdense electron-positron plasma by colliding ultra-intense laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of sustained acceleration of electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas by comoving electromagnetic (EM) pulses are presented. When a thin slab of overdense e+e- plasma is irradiated with linear-polarized ultra-intense short laser pulses from both sides, the pulses are transmitted when the plasma is compressed to thinner than {approx}2 relativistic skin depths. A fraction of the plasma is then captured and efficiently accelerated by self-induced JxB forces. For 1 {mu}m laser and 10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2} intensity, the maximum energy exceeds GeV in a picosecond.

Liang, Edison [Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tailoring the filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses with periodic lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show numerically that by using periodic lattices the filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses, otherwise a result of competing nonlinear effects, can be well controlled with respect to its properties. The diffraction induced by the lattice provides a regularizing mechanism to the nonlinear self-action effects involved in filamentation. We demonstrate a new propagation regime of intense lattice solitons bridging the field of spatial solitons with that of femtosecond laser filamentation. The effective filamentation control is expected to have an important impact on numerous applications.

Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Efremidis, N. K. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Dynamical Schwinger effect and high-intensity lasers. Realising nonperturbative QED.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of experimental verification of vacuum e{sup +}e{sup -} pair creation at the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with intensities 10{sup 20}-10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, achievable with present-day petawatt lasers, and approaching the Schwinger limit: 10{sup 29} W/cm{sup 2} to be reached at ELI. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the evolution of the e{sup +} and e{sup -} distribution functions governed by a non-Markovian source term for pair production. As possible experimental signals of vacuum pair production we consider e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into {gamma}-pairs and the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma. We discuss the dependence of the dynamical pair production process on laser wavelength, with special emphasis on applications in the X-ray domain (X-FEL), as well as the prospects for {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair creation at high-intensity lasers. We investigate perspectives for using high-intensity lasers as 'boosters' of ion beams in the few-GeV per nucleon range, which is relevant, e.g., to the exploration of the QCD phase transition in laboratory experiments.

Blaschke, D. B.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Roepke, G.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Shkirmanov, D. S.; Smolyansky, S. A.; Physics; Univ. of Wroclaw; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research; Univ. Rostock; Saratov State Univ.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Dynamical Schwinger effect and high-intensity lasers. Realising nonperturbative QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of experimental verification of vacuum e^+e^- pair creation at the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with intensities 10^{20}-10^{22} W/cm^2, achievable with present-day petawatt lasers, and approaching the Schwinger limit: 10^{29} W/cm^2 to be reached at ELI. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the evolution of the e^+ and e^- distribution functions governed by a non-Markovian source term for pair production. As possible experimental signals of vacuum pair production we consider e^+e^- annihilation into gamma-pairs and the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e^+e^- plasma. We discuss the dependence of the dynamical pair production process on laser wavelength, with special emphasis on applications in the X-ray domain (X-FEL), as well as the prospects for \\mu^+\\mu^- and \\pi^+\\pi^- pair creation at high-intensity lasers. We investigate perspectives for using high-intensity lasers as ``boosters'' of ion beams in the few-GeV per nucleon range, which is relevant, e.g., to the exploration of the QCD phase transition in laboratory experiments.

D. B. Blaschke; A. V. Prozorkevich; G. Roepke; C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. S. Shkirmanov; S. A. Smolyansky

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Momentum distributions of sequential ionization generated by an intense laser pulse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relative yield and momentum distributions of all multiply charged atomic ions generated by a short (30 fs) intense (10(14)-5 x 10(18) W/cm(2)) laser pulse are investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation. We predict a substantial shift in the maximum (centroid) of the ion-momentum distribution along the laser polarization as a function of the absolute phase. This effect should be experimentally detectable with currently available laser systems even for relatively long pulses, such as 25-30 fs. In addition to the numerical results, we present semianalytical scaling for the position of the maximum.

Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Sayler, A. M.; Rathje, T.; Paulus, Gerhard G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Plasma Lens for High Intensity Laser Focusing  

SciTech Connect

A plasma lens based on a short hydrogen-filled alumina capillary discharge is experimentally characterized. For a plasma length of about 5mm, the focal length, measured from the plasma entrance, was {approx} 11 to 8mm for on axis densities of {approx} 2.5 to 5 x 1018cm-3, respectively. The plasma temperature away from the walls of the 1/2mm diameter capillary was estimated to be {approx} 8eV indicating that the plasma is fully ionized. Such a lens should thus be suitable for focusing very high intensity pulses. Comparisons of the measured focusing strength to that predicted by a first-order fluid model [N. A. Bobrova, et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 016407 (2002)] shows reasonable agreement given that some of the observed plasma parameters are not predicted by this model.

Fang, F.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C. [UCLA Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Lopes, N. C. [Grupo de Lasers e Plasmas, ESuperior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Ito, H. [Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya City, Zip 321-8585 (Japan)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Energetic electron propagation in solid targets driven by the intense electric fields of femtosecond laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model is used to interpret experimental data on the propagation of energetic electrons perpendicular to and parallel to the propagation direction of intense femtosecond laser pulses that are incident on solid targets. The pulses with {approx_equal}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} intensity are incident normal onto a gadolinium or tungsten wire embedded in an aluminum substrate, and MeV electrons generated in the focal spot propagate along the laser direction into the irradiated wire. Electrons also propagate laterally from the focal spot through the aluminum substrate and into a dysprosium or hafnium spectator wire at a distance up to 1 mm from the irradiated wire. The ratio of the K shell emission from the spectator and irradiated wires is a measure of the numbers and energies of the MeV electrons propagating parallel to and perpendicular to the intense oscillating electric field of the laser pulse. It is found that the angular distribution of electrons from the focal spot is highly non-isotropic, and approximately twice as many electrons are driven by the electric field toward the spectator wire as into the irradiated wire. This quantitative result is consistent with the qualitative experimental observation that the oscillating electric field of an intense femtosecond laser pulse, when interacting with a heavy metal target, preferentially drives energetic electrons in the electric field direction as compared to perpendicular to the field.

Seely, J. F. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Szabo, C. I. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Spring Circle, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E. [Laboratoire pour L'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Simplified laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a simplified system of laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science and shock spectroscopy. We used commercially available one-box Nd:YAG lasers and beam homogenization solutions to create two launch systems, one based on a smaller (400 mJ) YAG laser and an inexpensive diffusive optic, and one based on a larger (2500 mJ) laser and a diffractive beam homogenizer. The flyer launch, flight, and impact processes were characterized by an 8 GHz fiberoptic photon Doppler velocimeter. We investigated effects of different substrates, adhesives, absorbers, ablative layers, and punching out disks from continuous foils versus fabricating individual foil disks, and found that a simple metal foil epoxied to a glass window was satisfactory in almost all cases. Our simplified system launched flyer plates with velocities up to 4.5 km s{sup -1} and kinetic energies up to 250 mJ that can drive sustained steady shocks for up to 25 ns. The factor that limits these velocities and energies is the laser fluence that can be transmitted through the glass substrate to the flyer surface without optical damage. Methods to increase this transmission are discussed. Reproducible flyer launches were demonstrated with velocity variations of 0.06% and impact time variations of 1 ns. The usefulness of this flyer plate system is demonstrated by Hugoniot equation of state measurements of a polymer film, emission spectroscopy of a dye embedded in the polymer, and impact initiation and emission spectroscopy of a reactive material consisting of nanoscopic fuel and oxidizer particles.

Brown, Kathryn E.; Shaw, William L.; Zheng Xianxu; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of the 90's, was for a long time the only quantitative data to confront theory.

LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

2000-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University,Kagamiyama 1-4-1, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8527 (Japan); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizugawa, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh. [Advanced Beam Technology Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); and others

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

Jahangiri, Fazel [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan) [Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J. (comps.)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Electric dipole-forbidden nuclear transitions driven by super-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric dipole-forbidden transitions of nuclei interacting with super-intense laser fields are investigated considering stable isotopes with suitable low-lying first excited states. Different classes of transitions are identified, and all magnetic sublevels corresponding to the near-resonantly driven nuclear transition are included in the description of the nuclear quantum system. We find that large transition matrix elements and convenient resonance energies qualify nuclear M1 transitions as good candidates for the coherent driving of nuclei. We discuss the implications of resonant interaction of intense laser fields with nuclei beyond the dipole approximation for the controlled preparation of excited nuclear states and important aspects of possible experiments aimed at observing these effects.

Adriana Plffy; Jrg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Higher order terms of radiative damping in extreme intense laser-matter interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The higher order terms of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation have been derived, and their effects are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation. The dominant group of terms up to the fourth order of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation is identified for ultra-intense laser-matter interactions. The second order terms are found to be the damping terms of the Lorentz force while the first order terms represent friction in the equation of motion. Because the second order terms restrict electron acceleration during the laser interaction, electrons/ions are prevented from over-accelerating. Radiative damping becomes highly significant when I{>=} 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} while Bremsstrahlung will be saturated, thus radiative damping will be a dominant source of hard x-rays in regimes at extreme intensities.

Pandit, Rishi R.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nonsequential double ionization below laser-intensity threshold: Anticorrelation of electrons without excitation of parent ion  

SciTech Connect

Two-electron correlated spectra of nonsequential double ionization below laser-intensity threshold are known to exhibit back-to-back scattering of the electrons, i.e., the anticorrelation of the electrons. Currently, the widely accepted interpretation of the anticorrelation is recollision-induced excitation of the ion plus subsequent field ionization of the second electron. We argue that another mechanism, namely, simultaneous electron emission, when the time of return of the rescattered electron is equal to the time of liberation of the bounded electron (i.e., the ion has no time for excitation), can also explain the anticorrelation of the electrons in the deep, below laser-intensity threshold regime. Our conclusion is based on the results of the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a model system of two one-dimensional electrons, as well as on an adiabatic analytic model that allows for a closed-form solution.

Bondar, D. I. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Yudin, G. L. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K 2R1 (Canada); Liu, W.-K. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Ivanov, M. Yu. [Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bandrauk, A. D. [Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

Weber, M.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

An intensity-modulated dual-wavelength He-Ne laser for remote sensing of methane  

SciTech Connect

The differential absorption laser radar for methane sensing detects a leakage of methane gas by emitting into the atmosphere the light of a wavelength absorbable by methane, receiving the light returning after being reflected or scattered on a road or wall surface, etc., and measuring the light intensity lost during the travel. This methane detection system is highly practicable as it makes an instantaneous remote detection possible. The authors have developed a new He-Ne laser that could be used as the light source for the above system. This device emits a two-wavelength laser beam (one wavelength absorbable by methane and the other not absorbable by methane but used for referential purposes) from a single plasma tube, and there is no possibility of the axes of the two-wavelength component deviating from each other. Further, using this laser, they have developed a vehicle-mounted type differential absorption laser radar system which has successfully detected low density methane leakage while the vehicle was moving.

Ueki, T.; Tanaka, H.; Uehara, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 1. Lasers and masers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes various types of lasers and masers. The following topics are discussed in detail: types and comparisons of laser sources, crystal and glass lasers, semiconductor lasers, organic dye and other liquid lasers, free-electron and x-ray lasers, masers and laser safety.

Weber, M.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Free Electron Laser Program Program at Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Program Developed at: Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Developed in: 1990's - 2010

78

#LabChat: Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at 1pm EST #LabChat: Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at 1pm EST May 15, 2012 - 2:03pm Addthis SLAC’s linac accelerates very short pulses of electrons to 99.9999999 percent the speed of light through a slalom that causes the electrons to emit X-rays, which become synchronized as they interact with the electron pulses and create the world’s brightest X-ray laser pulse. | Photo by Brad Plummer, SLAC. SLAC's linac accelerates very short pulses of electrons to 99.9999999 percent the speed of light through a slalom that causes the electrons to emit X-rays, which become synchronized as they interact with the electron pulses and create the world's brightest X-ray laser pulse. | Photo by

79

Double-slit vacuum polarisation effects in ultra-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of the strong laser-driven vacuum on a propagating electromagnetic probe wave has been studied in detail. We investigate two scenarios comprising a focused probe laser beam passing through a region of vacuum polarised by an ultra-intense laser field. By splitting this strong field into two, separated, monochromatic Gaussian pulses counter-propagating in a plane perpendicular to the probe field axis, we demonstrate a leading order light-by-light diffraction effect that generates an interference pattern reminiscent of the classic double-slit experiment. We calculate the total number of probe photons diffracted as well as the number diffracted into regions where the vacuum polarisation signal is higher than the probe background. In addition, we calculate the induced ellipticity and polarisation rotation in the probe beam and show how, in the realistic situation in which the centres of the two strong fields are not exactly aligned, certain ranges of beam separation and observation distance may actually lead to an increase over the idealised case of a single strong laser beam.

B. King; A. Di Piazza; C. H. Keitel

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ionisation of hydrogen molecule in intense ultrashort laser pulses: parallel versus perpendicular orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical comparison of the electronic excitation and ionisation behaviour of molecular hydrogen oriented either parallel or perpendicular to a linear polarised laser pulse is performed. The investigation is based on a non-perturbative treatment that solves the full time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation of both correlated electrons within the fixed-nuclei approximation and the dipole. Results are shown for two different laser pulse lengths and intensities as well as for a large variety of photon frequencies starting in the 1- and reaching into the 6-photon regime. In order to investigate the influence of the intrinsic diatomic two-center problem even further, two values of the internuclear separation and a newly developed atomic model are considered.

Yulian V. Vanne; Alejandro Saenz

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Controlling double ionization of atoms in an intense bichromatic laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

We consider the classical dynamics of a two-electron system subjected to an intense bichromatic linearly polarized laser pulse. By varying the parameters of the field, such as the phase lag and the relative amplitude between the two colors of the field, we observe several trends from the statistical analysis of a large ensemble of trajectories initially in the ground-state energy of the helium atom: high sensitivity of the sequential double-ionization component, low sensitivity of the intensities where nonsequential double ionization occurs, while the corresponding yields can vary drastically. All these trends hold irrespective of which parameter is varied: the phase lag or the relative amplitude. We rationalize these observations by an analysis of the phase-space structures that drive the dynamics of this system and determine the extent of double ionization. These trends turn out to be mainly regulated by the dynamics of the inner electron.

Kamor, A.; Uzer, T. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States); Mauger, F.; Chandre, C. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Campus de Luminy, case 907, 13288 Marseille cedex 09 (France)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Scaling of Pressure with Intensity in Laser-Driven Shocks and Effects of Hot X-ray Preheat  

SciTech Connect

To drive shocks into solids with a laser we either illuminate the material directly, or to get higher pressures, illuminate a plastic ablator that overlays the material of interest. In both cases the illumination intensity is low, <<10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, compared to that for traditional laser fusion targets. In this regime, the laser beam creates and interacts with a collisional, rather than a collisionless, plasma. We present scaling relationships for shock pressure with intensity derived from simulations for this low-intensity collisional plasma regime. In addition, sometimes the plastic-ablator targets have a thin flashcoating of Al on the plastic surface as a shine-through barrier; this Al layer can be a source of hot x-ray preheat. We discuss how the preheat affects the shock pressure, with application to simulating VISAR measurements from experiments conducted on various lasers on shock compression of Fe.

Colvin, J D; Kalantar, D H

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration in Plasma Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativisticGuiding of Relativistic Laser Pulses by Plasma Channels,"Wake Fields by Colliding Laser Pulses,"Phys. Rev. Lett.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of a high intensity EBIT for basic and applied science/011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is a device for producing and studying cold, very highly charged ions of any element, up to a fully ionized U{sup 92+}. These highly charged ions occur in hot plasmas and therefore play important roles in nuclear weapons, controlled fusion, and astrophysical phenomena. The remarkable interaction of these ions with surfaces may lead to technological applications. The highly charged ions can either be studied inside the EBIT itself with measurements of their x-ray emission spectra, or the ions can be extracted from the EBIT in order to study their interaction with solid material. Both types of measurements are being pursued vigorously with the two existing low-intensity EBITs at LLNL and with similar EBITs that have been built at six other laboratories around the world since the EBIT was first developed at LLNL 10 years ago. However, all existing EBITs have approximately the same intensity as the original LLNL EBIT; that is, they all produce about the same number of very-highly-charged ions (roughly 2 x 10{sup 6} per second) and the same number of x-ray photons (roughly 10{sup 7} per second). The goal of the High-Intensity-EBIT project is to increase the x-ray emission per centimeter of length along the electron beam by a factor of 100 and to increase the ion output by a factor of 1000. This dramatic increase in intensity will enable the next generation of basic and applied experimental research in the structure of highly charged ions. For example, the precision of EBIT x-ray measurements of atomic energy levels- which is now limited by count rate-can be improved by an order of magnitude, and new applications in surface science, nanotechnology, and microscopy will be possible with the expected intense ion beams. When the high ion output is combined with the demonstrated low emittance of EBIT ions, we will have a high-brightness source of highly charged ions that can be focused to submicrometer spots. One example of a measurement that will benefit from increased x-ray intensity is our study of the binding energy of high-Z heliumlike ions. The small ``two-electron`` contribution to this binding energy is a fundamental aspect of atomic structure. It arises from the small forces that the two electrons exert on each other in the presence of the much larger force from the atomic nucleus. Our existing EBIT measurements are sensitive to the so-called ``second order`` contribution to the two-electron binding energy, but with the High-Intensity EBIT we can probe an even more subtle effect: the screening by one electron of the quantum electrodynamic (QED) energy contribution from the other electron.

