National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for intensity laser science

  1. Possibilities for Nuclear Photo-Science with Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C J; Hartemann, F V; McNabb, D P; Messerly, M; Siders, C; Anderson, S; Barnes, P; Betts, S; Gibson, D; Hagmann, C; Hernandez, J; Johnson, M; Jovanovic, I; Norman, R; Pruet, J; Rosenswieg, J; Shverdin, M; Tremaine, A

    2006-06-26

    The interaction of intense laser light with relativistic electrons can produce unique sources of high-energy x rays and gamma rays via Thomson scattering. ''Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray'' (T-REX) sources with peak photon brightness (photons per unit time per unit bandwidth per unit solid angle per unit area) that exceed that available from world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude are possible from optimally designed systems. Such sources offer the potential for development of ''nuclear photo-science'' applications in which the primary photon-atom interaction is with the nucleons and not the valence electrons. Applications include isotope-specific detection and imaging of materials, inverse density radiography, transmutation of nuclear waste and fundamental studies of nuclear structure. Because Thomson scattering cross sections are small, < 1 barn, the output from a T-REX source is optimized when the laser spot size and the electron spot size are minimized and when the electron and laser pulse durations are similar and short compared to the transit time through the focal region. The principle limitation to increased x-ray or gamma-ray brightness is ability to focus the electron beam. The effects of space charge on electron beam focus decrease approximately linearly with electron beam energy. For this reason, T-REX brightness increases rapidly as a function of the electron beam energy. As illustrated in Figure 1, above 100 keV these sources are unique in their ability to produce bright, narrow-beam, tunable, narrow-band gamma rays. New, intense, short-pulse, laser technologies for advanced T-REX sources are currently being developed at LLNL. The construction of a {approx}1 MeV-class machine with this technology is underway and will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in variety of materials. Nuclear resonance fluorescent spectra are unique signatures of each isotope and provide an ideal mechanism for identification of nuclear

  2. New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-24

    The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions

  3. Collaborative, Data-Intensive Science Key to Science & Commerce Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2013-05-28

    This article coincides with the release of "Data-Intensive Science," co-edited by Dr. Kerstin Kleese van Dam. In the piece, Dr. Kleese van Dam explains how data-intensive science has the potential to transform not only how we do science but how quickly we can translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, decisions and, ultimately, economic success. In the article, she states it is clear that nations that can most effectively transform tons of scientific data into actionable knowledge are going to be the leaders in the future of science and commerce and how creating the required new insights for complex challenges cannot be done without effective collaboration. Because many science domains already are unable to explore all of the data they collect (or which is relevant to their research), progress in collaborative, data-intensive science is crucial toward unlocking the potential of big data.

  4. What is Data-Intensive Science?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2013-06-03

    What is Data Intensive Science? Today we are living in a digital world, where scientists often no longer interact directly with the physical object of their research, but do so via digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and, at times, visualized data. Advances in experimental and computational technologies have lead to an exponential growth in the volumes, variety and complexity of this data and while the deluge is not happening everywhere in an absolute sense, it is in a relative one. Science today is data intensive. Data intensive science has the potential to transform not only how we do science, but how quickly we can translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, decisions and ultimately economic success. Critically, data intensive science touches some of the most important challenges we are facing. Consider a few of the grand challenges outlined by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering: make solar energy economical, provide energy from fusion, develop carbon sequestration methods, advance health informatics, engineer better medicines, secure cyberspace, and engineer the tools of scientific discovery. Arguably, meeting any of these challenges requires the collaborative effort of trans-disciplinary teams, but also significant contributions from enabling data intensive technologies. Indeed for many of them, advances in data intensive research will be the single most important factor in developing successful and timely solutions. Simple extrapolations of how we currently interact with and utilize data and knowledge are not sufficient to meet this need. Given the importance of these challenges, a new, bold vision for the role of data in science, and indeed how research will be conducted in a data intensive environment is evolving.

  5. Intense transient magnetic-field generation by laser plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1981-08-18

    In a laser system, the return current of a laser generated plasma is conducted near a target to subject that target to the magnetic field thereof. In alternate embodiments the target may be either a small non-fusion object for testing under the magnetic field or a laser-fusion pellet. In the laser-fusion embodiment, the laser-fusion pellet is irradiated during the return current flow and the intense transient magnetic field is used to control the hot electrons thereof to hinder them from striking and heating the core of the irradiated laser-fusion pellet.

  6. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  7. User Training for Data Intensive Science Co-Chairs: Fernanda...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Training for Data Intensive Science Co-Chairs: Fernanda Foertter, Tim Fahey 1 ... L2, disk, tape..... * SharingLeveraging training efforts at other laboratories; don't ...

  8. Intensity Frontier| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intensity Frontier High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments Cosmic Frontier Theoretical and Computational Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator Stewardship Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC

  9. Laser Science & Technology Program Annual Report - 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H-L

    2001-03-20

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program Annual Report 2001 provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL LS&T Program during the April 2001 to March 2002 period using three formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the year; (2) brief summaries of research and development activity highlights within the four Program elements: Advanced Lasers and Components (AL&C), Laser Optics and Materials (LO&M), Short Pulse Laser Applications and Technologies (SPLAT), and High-Energy Laser System and Tests (HELST); and (3) a compilation of selected articles and technical reports published in reputable scientific or technology journals in this period. All three elements (Annual Overview, Activity Highlights, and Technical Reports) are also on the Web: http://laser.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. The underlying mission for the LS&T Program is to develop advanced lasers, optics, and materials technologies and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Laboratory and the nation. This mission statement has been our guide for defining work appropriate for our Program. A major new focus of LS&T beginning this past year has been the development of high peak power short-pulse capability for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). LS&T is committed to this activity.

  10. Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang

    2006-10-07

    A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

  11. Channeling of intense laser beams in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feit, M.D.; Garrison, J.C.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1997-09-01

    A hydrodynamic simulation is used to show that intense laser pulses propagating in underdense plasmas create stable, long-lived, and completely evacuated channels. At low intensities, I=10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, self focusing seriously distorts the temporal envelope of the pulse, but channeling still occurs. At high intensities, I=10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, channeling can proceed over many diffraction lengths with significant distortion restricted to the leading edge of the pulse. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  13. A Simulation Study of Fast Ignition with Ultrahigh Intensity Lasers |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Simulation Study of Fast Ignition with Ultrahigh Intensity Lasers Authors: Tonge, J., May, J., Mori, B., Fiuza, F., Martins, S.F., Fonseca, R.A., Silva, L.O., Ren, C. The coupling efficiency between the ignition laser and the target core for the fast ignition concept is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The details of the energy transport within the weakly collisional overdense plasma of a fast ignition target are examined by

  14. Laser Induced Nuclear Fusion, LINF, In Muonic Molecules With Ultrashort Super Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Paramonov, Gennady K.

    2010-02-02

    Muonium molecules where muons replace electrons increase the stability of molecules to ionization at superhigh intensities, I>10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. We show furthermore from numerical simulations that in the nonsymmetric series, pdu, dtu, ptu, the permanent dipole moments can be used to enhance LINF, Laser Induced Nuclear Fusion by laser induced recollision of the light nucleus with the heavier nucleus.

  15. Data Intensive Computing and Climate Science -- a team sport | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Data Intensive Computing and Climate Science -- a team sport Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Aug 2 2016 - 2:00pm Building/Room: Building 240/Room 1404-1405 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Anke Kamrath Speaker(s) Title: National Center for Atmospheric Research Host: Rick Stevens The presentation will cover the NCAR Climate Computing workflow and the challenges that are encountered across the simulation

  16. Emerging trends in X-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by intense laser beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, V.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2015-07-31

    X-ray line emission from hot dense plasmas, produced by ultra-short high intensity laser systems, has been studied experimentally in recent years for applications in materials science as well as for back-lighter applications. By virtue of the CPA technology, several laser facilities delivering pulses with peak powers in excess of one petawatt (focused intensities > 10{sup 20} W-cm{sup −2}) have either been commissioned across the globe during the last few years or are presently under construction. On the other hand, hard x-ray sources on table top, generating ultra-short duration x-rays at a repetition rate up to 10 kHz, are routinely available for time resolved x-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, the recent experiments on x-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by 45 fs, Ti:sapphire laser pulses (focused iintensity > 10{sup 18} W-cm{sup −2}) at RRCAT Indore will be presented.

  17. High-flux low-divergence positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser irradiated a tapered hollow target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian-Xun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tong-Pu Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gan, Long-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Yuan; Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-10-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate high-flux dense positrons generation by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse onto a tapered hollow target. By using a laser with an intensity of 4 × 10{sup 23 }W/cm{sup 2}, it is shown that the Breit-Wheeler process dominates the positron production during the laser-target interaction and a positron beam with a total number >10{sup 15} is obtained, which is increased by five orders of magnitude than in the previous work at the same laser intensity. Due to the focusing effect of the transverse electric fields formed in the hollow cone wall, the divergence angle of the positron beam effectively decreases to ∼15° with an effective temperature of ∼674 MeV. When the laser intensity is doubled, both the positron flux (>10{sup 16}) and temperature (963 MeV) increase, while the divergence angle gets smaller (∼13°). The obtained high-flux low-divergence positron beam may have diverse applications in science, medicine, and engineering.

  18. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Short, Robert W.; Craxton, Stephen; Letzring, Samuel A.; Soures, John

    1991-01-01

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  19. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  20. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  1. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  2. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  3. CRC handbook of laser science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.E. ); White, W.B. ); Machiels, A.J. )

    1986-01-01

    Laser action has been observed in all forms of matter and spans a spectrum ranging from radiowaves to X-rays. This book provides a concise, readily accessible source of critically evaluated data for workers in all areas of laser research an development. The emphasis is on the presentation of tubular and graphical data compiled by recognized authorities. Definitions of properties and references to the original data sources and to supplementary reviews and surveys are also provided, as appropriate.

  4. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: OPTICS, SAFETY...

  5. Novel high-energy physics studies using intense lasers and plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Bulanov, Stepan; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl

    2015-06-29

    In the framework of the project “Novel high-energy physics studies using intense lasers and plasmas” we conducted the study of ion acceleration and “flying mirrors” with high intensity lasers in order to develop sources of ion beams and high frequency radiation for different applications. Since some schemes of laser ion acceleration are also considered a good source of “flying mirrors”, we proposed to investigate the mechanisms of “mirror” formation. As a result we were able to study the laser ion acceleration from thin foils and near critical density targets. We identified several fundamental factors limiting the acceleration in the RPA regime and proposed the target design to compensate these limitations. In the case of near critical density targets, we developed a concept for the laser driven ion source for the hadron therapy. Also we studied the mechanism of “flying mirror” generation during the intense laser interaction with thin solid density targets. As for the laser-based positron creation and capture we initially proposed to study different regimes of positron beam generation and positron beam cooling. Since the for some of these schemes a good quality electron beam is required, we studied the generation of ultra-low emittance electron beams. In order to understand the fundamental physics of high energy electron beam interaction with high intensity laser pulses, which may affect the efficient generation of positron beams, we studied the radiation reaction effects.

  6. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontier | MINERvA In this Section: Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments at the Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT MicroBooNE MINERvA MINOS NOvA LBNF/DUNE Cosmic Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments MINERvA MINERvA Intensity Frontier MINERvA MINERvA is a neutrino-scattering experiment that uses the NuMI beamline at Fermilab to search for low-energy neutrino interactions. It is designed to study neutrino-nucleus interactions with unprecedented detail. The number of neutrinos that

  7. Self-focusing of an intense laser pulse interacting with a periodic lattice of metallic nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri Javan, N.

    2015-09-15

    The motivation for the present work is the study of self-focusing of an intense laser beam propagating through a periodic array of metallic nanoparticle. Using a perturbative method, a wave equation describing the nonlinear interaction of a laser beam with nanoparticles is derived. Evolution of laser spot size with the Gaussian profile for the circular and linear polarizations is considered. It is found that, in the same intensity, the linear polarization in a special interval of frequency resonantly acts better than the circular one.

  8. Protons acceleration in thin CH foils by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosarev, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with the intensities 10{sup 21}, 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} with CH plastic foils is studied in the framework of kinetic theory of laser plasma based on the construction of propagators (in classical limit) for electron and ion distribution functions in plasmas. The calculations have been performed for real densities and charges of plasma ions. Protons are accelerated both in the direction of laser pulse (up to 1 GeV) and in the opposite direction (more than 5 GeV). The mechanisms of forward acceleration are different for various intensities.

  9. Measurements of radiation doses induced by high intensity laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Other,OPTICS, SAFETY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview ...

  10. Interaction of high intensity laser with non-uniform clusters and enhanced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-10-15

    Laser irradiated clusters with non-uniform density variation are shown to broaden surface plasmon resonance very significantly. As the clusters get heated and expand hydro-dynamically, the Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission yield passes through a maximum in time. The maximum yield decreases with increase in non-uniformity in the electron density inside the clusters. At higher laser intensity, the nonlinearity in laser cluster interaction may arise even prior to electron heating, via the relativistic mass variation and the nonlinear restoration force on electrons. For clusters with radius less than one tenth of the laser wavelength, the restoration force nonlinearity dominates.

  11. The phase-lock dynamics of the laser wakefield acceleration with an intensity-decaying laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng Wang, Wentao; Zhang, Zhijun; Chen, Qiang; Tian, Ye; Qi, Rong; Yu, Changhai; Wang, Cheng; Li, Ruxin Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, T.

    2014-03-03

    An electron beam with the maximum energy extending up to 1.8?GeV, much higher than the dephasing limit, is experimentally obtained in the laser wakefield acceleration with the plasma density of 3.5??10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. With particle in cell simulations and theoretical analysis, we find that the laser intensity evolution plays a major role in the enhancement of the electron energy gain. While the bubble length decreases due to the intensity-decay of the laser pulse, the phase of the electron beam in the wakefield can be locked, which contributes to the overcoming of the dephasing. Moreover, the laser intensity evolution is described for the phase-lock acceleration of electrons in the uniform plasma, confirmed with our own simulation. Since the decaying of the intensity is unavoidable in the long distance propagation due to the pump depletion, the energy gain of the high energy laser wakefield accelerator can be greatly enhanced if the current process is exploited.

  12. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

    1991-09-10

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

  13. Propagation and absorption of high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation in diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kononenko, V V; Konov, V I; Gololobov, V M; Zavedeev, E V

    2014-12-31

    Femtosecond interferometry has been used to experimentally study the photoexcitation of the electron subsystem of diamond exposed to femtosecond laser pulses of intensity 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. The carrier concentration has been determined as a function of incident intensity for three harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser (800, 400 and 266 nm). The results demonstrate that, in a wide range of laser fluences (up to those resulting in surface and bulk graphitisation), a well-defined multiphoton absorption prevails. We have estimated nonlinear absorption coefficients for pulsed radiation at λ = 800 nm (four-photon transition) and at 400 and 266 nm (indirect and direct two-photon transitions, respectively). It has also been shown that, at any considerable path length of a femtosecond pulse in diamond (tens of microns or longer), the laser beam experiences a severe nonlinear transformation, determining the amount of energy absorbed by the lattice, which is important for the development of technology for diamond photostructuring by ultrashort pulses. The competition between wave packet self-focusing and the plasma defocusing effect is examined as a major mechanism governing the propagation of intense laser pulses in diamond. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Free-electron quantum signatures in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Salamin, Yousef I.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2005-09-15

    Quantum signatures of a free electron in interaction with a continuous-wave radiation field are investigated by looking for negativities in the Wigner function of the system. The free-electron wave function in the radiation field is calculated fully analytically by solving the appropriate Schroedinger equation in the Krammers-Henneberger frame. It is found that pronounced quantum signatures show up already for a laser peak field of magnitude E{sub 0}=1-2 a.u. and a frequency {omega}=1 a.u. However, the nonclassical behavior gets lost if the interaction with the radiation field is taken in the dipole approximation.

  15. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  16. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

    2008-10-08

    Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

  17. Selective breaking of bonds in water with intense, 2-cycle, infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, D. Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Dota, K.; Dey, D.; Tiwari, A. K.; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; De, S.; Vasa, P.

    2015-12-28

    One of the holy grails of contemporary science has been to establish the possibility of preferentially breaking one of several bonds in a molecule. For instance, the two O–H bonds in water are equivalent: given sufficient energy, either one of them is equally likely to break. We report bond-selective molecular fragmentation upon application of intense, 2-cycle pulses of 800 nm laser light: we demonstrate up to three-fold enhancement for preferential bond breaking in isotopically substituted water (HOD). Our experimental observations are rationalized by means of ab initio computations of the potential energy surfaces of HOD, HOD{sup +}, and HOD{sup 2+} and explorations of the dissociation limits resulting from either O–H or O–D bond rupture. The observations we report present a formidable theoretical challenge that need to be taken up in order to gain insights into molecular dynamics, strong field physics, chemical physics, non-adiabatic processes, mass spectrometry, and time-dependent quantum chemistry.

  18. Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated with a 200 TW femtosecond laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Colgan, J.; Hansen, S. B.; Zhidkov, A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Abdallah, J.; Sakaki, H.; et al

    2015-09-02

    We report, for the first time, that the energy of femtosecond optical laser pulses, E, with relativistic intensities I > 1021 W/cm2 is efficiently converted to X-ray radiation, which is emitted by “hot” electron component in collision-less processes and heats the solid density plasma periphery. As shown by direct high-resolution spectroscopic measurements X-ray radiation from plasma periphery exhibits unusual non-linear growth ~E4–5 of its power. The non-linear power growth occurs far earlier than the known regime when the radiation reaction dominates particle motion (RDR). Nevertheless, the radiation is shown to dominate the kinetics of the plasma periphery, changing in thismore » regime (now labeled RDKR) the physical picture of the laser plasma interaction. Although in the experiments reported here we demonstrated by observation of KK hollow ions that X-ray intensities in the keV range exceeds ~1017 W/cm2, there is no theoretical limit of the radiation power. Therefore, such powerful X-ray sources can produce and probe exotic material states with high densities and multiple inner-shell electron excitations even for higher Z elements. As a result, femtosecond laser-produced plasmas may thus provide unique ultra-bright X-ray sources, for future studies of matter in extreme conditions, material science studies, and radiography of biological systems.« less

  19. Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated with a 200 TW femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Colgan, J.; Hansen, S. B.; Zhidkov, A.; Pikuz, T. A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Abdallah, J.; Sakaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ogura, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Kanasaki, M.; Hasegawa, N.; Nishikino, M.; Kando, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawachi, T.; Masuda, S.; Hosokai, T.; Kodama, R.; Kondo, K.

    2015-09-02

    We report, for the first time, that the energy of femtosecond optical laser pulses, E, with relativistic intensities I > 1021 W/cm2 is efficiently converted to X-ray radiation, which is emitted by “hot” electron component in collision-less processes and heats the solid density plasma periphery. As shown by direct high-resolution spectroscopic measurements X-ray radiation from plasma periphery exhibits unusual non-linear growth ~E4–5 of its power. The non-linear power growth occurs far earlier than the known regime when the radiation reaction dominates particle motion (RDR). Nevertheless, the radiation is shown to dominate the kinetics of the plasma periphery, changing in this regime (now labeled RDKR) the physical picture of the laser plasma interaction. Although in the experiments reported here we demonstrated by observation of KK hollow ions that X-ray intensities in the keV range exceeds ~1017 W/cm2, there is no theoretical limit of the radiation power. Therefore, such powerful X-ray sources can produce and probe exotic material states with high densities and multiple inner-shell electron excitations even for higher Z elements. As a result, femtosecond laser-produced plasmas may thus provide unique ultra-bright X-ray sources, for future studies of matter in extreme conditions, material science studies, and radiography of biological systems.

  20. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontier | ArgoNeuT ArgoNeuT ArgoNeut detector at Proton Assembly Building Intensity Frontier ArgoNeuT The Argon Neutrino Teststand or ArgoNeuT detector, nicknamed for Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, is a liquid argon neutrino detector at Fermilab. Argon is a noble, non-toxic element that in its gaseous form constitutes about 1 percent of air. It exists as a colorless liquid only in the narrow temperature range of minus 186 to minus 189 degrees Celsius. Neutrinos passing through

  1. Spectroscopic study of gold nanoparticle formation through high intensity laser irradiation of solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Takahiro Sato, Shunichi; Herbani, Yuliati; Ursescu, Daniel; Banici, Romeo; Dabu, Razvan Victor

    2013-08-15

    A spectroscopic study of the gold nanoparticle (NP) formation by high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation of a gold ion solution was reported. The effect of varying energy density of the laser on the formation of gold NPs was also investigated. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the gold nanocolloid in real-time UV-visible absorption spectra during laser irradiation showed a distinctive progress; the SPR absorption peak intensity increased after a certain irradiation time, reached a maximum and then gradually decreased. During this absorption variation, at the same time, the peak wavelength changed from 530 to 507 nm. According to an empirical equation derived from a large volume of experimental data, the estimated mean size of the gold NPs varied from 43.4 to 3.2 nm during the laser irradiation. The mean size of gold NPs formed at specific irradiation times by transmission electron microscopy showed the similar trend as that obtained in the spectroscopic analysis. From these observations, the formation mechanism of gold NPs during laser irradiation was considered to have two steps. The first is a reduction of gold ions by reactive species produced through a non-linear reaction during high intensity laser irradiation of the solution; the second is the laser fragmentation of produced gold particles into smaller pieces. The gold nanocolloid produced after the fragmentation by excess irradiation showed high stability for at least a week without the addition of any dispersant because of the negative charge on the surface of the nanoparticles probably due to the surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles. A higher laser intensity resulted in a higher efficiency of gold NPs fabrication, which was attributed to a larger effective volume of the reaction.

  2. DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    William Watson, Physicist, OSTI staff. Free-Electron Lasers Results in DOE Databases Science.gov Ciencia.Science.gov (Espaol) WorldWideScience.org Energy Citations Database DOE ...

  3. Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2012-10-15

    By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

  4. Picosecond 14.7 nm interferometry of high intensity laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Smith, R F; Moon, S J; Rocca, J J; Keenan, R; Nilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Hunter, J R; Ng, A; Marconi, M C

    2004-10-14

    We have developed a compact, 14.7 nm, sub-5 ps x-ray laser source at LLNL together with a Mach-Zehnder type Diffraction Grating Interferometer built at Colorado State University for probing dense, high intensity laser-produced plasmas. The short wavelength and pulse length of the probe reduces refraction and absorption effects within the plasma and minimizes plasma motion blurring. This unique diagnostic capability gives precise 2-D density profile snapshots and is generating new data for rapidly evolving laser-heated plasmas. A review of the results from dense, mm-scale line focus plasma experiments will be described with detailed comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations.

  5. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  6. The Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern for Data-Intensive Science

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dart, Eli; Rotman, Lauren; Tierney, Brian; Hester, Mary; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The ever-increasing scale of scientific data has become a significant challenge for researchers that rely on networks to interact with remote computing systems and transfer results to collaborators worldwide. Despite the availability of high-capacity connections, scientists struggle with inadequate cyberinfrastructure that cripples data transfer performance, and impedes scientific progress. The Science DMZ paradigm comprises a proven set of network design patterns that collectively address these problems for scientists. We explain the Science DMZ model, including network architecture, system configuration, cybersecurity, and performance tools, that creates an optimized network environment for science. We describe use cases from universities, supercomputing centersmore » and research laboratories, highlighting the effectiveness of the Science DMZ model in diverse operational settings. In all, the Science DMZ model is a solid platform that supports any science workflow, and flexibly accommodates emerging network technologies. As a result, the Science DMZ vastly improves collaboration, accelerating scientific discovery.« less

  7. The Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern for Data-Intensive Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Rotman, Lauren; Tierney, Brian; Hester, Mary; Zurawski, Jason

    2013-08-13

    The ever-increasing scale of scientific data has become a significant challenge for researchers that rely on networks to interact with remote computing systems and transfer results to collaborators worldwide. Despite the availability of high-capacity connections, scientists struggle with inadequate cyberinfrastructure that cripples data transfer performance, and impedes scientific progress. The Science DMZ paradigm comprises a proven set of network design patterns that collectively address these problems for scientists. We explain the Science DMZ model, including network architecture, system configuration, cybersecurity, and performance tools, that creates an optimized network environment for science. We describe use cases from universities, supercomputing centers and research laboratories, highlighting the effectiveness of the Science DMZ model in diverse operational settings. In all, the Science DMZ model is a solid platform that supports any science workflow, and flexibly accommodates emerging network technologies. As a result, the Science DMZ vastly improves collaboration, accelerating scientific discovery.

  8. Theory and simulation of short intense laser pulse propagation in capillary tubes with wall ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veysman, M.; Cros, B.; Andreev, N.E.; Maynard, G.

    2006-05-15

    The theory and simulations of short intense laser pulses propagating in capillary tubes, whose properties are changed in time and space under the action of the laser field, are presented. A hybrid approach has been used in which the dynamics of fields inside the capillary tube is described analytically, whereas the ionization, heating, and expansion of the plasma created at the inner wall of the tube under the action of the transverse energy flux are calculated by numerical simulation. This hybrid method has allowed to determine the behavior of high laser fluxes guided over large distances. The threshold value for the incident intensity at which plasma creation plays a significant role has been estimated analytically and confirmed by numerical results. For intensities above the threshold, the transmission becomes highly sensitive to the energy of the laser pulse, being minimum at the intensity level for which the electron temperature of the capillary wall slightly exceeds the Fermi level and the electron collision frequency has a maximum.

  9. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  10. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  11. High harmonic generation in underdense plasmas by intense laser pulses with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Vieira, J.

    2015-12-15

    We study high harmonic generation produced by twisted laser pulses, with orbital angular momentum in the relativistic regime, for pulse propagation in underdense plasma. We consider fast time scale processes associated with an ultra-short pulse, where the ion motion can be neglected. We use both analytical models and numerical simulations using a relativistic particle-in-cell code. The present description is valid for relativistic laser intensities, when the normalized field amplitude is much larger than one, a ≫ 1. We also discuss two distinct processes associated with linear and circular polarization. Using both analytical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations, we are able to show that, for laser pulses in a well defined Laguerre-Gauss mode, angular momentum conservation is observed during the process of harmonic generation. Intensity modulation of the harmonic spectrum is also verified, as imposed by the nonlinear time-scale for energy transfer between different harmonics.

  12. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-06-15

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly.

  13. Enhanced dense attosecond electron bunch generation by irradiating an intense laser on a cone target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zou, De-Bin; Yin, Yan

    2015-03-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate enhanced spatially periodic attosecond electron bunches generation with an average density of about 10n{sub c} and cut-off energy up to 380 MeV. These bunches are acquired from the interaction of an ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulse with a cone target. The laser oscillating field pulls out the cone surface electrons periodically and accelerates them forward via laser pondermotive force. The inner cone wall can effectively guide these bunches and lead to their stable propagation in the cone, resulting in overdense energetic attosecond electron generation. We also consider the influence of laser and cone target parameters on the bunch properties. It indicates that the attosecond electron bunch acceleration and propagation could be significantly enhanced without evident divergency by attaching a plasma capillary to the original cone tip.

  14. High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; and others

    2012-07-11

    We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Near Field Intensity Trends of Main Laser Alignment Images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, R R; Beltsar, I; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Kamm, V M; Salmon, T; Wilhelmsen, K

    2015-01-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years; during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or ‘big data’ archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics over time performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements and was used to view potential trends. Results are presented for the NIF input and output sensor package trends and changes over the three year time-frame.

  16. Enhancing the energy of terahertz radiation from plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jahangiri, Fazel; Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran ; Hashida, Masaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Department of Physics, GSS, Kyoto University, Kyoto ; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori; Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka

    2013-05-13

    Terahertz (THz) radiation from atomic clusters illuminated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is investigated. By studying the angular distribution, polarization properties and energy dependence of THz waves, we aim to obtain a proper understanding of the mechanism of THz generation. The properties of THz waves measured in this study differ from those predicted by previously proposed mechanisms. To interpret these properties qualitatively, we propose that the radiation is generated by time-varying quadrupoles, which are produced by the ponderomotive force of the laser pulse.

  17. Observation of Magnetized Soliton Remnants in the Wake of Intense Laser Pulse Propagation through Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romagnani, L.; Bigongiari, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Galimberti, M.; Jung, R.; Osterholz, J.; Willi, O.; Liseykina, T. V.; Macchi, A.; Pegoraro, F.

    2010-10-22

    Slowly evolving, regularly spaced patterns have been observed in proton projection images of plasma channels drilled by intense (> or approx. 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) short ({approx}1 ps) laser pulses propagating in an ionized gas jet. The nature and geometry of the electromagnetic fields generating such patterns have been inferred by simulating the laser-plasma interaction and the following plasma evolution with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code and the probe proton deflections by particle tracing. The analysis suggests the formation of rows of magnetized soliton remnants, with a quasistatic magnetic field associated with vortexlike electron currents resembling those of magnetic vortices.

  18. Hot electron energy coupling in ultra-intense laser matter interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, A J; Sentoku, Y; Tabak, M

    2008-04-15

    We investigate the hydrodynamic response of plasma gradients during the interaction with ultra-intense energetic laser pulses, using one-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. As energetic laser pulses are capable of compressing the preformed plasma over short times, the coupling efficiency as well as the temperature of hot electrons drop, leading to localized heating near the point of absorption. We describe the cause of this drop, explain the electron spectra and identify the parametric region where strong compression occurs. Finally, we discuss implications for fast ignition and other applications.

  19. Correlated-intensity velocimeter for arbitrary reflector for laser-produced plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhehui; Luo Shengnian; Barnes, Cris W.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Paul, Stephen F.

    2006-10-15

    A laser-based technique, called correlated-intensity velocimeter for arbitrary reflector (CIVAR), is described for velocity measurement of reflecting surfaces in real time. Velocity versus time is an important measurement in laser-produced high-energy density plasma experiments because the motion of the surface depends on both the equation of the state of the surface material and laser-produced plasma. The physics and working principle of CIVAR are the same as those of a previous concept that resolves Doppler shift of plasma light emission using a pair of narrow passband interference filters. One unique feature of CIVAR is that a reflected laser beam is used instead of plasma emission. Therefore, CIVAR is applicable to both emitting and nonemitting reflecting surfaces. Other advantages of CIVAR include its simplicity, lower cost, and unambiguous data analysis that can be fully automated. The design of a single-point CIVAR is described in detail with emphasis on laser wavelength selection and signal-to-noise ratio. The single-point CIVAR system can be expanded into a multiple-point system straightforwardly. It is possible to use CIVAR concept to construct a two-dimensional imaging system for a nonuniform velocity field of a large reflecting surface; such a velocity imaging system may have applications beyond laser-produced plasma experiments, for example, in shock compression of condensed matter.

  20. Intensity-resolved ionization yields of aniline with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Hart, N.; Zhu, F.; Nava, R.; Pham, F.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Paulus, G. G.; Schuessler, H. A.; Mohamed, T.; Schroeder, H.

    2011-12-15

    We present experimental results for the ionization of aniline and benzene molecules subjected to intense ultrashort laser pulses. Measured parent molecular ions yields were obtained using a recently developed technique capable of three-dimensional imaging of ion distributions within the focus of a laser beam. By selecting ions originating from the central region of the focus, where the spatial intensity distribution is nearly uniform, volumetric-free intensity-dependent ionization yields were obtained. The measured data revealed a previously unseen resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI)-like process. Comparison of benzene, aniline, and Xe ion yields demonstrates that the observed intensity-dependent structures are not due to geometric artifacts in the focus. Finally for intensities greater than {approx}3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, we attribute the ionization of aniline to a stepwise process going through the {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state which sits three photons above the ground state and two photons below the continuum.

  1. Laser Manipulates Electronic Properties | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Manipulates Electronic Properties Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 06.08.16 Laser Manipulates Electronic Properties Dressing

  2. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  3. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  4. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westover, B.; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 ; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (?150?J, 0.7ps, 2נ10{sup 20}Wcm{sup ?2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2?MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5?MeV and 4?MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  5. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, B J

    2012-08-02

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or

  6. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

  7. A search for the sulphur hexafluoride cation with intense, few cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dota, Krithika; Mathur, Deepak; Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 ; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Patra, Kaustuv; Tiwari, Ashwani K.