Marrs, R.E., LLNL

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel  

SciTech Connect

Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or Omega may offer additional advantages and we would expect these to be explored and evaluated during the CD process. Question 3 - A laser/optics experts group should review this proposal to ensure the level of R&D is reasonable to provide a sufficient chance of success (>50%). In the preparation of the HILL proposal, we sent our proposal and cost estimates to laser designers/scientists across the complex. Though risks were identified with our design, the prevailing view of those we engaged was that the risks were appropriately represented by the TRL levels assigned and that the enabling R&D planned in our proposal was adequate for risk mitigation. Question 4 - More data and peer review is needed from its sister facilities around the world. It is our specific intent to conduct both scientific and technical workshops with the user community if the High Intensity Science field is further encouraged as part of the NNSA Roadmap. Question 5 - Does HILL have to be co-located with MARIE 1.0? Is that feasible from the point of view of TA-53 real estate? Multiple siting options were considered for HILL, including co-location with MaRIE 1.0 (the most cost-effective and flexible option), as well as in a separate, stand-alone building and in a retro-fitted existing building. The cost estimate included these contingencies and candidate locations for HILL in TA-53 were identified. There is actually significant space at TA-53 on the hill in the northeast end of the mesa. Question 6 - What would be the impact on the weapons program if this facility were NOT built? An inability to elucidate aspects of weapons science in the dense plasma regime and validate computer models for same. This will lead to reduced confidence in the computer tools used for certification. Question 7 - Will HILL allow some of the x-ray vulnerability studies proposed by SPARC? If so what does Sandia's vulnerability group think of this method versus SPARC. It is possible that some of the scope envisioned for SPARC could be achieved on HILL, although likely that the energy produced at HILL not bei

Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Comparison of techniques for solving the Laser Intensity Modulation Method (LIMM) equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Intensity Modulation Method (LIMM) is a technique for the determination of polarization and/or space charge profiles in the thickness direction of ceramic and polymeric samples. The experimental data are analyzed by means of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. This equation admits to multiple and very different solutions. A number of techniques have been developed in order to obtain the most physically reasonable profile. Several techniques based on the regularization method have been proposed. A recent version, polynomial regularization, was developed by Lang. A completely different approach is the Monte Carlo method of Tuncer and Lang. Several sets of both simulated and experimental data are analyzed by the two methods in this paper. Conclusions concerning speed and accuracy are presented.

Lang, S B [Ben Gurion University of the Negev; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Design of a high-intensity RFQ for a possible LHC laser ion source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed a 100 MHz RFQ to accelerate Pb25+ ions from 9.6 keV/u to 250 keV/u for the LHC ion program. We assume an input beam from a laser ion source with a total beam current of 90 mA, out of which 9 mA is Pb25+. The main challenge of the design is to match the tight longitudinal acceptance of the downstream Interdigital H structure while dealing with a high intensity beam composed of a variety of charge states. In this paper, we present a baseline setup optimized for nominal conditions, and show the sensitivity of the RFQ performance to varying input beam characteristics and rf parameters. Further studies will cover the compatibility of this design with an upgraded ECR source under investigation at CERN.

Hanke, K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

#LabChat: Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a concentrated photovoltaic unit that when commercialized will revolutionize the way solar energy is collected. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Lab LabChat: Science of...

90

Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Resonant Auger Decay of Molecules in Intense X-Ray Laser Fields: Light-Induced Strong Nonadiabatic Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resonant Auger process is studied in intense x-ray laser fields. It is shown that the dressing of the initial and decaying states by the field leads to coupled complex potential surfaces which, even for diatomic molecules, possess intersections at which the nonadiabatic couplings are singular. HCl is studied as an explicit showcase example. The exact results differ qualitatively from those without rotations. A wealth of nonadiabatic phenomena is expected in decay processes in intense x-ray fields.

Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Demekhin, Philipp V. [Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Moiseyev, Nimrod [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry and Minerva Center, Technion--Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

92

Lasers without Mirrors, Designed by Supercomputer - NERSC SCience...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it takes a big machine to understand the tiniest details. That's the case with free electron lasers (FELs). The powerful X-rays they generate can probe matter directly at...

93

Enhanced ring lasers: a new measurement tool for Earth sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the progress in the technology of fabrication of large ring lasers that has resulted in an increase in instrumental rotation sensitivity by as much as a factor of 3, to {delta}{Omega} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} rad s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}, which makes the domain of changes in the angular velocity of Earth's rotation, {Delta}{Omega}/{Omega} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9}, accessible to a local rotation sensor. New studies show that the largest contribution to the observed deviation in sensor performance with respect to the computed shot noise limit is caused by the micro-seismic background activity of the Earth. Our efforts have been concentrated on the improvement of sensor stability, including correction of drift effects, which are caused by the aging of the laser gas, fixing scale factor instabilities induced by atmospheric pressure variations, and minimising the temperature variations resulting from corresponding adiabatic expansion and compression of the local air around the instrument. To achieve this, we have recently introduced a pressure-stabilising vessel with dimensions slightly larger than the ring laser apparatus, such that it encloses the entire structure. By monitoring the optical frequency in the ring laser cavity continuously and stabilising the scale factor in a closed loop system with the pressure-stabilising vessel, it has become possible to extend the range of sensor stability from the short term (1 - 3 days) to well into the mid-term regime (>40 days), and possibly even well beyond that. Once a sufficiently long timeseries of the ring laser data has been recorded, we will be able to define the range of temporal stability in more detail. The extension of the regime of stability gives access to geophysical signals at frequencies substantially lower than previously observable with ring lasers. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Schreiber, K U; Kluegel, T; Wells, J.-P.; Holdaway, J; Gebauer, A; Velikoseltsev, A

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dissociation dynamics of diatomic molecules in intense laser fields: a scheme for the selection of relevant adiabatic potential curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissociation dynamics of diatomic molecules in intense laser fields: a scheme for the selection wave packet emerges mainly on the repulsive |2pu > state, while a bound oscillat- ing part of the wave electronic states serve as a first criterion for se- lecting essential potential curves. This selection pro

Thumm, Uwe

95

Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions  

SciTech Connect

We present results from the grant entitled, ???¢????????Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.???¢??????? The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

Mori, Warren, B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sensitivity to Dark Energy candidates by searching for four-wave mixing of high-intensity lasers in the vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical challenges to understand Dark Matter and Dark Energy suggest the existence of low-mass and weakly coupling fields in the universe. The quasi-parallel photon-photon collision system (QPS) can provide chances to probe the resonant production of these light dark fields and the induced decay by the coherent nature of laser fields simultaneously. By focusing high-intensity lasers with different colors in the vacuum, new colors emerge as the signature of the interaction. Because four photons in the initial and final states interplay via the dark field exchange, this process is analogous to four-wave mixing in quantum optics, where the frequency sum and difference among the incident three waves generate the fourth wave with a new frequency via the nonlinear property of crystals. The interaction rate of the four-wave mixing process has the cubic dependence on the intensity of each wave. Therefore, if high-intensity laser fields are given, the sensitivity to the weakly coupling of dark fields to photons rapidly increases over the wide mass range below sub-eV. Based on the experimentally measurable photon energies and the linear polarization states, we formulate the relation between the accessible mass-coupling domains and the high-intensity laser parameters, where the effects of the finite spectrum width of pulse lasers are taken into account. The expected sensitivity suggests that we have a potential to explore interactions at the Super-Planckian coupling strength in the sub-eV mass range, if the cutting-edge laser technologies are properly combined.

Kensuke Homma

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Potential Science for the OASIS Integral Field Spectrograph with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the science case for the Laser Guide Star system being built for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma. When used in combination with the NAOMI Adaptive Optics system and the OASIS visible-wavelength Integral Field Spectrograph, we demonstrate that there are substantial, exciting areas of astrophysical research in which the WHT can contribute.

S. L. Morris; J. Gerssen; M. Swinbank; R. Wilman

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Mass-Limited Solid Targets and Implications for Fast-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA EP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling of petawatt laser-generated hot electrons in mass-limited solid-foil-target interactions at "relativistic" laser intensities is presented using copper targets and parameters motivated by recent experiments at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Petawatt and 100-TW facilities. Electron refluxing allows a unique determination of the laser-electron conversion efficiency and a test with simulations.

Myatt, J.; Theobald, W.; Delettrez, J.A.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Maximov, A.V.; Short, R.W.

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Relativistic effects in the interaction of high intensity ultra-short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the effect of weakly relativistic ponderomotive force in the interaction of intense laser pulse with nonisothermal, underdense, collisional plasma is studied. Ponderomotive force modifies the electron density and temperature distribution. By considering the weakly relativistic effect and ohmic heating of plasma electrons, the nonlinear dielectric permittivity of plasma medium is obtained and the equation of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma is solved. It is shown that with considering the ohmic heating of electrons and collisions, the effect of ponderomotive force in weakly relativistic regime leads to steepening the electron density profile and increases the temperature of plasma electrons noticeably. Bunches of electrons in plasma become narrower. By increasing the laser pulse strength, the wavelength of density oscillations decreases. In this regime of laser-plasma interaction, electron temperature increases sharply by increasing the intensity of laser pulse. The amplitude of electric and magnetic fields increases by increasing the laser pulse energy while their wavelength decreases and they lost their sinusoidal form.

Abedi, Samira [Physics Department, North Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dorranian, Davoud [Laser Lab., Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abari, Mehdi Etehadi [Physics Department, Science Faculty, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, Babak [Physics Department, Science Faculty, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hot-electron production and suprathermal heat flux scaling with laser intensity from the two-plasmon-decay instability  

SciTech Connect

The fully kinetic reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) method has been applied to simulations of two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability, driven by crossed laser beams, in an inhomogeneous plasma for parameters consistent with recent direct-drive experiments related to laser-driven inertial fusion. The nonlinear saturated state is characterized by very spiky electric fields, with Langmuir cavitation occurring preferentially inside density channels produced by the ponderomotive beating of the crossed laser beams and the primary TPD Langmuir waves (LWs). The heated electron distribution function is, in all cases, bi-Maxwellian, with instantaneous hot-electron temperatures in the range 60-100 keV. The net hot-electron energy flux out of the system is a small fraction ({approx}1% to 2%) of the input laser intensity in these simulations. Scalings of the hot-electron temperature and suprathermal heat flux as functions of the laser intensity are obtained numerically from RPIC simulations. These simulations lead to the preliminary conclusion that Langmuir cavitation and collapse provide dissipation by producing suprathermal electrons, which stabilize the system in saturation and drive the LW spectrum to the small dissipation scales at the Landau cutoff. The Langmuir turbulence originates at an electron density 0.241 Multiplication-Sign the laser's critical density, where the crossed laser beams excite a 'triad' mode-a common forward LW plus a pair of backward LWs. Remnants of this 'triad' evolve in k-space and dominate the time-averaged energy spectrum. At times exceeding 10 ps, the excited Langmuir turbulence spreads toward lower densities. Comparisons of RPIC simulations with the extended Zakharov model are presented in appropriate regimes, and the necessary requirements for the validity of a quasi-linear Zakharov model (where the spatially averaged electron-velocity distribution is evolved) are verified by RPIC simulation results.

Vu, H. X. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); DuBois, D. F. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Myatt, J. F. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Compton harmonic resonances, stochastic instabilities, quasilinear diffusion, and collisionless damping with ultra-high intensity laser waves  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of electrons in two-dimensional, linearly or circularly polarized, ultra-high intensity (above 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) laser waves, is investigated. The Compton harmonic resonances are identified as the source of various stochastic instabilities. Both Arnold diffusion and resonance overlap are considered. The quasilinear kinetic equation, describing the evolution of the electron distribution function, is derived, and the associated collisionless damping coefficient is calculated. The implications of these new processes are considered and discussed.

Rax, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Creating intense polarized electron beam via laser stripping and spin-orbit interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent advance in laser field make it possible to excite and strip electrons with definite spin from hydrogen atoms. The sources of hydrogen atoms with orders of magnitude higher currents (than that of the conventional polarized electron cathods) can be obtained from H{sup -} sources with good monochromatization. With one electron of H{sup -} stripped by a laser, the remained electron is excited to upper state (2P{sup 3/2} and 2P{sup 1/2}) by a circular polarization laser light from FEL. Then, it is excited to a high quantum number (n=7) with mostly one spin direction due to energy level split of the states with a definite direction of spin and angular momentum in an applied magnetic field and then it is stripped by a strong electric field of an RF cavity. This paper presents combination of lasers and fields to get high polarization and high current electron source.

Danilov, V.; Ptitsyn, V.; Gorlov, T.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Investigation of non-stationary self-focusing of intense laser pulse in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

The authors have investigated the non-stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser pulse in cold quantum plasma. In case of high dense plasma, the nonlinearity in the dielectric constant is mainly due to relativistic high intense interactions and quantum effects. In this paper, we have introduced a ramp density profile for plasma and presented graphically the behavior of spot size oscillations of pulse at rear and front portions of the pulse. It is observed that the ramp density profile and quantum effects play a vital role in stronger and better focusing at the rear of the pulse than at the front in cold quantum plasmas.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Relative x-ray backlighter intensity comparison of ti and ti/sc combination foils driven in double-sided and single-sided laser configuration  

SciTech Connect

Use of multiple backlighter foils and/or double-sided laser interaction geometry with backlit imaging can result in improved backlighter efficiency. An experimental comparison of backlighter intensity for Ti foils and Ti/Sc combination foils in both the one-sided and double-sided laser-interaction configuration is presented. Spectrally-integrated framing camera images show intensity contributions of front and rear backlighter surfaces for both foil types. Analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra collected from foil targets show the relative contribution of Ti and Sc 2-1 He-like resonance lines to the total backlighter intensity.

Bullock, A B; Landen, O L; Bradley, D K

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction of the molecular electric dipole moment. These findings are explained by a tunneling model invoking the laser-induced Stark shifts associated with the dipoles and polarizabilities of the molecule and its unrelaxed cation. The focus of the present article is to understand the strong-field ionization of one-dimensionally-oriented polar molecules, in particular asymmetries in the emission direction of the photoelectrons. In the following article [Phys. Rev. A 83, 023406 (2011)] the focus is to understand strong-field ionization from three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric top molecules, in particular the suppression of electron emission in nodal planes of molecular orbitals.

Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Filsinger, Frank; Meijer, Gerard; Kuepper, Jochen [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Holmegaard, Lotte; Kalhoej, Line [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Nielsen, Jens H. [Department of Physics, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stapelfeldt, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fundamental science investigations to develop a 6-MV laser triggered gas switch for ZR: first annual report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2005, an intensive three-year Laser Triggered Gas Switch (LTGS) development program was initiated to investigate and solve observed performance and reliability issues with the LTGS for ZR. The approach taken has been one of mission-focused research: to revisit and reassess the design, to establish a fundamental understanding of LTGS operation and failure modes, and to test evolving operational hypotheses. This effort is aimed toward deploying an initial switch for ZR in 2007, on supporting rolling upgrades to ZR as the technology can be developed, and to prepare with scientific understanding for the even higher voltage switches anticipated needed for future high-yield accelerators. The ZR LTGS was identified as a potential area of concern quite early, but since initial assessments performed on a simplified Switch Test Bed (STB) at 5 MV showed 300-shot lifetimes on multiple switch builds, this component was judged acceptable. When the Z{sub 20} engineering module was brought online in October 2003 frequent flashovers of the plastic switch envelope were observed at the increased stresses required to compensate for the programmatically increased ZR load inductance. As of October 2006, there have been 1423 Z{sub 20} shots assessing a variety of LTGS designs. Numerous incremental and fundamental switch design modifications have been investigated. As we continue to investigate the LTGS, the basic science of plastic surface tracking, laser triggering, cascade breakdown, and optics degradation remain high-priority mission-focused research topics. Significant progress has been made and, while the switch does not yet achieve design requirements, we are on the path to develop successively better switches for rolling upgrade improvements to ZR. This report summarizes the work performed in FY 2006 by the large team. A high-level summary is followed by detailed individual topical reports.