    2013-11-21

    It is well established that upon ionization of sulphur hexafluoride, the SF{sub 6}{sup +} ion is never observed in mass spectra. Recent work with ultrashort intense laser pulses has offered indications that when strong optical field are used, the resulting bond hardening can induce changes in the potential energy surfaces of molecular cations such that molecular ions that are normally unstable may, indeed, become metastable enough to enable their detection by mass spectrometry. Do intense, ultrashort laser pulses permit formation of SF{sub 6}{sup +}? We have utilized intense pulses of 5 fs, 11 fs, and 22 fs to explore this possibility. Our results are negative: no evidence is discovered for SF{sub 6}{sup +}. However, multiply charged sulphur and fluorine ions from highly charged SF{sub 6}{sup q+} ions are observed that enable us to resolve the controversy regarding the kinetic energy release accompanying formation of F{sup +} fragment ions. Quantum chemical computations of field-distorted potential energy curves of SF{sub 6} and its molecular ion enable us to rationalize our non-observation of SF{sub 6}{sup +}. Our findings have implications for high harmonic generation from SF{sub 6} in the few-cycle regime.

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Free-Electron Lasers Free-Electron Lasers absorb and release energy at any wavelength and can be controlled more precisely than conventional lasers by producing intense powerful light in brief bursts with extreme precision. This innovative technology has opened doors to a vast array of possibilities for manufacturing and for basic research. Read more in the white paper In OSTI Collections: Free-Electron Lasers by Dr. William Watson, Physicist,

  9. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 1. Lasers and masers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes various types of lasers and masers. The following topics are discussed in detail: types and comparisons of laser sources, crystal and glass lasers, semiconductor lasers, organic dye and other liquid lasers, free-electron and x-ray lasers, masers and laser safety.

  10. Three-body fragmentation of CO{sub 2} driven by intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chengyin Liu, Yunquan; Gong, Qihuang; Wu, Cong; Fan, Yameng; Xie, Xiguo; Wang, Peng; Deng, Yongkai

    2015-03-28

    Dissociative ionization dynamics were studied experimentally for CO{sub 2} driven by intense laser pulses. Three-dimensional momentum vectors of correlated atomic ions were obtained for each three-body fragmentation event using triple ion coincidence measurement. Newton diagram demonstrated that three-body fragmentation of CO{sub 2}{sup n+} (n = 3-6) can occur through Coulomb explosion process and sequential fragmentation process depending on the fragmentation channels. The experimental data from these two processes were disentangled by using correlation diagram of correlated ions. Based on the accurate Coulomb explosion data, we reconstructed the bond angle distributions of CO{sub 2}{sup n+} at the moment of fragmentation, which are close to that of neutral CO{sub 2} before laser irradiation.

  11. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  12. Asymmetric branching of dissociated photofragments of HD{sup +} in an intense femtosecond laser field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Bhattacharyya, S. S.; Dutta, Bibhas

    2011-06-15

    We have numerically explored the asymmetry in the branching ratio of the photofragments in the photodissociation of HD{sup +} (neutral D and neutral H), leading to the possibility of localization of the electron on a chosen nucleus by careful tuning of the laser parameters. For two different frequencies we show that, starting from an initial stationary wave function, proper tuning of the pulse duration (2{sigma}) and peak intensities (I{sup 0}) of the laser pulses can lead to very different branching ratios of the two reaction channels. The results are interpreted in terms of the propagation of the nonstationary wave packet through regions having dominant radiative or nonradiative interactions at different times. We also investigate what effect the choice of initial vibrational state has on the overall asymmetry in the branching ratio of the dissociation products.

  13. Observation of plasma density dependence of electromagnetic soliton excitation by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarri, G.; Kar, S.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Bulanov, S. V.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Galimberti, M.; Heathcote, R.; Jung, R.; Osterholz, J.; Willi, O.; Schiavi, A.

    2011-08-15

    The experimental evidence of the correlation between the initial electron density of the plasma and electromagnetic soliton excitation at the wake of an intense (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) and short (1 ps) laser pulse is presented. The spatial distribution of the solitons, together with their late time evolution into post-solitons, is found to be dependent upon the background plasma parameters, in agreement with published analytical and numerical findings. The measured temporal evolution and electrostatic field distribution of the structures are consistent with their late time evolution and the occurrence of multiple merging of neighboring post-solitons.

  14. Ab initio calculation of the thermodynamic properties of InSb under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, ShiQuan; Cheng, XinLu; Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 ; Zhao, JianLing; Zhang, Hong

    2013-07-28

    In this paper, phonon spectra of InSb at different electronic temperatures are presented. Based on the phonon dispersion relationship, we further perform a theoretical investigation of the thermodynamic properties of InSb under intense laser irradiation. The phonon entropy, phonon heat capacity, and phonon contribution to Helmholtz free energy and internal energy of InSb are calculated as functions of temperature at different electronic temperatures. The abrupt change in the phonon entropy- temperature curve from T{sub e} = 0.75 to 1.0 eV provides an indication of InSb undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid. It can be considered as a collateral evidence of non-thermal melting for InSb under intense electronic excitation effect.

  15. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of Short Pulse Laser Xenon Double Ionization between 500 and 2300 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingras, G.; Tripathi, A.; Witzel, B.

    2009-10-23

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 50, 1393 (1966) [Sov. Phys. JETP 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1x10{sup 13} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The Xe{sup +}-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p{sup 6} {sup 2}S state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  16. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M

    2004-11-24

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by U{sub p} = ([1 + I{lambda}{sup 2}/1.3 x 10{sup 18}]{sup 1/2} - 1) m{sub o}c{sup 2}, where I{lambda}{sup 2} is the irradiance in W {micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2} and m{sub o}c{sup 2} is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of I{lambda}{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup 20} W {micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by affecting the contamination layer from which they

  17. Scaling of Pressure with Intensity in Laser-Driven Shocks and Effects of Hot X-ray Preheat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colvin, J D; Kalantar, D H

    2005-08-29

    To drive shocks into solids with a laser we either illuminate the material directly, or to get higher pressures, illuminate a plastic ablator that overlays the material of interest. In both cases the illumination intensity is low, <<10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, compared to that for traditional laser fusion targets. In this regime, the laser beam creates and interacts with a collisional, rather than a collisionless, plasma. We present scaling relationships for shock pressure with intensity derived from simulations for this low-intensity collisional plasma regime. In addition, sometimes the plastic-ablator targets have a thin flashcoating of Al on the plastic surface as a shine-through barrier; this Al layer can be a source of hot x-ray preheat. We discuss how the preheat affects the shock pressure, with application to simulating VISAR measurements from experiments conducted on various lasers on shock compression of Fe.

  18. Experimental nonlinear laser systems: Bigger data for better science?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D. M.; Toomey, J. P.; McMahon, C.; Noblet, Y.; Argyris, A.; Syvridis, D.

    2014-10-06

    Bigger data is supporting knowledge discovery in nonlinear laser systems as will be demonstrated with examples from three semiconductor laser based systems – one with optical feedback, a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) chaotic laser and a frequency shifted feedback laser system.

  19. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  20. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email John Kline (505) 667-7062 Email Thomson scattering is widely used to measure plasma temperature, density, and flow velocity in laser-produced plasmas at Trident, and is also used to detect plasma waves driven by unstable and nonlinear processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th

  1. Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington,

  2. Direct optical measurement of the on-shot incoherent focal spot and intensity contrast on the OMEGA EP laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dorrer, C.; Consentino, A.; Irwin, D.

    2016-05-18

    Characterizing the prepulse temporal contrast of optical pulses is required to understand their interaction with matter. Light with relatively low intensity can interact with the target before the main high-intensity pulse. Estimating the intensity contrast, instead of the spatially averaged power contrast, is important to understand intensity-dependent laser–matter interactions. A direct optical approach to determining the on-shot intensity of the incoherent pedestal on an aberrated high-intensity laser system is presented. The spatially resolved focal spot of the incoherent pedestal preceding the main coherent pulse and the intensity contrast are calculated using experimental data. Furthermore, this technique is experimentally validated onmore » one of the chirped pulse amplification beamlines of the OMEGA EP Laser System. The intensity contrast of a 1-kJ, 10-ps laser pulse is shown to be ~10× higher than the power contrast because of the larger spatial extent of the incoherent focal spot relative to the coherent focal spot.« less

  3. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10? W/cm) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  4. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  5. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  6. #LabChat: Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1pm EST | Department of Energy Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at 1pm EST #LabChat: Particle Accelerators, Lasers and Discovery Science, May 17 at 1pm EST May 15, 2012 - 2:03pm Addthis SLAC’s linac accelerates very short pulses of electrons to 99.9999999 percent the speed of light through a slalom that causes the electrons to emit X-rays, which become synchronized as they interact with the electron pulses and create the world’s brightest X-ray laser

  7. Waveguide CO{sub 2} laser with a quasi-homogeneous distribution of the output radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasenko, S A; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N

    2013-05-31

    An experimental sample of a waveguide CO{sub 2} laser with a quasi-uniform profile of the output radiation intensity is designed on the basis of a waveguide quasi-optical cavity of a new type comprising the generic confocal cavity with a nonuniform mirror and the hollow waveguide with the dimensions satisfying the conditions for self-imaging the quasi-uniform field. The surface of the mirror has the discrete large-scale absorbing nonuniformities. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of spatial-energy characteristics of the laser in using uniform or amplitude-stepped reflecting mirrors are presented. (lasers)

  8. Characterization of proton and heavier ion acceleration in ultrahigh-intensity laser interactions with heated target foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenna, P.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Yang, J.M.; Robson, L.; McCanny, T.; Shimizu, S.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.A.; Spohr, K.; Chapman, R.; Singhal, R.P.; Krushelnick, K.; Wei, M.S.

    2004-09-01

    Proton and heavy ion acceleration in ultrahigh intensity ({approx}2x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}) laser plasma interactions has been investigated using the new petawatt arm of the VULCAN laser. Nuclear activation techniques have been applied to make the first spatially integrated measurements of both proton and heavy ion acceleration from the same laser shots with heated and unheated Fe foil targets. Fe ions with energies greater than 10 MeV per nucleon have been observed. Effects of target heating on the accelerated ion energy spectra and the laser-to-ion energy conversion efficiencies are discussed. The laser-driven production of the long-lived isotope {sup 57}Co (271 days) via a heavy ion induced reaction is demonstrated.

  9. Lasers, Photonics, and Fusion Science: Bringing Star Power to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Target Alignment Sensor Installed on NIF Get the story Checking Target Vibration Response Learn more 3D Printing Could Revolutionize Laser Development Get the story ...

  10. Peculiarities of the angular distribution of laser radiation intensity scattered by laser-spark plasma in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyutin, A A; Podvyaznikov, V A; Chevokin, V K

    2010-02-28

    The spatiotemporal study of the diagram of laser radiation scattering by the laser-spark plasma produced by 3-ns and 50-ns pulses is performed. It is shown that radiation appearing outside the laser beam cone is scattered during the first one - two nanoseconds after the air breakdown, when the spark plasma is located in the vicinity of the laser beam waist and has a shape close to spherical.

  11. Generation of short gamma-ray pulses on electron bunches formed in intense interfering laser beams with tilted fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korobkin, V V; Romanovskiy, M Yu; Trofimov, V A; Shiryaev, O B

    2014-05-30

    It is shown that in the interference of multiple laser pulses with a relativistic intensity, phase and amplitude fronts of which are tilted at an angle with respect to their wave vector, effective traps of charged particles, which are moving at the velocity of light, are formed. Such traps are capable of capturing and accelerating the electrons produced in the ionisation of low-density gas by means of laser radiation. The accelerated electrons in the traps form a bunch, whose dimensions in all directions are much smaller than the laser radiation wavelength. Calculations show that the energy of accelerated electrons may amount to several hundred GeV at experimentally accessible relativistic laser intensities. As a result of the inverse Compton scattering, gamma-quanta with a high energy and narrow radiation pattern are emitted when these electrons interact with a laser pulse propagating from the opposite direction. The duration of emitted gamma-ray pulses constitutes a few attoseconds. The simulation is performed by solving the relativistic equation of motion for an electron with a relevant Lorentz force. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  12. Science, technology, and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) reviewed potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation; cleanup of radioactive waste; trace impurity removal; selective chemical reactions; photochemical activation or dissociation of gases; control of combustion particulates; crystal and powder chemistry; and laser induced biochemistry. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand (> 1000 tonnes/year) and high product enrichment price (> $600/kg of product) for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economically on an industrial scale. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of >$100 M in FY85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics; candidate elements; separative work units; spectroscopic selectivety; major systems; facilities; integrated process model;multivariable sensitivety studies; world market; and US enrichment enterprise. 23 figs. (AT)

  13. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  14. Channeling of microwave radiation in a double line containing a plasma filament produced by intense femtosecond laser pulses in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogatov, N A; Kuznetsov, A I; Smirnov, A I; Stepanov, A N

    2009-10-31

    The channeling of microwave radiation is demonstrated experimentally in a double line in which a plasma filament produced in air by intense femtosecond laser pulses serves as one of the conductors. It is shown that during the propagation of microwave radiation in this line, ultrashort pulses are formed, their duration monotonically decreasing with increasing the propagation length (down to the value comparable with the microwave field period). These effects can be used for diagnostics of plasma in a filament. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Hot Electron Diagnostic in a Solid Laser Target by Buried K-Shell Fluorer Technique from Ultra-Intense (3x1020W/cm2,< 500 J) Laser-Plasma Interactions on the Petawatt Laser at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuike, K.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.P.; Snavely, R.A.

    2000-06-29

    Characterization of hot electron production (a conversion efficiency from laser energy into electrons) in ultra intense laser-solid target interaction, using 1.06 {micro}m laser light with an intensity of up to 3 x 10{sup 20}W cm{sup -2} and an on target laser energy of {le}500 J, has been done by observing K{sub {beta}} as well as K{sub {alpha}} emissions from a buried Mo layer in the targets, which are same structure as in the previous 100 TW experiments but done under less laser intensity and energy conditions ({le} 4 x 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} and {le} 30 J). The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the energy, carried by hot electrons, has been estimated to be {approx}50%, which are little bit higher than the previous less laser energy ({approx} 20 J) experiments, yet the x-ray emission spectra from the target has change drastically, i.e., gamma flash.

  16. Upper limit power for self-guided propagation of intense lasers in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Weimin; Hu Zhidan; Chen Liming; Li Yutong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Zeng Ming; Liu Yue; Kawata, Shigeo; Zheng Chunyang; Mori, Warren B.

    2012-10-29

    It is shown that there is an upper-limit laser power for self-focusing of a laser pulse in plasma in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical power set by the relativistic effect. This upper limit is caused by the transverse ponderomotive force of the laser, which tends to expel plasma electrons from the laser propagating area. Furthermore, there is a lower-limit plasma density for a given laser spot size, below which self-focusing does not occur for any laser power. Both the lower-limit density and the upper-limit power are derived theoretically and verified by two-dimensional and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is also found that plasma channels may be unfavorable for stable guiding of lasers above the upper-limit power.

  17. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lar'kin, A. Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  18. Electron acceleration by laser wakefield and x-ray emission at moderate intensity and density in long plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, H. E.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2011-08-15

    The dynamics of electron acceleration by laser wakefield and the associated x-rays emission in long plasmas are numerically investigated for parameters close to the threshold of laser self-focusing. The plasma length is set by the use of dielectric capillary tubes that confine the gas and the laser energy. Electrons self-injection and acceleration to the 170 MeVs are obtained for densities as low as 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a moderate input intensity (0.77 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}). The associated x-ray emission at the exit of the capillary tube is shown to be an accurate diagnostic of the electrons self-injection and acceleration process.

  19. The Radiation Reaction Effect on Electrons at Super-High Laser Intensities with Application to Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naumova, N. M.; Sokolov, I. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Schlegel, T.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V. P.; Labaune, C.; Mourou, G. A.

    2009-07-25

    At super-high laser intensities the radiation back reaction on electrons becomes so significant that its influence on laser-plasma interaction cannot be neglected while simulating these processes with particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. We discuss a way of taking the radiation effect on electrons into account and extracting spatial and frequency distributions of the generated high-frequency radiation. We also examine ponderomotive acceleration of ions in the double layer created by strong laser pulses and we compare an analytical description with PIC simulations as well. We discuss: (1) non-stationary features found in simulations, (2) electron cooling effect due to radiation losses, and (3) the limits of the analytical model.