Warne, Larry Kevin; Van Den Avyle, James A.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Rose, David (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krompholz, Hermann G. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Vela, Russell (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Timoshkin, Igor (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Prestwich, Kenneth Randel (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krile, John (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Given, Martin (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); McKee, G. Randall; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; Struve, Kenneth William; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Benwell, Andrew L. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Kovaleski, Scott (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); LeChien, Keith, R.; Johnson, David (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Fouracre, R.A. (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Yeckel, Chris (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Miller, A. R. (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Hodge, Keith Conquest (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Pasik, Michael Francis; Savage, Mark Edward; Maenchen, John Eric; Curry, Randy D. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Feltz, Greg (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Bliss, David Emery; MacGregor, Scott (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Corley, J. P. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Anaya, Victor (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wallace, Zachariah (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Neuber, Andreas. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Resonant Auger decay of the core-excited C{sup *}O molecule in intense x-ray laser fields  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of the resonant Auger (RA) process of the core-excited C*O(1s{sup -1}{pi}*,v{sub r}=0) molecule in an intense x-ray laser field is studied theoretically. The theoretical approach includes the analog of the conical intersections of the complex potential energy surfaces of the ground and 'dressed' resonant states due to intense x-ray pulses, taking into account the decay of the resonance and the direct photoionization of the ground state, both populating the same final ionic states coherently, as well as the direct photoionization of the resonance state itself. The light-induced nonadiabatic effect of the analog of the conical intersections of the resulting complex potential energy surfaces gives rise to strong coupling between the electronic, vibrational, and rotational degrees of freedom of the diatomic CO molecule. The interplay of the direct photoionization of the ground state and of the decay of the resonance increases dramatically with the field intensity. The coherent population of a final ionic state via both the direct photoionization and the resonant Auger decay channels induces strong interference effects with distinct patterns in the RA electron spectra. The individual impact of these physical processes on the total electron yield and on the CO{sup +}(A {sup 2}{Pi}) electron spectrum are demonstrated.

Demekhin, Philipp V.; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Cederbaum, Lorenz S. [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Time-dependent unitary perturbation theory for intense laser driven molecular orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a time-dependent perturbation theory based on unitary transformations combined with averaging techniques, on molecular orientation dynamics by ultrashort pulses. We test the validity and the accuracy of this approach on LiCl described within a rigid-rotor model and find that it is more accurate than other approximations. Furthermore, it is shown that a noticeable orientation can be achieved for experimentally standard short laser pulses of zero time average. In this case, we determine the dynamically relevant parameters by using the perturbative propagator, that is derived from this scheme, and we investigate the temperature effects on the molecular orientation dynamics.

D. Sugny; A. Keller; O. Atabek; D. Daems; S. Gurin; H. R. Jauslin

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from K{sub {alpha}},K{sub {beta}}, and He{sub {alpha}} lines, of elemental copper foil and 'foam' targets irradiated with a mid-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater He{sub {alpha}} line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell K{sub {alpha}} transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant K{sub {beta}} radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Malamud, G. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Department of Physics, Nuclear Research Center - Negev, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

General approach to few-cycle intense laser interactions with complex atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general ab initio and nonperturbative method to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for the interaction of a strong attosecond laser pulse with a general atom, i.e., beyond the models of quasi-one-electron or quasi-two-electron targets, is described. The field-free Hamiltonian and the dipole matrices are generated using a flexible B-spline R-matrix method. This numerical implementation enables us to construct term-dependent, nonorthogonal sets of one-electron orbitals for the bound and continuum electrons. The solution of the TDSE is propagated in time using the Arnoldi-Lanczos method, which does not require the diagonalization of any large matrices. The method is illustrated by an application to the multiphoton excitation and ionization of Ne atoms. Good agreement with R-matrix Floquet calculations for the generalized cross sections for two-photon ionization is achieved.

Guan Xiaoxu; Zatsarinny, O.; Bartschat, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Schneider, B. I. [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia 22230 (United States); Feist, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Noble, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Computational Science and Engineering Department, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Relativistic theory of frequency blue-shift of an intense ionizing laser beam in a plasma  

SciTech Connect

Frequency up-conversion of a laser beam causing gas ionization in a cavity is considered in a fully relativistic fashion. A simple ionization model, based on one-photon and multiphoton processes is used. A Vlasov fully nonlinear and ionization-model independent description is used in calculating the current which drives the wave equation for the electric field. The evolution of the wave frequency and its upshift are contrasted with those obtained in the nonrelativistic limit. It is found that the nonrelativistic treatment overestimates the frequency upshift by a factor more than two. Purely relativistic effects, such as a significant frequency modulation and a respective temporal pulse compression, are observed in the exact case.

Hizanidis, K.; Vomvoridis, J.L. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Mendonca, J.T. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Physics; Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Physics

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

Dardi, P.S.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006)]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D{sup 3}He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006)]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Production of high-density high-temperature plasma by collapsing small solid-density plasma shell with two ultra-intense laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the anisotropic collapse of a plasma microshell by impact of two oppositely directed intense laser pulses can create at the center of the shell cavity a submicron-sized plasma of high density and temperature suitable for generating fusion neutrons.

Xu, H. [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany); Wong, A. Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam  

SciTech Connect

Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Polarisation response of a gas medium in the field of a high-intensity ultrashort laser pulse: high order Kerr nonlinearities or plasma electron component?  

SciTech Connect

The polarisation response of quantum systems modelling silver and xenon atoms in the field of a high-intensity femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser (photon energy h{omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 eV), has been investigated by direct numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation. The applicability ranges of the perturbation theory and polarisation expansion in powers of field are determined. The contributions of excited atoms and electrons in the continuous-spectrum states to the polarisation response at the fundamental frequency, which arise as a result of excitation and photoionisation, are analysed. It is shown that specifically ionisation changes the sign of dielectric susceptibility with an increase in radiation intensity for the systems under consideration. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

Volkova, E A; Popov, Alexander M; Tikhonova, O V [D.V. Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

A GPGPU based program to solve the TDSE in intense laser fields through the finite difference approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) based computational program and framework for the electronic dynamics of atomic systems under intense laser fields. We present our results using the case of hydrogen, however the code is trivially extensible to tackle problems within the single-active electron (SAE) approximation. Building on our previous work, we introduce the first available GPGPU based implementation of the Taylor, Runge-Kutta and Lanczos based methods created with strong field ab-initio simulations specifically in mind; CLTDSE. The code makes use of finite difference methods and the OpenCL framework for GPU acceleration. The specific example system used is the classic test system; Hydrogen. After introducing the standard theory, and specific quantities which are calculated, the code, including installation and usage, is discussed in-depth. This is followed by some examples and a short benchmark between an 8 hardware thread (i.e logical core) Intel Xeon CPU and an ...

Broin, Cathal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

A GPGPU based program to solve the TDSE in intense laser fields through the finite difference approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) based computational program and framework for the electronic dynamics of atomic systems under intense laser fields. We present our results using the case of hydrogen, however the code is trivially extensible to tackle problems within the single-active electron (SAE) approximation. Building on our previous work, we introduce the first available GPGPU based implementation of the Taylor, Runge-Kutta and Lanczos based methods created with strong field ab-initio simulations specifically in mind; CLTDSE. The code makes use of finite difference methods and the OpenCL framework for GPU acceleration. The specific example system used is the classic test system; Hydrogen. After introducing the standard theory, and specific quantities which are calculated, the code, including installation and usage, is discussed in-depth. This is followed by some examples and a short benchmark between an 8 hardware thread (i.e logical core) Intel Xeon CPU and an AMD 6970 GPU, where the parallel algorithm runs 10 times faster on the GPU than the CPU.

Cathal Broin; L. A. A Nikolopoulos

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Science, Technology and Mission Design for the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to achieve a major improvement in the accuracy of the tests of relativistic gravity in the solar system. By using a combination of independent time-series of gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun, along with measurements of the relativistic time delay on interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than 0.1 picoradians and 1 cm), LATOR will measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter \\gamma with accuracy of one part in a billion - a factor of 30,000 improvement compared to the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. LATOR's primary measurement pushes to unprecedented accuracy the search for cosmologically relevant scalar-tensor modifications of gravity by looking for a remnant scalar field in today's solar system. We present a comprehensive discussion of the science objectives, proposed technology, mission and optical designs, as well as the expected performance of this fundamental physics experiment in space.

Slava G. Turyshev; Michael Shao; Kenneth L. Nordtvedt Jr

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser  

SciTech Connect

The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4 deg.{sub -2.4}{sup +5.4} was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

Inubushi, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R. [Dipartmento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Boscheron, A.; Bonville, O.; Grenier, J. [CEA/CESTA, Le Barp (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Laser Drilling with Gated High Power Fiber Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Drilling...

126

Optimizing electron-positron pair production on kilojoule-class high-intensity lasers for the purpose of pair-plasma creation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions for the yield of electron-positron pairs, their energy spectra, and production rates have been obtained in the interaction of multi-kJ pulses of high-intensity laser light interacting with solid targets. The Bethe-Heitler conversion of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung [D. A. Gryaznykh, Y. Z. Kandiev, and V. A. Lykov, JETP Lett. 67, 257 (1998); K. Nakashima and H. Takabe, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1505 (2002)] is shown to dominate over direct production (trident process) [E. P. Liang, S. C. Wilks, and M. Tabak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4887 (1998)]. The yields and production rates have been optimized as a function of incident laser intensity by the choice of target material and dimensions, indicating that up to 5x10{sup 11} pairs can be produced on the OMEGA EP laser system [L. J. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)]. The corresponding production rates are high enough to make possible the creation of a pair plasma.

Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Short, R. W.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

National Security Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility Research Library Faces of Science 70 Years of Innovation Science Programs Applied Energy...

128

LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass laser...

129

Formation of ordered one-dimensional microstructures of dislocations in near-surface layer of semiconductor, under laser radiation with microstructured distribution of intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of investigation the process of formation of the ordered microstructures of dislocations in the near-surface layer a single-crystal plate of silicon under the action of pulsed laser radiation with microstructured distribution intensity. It has been found that generation of the ordered one-dimensional microstructures of dislocations takes place. The period of these ordered microstructures is d{approx_equal}3 divide 4 {mu}m. A combination of one-dimensional structures of dislocations produces ordered two-dimensional structure of dislocations.

Banishev, A. F.; Banishev, A. A. [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAS (ILIT RAS), Svyatoozerskaya Str.1, 140700 Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

149802 149802 , 1291 (2007); 318 Science et al. L. Ozyuzer, Superconductors Emission of Coherent THz Radiation from www.sciencemag.org (this information is current as of November 29, 2007 ): The following resources related to this article are available online at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291 version of this article at: including high-resolution figures, can be found in the online Updated information and services, http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291/DC1 can be found at: Supporting Online Material found at: can be related to this article A list of selected additional articles on the Science Web sites http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#related-content http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#otherarticles

131

SCience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all all SCience Chicago Office Environment, Safety and Health Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual December 2012 ~5 {?JI-- l L-H1- I Roxanne E. Purucker, Manager Date SC-CH FRAM Revision 7 Office of Science - Chicago Office SC-CH Revision History TITLE: SC-CH Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual POINT OF CONTACT: Karl Moro SCMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) TO BE UPDATED: December 31, 2013 Revision Date Reason/Driver Description 5 Oct 10 Annual review and revision of the SC-CH ES&H Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual Changes were primarily made to address administrative and organizational changes and general improvement of text and presentation. I 6 Nov 11 Annual review and revision of

132

Spectral broadening and compression of high-intensity laser pulses in quasi-periodic systems with Kerr nonlinearity  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of theoretical studies and numerical simulations of optical high-power pulse compression systems based on the spectral broadening in a Kerr nonlinear medium with subsequent pulse compression in a dispersive delay line. It is shown that the effective spectral broadening requires suppressing a smallscale instability arising due to self-focusing, which is possible in quasi-periodic systems consisting of a nonlinear medium and optical relay telescopes transmitting images of the laser beam through the system. The numerical calculations have shown the possibility of broadening the spectrum, followed by 15-fold pulse compression until the instability is excited. (control of laser radiation parameters)

Vlasov, Sergei N; Koposova, E V; Yashin, V E

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light pipe for high intensity laser pulses. Phys. Rev. Lett.and relativistically strong laser pulses in an underdensefrom Thomson scat- tering using laser wake?eld accelerators.

Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

Shadwick, B.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lasers and Optoelectronic Components Used with Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... example, beam profile and relative intensity noise ... for the laser wavelengths and energies for which ... The laser power and energy measurements are ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Guiding of Intense Laser Pulses in Efficient End-pumped Plasma Channels Generated by Self-guiding in Ar and H2 Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that self-guiding of intense short pulses in clustered gases can be utilized to generate long plasma channels, which upon expansion form waveguides suitable for propagation of laser pulses at high intensity. This scheme has several advantages over waveguide-generation in non-clustered gases. The absorption of energy by the target depends on the size of the clusters and not on the average density of the gas, which allows greater control of the density encountered by the guided pulse. In particular, electron densities less than 1018 cm-3 are feasible. Moreover, since clusters absorb sub-picosecond pulses very efficiently, channel generation by an auxiliary long-pulse laser is no longer necessary and a considerably simpler setup suffices. The problem of taper at the channel entrance, an old bugbear of side-pumped waveguides in gases, is shown to be significantly reduced. Evidence will be presented of waveguide generation in gases of argon and hydrogen clusters, using different cryogenic sources. A slit source is used for argon, and waveguides 1017 Wcm-2 were guided. The results of a propagation code suggest that even longer channels are well within experimental reach. Argon, however, has the disadvantage that a super-intense pulse would likely produce further ionization, and hence suffer ionization induced defocusing. Hydrogen clusters, which can easily be fully ionized, were formed using a more efficient conical nozzle cooled to 90 K, limiting maximum waveguide lengths to < 3 mm. Though these channels are short, there is no obvious reason why a longer target would not allow longer waveguides to be generated, and the experiments demonstrate the utility of this novel scheme.

Kumarappan, V.; Kim, K.-Y.; Milchberg, H.M. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Antonsen, T.M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF  

SciTech Connect

This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 4. Optical materials, Part 2 - Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book examines the optical properties of laser materials. Topics considered include: fundamental properties; transmitting materials; crystals; glasses; plastics; filter materials; mirror and reflector materials; polarizer materials; special properties; linear electrooptic materials; magnetooptic materials; elastooptic materials; photorefractive materials; and liquid crystals.

Weber, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ionization of one- and three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric-top molecules by intense circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study on strong-field ionization of a three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric top molecule, benzonitrile (C{sub 7}H{sub 5}N), by circularly polarized, nonresonant femtosecond laser pulses. Prior to the interaction with the strong field, the molecules are quantum-state selected using a deflector and three-dimensionally (3D) aligned and oriented adiabatically using an elliptically polarized laser pulse in combination with a static electric field. A characteristic splitting in the molecular frame photoelectron momentum distribution reveals the position of the nodal planes of the molecular orbitals from which ionization occurs. The experimental results are supported by a theoretical tunneling model that includes and quantifies the splitting in the momentum distribution. The focus of the present article is to understand strong-field ionization from 3D-oriented asymmetric top molecules, in particular the suppression of electron emission in nodal planes of molecular orbitals. In the preceding article [Dimitrovski et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 023405 (2011)] the focus is to understand the strong-field ionization of one-dimensionally-oriented polar molecules, in particular asymmetries in the emission direction of the photoelectrons.