  20. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Nishio, K.; Orlandi, R.; Koura, H.; Imai, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Sako, H.; Matsukawa, K.; and others

    2015-03-15

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9?GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  1. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  2. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph

    2012-05-05

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  3. Electrons in a relativistic-intensity laser field: generation of zeptosecond electromagnetic pulses and energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, A A; Galkin, A L; Kalashnikov, M P; Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Shiryaev, O B

    2011-08-31

    We study the motion of an electron and emission of electromagnetic waves by an electron in the field of a relativistically intense laser pulse. The dynamics of the electron is described by the Newton equation with the Lorentz force in the right-hand side. It is shown that the electrons may be ejected from the interaction region with high energy. The energy spectrum of these electrons and the technique of using the spectrum to assess the maximal intensity in the focus are analysed. It is found that electromagnetic radiation of an electron moving in an intense laser field occurs within a small angle around the direction of the electron trajectory tangent. The tangent quickly changes its direction in space; therefore, electromagnetic radiation of the electron in the far-field zone in a certain direction in the vicinity of the tangent is a short pulse with a duration as short as zeptoseconds. The calculation of the temporary and spectral distribution of the radiation field is carried out. (superintense laser fields)

  4. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy Science: A Talk by Carl Wieman

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wieman, Carl

    2011-04-13

    Carl Wieman presents a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium honoring Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.

  5. Diode laser with improved means for electrically modulating the emitted light beam intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, D.J.

    1989-10-31

    This patent describes a heterostructure combined semiconductor diode laser and junction field effect transistor device. It has located conduction path from a central exposed contract on its top surface through a centrally located semiconductor active laser region disposed between upper and lower opposite conductivity type cladding regions formed over a semiconductor substrate of the same conductivity type as the lower cladding region and having at least one laser stripe channel filled with a semiconductor composition of the same conductivity type as the lower cladding region and formed in the top surface of the substrate which supports the vertically arrayed cladding and active regions and an exposed contact on its underside.

  6. On stochastic heating of electrons by intense laser radiation in the presence of electrostatic potential well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-10-15

    A simple model developed by Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)] for the study of synergistic effects of electrostatic potential well and laser radiation is extended for the case where electric field of the well is accelerating electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. It was found that in these cases, the rate of stochastic heating of energetic electrons remains virtually the same as in Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)], where electric field in electrostatic potential was slowing down electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. However, the heating of electrons with relatively low energy can be sensitive to the orientation of the electrostatic potential well with respect to the direction of the laser radiation propagation.

  7. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  8. Dynamics and structure of self-generated magnetics fields on solids following high contrast, high intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertazzi, B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Böker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; D'Humières, E.; Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Lancia, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Starodubtsev, M.; and others

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of self-generated magnetic B-fields produced following the interaction of a high contrast, high intensity (I > 10{sup 19 }W cm{sup −2}) laser beam with thin (3 μm thick) solid (Al or Au) targets is investigated experimentally and numerically. Two main sources drive the growth of B-fields on the target surfaces. B-fields are first driven by laser-generated hot electron currents that relax over ∼10–20 ps. Over longer timescales, the hydrodynamic expansion of the bulk of the target into vacuum also generates B-field induced by non-collinear gradients of density and temperature. The laser irradiation of the target front side strongly localizes the energy deposition at the target front, in contrast to the target rear side, which is heated by fast electrons over a much larger area. This induces an asymmetry in the hydrodynamic expansion between the front and rear target surfaces, and consequently the associated B-fields are found strongly asymmetric. The sole long-lasting (>30 ps) B-fields are the ones growing on the target front surface, where they remain of extremely high strength (∼8–10 MG). These B-fields have been recently put by us in practical use for focusing laser-accelerated protons [B. Albertazzi et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 043502 (2015)]; here we analyze in detail their dynamics and structure.

  9. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-10-15

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case.

  10. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, Jon B.; Cremers, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  11. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  12. Self-compression of intense short laser pulses in relativistic magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olumi, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-11-15

    The compression of a relativistic Gaussian laser pulse in a magnetized plasma is investigated. By considering relativistic nonlinearity and using non-linear Schrdinger equation with paraxial approximation, a second-order differential equation is obtained for the pulse width parameter (in time) to demonstrate the longitudinal pulse compression. The compression of laser pulse in a magnetized plasma can be observed by the numerical solution of the equation for the pulse width parameter. The effects of magnetic field and chirping are investigated. It is shown that in the presence of magnetic field and negative initial chirp, compression of pulse is significantly enhanced.

  13. Ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Filsinger, Frank; Meijer, Gerard; Kuepper, Jochen [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Holmegaard, Lotte; Kalhoej, Line [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Nielsen, Jens H. [Department of Physics, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Stapelfeldt, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2011-02-15

    We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction of the molecular electric dipole moment. These findings are explained by a tunneling model invoking the laser-induced Stark shifts associated with the dipoles and polarizabilities of the molecule and its unrelaxed cation. The focus of the present article is to understand the strong-field ionization of one-dimensionally-oriented polar molecules, in particular asymmetries in the emission direction of the photoelectrons. In the following article [Phys. Rev. A 83, 023406 (2011)] the focus is to understand strong-field ionization from three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric top molecules, in particular the suppression of electron emission in nodal planes of molecular orbitals.

  14. Shock wave acceleration of protons in inhomogeneous plasma interacting with ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lecz, Zs.; Andreev, A.

    2015-04-15

    The acceleration of protons, triggered by solitary waves in expanded solid targets is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The near-critical density plasma is irradiated by ultrashort high power laser pulses, which generate the solitary wave. The transformation of this soliton into a shock wave during propagation in plasma with exponentially decreasing density profile is described analytically, which allows to obtain a scaling law for the proton energy. The high quality proton bunch with small energy spread is produced by reflection from the shock-front. According to the 2D simulations, the mechanism is stable only if the laser pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic development time of the parasitic Weibel instability.

  15. On the origin of super-hot electrons from intense laser interactions with solid targets having moderate scale length preformed plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krygier, A. G.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.

    2014-02-15

    We use particle-in-cell modeling to identify the acceleration mechanism responsible for the observed generation of super-hot electrons in ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions with solid targets with pre-formed plasma. We identify several features of direct laser acceleration that drive the generation of super-hot electrons. We find that, in this regime, electrons that become super-hot are primarily injected by a looping mechanism that we call loop-injected direct acceleration.

  16. The effect of external magnetic field on the bremsstrahlung nonlinear absorption mechanism in the interaction of high intensity short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedaghat, M.; Ettehadi-Abari, M.; Shokri, B. Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-03-15

    Laser absorption in the interaction between ultra-intense femtosecond laser and solid density plasma is studied theoretically here in the intensity range I?{sup 2}?10{sup 14}?10{sup 16}Wcm{sup ?2}?m{sup 2}. The collisional effect is found to be significant when the incident laser intensity is less than 10{sup 16}Wcm{sup ?2}?m{sup 2}. In the current work, the propagation of a high frequency electromagnetic wave, for underdense collisional plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that, by considering the effect of the ponderomotive force in collisional magnetized plasmas, the increase of laser pulse intensity leads to steepening of the electron density profile and the electron bunches of plasma makes narrower. Moreover, it is found that the wavelength of electric and magnetic fields oscillations increases by increasing the external magnetic field and the density distribution of electrons also grows in comparison with the unmagnetized collisional plasma. Furthermore, the spatial damping rate of laser energy and the nonlinear bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient are obtained in the collisional regime of magnetized plasma. The other remarkable result is that by increasing the external magnetic field in this case, the absorption coefficient increases strongly.

  17. High-resolution electron-ion coincidence spectroscopy of ethanol in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatamoto, T.; Pruemper, G.; Okunishi, M.; Ueda, K.; Mathur, D.

    2007-06-15

    High-resolution electron-ion coincidence spectroscopy is used to (i) map correlations between electrons and ions from atomlike ionization of ethanol by intense 400 and 800 nm light pulses and (ii) disentangle the effects of dissociative multiphoton (MPI) and tunneling (TI) ionization. Electron spectra correlated with C{sup n+} (n=1,2,3) exhibit a continuum structure with a high-energy tail due to inelastic collisions involving rescattered electrons following TI, while those correlated with C{sub 2}H{sub n}O{sup +} have structure characteristic of MPI and above-threshold ionization.

  18. Theoretical study of quantum molecular reaction dynamics and of the effects of intense laser radiation on a diatomic molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dardi, P.S.

    1984-11-01

    Within the very broad field of molecular dynamics, we have concentrated on two simple yet important systems. The systems are simple enough so that they are adequately described with a single Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface and that the dynamics can be calculated accurately. They are important because they give insight into solving more complicated systems. First we discuss H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. We present an exact formalism for atom-diatom reactive scattering which avoids the problem of finding a coordinate system appropriate for both reactants and products. We present computational results for collinear H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering which agree very well with previous calculations. We also present a coupled channel distorted wave Born approximation for atom-diatom reactive scattering which we show is a first order approximation to our exact formalism. We present coupled channel DWBA results for three dimensional H + H/sub 2/ reactive scattering. The second system is an isolated HF molecule in an intense laser field. Using classical trajectories and quantum dynamics, we look at energy absorbed and transition probabilities as a function of the laser pulse time and also averaged over the pulse time. Calculations are performed for both rotating and nonrotating HF. We examine one and two photon absorption about the fundamental frequency, multiphoton absorption, and overtone absorption. 127 references, 31 figures, 12 tables.

  19. Intense high repetition rate Mo Kα x-ray source generated from laser solid interaction for imaging application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, K.; Li, M. H.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, L. M.; Guo, X.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-15

    We report an efficient Mo Kα x-ray source produced by interaction of femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser pulses with a solid Molybdenum target working at 1 kHz repetition rate. The generated Mo Kα x-ray intensity reaches to 4.7 × 10{sup 10} photons sr{sup −1} s{sup −1}, corresponding to an average power of 0.8 mW into 2π solid angle. The spatial resolution of this x-ray source is measured to be 26 lp/mm. With the high flux and high spatial resolution characteristics, high resolving in-line x-ray radiography was realized on test objects and large size biological samples within merely half a minute. This experiment shows the possibility of laser plasma hard x-ray source as a new low cost and high resolution system for radiography and its ability of ultrafast x-ray pump-probe study of matter.

  20. Fundamental science investigations to develop a 6-MV laser triggered gas switch for ZR: first annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Van Den Avyle, James A.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Rose, David; Krompholz, Hermann G.; Vela, Russell; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Timoshkin, Igor (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Prestwich, Kenneth Randel (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Krile, John; Given, Martin (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); McKee, G. Randall; Rosenthal, Stephen Edgar; Struve, Kenneth William; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Benwell, Andrew L. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Kovaleski, Scott; LeChien, Keith, R.; Johnson, David (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Fouracre, R.A. (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Yeckel, Chris (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri); Wakeland, Peter Eric; Miller, A. R. (Titan Pulse Sciences Division); Hodge, Keith Conquest (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Pasik, Michael Francis; Savage, Mark Edward; Maenchen, John Eric; Curry, Randy D.; Feltz, Greg; Bliss, David Emery; MacGregor, Scott (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland); Corley, J. P. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Anaya, Victor (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wallace, Zachariah (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Neuber, Andreas. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

    2007-03-01

    In October 2005, an intensive three-year Laser Triggered Gas Switch (LTGS) development program was initiated to investigate and solve observed performance and reliability issues with the LTGS for ZR. The approach taken has been one of mission-focused research: to revisit and reassess the design, to establish a fundamental understanding of LTGS operation and failure modes, and to test evolving operational hypotheses. This effort is aimed toward deploying an initial switch for ZR in 2007, on supporting rolling upgrades to ZR as the technology can be developed, and to prepare with scientific understanding for the even higher voltage switches anticipated needed for future high-yield accelerators. The ZR LTGS was identified as a potential area of concern quite early, but since initial assessments performed on a simplified Switch Test Bed (STB) at 5 MV showed 300-shot lifetimes on multiple switch builds, this component was judged acceptable. When the Z{sub 20} engineering module was brought online in October 2003 frequent flashovers of the plastic switch envelope were observed at the increased stresses required to compensate for the programmatically increased ZR load inductance. As of October 2006, there have been 1423 Z{sub 20} shots assessing a variety of LTGS designs. Numerous incremental and fundamental switch design modifications have been investigated. As we continue to investigate the LTGS, the basic science of plastic surface tracking, laser triggering, cascade breakdown, and optics degradation remain high-priority mission-focused research topics. Significant progress has been made and, while the switch does not yet achieve design requirements, we are on the path to develop successively better switches for rolling upgrade improvements to ZR. This report summarizes the work performed in FY 2006 by the large team. A high-level summary is followed by detailed individual topical reports.

  1. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-15

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006)]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D{sup 3}He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006)]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  2. Laser Roadshow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    outreach / laser roadshow Laser Roadshow The NIF Laser Roadshow includes a number of interactive laser demonstrations (Laser Light Fountain, Laser DJ, and NIF "3D ride") that have traveled across the country to museums and science fairs to bring awareness and education to students and the general public about lasers and how they function. These demonstrations have been presented at the Lawrence Hall of Science, the National Boy Scout Jamboree, meetings of the American Association for

  3. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science Science Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star Discovery Science Photon Science HAPLS

  4. Specific features of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense 500-ps-long laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisenko, N. G.; Merkul’ev, Yu. A.; Orekhov, A. S.; Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S.; Munda, D. S.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Pimenov, V. G.; Sheveleva, E. E.

    2013-08-15

    The properties of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 3}) short (0.5 ps) 1.064-μm laser pulse were studied. It is found that, even at plasma densities exceeding the critical density, a small fraction of the incident laser radiation penetrates through the plasma in which the processes of density and temperature equalization still take place. The intensification (as compared to plasmas produced from denser foams and solid films) of transport processes in such plasma along and across the laser beam can be caused by the initial microheterogeneity of the solid target. The replacement of a small (10% by mass) part of the polymer with copper nanoparticles leads to a nearly twofold increase in the intensity of the plasma X-ray emission.

  5. 5.5-7.5 MeV Proton Generation by a Moderate-Intensity Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Interaction with H{sub 2}O Nanowire Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, A.; Palchan, T.; Bruner, N.; Schleifer, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Henis, Z. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Y. Jr. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the first generation of 5.5-7.5 MeV protons by a moderate-intensity short-pulse laser ({approx}5x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 40 fsec) interacting with frozen H{sub 2}O nanometer-size structure droplets (snow nanowires) deposited on a sapphire substrate. In this setup, the laser intensity is locally enhanced by the snow nanowire, leading to high spatial gradients. Accordingly, the nanoplasma is subject to enhanced ponderomotive potential, and confined charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced over the short scale length, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies.

  6. Investigation Of Plasma Produced By High-Energy Low-Intensity Laser Pulses For Implantation Of Ge Ions Into Si And Sio2 Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosinski, M.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Boody, F. P.; Gammino, S.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Mezzasalma, A.; Torrisi, L.

    2006-01-15

    The development of implantation techniques requires investigation of laser plasma as a potential source of multiply charged ions. The laser ion source delivers ions with kinetic energy and a charge state dependent on the irradiated target material and the parameters of the laser radiation used. By the focusing the laser beam on the solid target the higher current densities of ions than by using other currently available ion sources can be produced. The crucial issue for efficiency of the ion implantation technology is selection of proper laser beam characteristics. Implantation of different kinds of laser-produced ions into metals and organic materials were performed recently at the PALS Research Center in Prague, in cooperative experiments using 0.4-ns iodine laser pulses having energies up to 750 J at wavelength of 1315 nm or up to 250 J at wavelength of 438 nm. In this contribution we describe the characterization and optimization of laser-produced Ge ion streams as well as analysis of the direct implantation of these ions into Si and SiO2 substrates. The Ge target was irradiated with the use of laser pulses of energy up to 50 J at radiation intensities of {approx}1011 W/cm2 and {approx}2'1013 W/cm2. The implanted samples were placed along the target normal at distances of 17, 31 and 83 cm from the target surface. The ion stream parameters were measured using the time-of-fight method. The depth of ion implantation was determined by the Rutherford backscattering method (RBS). The maximum depth of implantation of Ge ions was {approx}450 nm. These investigations were carried out for optimization of low and medium energy laser-generated Ge ion streams, suitable for specific implantation technique, namely for fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures within the SRAP 'SEMINANO' project.

  7. Searching for minicharged particles via birefringence, dichroism and Raman spectroscopy of the vacuum polarized by a high-intensity laser wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villalba-Chávez, S. Müller, C.

    2013-12-15

    Absorption and dispersion of probe photons in the field of a high-intensity circularly polarized laser wave are investigated. The optical theorem is applied for determining the absorption coefficients in terms of the imaginary part of the vacuum polarization tensor. Compact expressions for the vacuum refraction indices and the photon absorption coefficients are obtained in various asymptotic regimes of interest. The outcomes of this analysis reveal that, far from the region relatively close to the threshold of the two-photon reaction, the birefringence and dichroism of the vacuum are small and, in some cases, strongly suppressed. On the contrary, in a vicinity of the region in which the photo-production of a pair occurs, these optical properties are manifest with lasers of moderate intensities. We take advantage of such a property in the search of minicharged particles by considering high-precision polarimetric experiments. In addition, Raman-like electromagnetic waves resulting from the inelastic part of the vacuum polarization tensor are suggested as an alternative form for finding exclusion limits on these hypothetical charge carriers. The envisaged parameters of upcoming high-intensity laser facilities are used for establishing upper bounds on the minicharged particles. -- Highlights: •Via dichroism and birefringence of the vacuum by a strong laser wave, minicharged particles can be probed. •The discovery potential is the highest in a vicinity of the first pair production threshold. •As alternative observable, Raman scattered waves are put forward.

  8. Toward a self-consistent model of the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse with an overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debayle, A.; ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 ; Sanz, J.; Gremillet, L.; Mima, K.

    2013-05-15

    Following a recent work by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046411 (2012)], we elaborate upon a one-dimensional model describing the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse and an overdense plasma. The analytical solutions of the reflected laser field, the electrostatic field, and the plasma surface oscillation are obtained within the cold-fluid approximation. The high-order harmonic spectrum is calculated from the exact solution of the plasma surface oscillations. In agreement with particle-in-cell simulations, two regimes of harmonic generation are predicted: for moderately relativistic laser intensities, or high plasma densities, the harmonic spectrum is determined by the discontinuity in the derivative of the reflected field when the electron plasma boundary oscillates across the fixed ion boundary. For higher intensities, the electron plasma boundary is confined inside the ion region and oscillates at relativistic velocities, giving rise to a train of reflected attosecond pulses. In both cases, the harmonic spectrum obeys an asymptotic ω{sup −4} scaling. The acceleration of electrons and the related laser absorption efficiency are computed by a test particle method. The model self-consistently reproduces the transition between the “anomalous skin effect” and the “J × B” heating predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. Analytical estimates of the different scalings are presented.

  9. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy Science: A Talk from Leo Holberg and Allen Mills

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Holberg, Leo; Mills, Allen [NIST

    2011-04-28

    Leo Holberg and Allen Mills present a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium honoring Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.

  10. A novel femtosecond-gated, high-resolution, frequency-shifted shearing interferometry technique for probing pre-plasma expansion in ultra-intense laser experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feister, S. Orban, C.; Nees, J. A.; Morrison, J. T.; Frische, K. D.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2014-11-15

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser “noise” (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target before the arrival of the main pulse. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-fs time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond probe pulse. After passing through the laser-target interaction region, the probe pulse is split and recombined in a laterally sheared Michelson interferometer. Importantly, the frequency shift in the probe allows strong plasma self-emission at the second harmonic of the pump to be filtered out, allowing plasma expansion near the critical surface and elsewhere to be clearly visible in the interferograms. To aid in the reconstruction of phase dependent imagery from fringe shifts, three separate 120° phase-shifted (temporally sheared) interferograms are acquired for each probe delay. Three-phase reconstructions of the electron densities are then inferred by Abel inversion. This interferometric system delivers precise measurements of pre-plasma expansion that can identify the condition of the target at the moment that the ultra-intense pulse arrives. Such measurements are indispensable for correlating laser pre-pulse measurements

  11. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email ...

  12. X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inubushi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.; Kawamura, T.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.

    2010-03-15

    The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4 deg.{sub -2.4}{sup +5.4} was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

  13. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H.; Dollar, F.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  14. Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A New Combination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Short-Pulse Lasers High-Powered Lasers Journal Articles home science photon science directed energy Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser: A ...

  15. Generation of very low energy-spread electron beams using low-intensity laser pulses in a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Samant, Sushil Arun; Sarkar, Deepangkar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Jha, Pallavi

    2011-03-15

    The possibility of obtaining high-energy electron beams of high quality by using a low-density homogeneous plasma and a low-intensity laser (just above the self-injection threshold in the bubble regime) has been explored. Three-dimensional simulations are used to demonstrate, for the first time, an energy-spread of less than 1%, from self-trapping. More specifically, for a plasma density of 2x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a laser intensity of a{sub 0}=2, a high-energy (0.55 GeV), ultrashort (1.4 fs) electron beam with very low energy-spread (0.55%) and high current (3 kA) is obtained. These parameters satisfy the requirements for drivers of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. It is also found that the quality of the electron beam depends strongly on the plasma length, which therefore needs to be optimized carefully to get the best performance in the experiments.

  16. Fabricating Nanowire Lasers | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Now, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories' Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC ... Michael E. Coltrin Director, Solid-State Lighting Science (SSLS) EFRC mecoltr@sandia.gov ...

  17. A spin-optoelectronic detector for the simultaneous measurement of the degree of circular polarization and intensity of a laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamari, Shailesh K. Porwal, S.; Oak, S. M.; Sharma, T. K.

    2015-08-17

    Simultaneous measurement of the degree of circular polarization and intensity of a laser beam is essential in advanced photonic applications. However, it is not feasible with conventional helicity dependent detectors where an additional detector is needed to measure the intensity. Here, we report the development of a spin-optoelectronic detector that can measure the degree of circular polarization and the intensity of a laser beam simultaneously. The principle of operation of device is based on the two independent fundamental phenomena occurring in Au/InP hybrid structures, namely, Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and the Photo-Voltaic (PV) Effect. The magnitude of ISHE and PV signals is simultaneously measured across the two pairs of contacts that are made on the top of device. No cross talk is observed between the two detectors made on the same chip. The all-electronic compact device is fast, operates at room temperature, and opens up the possibility of many applications in an integrated optoelectronic platform.

  18. Effects of electron recirculation on a hard x-ray source observed during the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with thin Au targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Courtois, C.; Lefebvre, E.; Bourgade, J. L.; Landoas, O.; Thorp, K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2013-12-15

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse on the preplasma of a high-Z solid target produced by the pulse's pedestal generates high-energy electrons. These electrons subsequently penetrate inside the solid target and produce bremsstrahlung photons, generating an x-ray source which can be used for photonuclear studies or to radiograph high area density objects. The source characteristics are compared for targets with thin (20 μm) and thick (100 μm) Au foils on the Omega EP laser at Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Simulations using the particle-in-cell code CALDER show that for a 20 μm thickness Au target, electrons perform multiple round-trips in the target under the effect of the laser ponderomotive potential and the target electrostatic potential. These relativistic electrons have random transverse displacements, with respect to the target normal, attributed to electrostatic fluctuation fields. As a result, the x-ray spot size is increased by a factor 2 for thin target compared to thick targets, in agreement with experimental results. In addition, the computed doses agree with the measured ones provided that electron recirculation in the thin target is taken into account. A dose increase by a factor 1.7 is then computed by allowing for recirculation. In the 100 μm target case, on the other hand, this effect is found to be negligible.

  19. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-05-15

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  20. Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I; Khodakovskii, N G; Mikheev, P M

    2013-08-31

    The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  1. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-07-29

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  2. Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 03-09.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    March 2009 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center 3 Cornell Center for the Study of Pulsed Power Driven High Energy Density Plasmas 4 Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science 5 The Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science 6 The Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University 7 The High Pressure Science and Engineering Center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas 8 HEDP Research at

  3. Effects of Landau quantization on the equations of state in intense laser plasma interactions with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliezer, Shalom; Norreys, Peter; Mendonca, Jose T.; Lancaster, Kate

    2005-05-15

    Recently, magnetic fields of 0.7({+-}0.1) gigaGauss (GG) have been observed in the laboratory in laser plasma interactions. From scaling arguments, it appears that a few gigaGauss magnetic fields may be within reach of existing petawatt lasers. In this paper, the equations of state (EOS) are calculated in the presence of these very large magnetic fields. The appropriate domain for electron degeneracy and for Landau quantization is calculated for the density-temperature domain relevant to laser plasma interactions. The conditions for a strong Landau quantization, for a magnetic field in the domain of 1-10 GG, are obtained. The role of this paper is to formulate the EOS in terms of those that can potentially be realized in laboratory plasmas. By doing so, it is intended to alert the experimental laser-plasma physics community to the potential of realizing Landau quantization in the laboratory for the first time since the theory was first formulated.

  4. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science Cutting edge, multidisciplinary national-security science. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets The thermal traits of a leaf, critical for photosynthesis, may be under strong evolutionary selection that occurs in response to environmental temperatures. Here a thermal leaf image details temperature variation, which greatly affects plant functions since temperature is closely linked to metabolic kinetics-the plant's

  5. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science & Technology Images of Lab scientists and researchers at work. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Scientist sees

  6. Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antici, P.; INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati; LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau ; Gremillet, L.; Grismayer, T.; Audebert, P.; Mančic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.

    2013-12-15

    Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

  7. National Ignition Facility & Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    33 National Ignition Facility & Photon Science Frequently asked Questions Q. What is NIF? A. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and highest-energy laser. NIF's 192 intense laser beams are capable of delivering to their target more than 100 times the energy of any previous laser system. experiments on the path to ignition began in 2010. during full-scale ignition experiments, NIF will direct up to 1.8 million joules of ultraviolet laser energy in billionth-of-a-second

  8. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science Office of Science β β * * * Office of Science α γ Office of * * * * * Office of Science Office of Science * α * * Office of Science α * * μ * * α 287 115 10.59 32 ms 283 113 10.12 100 ms 279 111 10.38 0.17 s 271 107 9.35 1.2 s 267 105 SF 1.8 h 275 109 10.35 12 ms 289 115 10.31 520 ms 285 113 9.74/9.48 4.5 s 281 111 SF 1 s 287 115 10.59 32 ms 283 113 10.12 100 ms 279 111 10.38 0.17 s 07 5 s 275 109 10.35 12 ms 285 1 9.74/ 4.5 281 111 SF 1 s 288 115 10.48 171 ms 284 113

  9. science

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    through the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF). The PCF is a long-term integrated roadmap to guide the science, technology and engineering activities and Directed Stockpile...

  10. JLF Science Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science publications JLF Science Publications 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2003-06 Title Author Source High-Intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target M. Gauthier et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11D827 High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV range J. F. Seely et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11E305 High Power Dynamic Polarization Control Using Plasma Photonics D. Turnbull et

  11. Attosecond Light and Science at the Time-scale of the Electron - Coherent X-Rays from Tabletop Ultrafast Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Margaret, Murnane [University of Colorado, Boulder and NIST

    2010-09-01

    Ever since the invention of the laser 50 years ago and its application in nonlinear optics, scientists have been striving to extend coherent laser beams into the x-ray region of the spectrum. Very recently however, the prospects for tabletop coherent sources at very short wavelengths, even in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum at wavelengths < 1nm, have brightened considerably. This advance is possible by taking nonlinear optics techniques to an extreme - physics that is the direct result of a new ability to manipulate electrons on the fastest, attosecond, time-scales of our natural world. Several applications have already been demonstrated, including making a movie of how electrons rearrange in a chemical bond changes shape as a molecule breaks apart, following how fast a magnetic material can flip orientation, understanding how fast heat flows in a nanocircuit, or building a microscope without lenses. Nature 460, 1088 (2009); Science 317, 775 (2007); Physical Review Letters 103, 257402 (2009); Nature Materials 9, 26 (2010); Nature 463, 214 (2010); Science 322, 1207 (2008).

  12. Resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme using intense characteristic x rays for water-window radiation generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-15

    A line pair for a resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme is proposed in which the wavelength matching between the aluminum K{alpha}{sub 2} line ({lambda}= 0.833 95 nm) and the 2p{sup 6}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} transition of the neonlike zinc ions ({lambda}= 0.834 00 nm) is used. The population kinetics code of the neonlike zinc ions in plasma under irradiation of the aluminum K{alpha} line shows that substantial amplification gain can be generated in the transition of (2p{sub 1/2},3p{sub 1/2}){sub 0}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} at a wavelength of 3.5 nm. We also investigate the experimental arrangement of this scheme, which implies that this scheme is feasible with the present ultra-short-pulse-laser technology.

  13. Self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin back-scattering of a long intense laser pulse in a finite temperature relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Barzegar, S.; Hashemzadeh, M.

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of electromagnetic waves propagating through a plasma considering the effects of relativistic mass and ponderomotive nonlinearities is investigated. The modified electron density distribution, the dispersion relation, and the spatial profiles of electromagnetic wave amplitude in the plasma are obtained. It is shown that the cut-off frequency decreases, and there is an intensity range in which the ponderomotive self-focusing takes place. In the upper limit of this range, the laser beam is defocused due to the relativistic ponderomotive force. In addition, the stability of electromagnetic waves to stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied, and the backscattered wave resulting from decay of high power electromagnetic beam is resolved in relativistic regime. The study of effects of electron density and temperature on the growth rate of backscattered wave has been shown that by increasing these effects, the growth rate of instability increases.

  14. On the study of threshold intensity dependence on the gain and loss processes in laser induced spark ignition of molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M. M. Aboulfotouh, A. M.; Gamal, Y. E. E.

    2015-03-30

    In the present work, a numerical analysis is performed to investigate the comparative contribution of the mechanisms responsible for electron gain and losses in laser spark ignition and plasma formation of H{sub 2}. The analysis considered H{sub 2} over pressure range 150 -3000 torr irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser radiation at wavelengths 1064 and 532 nm with pulse length 5.5 ns. The study based on a modified electron cascade model by one of the authors which solves numerically the time dependent Boltzmann equation as well as a set of rate equations that describe the rate of change of the excited states population. The model includes most of the physical processes that might take place during the interaction. Computations of The threshold intensity are performed for the combined and separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes. Reasonable agreement with the measured values over the tested pressure range is obtained only for the case of the combined contribution. Basing on the calculation of the electron energy distribution function, the determined relations of the time evolution of the electrons density for selected values of the tested gas pressure region revealed that photo-ionization of the excited states could determine the time of electron generation and hence spark ignition. Collisional ionization contributes to this phenomenon only at the high pressure regime. Loss processes due to electron diffusion, vibrational excitation are found to have significant effect over examined pressure values for the two applied laser wavelengths.

  15. Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

  16. Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The scope of our research in laser and related technologies has grown over the years and has attracted a broad user base for applications within DOE, DOD, and private industry. Within the next few years, we expect to begin constructing the National Ignition Facility, to make substantial progress in deploying AVLIS technology for uranium and gadolinium enrichment, and to develop new radar sensing techniques to detect underwater objects. Further, we expect to translate LLNL patent ideas in microlithography into useful industrial products and to successfully apply high-power, diode-based laser technology to industrial and government applications.

  17. World's Most Efficient Nanowire Lasers | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22... iodide (red in center) and bromide (green on the right), are shown in top inserts. ...

  18. Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N.; Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C.

    2013-08-15

    Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 μm (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

  19. Electrons Fingerprint the Fastest Laser Pulses | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    By Institution User Facilities User Facilities Home User Facilities at a Glance User Resources User Statistics By Institution By Project Data Archive User Statistics Collection Practices Policies and Processes Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights User Facility News Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 User Statistics By Institution Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The map

  20. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 4. Optical materials, Part 2 - Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the optical properties of laser materials. Topics considered include: fundamental properties; transmitting materials; crystals; glasses; plastics; filter materials; mirror and reflector materials; polarizer materials; special properties; linear electrooptic materials; magnetooptic materials; elastooptic materials; photorefractive materials; and liquid crystals.