Hansen, Jonas L. [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Holmegaard, Lotte; Kalhoej, Line; Kragh, Sofie Louise [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stapelfeldt, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Filsinger, Frank; Meijer, Gerard; Kuepper, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-samha, Mahmoud; Martiny, Christian Per Juul; Madsen, Lars Bojer [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Laser Materials Processing: Past, Present and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Science Showcase | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

May DOE Science Showcase - Oil Shale Research April DOE Science Showcase - Fission Theory March DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers February DOE Science Showcase -...

142

Laser induced chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division of theINFRARED LASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

Orel, Ann E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

YAG Laser Weld  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, The Effects of...

144

Volume 35A, number4 PHYSICS LETTERS l4June 1971 ULTRA-INTENSE LASER RADIATION AS A POSSIBLE ENERGY BOOSTER FOR RELATIVISTIC CHARGED PARTICLE *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new effect of large energy absorption is predicted for a relativistic charged particle interacting parallel with an ultraintense laser beam. For 10 example, V/cm in a a distance 10MeV electron of 1.3 mm. can absorb energy of 40MeV from a laser beam of A = 1.06!1 and ~ 3 x10 In the production of coherent y-ray radiation with ~=e2~2/mw2. For Wrmin = IT, Emax2E. from a laser beam being backscattered (anti- Let K=Emax/mc2, then the final total particle parallel scattering) by a high energy electron energy is given by Emax=(l K)E 0. To achieve beam [e.g., 1,2], it demonstrates the unusual this condition, the minimum value of ~ required role of an electron beam as a frequency multi- is plier for laser radiation. In this communication 1/2 (w~=r) = (mcw/e)(yK). a new effect of opposite sense is described in the mm (3) case of parallel scattering. Namely, when a rela- For a Nd-glass laser, w = 1.8x 5Eo. 1015 Under rad/sec this(x = tivistic laser beam charged moving particle almost is together interacting in the withsame a 1.06 condition, ii). When ( max)e K=2, Emax = 1 MeV and (~min)e 3 X direction, an abnormally large amount of energy 10volt/cm for an electron and (Emax)p~2GeV can be transferred from the radiation to the par- and (d min)p 5.5 x 1013 volt/cm for a proton. tide, as if the radiation behaves as an energy For experimental verification of this effect amplifier for the particle with an electron beam, some other effects must Since (np 0)11 =n, ~0.(A-A0) = 0 and nJ30 = be taken into consideration. in the case of parallel scattering, the i) Beam divergence. After scattering, the energy absorbed by the particle is simply as [2] particle is deflected by the radiation with a trans- f15 I verse momentum Pm. Since Porn = 0, the angle of ~11 L~0,11 / ~oJ / deflection is given by ~ Pm/Pn With Pm = where (6o)~=(1 _p~)-1and E e 2(A-A 2/2mc2,-(e/c)j A-Aol = (2rne)1/2andPn = energy absorbed if the particle was initially 0) at [2], we have rest. For a relativistic particle E 2, ~ 2mc2~5E (4 1 and ~~~ii 2y~.Therefore, 0>>rnc eq. (1) becomes

Yau Wa Chan

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publisher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences

Calegari, Frank

146

Photoionization of hydrogen atom by coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses: Direct propagation of electron wave packets on enormous spatial grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the hydrogen atom and its interaction with coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses is solved numerically exactly by employing the code implemented for the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method. Thereby, the wavefunction is followed in space and time for times longer than the pulse duration. Results are explicitly shown for 3 and 10 fs pulses. Particular attention is paid to identifying the effect of dynamic interference of photoelectrons emitted with the same kinetic energy at different times during the rising and falling sides of the pulse predicted in [\\emph{Ph.V. Demekhin and L.S. Cederbaum}, Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{108}, 253001 (2012)]. In order to be able to see the dynamic interference pattern in the computed electron spectra, the photoelectron wave packet has to be propagated over long distances. Clearly, complex absorption potentials often employed to compute spectra of emitted particles cannot be used to detect dy...

Demekhin, Philipp V; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publisher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Number Theory mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences

Skorobogatov, Alexei N.

148

Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 5. Optical materials. Part 3. Applications, coatings, and fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes the uses, coatings, and fabrication of laser materials. Topics considered include: optical waveguide materials; optical storage materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; laser crystals; laser glasses; quantum counter materials; thin films and coatings; multilayer dielectric coatings; graded-index surfaces and films; optical materials fabrication; fabrication techniques; fabrication procedures for specific materials.

Weber, M.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Laser Micro Texturing of Metallic Surfaces to Increase Hydrophobicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Micro...

151

Comparison of Substrate Processing Via Laser and Laser-Sustained ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Comparison of...

152

Laser Program annual report 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Laser particle sorter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Optical materials, Part 1 - Nonlinear optical properties/radiation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book examines the nonlinear optical properties of laser materials. The physical radiation effects on laser materials are also considered. Topics considered include: nonlinear optical properties; nonlinear and harmonic generation materials; two-photon absorption; nonlinear refractive index; stimulated Raman scattering; radiation damage; crystals; and glasses.

Weber, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

156

FREE-ELECTRON LASERS  

SciTech Connect

We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this new technology extends from the fields of solid-state physics, gas- and liquid-phase photochemistry, and surface catalysis to futuristic schemes for ultrahigh-energy linear accelerators.

Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 03-09.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

March 2009 March 2009 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center 3 Cornell Center for the Study of Pulsed Power Driven High Energy Density Plasmas 4 Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science 5 The Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science 6 The Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University 7 The High Pressure Science and Engineering Center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas 8 HEDP Research at the Nevada Terawatt Facility 9 Publication Highlights and Awards and Highlights Message from the Director Chris Deeney, Defense Science Division This quarterly newsletter was very therapeutic. We are embroiled in so much budget action that taking the time

158

Imaging the geometrical structure of the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion by high-order above-threshold ionization in an intense laser field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a frequency-domain theory, we demonstrate that an angle-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum carries three pieces of important information: the fingerprint of the molecular wave function in the direct above-threshold-ionization amplitude, the geometrical structure of the molecule in the potential scattering between two plane waves, and the interaction between the ionized electron and the laser field, manifested in a phase factor associated with laser-assisted collisions. As a result all main interference features in the HATI spectrum can be physically explained. As an application it is pointed out that the skeleton structure of a molecule can be better imaged using lasers of higher frequencies.

Guo Yingchun [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Fu Panming; Wang Bingbing [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yan Zongchao [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3 (Canada); Center for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Gong Jiangbin [Department of Physics and Center of Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

NREL: Energy Sciences - Yufeng Zhao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yufeng went on to study one-dimensional materials, including carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires, at Rice University. He has a background in laser...

160

Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector  

SciTech Connect

A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Harmonic generation at high intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Laser Applications in Materials Technology (II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Technology (II). Sponsorship, MS&T ...

164

Science Afternoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Science Afternoon: From Invention to Marketplace. Science Afternoon: Focus on ... Understand It? Science Afternoons. To continue ...

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

166

Materials Science Dominates R&D 100 Awards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 16, 2010... Technologies, Electric Devices, Energy Technologies, Imaging Technologies, Lasers and Photonics, Process Sciences, Safety and...

167

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science: Evaluating the Use Stojanovicd , Femke Reitsmae , Lukasz Korczynskif and Boyan Brodaricg a Centre for Geospatial Science of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; e Department of Geography, University

Stock, Kristin

169

Science Pillars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Science & Innovation Science Pillars Science Pillars...

170

Science DMZ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA...

171

Web Site Highlights 50 Years of NIST Contributions to Laser ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web Site Highlights 50 Years of NIST Contributions to Laser Science. For Immediate Release: December 15, 2009. ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Effects of Laser Machining on Structure and Mechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Technology (II). Presentation Title, The Effects...

173

Laser Applications in Materials Processing - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Sponsorship, MS&T...

174

Laser Processing of Biomedical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Recent Advances in Laser Fabrication and Characterization Methods:...

175

NIST Measurement Services: cw Laser Power and Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... estimates for the NIST laser energy measurements are ... fields of physical science, engineering, applied mathematics, statistics, biotechnology, and ...

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

Laser programs highlights 1993  

SciTech Connect

Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Free-Electron Lasers: Present Status and Future Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38,892 (1977). C. Brau, "Free-Electron Lasers", Science 239,115 (1988). T. Marshall, "Free-Electron Lasers", MacMillan (1985); C Brau, "Free- Electron Lasers", Academic Press (

Kim, K.-J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: ... Description: Group focus in materials science (inkjet metrology, micro-macro, advanced characterizations). ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Science Showcase | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase Science Showcase 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 December DOE Science Showcase - Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research November DOE Science Showcase - Gamma-Ray Bursts October DOE Science Showcase - Bayesian Inference September DOE Science Showcase - Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors August DOE Science Showcase - Exciting Higgs Boson Research July DOE Science Showcase - DOE's Smart Grid Research June DOE Science Showcase - DOE Plasma Research May DOE Science Showcase - Oil Shale Research April DOE Science Showcase - Fission Theory March DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers February DOE Science Showcase - Heat Pump Research January DOE Science Showcase - Monte Carlo Methods December DOE Science Showcase - Quantum Computer Hardware November DOE Science Showcase - Metamaterials

180

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg distribution and its relationship with soil water and salt under mulched drip irrigation in Xinjiang of China of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Received July 8, 2010; accepted

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Dye laser amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

Moses, E.I.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Laser Direct-Write Microfabrication and Patterning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ability to generate small structures is central to modern science and technology. In this work, four laser direct-write microfabrication and micropatterning techniques were studied: (more)

Yuan, Dajun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Laser Spark Plug Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the ignition system needs of large bore high pressure lean burn natural gas engines a laser diode side pumped passively Q-switched laser igniter was designed and tested. The laser was designed to produce the optical intensities needed to initiate ignition in a lean burn high brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) engine. The experimentation explored a variety of optical and electrical input parameters that when combined produced a robust spark in air. The results show peak power levels exceeding 2 MW and peak focal intensities above 400 GW/cm2. Future research avenues and current progress with the initial prototype are presented and discussed.

McIntyre, D.L.; Richardson, S.W.; Woodruff, S.D.; McMillian, M.H.; Guutam, M. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining  

SciTech Connect

The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with improvements to the focusability of the individual beams, the maximum peak intensity can be increased further to {approx} 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Lastly, an important feature of the CAPE architecture is the ability to coherently combine beams to produce complex spatio-temporal intensity distributions for laser-based accelerators (e.g. all-optical electron injection and acceleration) and high energy density science applications such as fast ignition.

Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Development of Scaled Astrophysical Experiments for Current and Future Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research proposes to design and field scaled astrophysical experiments for the Laboratory's intense-short-pulse Titan laser in the collisionless plasma regime to investigate plasma-scaling properties with regard to powerful astrophysical phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. In addition, we propose to design an experiment using high-gain thermonuclear ignition coupled with petawatt lasers to produce conditions relevant to a magnetized, radiation-dominated accretion disk surrounding stellar black holes. This work will enable development of a high-energy-density (HED) platform for scaled astrophysical science on fusion-class lasers. We will implement proton deflectometry to characterize magnetic fields associated with the interaction of short-pulse, high-energy lasers with solids.

Klein, R

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers  

SciTech Connect

An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

LaserFest Celebration  

SciTech Connect

LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by...

190

Physics of short-wavelength-laser design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics and design of vuv and soft x-ray lasers pumped by ICF class high intensity infrared laser drivers are described (for example, the SHIVA laser facility at LLNL). Laser design and physics issues are discussed in the case of a photoionization pumping scheme involving Ne II and line pumping schemes involving H-like and He-like neon.

Hagelstein, P.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

main content Science at Fermilab Frontiers of Particle Physics Experiments & Projects Energy Frontier Tevatron at Fermilab Fermilab and the LHC Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier...

192

131Cognitive Science COGNITIVE SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

131Cognitive Science COGNITIVE SCIENCE PROFESSOR ELMES* MAJOR A major in cognitive science leading courses: Cognitive Science 110, 395, 403, 473; Computer Science 111, 211; Philosophy 106, 313; Psychology Science: Com- puter Science 295 (LISP, PROLOG or C), 313, 315; Psychology 207 b. Philosophical Foundations

Marsh, David

193

Article on Trident Laser Facility for NA-11 Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Trident Intermediate-Scale Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an extremely versatile Nd:glass laser system dedicated to high energy density laboratory physics and weapons physics research and fundamental laser-matter interactions. Trident is a three-beam, 200 J/beam at the second harmonic for glass (527 nm wavelength), facility with tremendous flexibility and high beam quality. Pulse durations varying over 6 orders of magnitude, from 0.5 picoseconds to 1.0 microsecs, can be directed to either of two different target chambers with changeable illumination geometries, including the ability to achieve near-diffraction limited focus. This provides a unique range of capability at one facility from sub-picosecond pulses (and high-intensity laser science) to nanosecond pulses (and LPI physics relevant to ICF) to microsecond pulses (and driving flyer plates for supported shock dynamic materials science.) When in short-pulse mode (less than picosecond pulse), a single beam can provide up to 200 TW of power with uniquely controllable and measured pre-pulse contrast of 10 orders of magnitude. A recent external capability review at Los Alamos concluded that 'Trident is generating excellent, cutting edge science and is a leading intermediate scale laser system worldwide.'

Barnes, Cris W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Laser fusion pulse shape controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

Siebert, Larry D. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Science and Technology Review January/February 2011  

SciTech Connect

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) World's Most Intense X-Ray Laser Focuses on Livermore Science - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Groundbreaking Science with the World's Brightest X Rays - Experiments with x rays of unparalleled brightness and extremely short duration aim to reveal new information about atoms and molecules in motion; (3) From Data to Discovery - Ongoing control system enhancements at the National Ignition Facility bolster the understanding of experimental data and keep the system performing at its peak; (4) The Sun in All Its Splendor - Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Livermore-developed multilayer mirrors are enabling unprecedented full-disk, high-resolution images of the Sun; and (5) Drilling Deep into Plant Veins - A novel combination of imaging techniques is being used to understand the three-dimensional architecture of plant cell walls.

Blobaum, K J

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Bunch Length Measurements With Laser/SR Cross-Correlation  

SciTech Connect

By operating SPEAR3 in low-{alpha} mode the storage ring can generate synchrotron radiation pulses of order 1ps. Applications include pump-probe x-ray science and the production of THz radiation in the CSR regime. Measurements of the bunch length are difficult, however, because the light intensity is low and streak cameras typically provide resolution of only a few ps. Tests are now underway to resolve the short bunch length using cross-correlation between a 60-fs Ti:Sapphire laser and the visible SR beam in a BBO crystal. In this paper we report on the experimental setup, preliminary measurements and prospects for further improvement.

Miller, Timothy; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Lindenberg, Aaron; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Goodfellow, John; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Mok, Walter; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Wen, Haidan; /SLAC

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes technical progress during the program Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, the worlds smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700C capability, UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments Using HERCULES Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing laser power and plasma electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 6.1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 80 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using F/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. We also studied the influence of laser focusing conditions by changing the f-number of the optics to F/15 and found an increase in density threshold for electron production compared to the F/10 configuration. The analysis of different phenomena such as betatron motion of electrons, side scattering of the laser pulse for different focusing conditions, the influence of plasma density down ramp on LWFA are shown.

Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Horovitz, Y. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dynamical Experiments Group, Propulsion Division, Soreq NRC, Yavnee 81800 (Israel)

2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Faculty of Science General Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science General Science The General Science program gives you maximum flexibility to explore the sciences, plus the core requirements you need for on-going, specialized studies. www.uwindsor.ca/science Rigorous, Enriching Programs The BSc General Science program is a great way to explore your many interests

202

Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science Thomas Henick-Kling Professor of Enology Director of Viticulture & Enology Program #12;Wine Science Wine Science Growth of Washington Wine Industry #12;Wine Science Wine Science Wine Grapes utilized 2007 2008 2009 2010 WA 127,000 145,000 156,000 160,000 NY 24,000 26,000 30

203

Coherent instabilities in random lasers  

SciTech Connect

A numerical study is presented of random lasers as a function of the pumping rate above the threshold for lasing. Depending on the leakiness of the system resonances, which is typically larger in random lasers compared to conventional lasers, we observe that the stationary lasing regime becomes unstable above a second threshold. Coherent instabilities are observed as self pulsation at a single frequency of the output intensity, population inversion, as well as the atomic polarization. We find these Rabi oscillations have the same frequency everywhere in the random laser despite the fact that the field intensity strongly depends on the spatial location.

Andreasen, Jonathan; Sebbah, Patrick; Vanneste, Christian [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 6622, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06108, Nice Cedex 02 (France)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Science Conference Proceedings : About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Conference Proceedings - Home Science Conference Proceedings - Home Science Conference Proceedings - About Science Conference Proceedings - Advanced Search Science...

205

Laser cooling of solids  

SciTech Connect

We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Presented at the Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 conference, Kyoto, Japan 10-15 Sep 2001 Fusion Electra: A Krypton Fluoride Laser for Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Washington, DC. USA 1 Commonwealth Technology, Inc, Alexandria, VA. USA 2 Jaycor, Inc. Alexandria foil structure; the recirculator to cool and quiet the laser gas; and long life optical windows. We gas between shots; and long life optical windows. It will take several years to develop an advanced

207

NETL: Advanced Research - Coal Utilization Sciences/Sensors ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of pulverized coal with laser diagnostics. NETL's Advanced Research Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program is a crosscutting research and development effort whose goal is to...

208

Information Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science Information Science1354608000000Information ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov...

209

Science | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Science Neutron Science Neutron Scattering Science Neutrons are one of the fundamental particles that make up matter and have properties that make them ideal for certain types of research. In the universe, neutrons are abundant, making up more than half of all visible matter. Neutron scattering provides information about the positions, motions, and magnetic properties of solids. When a beam of neutrons is aimed at a sample, many neutrons will pass through the material. But some will interact directly with atomic nuclei and "bounce" away at an angle, like colliding balls in a game of pool. This behavior is called neutron diffraction, or neutron scattering. Using detectors, scientists can count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final position

210

Is sustainability science really a science?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively...

211

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and...

212

Science & Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Faces of Science Science & Engineering Capabilities...

213

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

214

Science Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

215

Computer Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations...

216

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel...

217

OECD energy intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

to examine OECD countries' energy intensity levels (i.e., the ratio of energy ... steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the Organisation of...

218

Science Education ProgramScience Education Program TEACH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Education ProgramScience Education Program TEACH SCIENCE IMPACT THE FUTURE #12;Science Education ProgramScience Education Program Why Teach Science? #12;Science Education Program SCIENCE, a middle school science teacher. He teaches several grades and covers many science topics, covering

de Lijser, Peter

219

Enabling Intensity and Energy Frontier Science with a Muon Accelerator Facility in the U.S.: A White Paper Submitted to the 2013 U.S. Community Summer Study of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A staged approach towards muon based facilities for Intensity and Energy Frontier science, building upon existing and proposed facilities at Fermilab, is presented. At each stage, a facility exploring new physics also provides an R&D platform to validate the technology needed for subsequent stages. The envisioned program begins with nuSTORM, a sensitive sterile neutrino search which also provides precision neutrino cross-section measurements while developing the technology of using and cooling muons. A staged Neutrino Factory based upon Project X, sending beams towards the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), which will house the LBNE detector, could follow for detailed exploration of neutrino properties at the Intensity Frontier, while also establishing the technology of using intense bunched muon beams. The complex could then evolve towards Muon Colliders, starting at 126 GeV with measurements of the Higgs resonance to sub-MeV precision, and continuing to multi-TeV colliders for the exploration of physics beyond the Standard Model at the Energy Frontier. An Appendix addresses specific questions raised by the Lepton Colliders subgroup of the CSS2013 Frontier Capabilities Study Group.

J-P. Delahaye; C. Ankenbrandt; A. Bogacz; S. Brice; A. Bross; D. Denisov; E. Eichten; P. Huber; D. M. Kaplan; H. Kirk; R. Lipton; D. Neuffer; M. A. Palmer; R. Palmer; R. Ryne; P. Snopok

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Helps Fight...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

human health. "This is the first new biological structure solved with a free-electron laser," said Henry Chapman of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

222

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analysis of a laser induced plasma in high pressure SF6 gas for high-voltage, high-current switching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Laser Triggered Switch Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an intensive development study to understand and optimize the laser triggered gas switch (LTGS) for (more)

Clark, Waylon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Efficient electron injection into plasma waves using higher-order laser modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waves using higher-order laser modes P. Michel, E. Esarey, ?higher-order transverse laser modes as drivers for plasmaparticu- lar, using a ring laser beam with maximum intensity

Michel, P.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; Leemans, W.P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photon Sciences Training Courses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences Training Courses Photon Sciences Training Courses Beamline Ops (BLOSA) BNL Web Courses (Help) BNL Class Schedules Business Systems & Software Contractor Orientation Cranes, Forklifts, Aerial Lifts Electrical Environmental ESH Briefings ESH Tours GERT GERT Reciprocity Human Resources IRP (Briefings) (Procedures) Job Briefings JRAs and FRAs Lasers Lead Machine Shops Medical Surveillance Nano Materials NSLS-II (Bldg 740) Photographic Dark Rm Procedures (Control Rm) Procedures (PRMs) (SOPs) Radiological Remedial (GERT) (NSLS) Roster Form (.docx) R2A2s Source Dev Lab Staff Development Study Guides Supervisory Training Training Course Dev Form User Training Work Control All Photon Sciences (PS) courses and some BNL courses (HP, OM, TQ, and GE) commonly assigned by the PS Directorate for work within PS buildings are

226

Faculty of Science Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science Computer Science Computer software engineering, network and system analysis.uwindsor.ca/computerscience The University of Windsor offers a variety of computer science programs to prepare students for a career in the technology industry or in research and academia. A computer science degree provides an in-depth understanding

227

PHYSICISTS USE LASER LIGHT TO FOCUS ATOMS ON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... McClelland co-authored the Science paper with Robert ... Lasers, as all forms of light, have characteristic wave ... prints (color or black and white) of the ...

228

Fiber-optic-coupled, laser heated thermoluminescence dosimeter ...  

Fiber-optic-coupled, laser heated thermoluminescence dosimeter for remote radiation sensing Alan L. Hustona) and Brian L. Justus Optical Sciences ...

229

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

230

AGS intensity upgrades  

SciTech Connect

After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse accelerated to 24 GeV was achieved. The high intensity slow-extracted beam program at the AGS typically serves about five production targets and about eight experiments including three rare Kaon decay experiments. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of four.

Roser, T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Speckle-free laser imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Dye laser amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

234

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes findings of the 2013 Snowmass Community Summer Study Instrumentation Frontier's subgroup on the Intensity Frontier. This report is directed at identifying instrumentation R&D needed to support particle physics research over the coming decades at the Intensity Frontier.

S. H. Kettell; R. A. Rameika; R. S. Tschirhart

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Light intensity compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fast-ion spectrometry of ICF implosions and laser-foil experiments at the omega and MTW laser facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast ions generated from laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and laser-foil interactions. LPI, which vary in nature depending on the wavelength and intensity ...

Sinenian, Nareg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EMSL: Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's unique and state-of-the-art capabilities along with staff expertise can help scientists gain a predictive understanding of the molecular-to-mesoscale processes in climate, biological, environmental and energy systems. These advancements are critical to development of sustainable solutions to the nation's energy and environmental challenges. Four Science Themes help EMSL define and direct the research investments and establish a portfolio of user projects to accelerate scientific innovation and discovery in the areas of environmental molecular science critical to DOE and the nation. EMSL's annual call for proposals solicits proposals on specific topics within these Science Themes. Over the next 10 years, EMSL will focus its science toward developing

238

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

239

Synchronization in semiconductor laser rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the dynamics of semiconductor lasers coupled in a ring configuration. The lasers, which have stable output intensity when isolated, behave chaotically when coupled unidirectionally in a closed chain. In this way, we show that neither feedback nor bidirectional coupling is necessary to induce chaotic dynamics at the laser output. We study the synchronization phenomena arising in this particular coupling architecture, and discuss its possible application to chaos-based communications. Next, we extend the study to bidirectional coupling and propose an appropriate technique to optical chaos encryption/decryption in closed chains of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers.

Javier M. Buldu; M. C. Torrent; Jordi Garcia-Ojalvo

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

240

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: Key metrologies/systems: In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, linear and non-linear spectroscopies ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

NIST/JILA 'Dark Pulse Laser' Produces Bursts of Almost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of overall energy gains gradually giving way to overall energy losses. Eventually, the laser reaches a steady state of repeated brief intensity dipsa ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

245

The Hurricane Intensity Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensity issue of hurricanes is addressed in this paper using the angular momentum budget of a hurricane in storm-relative cylindrical coordinates and a scale-interaction approach. In the angular momentum budget in storm-relative coordinates,...

T. N. Krishnamurti; S. Pattnaik; L. Stefanova; T. S. V. Vijaya Kumar; B. P. Mackey; A. J. OShay; Richard J. Pasch

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience KenKen HawickHawick k.a.k.a.hawickhawick@massey.ac.nz@massey.ac.nz Massey UniversityMassey University #12;Computational Science / eScienceComputational Science / eScience Computational Science concerns the application of computer science to physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology

Hawick, Ken

248

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lyman, John L. (Los Alamos, NM); Aldridge, III, Jack P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Laser Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... over a wide range of powers, energies, and wavelengths. ... the SI units for laser power and energy. ... Novel power meter for high-efficiency laser diode ...

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nonperturbative Vacuum-Polarization Effects in Proton-Laser Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the collision of a high-energy proton beam and a strong laser field, merging of laser photons can occur due to the polarization of vacuum. The probability of photon merging is calculated by exactly accounting for the laser field which involves a highly nonperturbative dependence on the laser intensity and frequency. It is shown that the nonperturbative vacuum-polarization effects can be experimentally measured by combining the next generation of tabletop petawatt lasers with proton accelerators presently available.

Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Investigating science teachers' beliefs about science and science teaching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purposes of this quantitative, descriptive study were to investigate Saudi science teachers' beliefs about science and science teaching, and to determine how do Saudi (more)

AL-Abdulkareem, Saleh A. M., 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Science Driven Production Cyberinfrastructure--the Open Science Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the Open Science Grid, a large distributed computational infrastructure in the United States which supports many different high-throughput scientific applications, and partners (federates) with other infrastructures nationally ... Keywords: Data intensive computing, Distributed computing, Grids, High throughput computing, Scientific computing

Mine Altunay; Paul Avery; Kent Blackburn; Brian Bockelman; Michael Ernst; Dan Fraser; Robert Quick; Robert Gardner; Sebastien Goasguen; Tanya Levshina; Miron Livny; John Mcgee; Doug Olson; Ruth Pordes; Maxim Potekhin; Abhishek Rana; Alain Roy; Chander Sehgal; Igor Sfiligoi; Frank Wuerthwein

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Science Cinema  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cinema Science Experiments and Demonstrations Frostbite Theater - A collection of short, fun videos that you can use to explore liquid nitrogen, radioactivity, electricity and even...

255

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Science Highlights Operations Events Abstracts Publications Credits Cover images legend Disclaimer National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report For the period...

256

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely...

257

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

258

Le Bail Intensity Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Le Bail Intensity Extraction Le Bail Intensity Extraction Presentation Goal Introduce the concepts behind LeBail fitting; why it is useful and how to perform a Le Bail fit with GSAS. Format: PDF slides or a RealPlayer video of the slides with accompanying audio and a demo video that shows how a Le Bail fit is performed. Presentation Outline What is the Le Bail method? Other approaches Why use the Le Bail method? Parameter fitting with Le Bail intensity extraction Le Bail refinement strategies Avoiding problems with background fitting: BKGEDIT Demo: an example Le Bail fit Links Le Bail lecture Slides (as PDF file) FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or better screen resolution) FlashMovie file (800x600 pixels) Le Bail demo FlashMovie presentation with index (best viewed with 1024x768 or

259

Magellan: experiences from a science cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud resources promise to be an avenue to address new categories of scientific applications including data-intensive science applications, on-demand/surge computing, and applications that require customized software environments. However, there is a ... Keywords: cloud computing, mapreduce, programming model, science, virtual machines

Lavanya Ramakrishnan; Piotr T. Zbiegel; Scott Campbell; Rick Bradshaw; Richard Shane Canon; Susan Coghlan; Iwona Sakrejda; Narayan Desai; Tina Declerck; Anping Liu

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

High intensity hadron accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

Teng, L.C.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT www.esr.pdx.edu Undergraduate Program: Environmental Science an emphasis on natural sciences and mathematics (Environmental Science) or emphasis on policy, geography and social sciences (Environmental Studies). Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Environmental Science Bachelor

262

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mhlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four thin-film damage competitions organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research.

Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, February-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported in the magnetic fusion energy and laser fusion energy programs, aluminium-air battery and vehicle research, geothermal research, nuclear waste management, basic energy science, and chemistry and materials science. (FS)

Truhan, J.J.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Life Sciences Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Life Sciences Portal. Life Sciences Portal. Programs ... more. >> see all Life Sciences programs and projects ... ...

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

267

Life sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

Day, L. (ed.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Intensity Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. Well discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools were using, what goals have been identified, how we structured the plan to include our team in the process and so on.

Rappolee, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fusion Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS) Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights HPC Requirements Reviews NERSC HPC Achievement...

270

Science Accelerator : User Account  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Office of Science Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website PoliciesImportant Links Science Accelerator science.gov WorldWideScience.org Deep Web Technologies...

271

NEWTON's Computer Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Science Videos Do you have a great computer science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Computer Science Videos from Purdue Computer Science Videos from...

272

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedResearch, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Research, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Apparatus for laser beam profile measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for measuring the spatial intensity profile of the output beam from a continuous-wave laser oscillator. The rapid and repetitive passing of a small aperture through the otherwise totally blocked output beam of the laser under investigation provides an easily interpretable, real-time measure of the intensity characteristics thereof when detected by a single detector and the signal generated thereby displayed on an oscilloscope synthronized to the motion of the aperture.

Barnes, N.P.; Gettemy, D.J.

1985-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Very high intensity reaction chamber design  

SciTech Connect

The problem of achieving very high intensity irradiation by light in minimal regions was studied. Three types of irradiation chamber are suggested: the common laser-reaction chamber, the folded concentric or near-concentric resonator, and the asymmetric confocal resonator. In all designs the ratio of high-intensity illuminated volume to other volume is highly dependent (to the $sup 3$/$sub 2$ power) on the power and fluence tolerances of optical elements, primarily mirrors. Optimization of energy coupling is discussed for the common cavity. For the concentric cavities, optimization for both coherent and incoherent beams is treated. Formulae and numerical examples give the size of chambers, aspect ratios, maximum pass number, image sizes, fluences, and the like. Similarly for the asymmetric confocal chamber, formulae and numerical examples for fluences, dimensions, losses, and totally contained pass numbers are given. (auth)

Devaney, J.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of laser radiation limiters based on stratified solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of limiting the intensity of laser radiation using a light-induced critical scattering of light at optothermodynamic conversion of stratified solutions of triethylamine/water and 2-butoxyethanol/water into the labile supercritical region ... Keywords: critical state, intensity limiting, laser, radiation, stratified solutions

A. Yu. Gerasimenko; V. M. Podgaetsky; V. N. Semin; M. M. Simunin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said  

SciTech Connect

A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

Sher, Mark H. (Los Altos, CA); Macklin, John J. (Stanford, CA); Harris, Stephen E. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Consequences of intensity constraints on inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the conflicting requirements of high implosion efficiency (low corona temperature) and adequate energy transport (high corona temperature) can, together with other effects, limit useful infrared light intensities to values on the order of 100 Tw/cm/sup 2/. Increased interest in ultraviolet lasers, for which this intensity constraint is expected to be less severe, and the entry of charged-particle drivers in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) competition are consequences of this limitation. Analytical results based on a simple model are presented which show how the gain of an ICF target is modified by the existence of an arbitrary intensity constraint.

Kidder, R.E.

1979-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Relativistic second-harmonic generation of a laser from underdense plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high intensity laser obliquely incident on a vacuum-plasma interface produces second-harmonic radiation in the reflected component. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation increases with the angle of incidence, up to critical angle of incidence (our model is not valid beyond critical angle of incidence). The efficiency also depends on electron density, showing a maximum at {omega}{sub p}{sup 2}/{omega}{sup 2} congruent with 0.7, where {omega}{sub p} and {omega} are relativistic plasma frequency and laser frequency, respectively. The efficiency of second-harmonic generation increases sharply with laser intensity in the nonrelativistic regime and saturates at higher intensities. The intensity of the second harmonic is proportional to square of the laser intensity at low pump laser intensities and tends to proportional to laser intensity in the strong relativistic regime.