  1. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fiber lasers Fiber Lasers NIF & Photon Science physicists are exploring the fundamental limits of traditional round fiber structure and developing alternate solutions to allow scaling to higher powers and pulse energies. Comprehensive models of ribbon fiber structures, or waveguides, are also being developed. The goal is to develop ribbon fiber lasers that can amplify light beams to powers well beyond fundamental limits. Joint research efforts with the Lasers and Optics Research Center at

  2. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wikipedia to forecast diseases November 13, 2014 Los Alamos research published in Public Library of Science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 13, 2014-Scientists can now monitor and forecast diseases around the globe more effectively by analyzing views of Wikipedia articles, according to a team from Los Alamos National Laboratory. "A global disease-forecasting system will improve the way we respond to epidemics," scientist Sara Del Valle said. "In the same way we check the weather each

  3. Hot Electron Diagnostic in a Solid Laser Target by K-Shell Lines Measurement from Ultra-Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions R=1.06 (micron)m, 3x10 W/cm -2(less than or equal to) 500 J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuike, K.; Wharton, K.B.; Key, M.; Hatchett, S.; Snavely, R.

    2000-07-27

    Characterization of hot electron production (a conversion efficiency from laser energy into electrons) from ultra intense laser-solid target interaction by observing molybdenum (Mo) K{beta} as well as K{alpha} emissions from a buried fluorescence tracer layer in the targets has been done. The experiments used 1.06 {micro}m laser light with an intensity of from 2 x 10{sup 18} up to 3 x 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2} (20-0.5 ps pulse width) and an on target laser energy of 280-500 J. The conversion efficiency from the laser energy into the energy, carried by hot electrons, has been estimated to be {approx}50% for the 0.5 ps shots at an on-target laser intensity of 3 x 10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2}, which increased from {approx}30% at 1 x 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2} 5 ps shots and {approx} 12% at 2 x 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} 20 ps shots.

  4. A high-resolution imaging X-ray crystal spectrometer for intense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for intense laser plasma interaction experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A high-resolution imaging X-ray crystal spectrometer for intense laser plasma ...

  5. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575 ...

  6. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  7. Intense Laser - Electron Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, T.; Ditmire, T.; LeSage, G.

    2000-02-25

    Applicants seeking a Certificate of Compliance for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) cask must evaluate the consequences of a handling accident resulting in a drop or tip-over of the cask onto a concrete storage pad. As a result, analytical modeling approaches that might be used to evaluate the impact of cylindrical containers onto concrete pads are needed. One such approach, described and benchmarked in NUREG/CR-6608,{sup 1} consists of a dynamic finite element analysis using a concrete material model available in DYNA3D{sup 2} and in LS-DYNA,{sup 3} together with a method for post-processing the analysis results to calculate the deceleration of a solid steel billet when subjected to a drop or tip-over onto a concrete storage pad. The analysis approach described in NUREG/CR-6608 gives a good correlation of analysis and test results. The material model used for the concrete in the analyses in NUREG/CR-6608 is, however, somewhat troublesome to use, requiring a number of material constants which are difficult to obtain. Because of this a simpler approach, which adequately evaluates the impact of cylindrical containers onto concrete pads, is sought. Since finite element modeling of metals, and in particular carbon and stainless steel, is routinely and accurately accomplished with a number of finite element codes, the current task involves a literature search for and a discussion of available concrete models used in finite element codes. The goal is to find a balance between a concrete material model with a limited number of required material parameters which are readily obtainable, and a more complex model which is capable of accurately representing the complex behavior of the concrete storage pad under impact conditions. The purpose of this effort is to find the simplest possible way to analytically represent the storage cask deceleration during a cask tip-over or a cask drop onto a concrete storage pad. This report is divided into three sections. The Section II provides a summary of the literature search on concrete finite element models. The Section III discusses commercial codes. The Section IV provides recommendations.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the origin of the multipeak structure of kinetic-energy-release spectra from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Haixiang; Guo Yahui [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); China and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 10039 (China); Lu Ruifeng [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang Peiyu; Han Keli; He Guozhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of hydrogen molecular ions in intense laser pulses (100 fs, I = 0.77 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 2.5 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) has been studied, and the kinetic-energy-release spectra of Coulomb explosion channel have been calculated by numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In a recent experiment, a multipeak structure from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization is interpreted by a vibrational 'comb' at a critical nuclear distance. We found that the peaks could not be attributed to a single vibrational level but a collective contribution of some typical vibrational states in our calculated Coulomb explosion spectra, and the main peak shifts toward the low-energy region with increasing vibrational level, which is also different from the explanation in that experiment. We have also discussed the proton's kinetic-energy-release spectra for different durations with the same laser intensity.

  9. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 5. Optical materials. Part 3. Applications, coatings, and fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes the uses, coatings, and fabrication of laser materials. Topics considered include: optical waveguide materials; optical storage materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; laser crystals; laser glasses; quantum counter materials; thin films and coatings; multilayer dielectric coatings; graded-index surfaces and films; optical materials fabrication; fabrication techniques; fabrication procedures for specific materials.

  10. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  11. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  12. Sandia National Labs: Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center (PCNSC):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departments Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences Radiation and Solid Interactions Nanomaterials Sciences Surface and Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Semiconductor Material and Device Sciences Advanced Materials Sciences Lasers, Optics, and Remote Sensing Energy Sciences CINT User Program CINT Science Small Science

  13. Influence of irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons on the photoluminescence of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals preliminarily subjected to the intense radiation of a neodymium laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glinchuk, K. D.; Medvid', A. P.; Mychko, A. M.; Naseka, Yu. M.; Prokhorovich, A. V.; Strilchuk, O. M.

    2013-04-15

    The effect of the preliminary treatment of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals with high-power pulses of neodymium laser radiation (the power density is {<=}1.8 MW/cm{sup 2}, at a wavelength of 532 nm) on the low-temperature (5 K) photoluminescence induced by {gamma}-ray radiation (the dose was {Phi}{sub {gamma}} = 5 kGy) is studied. The luminescence bands are related to radiation-stimulated donor-acceptor pairs, which include shallow neutral donors and neutral cadmium vacancies stimulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation, the transition of free electrons to neutral cadmium vacancies formed by radiation, and the annihilation of excitons bound to the above vacancies. It is shown that, in the crystals preliminarily treated with laser radiation, the intensity of the {gamma}-ray-stimulated luminescence bands is significantly lower than in crystals not subjected to laser radiation. This fact is accounted for by a decrease in the concentration of cadmium vacancies generated by the {gamma}-ray radiation as a result of their annihilation during the course of their interaction with laser-stimulated defects, in particular, as a consequence of their recombination at laser-stimulated interstitial cadmium atoms.

  14. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  15. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  16. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Optical materials, Part 1 - Nonlinear optical properties/radiation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the nonlinear optical properties of laser materials. The physical radiation effects on laser materials are also considered. Topics considered include: nonlinear optical properties; nonlinear and harmonic generation materials; two-photon absorption; nonlinear refractive index; stimulated Raman scattering; radiation damage; crystals; and glasses.

  17. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-15

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s{sup −1} impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25–100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  18. NIF & Photon Science Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management NIF & Photon Science Management The management team for the NIF & Photon Science Principal Directorate supports the directorate's key mission areas: Stockpile Stewardship, national security applications, NIF Discovery Science, laser-based directed energy and related laser and optical technologies, and advanced photon technologies. Directorate Programs Jeff Wisoff Principal Associate Director NIF & Photon Science Jeff Atherton Principal Deputy Principal Associate Director

  19. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    june Science & Technology - 2016 June A Top-down View of NIF Neutron Emissions Getting Laser Diodes to March in Lockstep Laser diodes are compact and efficient electronic devices used in compact disc players, laser printers, remote controls, and many other consumer products. Grouping several laser diodes into an array can produce enough power to energize, or "pump," a high-energy solid-state laser source with much greater efficiency than, for example, the giant flashlamps that

  20. Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour December 10, 2015 Ultrafast Laser Facility - Virtual Tour A look at the technology and science in the Ultrafast lab PARC Research Scientist ...

  1. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} to intense electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Yalisove, Steven M.; Torralva, Ben; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (402{sup ¯}), (003), (310), and (112{sup ¯}) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four A{sub g} and three B{sub g} Raman modes. ZrO{sub 2} underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  2. Final Report for DE-SC0002298 Agency Number: DE-PS02-09ER09-01 An Advanced Network and distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livny, Miron

    2014-08-17

    The original intent of this project was to build and operate an Advanced Network and Distributed Storage Laboratory (ANDSL) for Data Intensive Science that will prepare the Open Science Grid (OSG) community for a new generation of wide area communication capabilities operating at a 100Gb rate. Given the significant cut in our proposed budget we changed the scope of the ANDSL to focus on the software aspects of the laboratory – workload generators and monitoring tools and on the offering of experimental data to the ANI project. The main contributions of our work are twofold: early end-user input and experimental data to the ANI project and software tools for conducting large scale end-to-end data placement experiments.

  3. Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui; Luo, Shengnian; Barnes, Cris W.; Paul, Stephen F.

    2008-11-11

    A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

  4. Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

  5. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W. A.; Newell, W. R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Langley, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focused to {approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} has been investigated by the three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. In a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three-dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, cannot. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multielectronic processes.

  6. Biological Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  7. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575 Email Short-pulse ion acceleration The Trident facility is a world-class performer in the area of ion acceleration from laser-solid target interactions. Trident has demonstrated over 100 MeV protons at intensities of 8x1020 W/cm2 with efficiencies approaching 5%. These intense relativistic interactions can be diagnosed

  8. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  9. Ultrafast Charge Dynamics Initiated by High-Intensity, Ultrashort...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast Charge Dynamics Initiated by High-Intensity, Ultrashort Laser-Matter Interaction Citation ... We report results of recent experiment in which such charge ...

  10. Ultrafast proton radiography of the magnetic fields generated by a laser-driven coil current

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Lan; Ji, Hantao; Fiksel, Gennady; Fox, William; Evans, Michelle; Alfonso, Noel

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic fields generated by a current flowing through a U-shaped coil connecting two copper foils were measured using ultrafast proton radiography. Two ~ 1.25 kJ, 1-ns laser pulses propagated through laser entrance holes in the front foil and were focused to the back foil with an intensity of ~ 3 x 1016 W/cm2. The intense laser-solid interaction induced a high voltage between the copper foils and generated a large current in the connecting coil. The proton data show ~ 40-50 T magnetic fields at the center of the coil ~ 3-4 ns after laser irradiation. In conclusion, the experiments providemore » significant insight for future target designs that aim to develop a powerful source of external magnetic fields for various applications in high-energy-density science.« less

  11. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  12. Device Architecture Simplification of Laser Pattering in High-Volume Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication using Intensive Computation for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grupp Mueller, Guenther; Herfurth, Hans; Dunham, Scott; Xu, Baomin

    2013-11-15

    Prices of Si based solar modules have been continuously declining in recent years. Goodrich is pointing out that a significant portion of these cost reductions have come about due to ?economies of scale? benefits, but there is a point of diminishing returns when trying to lower cost by simply expanding production capacity [1]. Developing innovative high volume production technologies resulting in an increase of conversion efficiency without adding significant production cost will be necessary to continue the projected cost reductions. The Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) is seeking to achieve this by closing the PV efficiency gap between theoretical achievable maximum conversion efficiency - 29% for c-Si - and the current typical production - 18.5% for a typical full area back contact c-Si Solar cell ? while targeting a module cost of $0.50/Watt . The research conducted by SolarWorldUSA and it?s partners within the FPACE framework focused on the development of a Hybrid metal-wrap-through (MWT) and laser-ablated PERC solar cell design employing a extrusion metallization scheme to achieve >20% efficient devices. The project team was able to simulate, develop and demonstrate the technologies necessary to build p-type MWT PERC cells with extruded front contacts. Conversion efficiencies approaching 20% were demonstrated and a path for further efficiency improvements identified. A detailed cost of ownership calculation for such a device was based on a NREL cost model and is predicting a $/Watt cost below 85 cents on a 180 micron substrate. Several completed or planned publications by SolarWorldUSA and our partners are based on the research conducted within this project and are adding to a better understanding of the involved technologies and materials. Several aspects and technologies of the proposed device have been assessed in regards to technical effectiveness and economic feasibility. It has been shown in a pilot demonstration with wafer

  13. Mercury: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery Science Lab Astrophysics Nuclear Astrophysics Planetary Physics Plasma Physics Photon Science Advanced Optical Technologies Fiber Lasers Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Short-Pulse Lasers High-Powered Lasers Journal Articles home / science / photon science / highpowered lasers / mercury Mercury: A Diode-Pumped

  14. Two-gigawatt burst-mode operation of the intense microwave prototype (IMP) free-electron laser (FEL) for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, B.; Allen, S.; Bell, H.

    1993-10-06

    The MTX explored the plasma heating effects of 140 GHz microwaves from both Gyrotrons and from the IMP FEL wiggler. The Gyrotron was long pulse length (0.5 seconds maximum) and the FEL produced short-pulse length, high-peak power, single and burst modes of 140 GHZ microwaves. Full-power operations of the IMP FEL wiggler were commenced in April of 1992 and continued into October of 1992. The Experimental Test Accelerator H (ETA-II) provided a 50-nanosecond, 6-MeV, 2--3 kAmp electron beam that was introduced co-linear into the IMP FEL with a 140 GHz Gyrotron master oscillator (MO). The FEL was able to amplify the MO signal from approximately 7 kW to peaks consistently in the range of 1--2 GW. This microwave pulse was transmitted into the MTX and allowed the exploration of the linear and non-linear effects of short pulse, intense power in the MTX plasma. Single pulses were used to explore and gain operating experience in the parameter space of the IMP FEL, and finally evaluate transmission and absorption in the MTX. Single-pulse operations were repeatable. After the MTX was shut down burst-mode operations were successful at 2 kHz. This paper will describe the IMP FEL, Microwave Transmission System to MTX, the diagnostics used for calorimetric measurements, and the operations of the entire Microwave system. A discussion of correlated and uncorrelated errors that affect FEL performance will be made Linear and non-linear absorption data of the microwaves in the MTX plasma will be presented.

  15. Ceremony | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    lasers, and for transformative discoveries profoundly impacting the successful development of the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, heralding a new era for science." Dr. ...

  16. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  17. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  18. Intense fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-15

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 21} neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10{sup 20} neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the

  19. Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trident Laser Facility Trident Laser Facility Enabling world-class science in high-energy density physics and fundamental laser-matter interactions April 12, 2012 Invisible infrared light from the 200-trillion watt Trident Laser enters from the bottom to interact with a one-micrometer thick foil target in the center of the photo. The laser pulse produces a plasma - an ionized gas - many times hotter than the center of the sun, which lasts for a trillionth of a second. During this time some

  20. Development and calibration of mirrors and gratings for the Soft X-ray materials science beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Baker, Sherry L.; Robinson, Jeff C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Heimann, Philip; Yashchuk, Valerie V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Schlotter, William F.; Rowen, Michael

    2012-04-18

    This article discusses the development and calibration of the x-ray reflective and diffractive elements for the Soft X-ray Materials Science (SXR) beamline of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser (FEL), designed for operation in the 500 – 2000 eV region. The surface topography of three Si mirror substrates and two Si diffraction grating substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical profilometry. The figure of the mirror substrates was also verified via surface slope measurements with a long trace profiler. A boron carbide (B4C) coating especially optimized for the LCLS FEL conditions was deposited on allmore » SXR mirrors and gratings. Coating thickness uniformity of 0.14 nm root mean square (rms) across clear apertures extending to 205 mm length was demonstrated for all elements, as required to preserve the coherent wavefront of the LCLS source. The reflective performance of the mirrors and the diffraction efficiency of the gratings were calibrated at beamline 6.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. To verify the integrity of the nanometer-scale grating structure, the grating topography was examined by AFM before and after coating. This is to our knowledge the first time B4C-coated diffraction gratings are demonstrated for operation in the soft x-ray region.« less

  1. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2016 February NIF Optics Damage Repair is 2015 Top Technology Pick ... of what takes place when NIF's 192 laser beams enter the pencil eraser-sized gold ...

  2. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2015 March Developing Algorithms for Laser-based 3D Metal Printing ... In order to print a 3D part using the SLM process, the user must enter data into the ...

  3. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  4. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  5. Dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  6. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  7. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the ways that researchers search for signals of new physics is to observe rarely ... This puts a limit on the maximum energy that the electrons can reach in such a machine. ...

  8. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Fermilab and the other located 450 miles away in northern Minnesota at the Soudan Mine. ... In Minnesota, a 6,000-ton steel detector searches for neutrinos that have changed types, ...

  9. Laser Spark Plug Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.L.; Richardson, S.W.; Woodruff, S.D.; McMillian, M.H.; Guutam, M.