Singh, K.P.; Gupta, D.N.; Yadav, Sushila; Tripathi, V.K. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beams originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD`s are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens in positioned coaxial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shuttles and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

Vann, C.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

284

CIM - compact intensity modulation.  

SciTech Connect

Compact intensity modulation (CIM), a new method to modulate the intensity of a neutron beam is demonstrated. CIM allows the production of arbitrary signals where the focus point can be chosen and changed without any constraints. A novel feature in this technique compared to spin echo techniques is that the neutron polarization is kept parallel or anti-parallel to the static fields during the passage through the magnetic fields and the beating pattern at the detector is produced by an amplitude modulation (AM) of the adiabatic RF-spin flippers rather than Larmor precession like in neutron spin echo (NSE) instruments; thus, the achievable contrast is very high and the instrument resolution can be changed very quickly. This gives the fascinating possibility at pulsed neutron sources to sweep the modulation frequency of the flippers in order to increase dynamic resolution range during the same neutron pulse.

Bleuel, M.; Lang, E.; Gahler, G.; Lal, J.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Inst. Lau Langevin

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Unlocking energy intensive habits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy intensive habits energy intensive habits Presentation at LBL Oct 10, 2013 by Hal Wilhite Professor and Research Director University of Oslo Centre for Development and the Environment Source: WWF US EIA Outlook 2011 Conventional framing of the energy consumption and savings * Sovereign consumers * Economically rational and persistentely reflexive. * Uninfluenced by social and material conditions of everyday life * Focus on efficiency and not on size and volume which is for the most part treated as an indifferent variable Cognitive reductionism The change of frame * From individual to socio-material * From rational/reflexive experience-based (practical) knowledge * From efficiency to reduction A theory of habit * Acknowledges the role of lived experience (history, both cultural and personal) in forming

286

Gratings for High-Energy Petawatt Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To enable high-energy petawatt laser operation we have developed the processing methods and tooling that produced both the world's largest multilayer dielectric reflection grating and the world's highest laser damage resistant gratings. We have successfully delivered the first ever 80 cm aperture multilayer dielectric grating to LLNL's Titan Intense Short Pulse Laser Facility. We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings.

Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Carlson, T C; Nissen, J D; Summers, L J; Hoaglan, C R; Aasen, M D; Peterson, J E; Jovanovic, I

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE ANYTHING BUT TEXTBOOK #12;Areas of study Bachelor of Computer Science* Algorithms Biomedical Computing Computer Game Development Computer and Internet Security Mathematics Computer Science and Mathematics Concentrations in Computing Theory and Numerical Methods

Carleton University

290

Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology) SpecialiSationS Environmental Microbiology environment. This specialisation can be attached to the Environmental Sciences major. Environmental Modelling Sciences major. Land and Freshwater Environments This specialisation is for students interested

Waikato, University of

291

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Treaty Verification Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

294

The Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern for Data-Intensive Science Eli Dart Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 eddart@lbl.gov Lauren Rotman Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 lbrotman@lbl.gov Brian Tierney Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 bltierney@lbl.gov Mary Hester Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 mchester@lbl.gov Jason Zurawski Internet2 Office of the CTO Washington DC, 20036 zurawski@internet2.edu Abstract The ever-increasing scale of scientific data has become a sig- nificant challenge for researchers that rely on networks to interact with remote computing systems and transfer re- sults to collaborators worldwide. Despite the availability of high-capacity connections,

295

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

296

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Science Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbon-neutral energy technologies. To establish the scientific foundations for the kind of transformative breakthroughs needed to build a 21st-century energy economy, we must address fundamental questions involving matter and energy. Below is a sampling of such questions that can be addressed by light-source facilities:

297

Science Museum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 - Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum July 22, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury...

298

Science Museum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lecture December 12, 2013 Last in year-long series of public talks at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 12, 2013-The role Los Alamos National Laboratory plays...

299

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science EXAFS and XANES of plutonium and uranium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposition J.A. Fortner, A.J. Kropf, R.J. Finch, M.C. Hash, S.B. Aase,...

300

ARM - Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 Science New C-band...

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Set Parser r = Input [r ? Input] #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 13) :: [ ] #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 13 Applicative interface fail : {r Parser r Parser r (p q) inp = p inp ++ q inp #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

Löh, Andres

302

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 7 Regular functors Combinators for regular functors: data I r r #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 8 Converting between datatype[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with the multirec

Löh, Andres

303

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook 2013 #12;Welcome to Computer Science Welcome from the Head of Department 2 What is Computer Science? 2 Careers in Computer Science 3 What can you do with a Computer Science degree? 4 Meet our students 5 Academic information Important dates 7 Admission

Sun, Jing

304

Experimental study of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect

The filamentation instability can lead to regions of increased laser intensity when a spatially nonuniform laser beam interacts with a plasma. An experimental technique will be described which identifies the density perturbation produced by filaments. The growth of filaments has been investigated and, when the laser intensity is large enough, the transverse density profile of the filament can be measured. Evidence of filament growth influenced by plasma flow and density gradients is presented. 19 refs., 4 figs.

Young, P.E.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Materials Science Evaluation Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Subject Areas. Modeling; Nondestructive; ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Bioanalytical Science Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioanalytical Science Group. Welcome. We provide the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

307

Argonne TDC: Physical Sciences  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

308

Science Challenges & Opportunities for an Advanced X-ray Free...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Challenges & Opportunities for an Advanced X-ray Free-electron Laser Wednesday, October 2, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conference Room Robert Schoenlein, Lawrence...

309

Science & Technology Review September 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Livermore--Poised for the Future, Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) A Hitchhiker's Guide to Early Earth--Experiments examine the possibility that the building blocks of life arrived on Earth as hitchhikers on comets; (3) A New World of Maps--More than pretty pictures, maps prepared with the tools of geographic information sciences allow researchers to find new relationships among spatial information; (4) Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Stack Up to Efficient, Clean Power--The goal of Livermore's research in solid-oxide fuel cells is electric power generated cleanly and efficiently at an affordable cost; and (5) Empowering Light, Historic Accomplishments in Laser Research--During the past 40 plus years, the laser program at Livermore has played a seminal role in taking high-energy lasers from concept to reality.

Budil, K

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions  

SciTech Connect

The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarela-tivistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover, the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarelativistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

Bulanov, S. S. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leemans, W. P. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser Spectro.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more information about my work on laser spectroscopy, consult the following papers: Sansonetti, CJ, Gillaspy, JD, and ...

313

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedBasic Energy Sciences, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

315

Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

447 Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The Department of Computer Science provides undergraduate instruction leading to the bachelor's degree in computer science. This program in computer science is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting body recognized

Suzuki, Masatsugu

316

Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR...

317

Neutron Science | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physics for this groundbreaking work. Today, the laboratory is home to two of the most powerful neutron science facilities in the world-the Spallation...

318

Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The athermal Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new laser concept is presented, called the athermal laser, unifying all the hitherto known implementations of radiative laser cooling.

Muys, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Science of NSE | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science of the Neutron Spin Echo Spectrometer The Science of the Neutron Spin Echo Spectrometer Main Features NSE is of the original generic IN11 kind, which is the technique with the largest potential to extend the resolution beyond current limits. The instrument possesses a number of unique features: Ultrahigh resolution: τmax ≤ 1 µs (Δħω = 0.7neV) Huge dynamical range extending up to 1:106 Position-sensitive area detector Field compensation and magnetic shielding Optional intensity-modulated mode A moderator detector distance of 18 m yields a frame width of Δλ = 0.366 nm. The resolution of τmax= 1 µs shall be obtained for λ > 1.8 nm (g = 1.8). In addition, due to the TOF λ separation the wavelength dependent part of the Q-resolution is an order of magnitude better than at reactor instruments [3]. Exploiting that the Fourier time τ∼λ3 a subsequent use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Characteristics of an envelope model for laser-plasma accelerator simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation of laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) experiments is computationally intensive due to the disparate length scales involved. Current experiments extend hundreds of laser wavelengths transversely and many thousands in the propagation direction, ... Keywords: Envelope model, Laser wakefield acceleration, Laser-plasma acceleration, PIC, Plasma accelerator

Benjamin M. Cowan; David L. Bruhwiler; Estelle Cormier-Michel; Eric Esarey; Cameron G. R. Geddes; Peter Messmer; Kevin M. Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.

Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E.M.; Perry, M.D.; Mason, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

325

Peter A. Norreys Professor of Inertial Fusion Science,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campaign · "Science of Ignition on the NIF" Workshop · Central Laser Facility / ORION #12;Universities: LLNL NIF Point Design #12;Cryogenic target & shield #12;Target Gain G is NOT a physics parameter (CH or Be) NIF 1MJ Indirect Drive Design Laser energy = 1MJ Fuel kinetic energy = 10kJ Total

326

The mechanism of thin film Si nanomachining using femtosecond laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond (fs) laser ablation has been the subject of intense recent research. The pulse time ('width') is shorter than the electronic relaxation time, resulting in a decoupling of the period of laser illumination and ...

Jia, Jimmy Yi-Jie, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked Who ordered that? upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gail Harlamoff: Executive Director, Life Lab Science Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensive teacher training program. So thats been great.when you were training to do the LASERS program in your ownschool programs, and weve got teacher trainings. It opened

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Role of Radiation and Other Renascent Subfields in Atmospheric Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizons of atmospheric science are undergoing a considerable expansion as a result of intense interest in problems of climate. This has caused somewhat of a renaissance in hitherto-neglected subfields of atmospheric science. Focusing on ...

W. J. Wiscombe; V. Ramanathan

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Materials Science & Engineering | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering SHARE Materials Science and Engineering ORNL's core capability in applied materials science and engineering directly supports missions in clean energy, national security, and industrial competitiveness. A key strength of ORNL's materials science program is the close coupling of basic and applied R&D. Programs building on this core capability are focused on (1) innovations and improvements in materials synthesis, processing, and design; (2) determination and manipulation of critical structure-property relationships, and (3)

332

High-performance laser processing using manipulated ultrafast laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We employ manipulated ultrafast laser pulses to realize microprocessing with high-performance. Efficient microwelding of glass substrates by irradiation by a double-pulse train of ultrafast laser pulses is demonstrated. The bonding strength of two photostructurable glass substrates welded by double-pulse irradiation was evaluated to be 22.9 MPa, which is approximately 22% greater than that of a sample prepared by conventional irradiation by a single pulse train. Additionally, the fabrication of hollow microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional shape embedded in fused silica is realized by spatiotemporally focusing the ultrafast laser beam. We show both theoretically and experimentally that the spatiotemporal focusing of ultrafast laser beam allows for the creation of a three-dimensionally symmetric spherical peak intensity distribution at the focal spot.

Sugioka, Koji; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

High-Energy Laser Ponderomotive Acceleration  

SciTech Connect

A new concept of TeV-range laser ponderomotive acceleration in a plasma is proposed. Particles are accelerated in the point-like scattering by the leading front of the laser pulse, propagating at the group velocity less than the vacuum speed of light. In this scheme, the gain in particle energy is determined by the group velocity and does not depend on laser intensity, which determines the quantum probability of acceleration. The quantum and classical analysis of the scheme proposed is presented. Estimates show that the concept proposed is a promising technique for compact laser acceleration of TeV energy range.

Smetanin, I.V.; /Lebedev Inst.; Barnes, C.; /SLAC; Nakajima, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

History of Science 157 Sociology of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 History of Science 157 Sociology of Science Fall 2009 Steven Shapin Science Center 469 Tuesdays to thinking about science, its historical development, its relations to society and other forms of culture: Science Center 451 Office hours: Mondays 8:30 -> 10.15, or by arrangement #12;2 E-mail: shapin

Shapin, Steven

335

www.ucd.ie/science UCD SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* D N 200 SC IEN C E 4 N ew Pathw ays to Teaching M athem atics and Science www.ucd.ie/science UCD SCIENCE 2013 Discover. Experience. Choose. #12;2 www.ucd.ie/science Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 6 DN & Biomolecular Sciences Pharmacology 12 DN200 Neuroscience 11 DN200 Plant Biology 14 DN200 Physiology 13 DN200

336

NERSC Science Gateways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways Demos Database services OpenDAP User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Home For Users Science Gateways Science...

337

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientificthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced5 Simulation Data Key Remote Science Drivers Instruments and

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Contact ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences Organization Charts Neutron Sciences Directorate Associate Laboratory Director for Neutron Sciences, Kelly Beierschmitt Biology and Soft Matter Division Director, Paul...

340

More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics ORNL wins six R&D 100s R&D Magazine recognizes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviewed are the present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research at the ILE (Institute of Laser Engineering) Osaka. The Gekko XII and Peta Watt laser system have been operated for investigating the fast ignition, the relativistic laser plasma interactions and so on. In particular, the fast ignition experiments with cone shell target have been in progress as the UK and US-Japan collaboration programs. In the experiments, the imploded high density plasmas are heated by irradiating 500 J level peta watt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by injecting the peta watt laser into the cone shell target. Transport of relativistic high density electron is the critical issue as the basic physics for understanding the dense plasma heating process. By the theory, simulation and experiment, the collective phenomena in the interactions of intense relativistic electron current with dense plasmas has been investigated to find the formation of self organized flow as the result of filamentation (Weibel) instability. Through the present understanding, the new project, FIREX-I has started recently to prove the principle of the fast ignition scheme. Keywords: fast ignition, peta watt laser, relativistic electron, weibel instability

Mima Kunioki; Tanaka Kazuo. A; Kodama Ryosuke; Johzaki Tomohiro; Nagatomo Hideo; Shiraga Hiroyuki; Miyanaga Noriaki; Azechi Hiroshi; Nakai Mitsuo; Norimatsu Takayoshi; Nagai Keiji; Sunahara Atsushi; Nishihara Katsunobu; Taguchi Toshihiro; Sakagami Hitoshi; Sentoku Yasuhiko; Ruhl Hartmut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

EMSL: Science: Cross-Cutting Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cross-Cutting Science Areas Cross-cutting science EMSL's integrated approach supports science that doesn't fit easily into single categories. Here we capture EMSL's areas of...

343

REFLECTED LIGHT INTENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM DEFECTS ON HIGHLY REFLECTIVE SPHERES PDO 6984778, Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

A light reflection technique suitable for development into an automated surface quality certification system was investigated to determine if reflected light intensity distributions could be corre]ated with surface defect depths. Reflected laser light intensity distributions from pit and scratch defects on highly reflective spheres were studied with a commercial multi-element photodetector. It was found that the intensity distributions --Goll'lf be correlated with depths of pits and scratches in a size range of concern on highly reflective' spheres.

Klingsport, P. E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermal effects in intense laser-plasma interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. All rights reserved. BAS-3-1085 (c) Copyright ' B. A.All rights reserved. eV eV BAS-3-1083 (b) Copyright ' B. A.All rights reserved. 4.0e+04 BAS-3-1073 (d) Copyright ' B.

Shadwick, B.A.; Tarkenton, G.M.; Esarey, E.H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun Photometer Laser and Lamp Based Radiometric Calibrations Sun Photometer Laser and Lamp Based Radiometric Calibrations Allen, D.W.(a), Souaidia, N.(a), Pietras, C.(b), Brown, S.(a), Lykke, R.(a), Frouin, R.(c), Deschamps, P.Y.(d), Fargion, G.(b), and Johnson, B.C.(a), National Institute of Standards and Technology (a), National Aeronautics and Space Administration, SAIC (b), Scripps Institution of Oceanography (c), Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique, France (d) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The goals of this study were to calibrate the radiometers using independent methods, evaluate the uncertainties for each method, and assess the influence of the results in terms of the science requirements. The radiometers were calibrated in irradiance and radiance mode using a monochromatic, laser-illuminated integrating sphere, in radiance mode using

346

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. Breakthroughs in the technology of superconducting magnets, nanometer beams, laser instrumentation and information technology will give high-energy physicists new accelerators to explore the deepest secrets of the universe: the ultimate structure of matter and the nature of space and time. But breakthroughs in accelerator science may do more than advance the exploration of particles and forces. No field of science is an island. Physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, medicine— all interact in the continuing human endeavor to explore and understand our world and ourselves. Research at high-energy physics laboratories will lead to the next generation of particle accelerators—and perhaps to new tools for medical science.

347

Laser Catalyst  

INLs Laser Catalyst is a method for removing contaminant matter from a porous material. A polymer material is applied to a contaminated surface and ...

348

Fusion pumped laser  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fusion pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pappas, D.S.

1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Adventures in Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics IQ Test Previous Video (Physics IQ Test) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Polymers, Foams and Gels) Polymers, Foams and Gels Adventures in Science Professor Cynthia...

351

Understanding Materials Science History, Science, Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... CITATION: Hummel, R.E. Understanding Materials Science History, Science, Applications, 2nd Edition, New York: Springer, 2004.

352

Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Scrambled Science Words  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words The computer will pick a science word or term and then scramble its letters. Once you...

354

Anthropology Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthropology Bachelor of Science 201213 Degree Map First Year Fall Winter Spring Notes ANTH 1031 4 Lab Science Elective 4 Lab Science Elective 4 Science Elective 4 Total Credits

Bertini, Robert L.

355

Science in the News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science in the News Now you can get science news from many U.S. science agencies via a new feed at Science.gov. From aftershock assessment of earthquakes to food recalls to U.S....

356

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sciences Geological Sciences Atomic-scale structure of the orthoclase (001)-water interface measured with high-resolution x-ray reflectivity P. Fenter, H. Teng, P. Geissbühler, J.M. Hanchar, K.L. Nagy, and N.C. Sturchio Chemical analysis of individual interplanetary dust particles G.J. Flynn, S.R. Sutton, M. Rivers, P. Eng, and M. Newville Diffusion-limited biotransformation of metal contaminants in soils/sediments: chromium T. Tokunaga, J. Wan, D. Joyner, T. Hazen, M. Firestone, E. Schwartz, S. Sutton, and M. Newville Investigation of meteorite porosity by computed microtomography G.J. Flynn, M. Rivers, and S.R. Sutton Microscale imaging of pore structure in hydrothermal sulfide chimneys using synchrotron x-ray computed tomography P. O'Day, J. Muccino, S. Thompson, M.Jew, and J. Holloway

357

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Science Highlights Science highlights feature research conducted by staff and users at the ALS. If a Power Point summary slide or a PDF handout of the highlight is available, you will find it linked beneath the highlight listing and on the highlight's page. You may also print a version of a highlight by clicking the print icon associated with each highlight. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 ALS research has shown how the scales of a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin can literally re-orient themselves in real time to resist force, in essence creating an adaptable body armor. Read more... New Research on Jamming Behavior Expands Understanding Print Tuesday, 22 October 2013 00:00 Recent ALS research has revealed that even magnetic domains behave very much like other granular material systems, and their dynamical behavior mimics the universal characteristics of several jammed systems.

358

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

359

Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration  

SciTech Connect

The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy and reduce carbon emissions across the industrial sector. the portfolio focuses the...

362

NIST Laser Applications Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Group. Welcome. The Laser Applications Group advances laser technology for applications in optical ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study  

SciTech Connect

Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows: SuperMicro X7DBE Xeon Dual Socket Blackford Server Motherboard; 2 Intel Xeon Dual-Core 2.66 GHz processors; 1 GB DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM (2 x 512); 80GB Hard Drive (Seagate SATA II Barracuda). The Fusion board is presently capable of 4X in a PCIe slot. The image resampling benchmark was run on a dual Xeon workstation with NVIDIA graphics card (see Chapter 5 for full specification). An XtremeData Opteron+FPGA was used for the language classification application. We observed that these benchmarks are not uniformly I/O intensive. The only benchmark that showed greater that 50% of the time in I/O was the graph algorithm when it accessed data files over NFS. When local disk was used, the graph benchmark spent at most 40% of its time in I/O. The other benchmarks were CPU dominated. The image resampling benchmark and language classification showed order of magnitude speedup over software by using co-processor technology to offload the CPU-intensive kernels. Our experiments to date suggest that emerging hardware technologies offer significant benefit to boosting the performance of data-intensive algorithms. Using GPU and FPGA co-processors, we were able to improve performance by more than an order of magnitude on the benchmark algorithms, eliminating the processor bottleneck of CPU-bound tasks. Experiments with a prototype solid state nonvolative memory available today show 10X better throughput on random reads than disk, with a 2X speedup on a graph processing benchmark when compared to the use of local SATA disk.

Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

NIST Forensic Science Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. NIST Forensic Science Research. NIST has conducted and supported forensic science research for many decades. ...

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

NETL: Science Bowl Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Initiatives > Science Bowl Information Educational Initiatives Science Bowl Information Regional Sites Southwestern PA Regional Site West Virginia Regional Site...

366

NIST Forensic Science Newsroom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... three publication covers See our latest publications! NIST Forensic Science Newsroom. ... News Archive. NIST Forensic Science News newsletter. ...

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

Biology | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioinformatics Nuclear Medicine Climate and Environment Systems Biology Computational Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials...

368

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Research Ranks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selected science "Breakthrough of the Year": the discovery of what appears to be the Higgs boson. Scientists aimed the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser at thousands of tiny...

369

Laser Controlled Area Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

72 72 2 Effective: Page 1 of 16 3/6/13 Subject: X26C Laser Safety Program Documentation The only official copy of this file is the one on-line in the Photon Sciences website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the Photon Sciences website. 2.1/2g03e011.doc 1 (06/2009) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Hazard Class 3B and 4 laser systems must be documented, reviewed, and approved through use of this form. Each system must be reviewed annually. Modify the template for this document to fit your particular circumstance.

370

Performance of the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility has now been operating in a routine way for outside users since November 1, 1981. From that date through December of 1982, the accelerator system was scheduled for neutron science for 4500 hours. During this time the accelerator achieved its short-term goals by delivering about 380,000,000 pulses of beam totaling over 6 x 10/sup 20/ protons. The changes in equipment and operating practices that evolved during this period of intense running are described. The intensity related instability threshold was increased by a factor of two and the accelerator beam current has been ion source limited. Plans to increase the accelerator intensity are also described. Initial operating results with a new H/sup -/ ion source are discussed.

Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

372

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

373

energy intensity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

intensity intensity Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

374

Metalworking Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Several models of metalworking lasers of both domestic and foreign manufacture are commercially available. The majority of these are of either the neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) solid-state type or the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas type. These lasers may have pulsed or...

375

COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a board computational accelerator physics initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

Cary, J.R.; Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; McInnes, L.; Borland, M.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.; Wang, Y.; Fischer, W.; Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Ryne, R.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.; Qiang, J.; Ng, E.; Li, S.; Ng, C.; Lee, R.; Merminga, L.; Wang, H.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dechow, D.; Mullowney, P.; Messmer, P.; Nieter, C.; Ovtchinnikov, S.; Paul, K.; Stoltz, P.; Wade-Stein, D.; Mori, W.B.; Decyk, V.; Huang, C.K.; Lu, W.; Tzoufras, M.; Tsung, F.; Zhou, M.; Werner, G.R.; Antonsen, T.; Katsouleas, T.; Morris, B.

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computing Sciences] 7 Combinators data I r = I r data K a r = K a data U r = U -- for constructors) Fix f r fold alg (In f) = alg (fmap (fold alg) f) #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 17 Representing a family data ExprF (r :: ) (ix

Löh, Andres

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study of governments, public policies, and political behavior. Political science uses both humanistic perspectives and scientific skills to examine the United States and all countries and regions of the world. Students enrolled in Political Science courses explore

382

Past Science Advisors Early Science Advisors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NSTC NNSA with R&D agencies Science and Technology in the U.S. GovernmentScience and Technology Transportation Defense Energy NSF-36 NIH USGS NOAA NIST Homeland Security DARPA, ONR, AFOSR NSTC NNSA Science NIST Homeland Security DARPA, ONR, AFOSR NSTC NNSA Science and Technology are important to most Federal

Colorado at Boulder, University of

383

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic diff Andres Löh joint work with Eelco Lempsink and Sean Leather Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University IFIP WG 2.1 meeting #64, Weltenburg, April 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

Löh, Andres

384

Science & Technology Review June 2009  

SciTech Connect

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

Bearinger, J P

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Science DMZ: a network design pattern for data-intensive science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever-increasing scale of scientific data has become a significant challenge for researchers that rely on networks to interact with remote computing systems and transfer results to collaborators worldwide. Despite the availability of high-capacity ...

Eli Dart, Lauren Rotman, Brian Tierney, Mary Hester, Jason Zurawski

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Laser Program annual report, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

PERI Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERI PERI - Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels for Multicore Samuel Williams † , Kaushik Datta † , Jonathan Carter , Leonid Oliker † , John Shalf , Katherine Yelick † , David Bailey CRD/NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA † Computer Science Division, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA E-mail: SWWilliams@lbl.gov, kdatta@eecs.berkeley.edu, JTCarter@lbl.gov, LOliker@lbl.gov, JShalf@lbl.gov, KAYelick@lbl.gov, DHBailey@lbl.gov Abstract. We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to Sparse Matrix Vector Multiplication

388

The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and imagination of many LANL staff and managers and resulted in a strategy which focuses on our strengths while recognizing that the science of signatures is dynamic. This report highlights the interdependence between SoS, advances in materials science, and advances in information technology. The intent is that SoS shape and inform Los Alamos investments in nuclear forensics, nuclear diagnostics, climate, space, energy, and biosurveillence; the areas of leadership that you will read about in this strategy document. The Science of Signatures is still a relatively new strategic direction for the Laboratory. The primary purpose of this document is tell Laboratory staff how SoS is being managed and give them a chance to get involved. A second important purpose is to inform the Department of Energy and our customers of our capability growth in this important scientific area. Questions concerning the SoS strategy and input to it are welcomed and may be directed to any member of the SoS Leadership Council or to the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Science Directorate Office.

Smith, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Eugene J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Science & Technology Review October 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Livermore researchers won five R&D 100 awards in R&D Magazine's annual competition for the top 100 industrial innovations worldwide. This issue of Science & Technology Review highlights the award-winning technologies: noninvasive pneumothorax detector, microelectromechanical system-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, large-area imager, hyper library of linear solvers, and continuous-phase-plate optics system manufactured using magnetorheological finishing. Since 1978, Laboratory researchers have received 118 R&D 100 awards. The R&D 100 logo (on the cover and p 1) is reprinted courtesy of R&D Magazine.

Chinn, D J

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

391

Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences The goal of the program is to understand the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules using photons and ions as probes. The current program is focussed on studying inner-shell photo-ionization and photo-excitation of atoms and molecules, molecular orientation effects in slow collisions, slowing and cooling molecules, and X-ray photo-excitation of laser-dressed atoms. The experimental and theoretical efforts are designed to break new ground and to provide basic knowledge that is central to the programmatic goals of the Department of Energy (DOE). Unique LBNL facilities such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ECR ion sources at the 88-inch cyclotron, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) are

392

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

APS Science 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In my five years as the Director of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), I have been fortunate to see major growth in the scientific impact from the APS. This year I am particularly enthusiastic about prospects for our longer-term future. Every scientific instrument must remain at the cutting edge to flourish. Our plans for the next generation of APS--an APS upgrade--got seriously in gear this year with strong encouragement from our users and sponsors. The most promising avenue that has emerged is the energy-recovery linac (ERL) (see article on page xx), for which we are beginning serious R&D. The ERL{at}APS would offer revolutionary performance, especially for x-ray imaging and ultrafast science, while not seriously disrupting the existing user base. I am very proud of our accelerator physics and engineering staff, who not only keep the current APS at the forefront, but were able to greatly impress our international Machine Advisory Committee with the quality of their work on the possible upgrade option (see page xx). As we prepare for long-term major upgrades, our plans to develop and optimize all the sectors at APS in the near future are advancing. Several new beamlines saw first light this year, including a dedicated powder diffraction beamline (11-BM), two instruments for inelastic x-ray scattering at sector 30, and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Nanoprobe beamline at sector 26. Our partnership in the first x-ray free-electron laser (LCLS) to be built at Stanford contributes to revolutionary growth in ultrafast science (see page xx), and we are developing a pulse chirping scheme to get ps pulses at sector 7 of the APS within a year or so. In this report, you will find selected highlights of scientific research at the APS from calendar year 2006. The highlighted work covers diverse disciplines, from fundamental to applied science. In the article on page xx you can see the direct impact of APS research on technology. Several new products have emerged from work at the APS, to complement the tremendous output of work in basic science, which often has payoff in technology but over decades rather than years. Highlights in this report also reflect the relevance of APS work to Department of Energy missions, for example a route to more efficient fuel cells (page xx mr-88-073113) addresses the energy challenge, and natural approaches to cleaning up the environment.

Gibson, J. M.; Fenner, R. B.; Long, G.; Borland, M.; Decker, G.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

396

Biological Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Science Biological Science A unique zinc-binding site revealed by the high-resolution x-ray structure of homotrimeric Apo2L/TRAIL S.G. Hymowitz, M.P. O'Connell, M.H. Ultsch, A. Hurst, K. Totpal, A. Ashkenazi, R.F. Kelley, and A.M. de Vos b-carbonic anhydrase active site architecture is a mirror image of a-carbonic anhydrases E.F. Pai and M.S. Kimber Binding of Cd ions to the cell wall of B. Subtilis - an EXAFS study M. Boyanov, D. Fowle, K. Kemner, B. Bunker, and J. Fein Crystallographic evidence for Try157 functioning as the active site base in human UDP-galactose 4-epimerase J.B. Thoden, T.M. Wohlers, J.L. Fridovich-Keil, and H.M. Holden Crystallographic studies of dsDNA phage HK97 structure and maturation W.R. Wikoff, Z. Che, W. Schildkamp, L. Liljas, R.L. Duda, R.W. Hendrix, and

397

Laser Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community needs to work together to provide the technical case for funding an IFE program. IFE program should nurture competition, with judgments made on the basis of technical progress and the potential of the various approaches to IFE. Direct-drive with lasers looks very attractive for IFE, the physics and needed technologies are mature and advancing. KrF provides physics advantages for direct drive. KrFs demonstrated performance is competitive with solid state lasers as a high-rep-rate durable, efficient IFE driver. (on several important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy

Steve Obenschain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

CO{sub 2} laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to {approx}2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO{sub 2} pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is {approx}10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

1984-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer  

SciTech Connect

The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Web of Science Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web of Science #12; Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2 Web of Science.................................................................................................................. 4 ISI Web of Knowledge

Huang, Su-Yun

404

Laser-frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

A high quality mode locked pulse train was obtained at 9.55 micrometers, the CO2 wavelength chosen for frequency doubling into the atmospheric window at 4.8 micrometers. The pulse train consists of a 3 micro sec burst of 1.5 nsec pulses separated by 40 nsec, in a TEM(00) mode and with a total energy of 100 mJ. The pulse intensity without focussing is about 3 MW/sq.cm., already quite close to the target intensity of 10 MW/sq.cm. for frequency doubling in a AgGaSe2 crystal. The mode-locked train is obtained by intracavity modulation at 12.5 MHz using a germanium crystal driven with a power of about 30 Watts. Line selection is achieved firstly by the use of a 0.92 mm thick CaF2 plate at the Brewster angle within the cavity, which completely suppresses 10.6 micrometer band radiation. Secondly, a particular rotational line, the P20 at 9.55 micrometers, is selected by the injection of a continuous beam is mode-matched to the pulsed laser cavity using a long focal length lens, and for best line-locking it is necessary to fine tune the length of the pulsed laser resonator. Injection causes substantial depression of the gain switched spike.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Laser wakefield acceleration experiments at the University of Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing the laser power and electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 8x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 100 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using f/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of the laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. Betatron motion of electrons was also observed depending on laser power and electron density.

Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Horovitz, Y.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Reed, S.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Huntington, C. M.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, Space Physics Research Lab., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Levin, M.; Zigler, A. [Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Laser barometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Supercomputing | Computer Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resilience Engineering of Scientific Software Translation Quantum Computing Machine Learning Information Retrieval Content Tagging Visual Analytics Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Research Areas | Computer Science SHARE Computer Science Computer Science at ORNL involves extreme scale scientific simulations through research and engineering efforts advancing the state of the art in algorithms, programming environments, tools, and system software. ORNL's work is strongly motivated by, and often carried out in direct

408

Polish grid infrastructure for science and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure, functionality, parameters and organization of the computing Grid in Poland is described, mainly from the perspective of high-energy particle physics community, currently its largest consumer and developer. It represents distributed Tier-2 in the worldwide Grid infrastructure. It also provides services and resources for data-intensive applications in other sciences.