    2007-04-01

    To meet the ignition system needs of large bore high pressure lean burn natural gas engines a laser diode side pumped passively Q-switched laser igniter was designed and tested. The laser was designed to produce the optical intensities needed to initiate ignition in a lean burn high brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) engine. The experimentation explored a variety of optical and electrical input parameters that when combined produced a robust spark in air. The results show peak power levels exceeding 2 MW and peak focal intensities above 400 GW/cm2. Future research avenues and current progress with the initial prototype are presented and discussed.

  10. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  11. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  12. Science and Technology Day

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Technology Day Science and Technology Day February 24, 2015 Tuesday, Feb. 24 Berkeley Lab Building 50 Auditorium Attendance is open to anyone. Remote streaming is available at hosting.epresence.tv/lbl (Broadcast only) Time Title Speaker 8:15 Registration 8:55 Welcome Sudip Dosanjh, NERSC Director 9:00 The Year in Science at NERSC Richard Gerber, NERSC Senior Science Advisor 9:30 Science Keynote: Efficient modeling of laser-plasma accelerators using the ponderomotive-based code

  13. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  14. Learn More about Fusion & Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    education Learn More about Fusion & Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the road. Glossary Don't know what something means? Find definitions of terms related to NIF, fusion, and photon science in our glossary. For Teachers LLNL's Science Education Program provides professional development instruction to in-service and pre-service teachers. For Kids See how we make giant crystals

  15. Materials Science Research | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Research For photovoltaics and other energy applications, NREL's primary research in materials science includes the following core competencies. A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate Materials Physics Through materials growth and characterization, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. An image of multiple, interconnecting red and blue particles Electronic Structure Theory We

  16. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  17. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  18. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  19. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  20. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    november Science & Technology - 2015 November New Laser Pump Wins R&D 100 Award R&D 100 Awards Logo A new laser pumping system developed for LLNL's High Repetition Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System (HAPLS) project has been named one of the top 100 industrial inventions worldwide for 2015. The trade journal R&D Magazine announced the winners of its annual R&D 100 awards, sometimes called the "Oscars of Invention," on Nov. 13; LLNL won a total of three awards. With

  1. Laser accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vescial, F.; Aronowitz, F.; Niguel, L.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a laser accelerometer. It comprises: an optical cavity characterizing a frame having an input axis (x), a cross axis (y) orthogonal to and co-planar with the input axis and a (z) axis passing through the intersection of the (x) and (y) axes, the (z) axis being orthogonal to the plane of the (x) and (y) axes; and (x) axis proof mass having a predetermined blanking surface; a flexible beam having a first end coupled to the (x) axis proof mass and a second end coupled to the frame, deflection of the flexible beams permitting a predetermined range of movement of the (x) proof mass on the input axis in a direction opposite to sensed acceleration of the frame; a laser light source having a mirror means within the cavity for providing a light ray coaxially aligned with the (z) axis; detector means having at least a first detector on a sensitive plane, the plane being normal to the (z) axis; bias and amplifier means coupled to the detector means for providing a bias current to the first detector and for amplifying the intensity signal; the (x) axis proof mass blanking surface being centrally positioned within and normal to the light ray null intensity region to provide increased blanking of the light ray in response to transverse movement of the mass on the input axis; control means responsive to the intensity signal for applying an (x) axis restoring force to restore the (x) axis proof mass to the central position and for providing an (x) axis output signal proportional to the restoring force.

  2. Excimer lasers and optics. SPIE volume 710

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luk, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following contents: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. High average power commercial excimer lasers. Inductively stabilized excimer lasers. Characteristics of an e-beam pumped KrF laser system. Large excimer lasers for fusion. High power picosecond KrF laser system. MATERIAL PROCESSING. Fundamental aspects of pulsed-laser irradiation of semiconductors. Advances in excimer laser lithography. Laser photochemical vapor deposition. Studies of excimer laser etching mechanism using laser-induced fluorescence measurements. Industrial applications of excimer lasers. Excimer laser processing of semiconductor devices: high efficiency solar cells. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT II. Review of UV laser damage measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Generation of subnanosecond excimer laser pulses by means of stimulated Brillouin scattering in liquids. Amplification in a XeCl excimer gain module of 200-fsec UV pulses derived from a colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) laser system. High order multiphoton processes observed with subpicosecond excimer lasers. VUV fluorescence and harmonic generation with intense picosecond 248 nm KrF radiation. Excited state excimer spectroscopy. Multi-kilojoule narrowband XeCl laser. Performance and properties of e-beam pumped XeF(C ..-->.. A) lasers. Long-pulse e-beam pumped excimer laser.

  3. Development of Time Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of Time Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions Authors: Notley, M ; Weber, R ; Fell, B ; Jefferies, J ; Freeman, R ; Mackinnon, ...

  4. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology / 2016 / july Science & Technology - 2016 July 3D Printing Could Revolutionize Laser Development Three-month Turnaround for a New NIF Diagnostic Talk about being responsive to the needs of your customers. The NIF & Photon Science team developed and deployed a complex new diagnostic for NIF's radiation-effects source development program in just three months, from concept to execution. The diagnostic, dubbed Sentinel because of its resemblance to the squid-like

  5. Science on the Hill

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill Science on the Hill Recent Los Alamos research and achievements featured in the Santa Fe New Mexican News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Hot-cast perovskite solar cells show promise for creating more efficient and affordable solar panels, LEDs, and lasers. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. Something new under the sun Recent research breakthroughs at Los Alamos National Laboratory are helping to deliver on the

  6. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, the worlds smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700C capability, UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  7. Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated with a 200 TW femtosecond laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities...

  8. Picture of the Week: Laser-driven neutron source for research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-driven neutron source for research and global security At Los Alamos's Trident facility, scientists are using an ultra-high intensity laser beam to produce high intensity ...

  9. Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science ...

  10. Laser plasma instability experiments with KrF lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S.; Chan, L-Y.; Kehne, D.; Schmitt, A. J.; Colombant, D.; Velikovich, A.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Afeyan, B.; Phillips, L.; Seely, J.; Brown, C.; Feldman, U.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Mostovych, A. N.; Holland, G.

    2007-05-15

    Deleterious effects of laser-plasma instability (LPI) may limit the maximum laser irradiation that can be used for inertial confinement fusion. The short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth, and very uniform illumination available with krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers should increase the maximum usable intensity by suppressing LPI. The concomitant increase in ablation pressure would allow implosion of low-aspect-ratio pellets to ignition with substantial gain (>20) at much reduced laser energy. The proposed KrF-laser-based Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would exploit this strategy to achieve significant fusion power (150 MW) with a rep-rate system that has a per pulse laser energy well below 1 MJ. Measurements of LPI using the Nike KrF laser are presented at and above intensities needed for the FTF (I{approx}2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}). The results to date indicate that LPI is indeed suppressed. With overlapped beam intensity above the planar, single beam intensity threshold for the two-plasmon decay instability, no evidence of instability was observed via measurements of (3/2){omega}{sub o} and (1/2){omega}{sub o} harmonic emissions.

  11. Dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye lr amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant.

  12. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 new experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.

  13. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 newmore » experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.« less

  14. Math and Science Academy for Teachers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Teachers (MSA) is an intensive three-year program designed to support whole-school continuous improvement in math and science teaching and learning. L NL Math and Science...

  15. Measuring Arithmetic Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Measuring Arithmetic Intensity Arithmetic intensity is a measure of floating-point operations (FLOPs) performed by a given code (or code section) relative to the amount of memory accesses (Bytes) that are required to support those operations. It is most often defined as a FLOP per Byte ratio (F/B). This application note provides a methodology for determining arithmetic intensity using Intel's Software Development Emulator Toolkit (SDE) and VTune Amplifier (VTune)

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We conducted 160 dual-radiosonde soundings during the fall 2000 Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period...

  17. The Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The National Institute for Stan- dards and Technology (NIST) framework for security uses the CIA concepts-Confidentiality, Integrity, and Avail- ability. 22 Data-intensive science ...

  18. Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy for Teachers (MSA) Program Description MSA is an intensive and comprehensive professional development program for K-12 teachers....

  19. Science on the Hill - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on the Hill - 2016 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Hot-cast perovskite solar cells show promise for creating more efficient and affordable solar panels, LEDs, and lasers. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. Something new under the sun Recent research breakthroughs at Los Alamos National Laboratory are

  20. Science and Science Fiction

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Robert [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

  1. Science and Technology Review January/February 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-11-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) World's Most Intense X-Ray Laser Focuses on Livermore Science - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Groundbreaking Science with the World's Brightest X Rays - Experiments with x rays of unparalleled brightness and extremely short duration aim to reveal new information about atoms and molecules in motion; (3) From Data to Discovery - Ongoing control system enhancements at the National Ignition Facility bolster the understanding of experimental data and keep the system performing at its peak; (4) The Sun in All Its Splendor - Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Livermore-developed multilayer mirrors are enabling unprecedented full-disk, high-resolution images of the Sun; and (5) Drilling Deep into Plant Veins - A novel combination of imaging techniques is being used to understand the three-dimensional architecture of plant cell walls.

  2. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bozek, John

    2014-06-03

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  3. 2016 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Create the First-ever, 2-stage Laser-plasma Accelerator Powered by Independent Laser Pulses Read More External linkage Dwarf Galaxies 01.05.16SCIENCE ...

  4. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs Science Briefs Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Science Briefs - 2016» Science Briefs - 2015» Science Briefs - 2014» Science Briefs - 2013» Science Briefs - 2012» Science Briefs - 2011» Elizabeth Kelly Kelly named Fellow of the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Elizabeth Kelly with the title of Fellow. - 8/2/16 Beverly Aikin, left, and Ellen Cerreta

  5. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  6. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  7. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  8. Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Harvey Arnold; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2014-11-18

    Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

  9. Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in shaping the terahertz pulses by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse. The electromagnetic spectrum. The scarcity of intense broadband sources of radiation in the...

  10. Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping the terahertz pulses by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse. The electromagnetic spectrum. The scarcity of intense ...

  11. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  12. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  13. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key ...

  14. Ion Deflection for Final Optics In Laser Inertial Fusion Power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ion Deflection for Final Optics In Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants Citation Details ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  15. Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Energetic-Material Ignition Mechanisms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... Direct picosecond laser drive is used to introduce shock waves into thin films of ...

  16. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; BIOPHYSICS; LASERS; LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY...

  17. Building-Level Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  18. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    january Science & Technology - 2016 January HAPLS Passes a Key Milestone The High-Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System (HAPLS) under construction at LLNL recently achieved a key average power milestone more than two months ahead of schedule, and is now moving into the next phase in its development. The HAPLS high-energy diode-pumped solid-state pump laser, firing at a repetition rate of 3.3 Hz (3.3 shots per second), achieved 70 joules of infrared (1,053-nanometer) energy and 39

  19. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  20. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  1. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  2. High power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabu, Razvan

    2015-02-24

    Specifications of the high power laser system (HPLS) designed for nuclear physics experiments are presented. Configuration of the 2 × 10 PW femtosecond laser system is described. In order to reach the required laser beam parameters, advanced laser techniques are proposed for the HPLS: parametric amplification and cross-polarized wave generation for the intensity contrast improvement and spectral broadening, acousto-optic programmable filters to compensate for spectral phase dispersion, optical filters for spectrum management, combined methods for transversal laser suppression.

  3. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  4. High School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High School Science Bowl January 28, 2017 A Competition Like No Other The Iowa Regional High School Science Bowl is an opportunity for Iowa's top science and math students to face-off in an intense question and answer format where contestants are quizzed on their knowledge of math and a range of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, Earth and space science, physics and energy. Iowa's Regional competition is hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Iowa State

  5. Conference: Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Science: Remarks from Steve Chu at the Scientific Symposium Held in his Honor | ScienceCinema Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Energy Science: Remarks from Steve Chu at the Scientific Symposium Held in his Honor Citation Details Title: Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Energy Science: Remarks from Steve Chu at the Scientific Symposium Held in his Honor

  6. Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers

  7. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

  8. Fermilab computing at the Intensity Frontier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Group, Craig; Fuess, S.; Gutsche, O.; Kirby, M.; Kutschke, R.; Lyon, A.; Norman, A.; Perdue, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2015-12-23

    The Intensity Frontier refers to a diverse set of particle physics experiments using high- intensity beams. In this paper I will focus the discussion on the computing requirements and solutions of a set of neutrino and muon experiments in progress or planned to take place at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located near Chicago, Illinois. In addition, the experiments face unique challenges, but also have overlapping computational needs. In principle, by exploiting the commonality and utilizing centralized computing tools and resources, requirements can be satisfied efficiently and scientists of individual experiments can focus more on the science and less onmore » the development of tools and infrastructure.« less

  9. Fermilab computing at the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Group, Craig; Fuess, S.; Gutsche, O.; Kirby, M.; Kutschke, R.; Lyon, A.; Norman, A.; Perdue, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2015-12-23

    The Intensity Frontier refers to a diverse set of particle physics experiments using high- intensity beams. In this paper I will focus the discussion on the computing requirements and solutions of a set of neutrino and muon experiments in progress or planned to take place at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located near Chicago, Illinois. In addition, the experiments face unique challenges, but also have overlapping computational needs. In principle, by exploiting the commonality and utilizing centralized computing tools and resources, requirements can be satisfied efficiently and scientists of individual experiments can focus more on the science and less on the development of tools and infrastructure.

  10. Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights Print No. Slide ... Vol. 356 294 Graphene's 3D Counterpart 10.0.1 ... 06.27.2007 Vol. 277 142 Laser-Seeded CSR 1.4.3 04.25.2007 ...

  11. Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print No. Slide Beamline Full Web ... Vol. 356 294 Graphene's 3D Counterpart 10.0.1 ... 06.27.2007 Vol. 277 142 Laser-Seeded CSR 1.4.3 04.25.2007 ...

  12. Energy Intensity Indicators Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The files listed below contain energy intensity data and documentation that supports the information presented on this website. The files are in Microsoft® Excel® format (2007 and later versions).

  13. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  14. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  15. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  16. Apparatus for laser beam profile measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, N.P.; Gettemy, D.J.

    1985-01-30

    Apparatus for measuring the spatial intensity profile of the output beam from a continuous-wave laser oscillator. The rapid and repetitive passing of a small aperture through the otherwise totally blocked output beam of the laser under investigation provides an easily interpretable, real-time measure of the intensity characteristics thereof when detected by a single detector and the signal generated thereby displayed on an oscilloscope synthronized to the motion of the aperture.

  17. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal

  18. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Project Description Chemistry used in measurement and detection science plays a crucial role in the Laboratory's Science of Signatures scientific thrust. Measurement and detection science areas that require chemistry include nuclear and radiological, materials, biological, energy, climate, and space. Los Alamos scientists integrate chemical-science capabilities to ensure that the Laboratory can

  19. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Materials Physics and Applications» Materials Science and Technology» Institute for Materials Science» Materials Science Rob Dickerson uses a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope at the Electron Microscopy Laboratory managed by Los

  20. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  1. Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations in chemistry, physics, materials, engineering, and computer science IEEE Xplore Full text...

  2. Accelerating Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program Wahid Bhimji , ... Early User Program, focused on real science applications and workflows that can ...

  3. ARM - Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  4. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  5. Science Gateways

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Science Gateways A science gateway is a web-based interface to access HPC computers ... perform shared computations, and generally interact with NERSC resources over the web. ...

  6. Accelerator Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Science Accelerator Science ReframAccelerator.jpg Particle accelerators are among the largest, most complex, and most important scientific instruments in the world....

  7. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  8. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  9. PERI Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERI - Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels for Multicore Samuel Williams † , Kaushik Datta † , Jonathan Carter , Leonid Oliker † , John Shalf , Katherine Yelick † , David Bailey CRD/NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA † Computer Science Division, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA E-mail: SWWilliams@lbl.gov, kdatta@eecs.berkeley.edu, JTCarter@lbl.gov, LOliker@lbl.gov, JShalf@lbl.gov, KAYelick@lbl.gov, DHBailey@lbl.gov

  10. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  11. Is sustainability science really a science?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively ...