Ryszard Gokieli; Krzysztof Nawrocki; Adam Padee; Dorota Stojda; Karol Wawrzyniak; Wojciech Wislicki

2007-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Polish grid infrastructure for science and research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure, functionality, parameters and organization of the computing Grid in Poland is described, mainly from the perspective of high-energy particle physics community, currently its largest consumer and developer. It represents distributed Tier-2 in the worldwide Grid infrastructure. It also provides services and resources for data-intensive applications in other sciences.

Gokieli, Ryszard; Padee, Adam; Stojda, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Karol; Wislicki, Wojciech

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Preformed transient gas channels for laser wakefield particle acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Acceleration of electrons by laser-driven plasma wake fields is limited by the range over which a laser pulse can maintain its intensity. This distance is typically given by the Rayleigh range for the focused laser beam, usually on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm. For practical particle acceleration, interaction distances on the order of centimeters are required. Therefore, some means of guiding high intensity laser pulses is necessary. Light intensities on the order of a few times 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} are required for laser wakefield acceleration schemes using near IR radiation. Gas densities on the order of or greater than 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} are also needed. Laser-atom interaction studies in this density and intensity regime are generally limited by the concomitant problems in beam propagation introduced by the creation of a plasma. In addition to the interaction distance limit imposed by the Rayleigh range, defocusing of the high intensity laser pulse further limits the peak intensity which can be achieved. To solve the problem of beam propagation limitations in laser-plasma wakefield experiments, two potential methods for creating transient propagation channels in gaseous targets are investigated. The first involves creation of a charge-neutral channel in a gas by an initial laser pulse, which then is ionized by a second, ultrashort, high-intensity pulse to create a waveguide. The second method involves the ionization of a gas column by an ultrashort pulse; a transient waveguide is formed by the subsequent expansion of the heated plasma into the neutral gas.

Wood, W.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Intense low energy positron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gender Gaps in the Mathematical Sciences: The Creativity Factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents an overview, and recent history, of studies of gender gaps in the mathematically-intensive sciences. Included are several statistics about gender differences in science, and about public resources aimed at addressing them. We then examine the role that gender differences in creativity play in explaining the recent and current gender differences in the mathematical sciences, and identify several constructive suggestions aimed at improving analytical creativity output in research institutions.

Hill, Theodore P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Molecular dynamic studies on anisotropic explosion of laser irradiated Xe cluster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three dimensional molecular dynamic model is used to investigate the dynamics of Xe clusters of various radii irradiated by laser of moderate intensities ({approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}). The FWHM pulse duration of the laser is varied from few laser cycles to hundreds of femtosecond. For cluster of radius 50 A irradiated by a laser of 170 fs pulse duration, it is observed that ion yield is more along the direction of laser polarization than perpendicular to it. This trend reverses (more ions are emitted along the direction perpendicular to laser polarization than parallel to it) when laser pulses of few cycles are used. This reversal of anisotropy is explained on the basis of spatial shielding of ions due to the oscillating inner electron cloud along direction of laser electric field. The nature of anisotropy remains same with variations in laser intensity and cluster size.

Mishra, Gaurav; Gupta, N. K. [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumabi-400085 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Laser Cladding With Powder: effect of some machining parameters on clad properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ardness, bonding and microstructure. Hence, it was decided to introduce this technique in the Dutch industry. The project consisted of three parts. One part covered the achievement and enhancement of insight in phenomena that occur in laser cladding. The second part involved the development of tools that facilitate the use of laser cladding. The third part consisted of the development of practical applications. Some aspects of this project are discussed in this thesis. This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO 2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa- 6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is attained with an arbitrarily shaped intensity profile. Input parameters for this model are laser machining parameters and properties of the laser beam, as well as material properties and the absorption of laser energy at the s

Marcel Schneider; Dr. Ir. J. Meijer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uncertainties in the Line Intensities in the 1130 nm Band of Water Vapor Uncertainties in the Line Intensities in the 1130 nm Band of Water Vapor Giver, L.P. (a), Pilewskie, P. (a), Gore, W.J. (a), Chackerian, Jr., C. (b), Varanasi, P. (c), Freedman, R.S. (d), and Bergstrom, R. (e), NASA-Ames Research Center (a), SETI Institute (b), State University of New York at Stony Brook (c), Space Physics Research Institute (d), Bay Area Environmental Research Insitute (e) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Belmiloud et al (GRL 27, 3703-3706 (2000)) have recently asserted that the line intensities in the 1130 nm band of water vapor band listed in the HITRAN database are much too weak. Giver et al (JQSRT 66, 101-105(2000)) pointed unit-conversion errors out in the intensity data previously appearing in the HITRAN database and corrected the intensity data so that

416

Science Cafe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafés Cafés Science Cafe November 1, 2013 Print Tuesday, 24 September 2013 15:00 Friday, November 1@ 12 noon in USB 15-253 jackson Exposing the Trade Secrets of Ancient Roman Engineers: Nano-Structure and Material Properties of Al-tobermorite in 2000-Year-Old Seawater Harbor Concrete Marie Jackson, UC Berkeley, Beamlines 5.3.2, 12.2.2,12.3.2 DNA Labelled with Gold Greg Hura, Physical Biosciences Division, Beamline 12.3.1 robin Pseudo-Single-Bunch Operation with Adjustable Frequency - A New Operation Mode for the ALS Dave Robin, AFRD August 29, 2013 Print Thursday, 11 April 2013 08:37 Date-Change: Thursday, August 29 @ 12 noon in USB 15-253 beavers Under Pressure: Why Diamonds Are a Crystallographer's Best Friend! Christine Beavers, Experimental Systems Group, Beamline 11.3.1

417

Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 10{sup 13}Wcm{sup {minus}2}.

Baldis, H.A.; Labaune, C.; Renard, N. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)] [and others

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1991-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor. 4 figs.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Materials Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science & Technology Science Education Innovation Energy Sources Energy Usage Energy Efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Behavioral Sciences | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Computational Engineering Computer Science Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems...

422

NREL: Energy Sciences - Theoretical Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Science Solid-State Theory Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Theoretical Materials Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. Using modern computational techniques, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, applies quantum mechanics to complex materials, yielding quantitative predictions to guide and interact with experimental explorations. Current research focuses on the following efforts: Design new photovoltaic materials that can improve solar cell efficiency and reduce its cost. Explain the underlying physics of new

423

Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

Bushaw, B.A.

1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Laser Detection Of Material Thickness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection Of Material Thickness Detection Of Material Thickness Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of

425

ORISE: Center for Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education Completed in January 2009, the Center for Science Education was established to...

426

Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA...

427

Science Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2009 9, 2009 » Links Scientific Highlight » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Ions in the Clutches of Carbon Nanotubes Currently, more than 1/6th of the people in the world lack safe and clean water. Population shifts, global warming and many other global changes will make this shortage even more critical in the coming years. Solutions to this problem lie in the development of new, energy-efficient means of purifying water. One of the traditional purification technologies-called membrane-based reverse osmosis-is very energy intensive, and this is spurring a flurry of activities into creating new, energy-efficient materials. Among the most promising of these materials are carbon nanotubes. A related material, activated carbon-basically carbon treated

428

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting.

429

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser (10) is formed of a vanadium (12) and titanium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions (32).

Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surfatron laser-plasma accelerator: prospects and limitations  

SciTech Connect

The surfatron laser-plasma accelerator is an extension of the plasma beat wave accelerator scheme. It utilizes very intense electric fields, 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 10/ V/cm, associated with focussed laser beams to accelerate particles. (GHT)

Joshi, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions.

Nilsen, J.

1991-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

E-Science Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on December 6, 2011, E-Science Day was a day-long event,regional librarians in e-science, and to expose regionalthe initiation of e-science support projects within their

Abad, Raquel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Communicating Evolution as Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):14515. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

Thanukos, Anastasia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Science-Driven Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office of Science Networking Requirements Workshop Report February 21, 2006 1-1 Science-Driven Network Requirements...

437

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

438

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

High intensity protons in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

Montag, C.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Blaskiewicz& #44; M.; Brennan& #44; J.M.; Drees& #44; K.A.; Fischer& #44; W.; Huang& #44; H.; Minty& #44; M.; Robert-Demolaize& #44; G.; Thieberger& #44; P.; Yip& #44; K.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The direct measurement of ablation pressure driven by 351-nm laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instantaneous scaling of ablation pressure to laser intensity is directly inferred for ramp compression of diamond targets irradiated by 351-nm light. Continuously increasing pressure profiles from 100 to 970 GPa are produced by direct-drive laser ablation at intensities up to 7 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The free-surface velocity on the rear of the target is used to directly infer the instantaneous ablation-pressure profile at the front of the target. The laser intensity on target is determined by laser power measurements and fully characterized laser spots. The ablation pressure is found to depend on the laser intensity as P(GPa)=42({+-}3)[I(TW/cm{sup 2})]{sup 0.71({+-}0.01)}.

Fratanduono, D. E. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Direct High-Power Laser Acceleration of Ions for Medical Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical investigations show that linearly and radially polarized multiterawatt and petawatt laser beams, focused to subwavelength waist radii, can directly accelerate protons and carbon nuclei, over micron-size distances, to the energies required for hadron cancer therapy. Ions accelerated by radially polarized lasers have generally a more favorable energy spread than those accelerated by linearly polarized lasers of the same intensity.

Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physics Department, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Celebrating 50 Years of Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When thinking of an innovation that has truly changed our world, it is the laser. Right after discovery back in 1960, it is immediately propelled to a public star. People loved the mystery around this new kind of light. It was soon recognized as a symbol of our entry into the future: The Laser Age has started. Newspapers speculated about ''death rays'' as new weapons. It did not take long time until it appeared in Science fiction movies. However reality was much more beneficial and even more diverse. This device has managed to exceed the wildest predictions of the early laser pioneers when it comes to its applications. Today lasers are not a weird scientist's toy, but are commonly used in our everyday life.Of course, nothing of that was foreseen in the early 1950s. Important fundamentals of lasers have been laid already in 1917 by Albert Einstein, introducing the Einstein coefficient of stimulated emission, and subsequent experimental work by Rudolf Ladenburg, Willis Lamb, Alfred Kastler and others.

Rebel, Heinigerd [Instituet fuer Kernphysik, Forschungzentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

laser_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimensional Measurements. Laser Measurements. Rate our Services. Technical ... Laser Frequency/Wavelength (14510S-14511S). The ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Lederman Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lederman Science Center: Fermilab Science for Kids and Educators LSC Home Plan a Visit DirectionsMap Exhibits: Overview - List - Physics Playground LSC Floorplan LSC Store...

448

National Security Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSS cover - april NSS cover - april Read the April 2013 issue: web | interactive| pdf Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Utility Navigation Skip to Top Navigation Skip to Content Navigation Los Alamos National Laboratory submit About | Mission | Business | Newsroom | Phonebook Los Alamos National Laboratory links to site home page Science & Innovation Collaboration Careers, Jobs Community, Environment Science & Innovation Home » Science & Engineering Capabilities Accelerators, Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Materials Science National Security, Weapons Science Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

449

Science Conference Proceedings  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

energy, aeronautics and astronautics, meteorology, engineering, computer science, electric power, and fossil fuels The OSTI Science Conference Proceedings portal was devised to...

450

Science Fair Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Fair Projects NEWTON Ask A Scientist program is not designed to provide science fair ideas or deal with individual project problems. Our program is designed to answer...

451

NEWTON's General Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Videos Do you have a great general science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Videos from National Geographic Kids Videos from National Geographic...

452

DOE Science Showcase - Nanotechnology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

valuable way to spotlight needs and target resources in this critical area of science and technology. Nanotechnology Research Results in DOE Databases DOepatents ScienceCinema...

453

Basic Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govbesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

454

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govfesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

455

Life Sciences News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Life Sciences News. ... may be within reach of every doctor's office if recent ... NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology researchers Gregg ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

Science Accelerator Widget  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator Widget You can now explore multiple Science Accelerator features through the new tabbed widget. Download this tool via the 'Get Widget Options' link or by...

457

INSTITUTE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Pod vod?renskou v 2, 182 07 Prague 8, Czech Republic. phone: (+420)266052083...

458

NEWTON's General Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Archive: Loading Most Recent General Science Questions: What is Equilibrium? Banana and Human Genetics Hair Examination Body Buffer Action Jellyfish : Plant or...

459

NEWTON's Computer Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Computer Science Questions: Preparation for Video Game Creator Most Common Programming and Web Script How Does Spell Check Work? How...

460

BNL | Computational Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Science Center Home Research Support Areas Publications Staff EBC Environmental, Biological, and Computational Sciences Directorate CSC image CSC image CSC image CSC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensity laser science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial Photosynthesis II - EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion...

462

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laser Beam Delivery [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities...

464

Single Variable and Multivariate Analysis of Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra for Prediction of Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in Igneous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) will be employed by the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity to obtain UV, VIS, and VNIR atomic emission spectra of surface rocks and soils. LIBS quantitative analysis is complicated by chemical matrix effects related to abundances of neutral and ionized species in the resultant plasma, collisional interactions within plasma, laser-to-sample coupling efficiency, and self-absorption. Atmospheric composition and pressure also influence the intensity of LIBS plasma. These chemical matrix effects influence the ratio of intensity or area of a given emission line to the abundance of the element producing that line. To compensate for these complications, multivariate techniques, specifically partial least-squares regression (PLS), have been utilized to predict major element compositions (>1 wt.% oxide) of rocks, PLS methods regress one or multiple response variables (elemental concentrations) against multiple explanatory variables (intensity at each pixel of the spectrometers). Because PLS utilizes all available explanatory variable and eliminates multicollinearity, it generally performs better than univariate methods for prediction of major elements. However, peaks arising from emissions from trace elements may be masked by peaks of higher intensities from major elements. Thus in PLS regression, wherein a correlation coefficient is determined for each elemental concentration at each spectrometer pixel, trace elements may show high correlation with more intense lines resulting from optical emissions of other elements. This could result in error in predictions of trace element concentrations. Here, results of simple linear regression (SLR) and multivariate PLS-2 regression for determination of trace Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in igneous rock samples are compared. This study focuses on comparisons using only line intensities rather than peak areas to highlight differences between SLR and PLS.

Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Speicher, Elly A [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Dyar, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Carmosino, Marco L [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

465

NEWTON's Material Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Videos Material Science Videos Do you have a great material science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: University of Maryland - Material Science University of Maryland - Material Science The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a set of videos about various topics in material science to help students understand what material science is. Learn about plasma, polymers, liquid crystals and much more. LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com offers a series of educational material science lectures that are available to the public for free. Learn about topics like polymers, non-crystalline solids, crystal geometry, phase diagrams, phase transformations and more. NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos

466

Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CO2 laser frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Science and technology review, October 1997  

SciTech Connect

This month`s issue contains articles entitled Livermore Science and Technology Garner Seven 1997 R&D 100 Awards; New Interferometer Measures to Atomic Dimensions; Compact More Powerful Chips from Virtually Defect-free Thin Film Systems, A New Precision Cutting Tool; The Femtosecond Laser; MELD: A CAD Tool for Photonoics Systems, The Tiltmeter: Tilting at Great Depths to Find Oil; Smaller Insulators Handle Higher Voltage; and Compact Storage Management Software: The Next Generation.

Upadhye, R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Photon Sciences | About the Photon Sciences Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Photon Sciences Directorate About the Photon Sciences Directorate The Photon Sciences Directorate operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), both funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science. These facilities support a large community of scientists using photons (light) to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. NSLS National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source II This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven Lab and a time of unprecedented growth for the directorate. The NSLS-II Project is progressing rapidly and smoothly through design and construction, driven by

471

Laser barometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

Abercrombie, Kevin R. (Westminster, CO); Shiels, David (Thornton, CO); Rash, Tim (Aurora, CO)

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

472

Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity  

SciTech Connect

The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

Rohringer, N; Santra, R

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Welcome. The Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group conducts research in ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop. Purpose: The New Frontiers in IT and Measurement Science Rapid advances ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring of Si Title Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring of Si Publication Type...

476

EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition,...

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