  12. Explosives Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives Science Explosives Science Current efforts in explosives science cover many areas critical to national security. One particular area is the need for countermeasures against explosive threats. v Comprehensive explosives process Los Alamos National Laboratory offers a comprehensive explosives process. This process leverages entire technical divisions dedicated to explosives science. Los Alamos scientists combine advanced expertise and capabilities with modern facilities. These assets

  13. Statistical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Statistical Sciences Applying statistical reasoning and rigor to multidisciplinary scientific investigations Contact Us Group Leader James Gattiker (Acting) Email Deputy Group Leader Geralyn Hemphill (Acting) Email Group Administrator LeeAnn Martinez (505) 667-3308 Email Statistical Sciences Statistical Sciences provides statistical reasoning and rigor to multidisciplinary scientific investigations and development, application, and communication of cutting-edge statistical sciences research.

  14. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  15. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  16. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  17. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siekhaus, Wigbert

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  18. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  19. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  20. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  1. Explore Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explore Explore Science Create your own science adventure by exploring our varied exhibits, and learn what inspired our scientists, engineers and technicians to discover new things. August 18, 2014 boys conducting experiment [Science is] a great game. It is inspiring and refreshing. The playing field is the universe itself. -I.I. Rabi Science is thinking in an organized way about things. You don't need a license or permission to practice science. Scientists are interested in just about anything

  2. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Actinide Chemistry» Modeling and Simulation in the Chemical Sciences» Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry» Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science» Chemical Researcher Jeff Pietryga shows two vials of different-size nanocrystals, each

  3. Science Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science Events Learn about our science by coming to Frontiers in Science lectures, catch Cafe Scientific events in your community, or come to sicence events at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sep 27 Tue 7:00 AM Systems Approaches in Immunology Inn and Spa at Loretto - Santa Fe, NM Advancements in immunology can be made through the development of theoretical and experimental techniques supplying models that bring together phenomena at different levels of complexity to study mechanisms that

  4. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  5. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  6. 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program Due December

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program Due December 10 November 18, 2013 by Francesca Verdier NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program is now open for its second round of allocations to projects in data intensive science. This pilot aims to support and enable scientists to tackle their most demanding data intensive challenges. Selected projects will be piloting new methods and technologies targeting data

  7. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  8. Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized pulse by laser foil interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ouyang, J. M.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, P.

    2013-07-15

    Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse in ultra-intense laser thin-foil interaction is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the plasma foil as a nonlinear optical shutter has an obvious cut-out effect on the laser temporal and spatial profiles. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the high intensity part of a Gaussian laser pulse can be well extracted from the whole pulse. The transmitted pulse with longitudinal steep rise front and transverse super-Gaussian profile is thus obtained which would be beneficial for the radiation pressure acceleration regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability is observed in the simulations, which destroys the foil and results in the cut-out effect of the pulse in the rise front of a circularly polarized laser.

  9. NERSC's First 'Data Day' Showcases HPC Tools for Data-Intensive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science NERSC's First 'Data Day' Showcases HPC Tools for Data-Intensive Science NERSC's First 'Data Day' Showcases HPC Tools for Data-Intensive Science August 24, 2016 photo of data day »See more photos of NERSC's first-ever Data Day. More than 100 HPC enthusiasts attended NERSC's first-ever "Data Day," a two-day event designed to bring together researchers who use, or are interested in using, NERSC systems for data-intensive science. Held August 22-23 at Berkeley Lab, Data Day

  10. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

  11. Science Engagement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Engagement Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science Engagement The ESnet Science Engagement team's mission is to ensure that science collaborations at every scale, in every domain, have the information and

  12. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When the "dust" settled at the end of an intense day of science and math questions and ... among several teams that stayed for an afternoon of math and science challenge activities. ...

  13. Combining Electrons and Lasers to Create Designer Beams for Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Combining Electrons and Lasers to Create Designer Beams for Materials Research Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E:

  14. Mission | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical and Computational Physics ...

  15. NNSA 2014 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 2014 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual ● Stewardship Science Academic Alliances ● High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas ● National Laser Users' Facility ● Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program On the Cover Direct numerical simulation of a hydrogen jet injected from a wall into a turbulent boundary layer. Isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude are colored by the local streamwise velocity. The lower-right inset shows a top-down view of the simulation while the upper-left

  16. Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences at LLNL Eric Schwegler is the Point-of-Contact for DOE Office of Science Programs - Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL. Highlights Mesoscale Simulations of Coarsening in GB Networks Coherency Does Not Equate to Stability Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy Data LLNL BES Programs Theme area 1: Time, Space and Energy Resolved Investigations of Materials in Extreme

  17. Energy Intensity Indicators: Efficiency vs. Intensity | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency vs. Intensity Energy Intensity Indicators: Efficiency vs. Intensity Efficiency improvements in processes and equipment and other explanatory factors can contribute to observed changes in energy intensity. Within the category "other explanatory factors" we can identify two separate effects: structural changes and behavioral factors, which are further discussed in item 2) below. (1) Declines in energy intensity are a proxy for efficiency improvements, provided a)

  18. Laser apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  19. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  20. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  1. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-06-11

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  2. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-09-15

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  3. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper

  4. Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Gallery The latest photos from NNSA headquarters and across the nuclear security enterprise. The latest photos from NNSA headquarters and across the nuclear security enterprise. Visit us on Flickr

    science Photon Science Along with its primary missions-global security, energy security, basic science, and national competitiveness-the NIF & Photon Science Directorate also pursues research and development projects to innovate and develop cutting-edge technologies in support of those

  5. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feed-image Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource/albums Twitter: AdvLightSource YouTube: AdvancedLightSource Home Science Highlights Science Briefs Science Briefs ALS Science Briefs are short (250 words maximum) descriptions of recently published ALS-related work. These "brief" highlights also include one image, a caption (50 words), and the publication citation. All ALS users and beamline scientists are invited to fill out the short submission

  6. Science Digests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Digests Science Digests Our Science Digests embrace complex issues around our science, technologies, and mission in a series of mini-articles that provide a context for our historical approach, current problem solving and our vision for the future. Spatial partitioning for the ocean simulation data set. Data triage enables extreme-scale computing Data selection and triage are important techniques for large-scale data, which can drastically reduce the amount of data written to disk or

  7. Big Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2010-01-08

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  8. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  9. Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrah, Nora

    2015-10-13

    This grant supported a Single Investigator and Small Group Research (SISGR) application to enable multi-user research in Ultrafast Science using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray free electron laser (FEL) which lased for the first time at 1.5 Å on April 20, 2009. The goal of our proposal was to enable a New Era of Science by requesting funds to purchase and build Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science (AIUS), to utilize the intense, short x-ray pulses produced by the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will allow peer review selected users to probe the ultrasmall and capture the ultrafast. These tools will expand on the investment already made in the construction of the light source and its instrumentation in both the LCLS and LUSI projects. The AIUS will provide researchers in the AMO, Chemical, Biological and Condensed Matter communities with greater flexibility in defining their scientific agenda at the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will complement and significantly augment the present AMO instrument (funded through the LCLS project) through detectors and capabilities not included in the initial suite of instrumentation at the facility. We have built all of the instrumentations and they have been utilized by scientists. Please see report attached.

  10. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  11. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  12. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  13. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, Michael P.; Chen, Chung H.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  14. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  15. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Laser-driven ion acceleration with hollow laser beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brabetz, C. Kester, O.; Busold, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T.; Deppert, O.; Jahn, D.; Roth, M.; Schumacher, D.

    2015-01-15

    The laser-driven acceleration of protons from thin foils irradiated by hollow high-intensity laser beams in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) is reported for the first time. The use of hollow beams aims at reducing the initial emission solid angle of the TNSA source, due to a flattening of the electron sheath at the target rear side. The experiments were conducted at the PHELIX laser facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH with laser intensities in the range from 10{sup 18} W cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}. We observed an average reduction of the half opening angle by (3.07±0.42)° or (13.2±2.0)% when the targets have a thickness between 12 μm and 14 μm. In addition, the highest proton energies were achieved with the hollow laser beam in comparison to the typical Gaussian focal spot.

  17. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  18. Imaging System With Confocally Self-Detecting Laser.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Robert H.; Rogomentich, Fran J.

    1996-10-08

    The invention relates to a confocal laser imaging system and method. The system includes a laser source, a beam splitter, focusing elements, and a photosensitive detector. The laser source projects a laser beam along a first optical path at an object to be imaged, and modulates the intensity of the projected laser beam in response to light reflected from the object. A beam splitter directs a portion of the projected laser beam onto a photodetector. The photodetector monitors the intensity of laser output. The laser source can be an electrically scannable array, with a lens or objective assembly for focusing light generated by the array onto the object of interest. As the array is energized, its laser beams scan over the object, and light reflected at each point is returned by the lens to the element of the array from which it originated. A single photosensitive detector element can generate an intensity-representative signal for all lasers of the array. The intensity-representative signal from the photosensitive detector can be processed to provide an image of the object of interest.

  19. Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurz, P.; Whitby, J. A.; Managadze, G. G.

    2009-06-16

    Knowing the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary objects allows the study of their origin and evolution within the context of our solar system. Exploration plans in planetary research of several space agencies consider landing spacecraft for future missions. Although there have been successful landers in the past, more landers are foreseen for Mars and its moons, Venus, the jovian moons, and asteroids. Furthermore, a mass spectrometer on a landed spacecraft can assist in the sample selection in a sample-return mission and provide mineralogical context, or identify possible toxic soils on Mars for manned Mars exploration. Given the resources available on landed spacecraft mass spectrometers, as well as any other instrument, have to be highly miniaturised.

  20. Climate & Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear...

  1. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2015 November New Laser Pump Wins R&D 100 Award October HAPLS Completes Phase 1 Energy-Ramping Campaign Shaping NIF's Beams for Direct-Drive Experiments September A Pioneering Betatron X-Ray Experiment August New ARC Front End Proves Its Mettle July Two NIF&PS Technologies Named R&D 100 Finalists ELI Beamlines Officials Tour HAPLS Project June Measuring NIF Implosions with a Bang Dante: Measuring NIF's Inferno May HAPLS Team Reaches Key Milestone Supplying

  2. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  3. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  4. NERSC Launches Data-intensive Science Pilot Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resources to realize the full potential from new instruments and detectors," said Shane Canon, who heads NERSC's Technology Integration Group. "This effort is aimed at addressing...

  5. French intensive truck garden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T D

    1983-01-01

    The French Intensive approach to truck gardening has the potential to provide substantially higher yields and lower per acre costs than do conventional farming techniques. It was the intent of this grant to show that there is the potential to accomplish the gains that the French Intensive method has to offer. It is obvious that locally grown food can greatly reduce transportation energy costs but when there is the consideration of higher efficiencies there will also be energy cost reductions due to lower fertilizer and pesticide useage. As with any farming technique, there is a substantial time interval for complete soil recovery after there have been made substantial soil modifications. There were major crop improvements even though there was such a short time since the soil had been greatly disturbed. It was also the intent of this grant to accomplish two other major objectives: first, the garden was managed under organic techniques which meant that there were no chemical fertilizers or synthetic pesticides to be used. Second, the garden was constructed so that a handicapped person in a wheelchair could manage and have a higher degree of self sufficiency with the garden. As an overall result, I would say that the garden has taken the first step of success and each year should become better.

  6. Light Speed Ahead! | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    In their experiments, the team applied two laser pulses to a gold sample surface: the ... and Biosciences Division, Condensed Phase and Interfacial Molecular Science Program. ...

  7. Smooth and vertical facet formation for AlGaN-based deep-UV laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; ALUMINIUM NITRIDES; GALLIUM NITRIDES; ETCHING; LASERS; ...

  8. Measurements of High-Intensity Laser Induced Ionizing Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  9. Electron dynamics in intense laser fields with Bohmian trajectories...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extension, as the characteristic features of high order harmonic generation spectrum. ... In this case, the resulting patterns in the high-order harmonic generation and the above ...

  10. Measurements of High-Intensity Laser Induced Ionizing Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  11. Measurements of radiation doses induced by high intensity laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Liang, T. ; SLAC Georgia Tech ; Bauer, J. ; Cimeno, M. ; SLAC ; Ferrari, A. ; HZDR Inst. Radiation Phys., Dresden ; Galtier, E. ; Granados, E. ; Heimann, P. ; Lee, ...

  12. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2001-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  13. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2003-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  14. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2002-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  15. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Advanced Superconducting Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility photo The Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility is America's only test bed for cutting-edge, record high-intensity particle beams and for accelerator research aimed at intensity frontier proton accelerators. FAST will also be unique in the United States as a particle beam research facility based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, on which nearly all proposed future accelerators in the world are

  16. INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers February 19, 2016 - 11:53am Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Watch our CO2 drop dramatically compared to other countries in this interactive Curious about the total amount of carbon we emit into the atmosphere? Compare countries from around the globe using this tool. If

  17. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  18. Explosive laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  19. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Briefs Science Briefs Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Elizabeth Kelly Kelly named Fellow of the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Elizabeth Kelly with the title of Fellow. - 8/2/16 Beverly Aikin, left, and Ellen Cerreta Aikin and Cerreta named as ASM Fellows ASM

  20. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

    2010-02-05

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  1. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-08

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  2. Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Scientists are advancing the fundamental science of materials within the context of global energy-related challenges. They are developing experimental and theoretical...

  3. Information Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) American Society for Indexing (ASI) Digital Library Federation (DLF) National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Special...

  4. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum ... how nanoparticles work, while "Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum," gives ...

  5. Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Advanced Materials Laboratory Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Combustion Research Facility Computational Science Research Institute Joint BioEnergy Institute About EC News ...

  6. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  7. Laser applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The breadth of current applications of laser technology is described. It is used as the basis for extrapolating to future application in such activities as AVLIS, SIS, ICP-MS, and RIMs.

  8. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Short-Pulse Lasers NIF Petawatt Laser Is on Track to Completion The National Ignition Facility's Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC), a petawatt-class laser with peak power ...

  9. Science & Technology Review January/February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-12-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Another Step for High-Energy-Density Science and Teller's Legacy--Commentary by George H. Miller. (2) Titan Leads the Way in Laser-Matter Science--Livermore's Titan laser combines long- and short-pulse lasers to explore high-energy-density science. (3) Identifying the Source of Stolen Nuclear Materials--Nuclear forensic scientists are using advanced techniques to discover the exact nature of interdicted radiological and nuclear materials, their age and origin, and where legitimate control was lost. (4) Tiny Tubes Make the Flow Go--Membranes made up of billions of tiny carbon tubes 50,000 times slimmer than a human hair allow liquids and gases to flow through at astonishingly fast speeds. (5) Acidic Microbe Community Fosters the Unique--In an abandoned mine, where the pH can be even lower than zero, communities of acidophilic microbes produce hundreds of unusual proteins.

  10. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1986-11-01

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

  11. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science sleuth on the trail of a martian mystery March 19, 2013 EMBARGOED: Until 5 p.m. MDT, March 19, 2013Poster Session T617, Poster #246, 44 th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference Postdoctoral researcher sees promise in data from cutting room floor THE WOODLANDS, Texas, March 19, 2013 - When it comes to examining the surface of rocks on Mars with a high-powered laser, five is a magic number for Los Alamos National Laboratory postdoctoral researcher Nina Lanza. During a poster session today

  12. Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy for Teachers (MSA) Program Description MSA is an intensive and comprehensive professional development program for K-12 teachers. Participants commit to attend a three-week Summer Institute for three years during which they study best practices in math and science education. Teachers also receive instructional support and additional math and science content workshops during the school year. Program Objectives 1. To increase teachers' content

  13. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  14. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F.; Albright, Brian J.; Fernandez, Juan C.

    2012-09-04

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL

  15. Thermal Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Sciences NETL's Thermal Sciences competency provides the scientific, engineering, and technology development community with innovative and efficient approaches to measure, harness, and convert thermal energy. Research includes sensors, advanced energy concepts, and thermodynamic optimization, specifically: Sensors and Diagnostics Advanced sensor and diagnostic technology to develop and evaluate advanced methods for non-intrusive measurement and measurement in extreme environments.

  16. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

    1984-04-27

    The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  17. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Paul; Bernhardt, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  18. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  19. Joining of materials using laser heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockeram, Brian V.; Hicks, Trevor G.; Schmid, Glenn C.

    2003-07-01

    A method for diffusion bonding ceramic layers such as boron carbide, zirconium carbide, or silicon carbide uses a defocused laser beam to heat and to join ceramics with the use of a thin metal foil insert. The metal foil preferably is rhenium, molybdenum or titanium. The rapid, intense heating of the ceramic/metal/ceramic sandwiches using the defocused laser beam results in diffusive conversion of the refractory metal foil into the ceramic and in turn creates a strong bond therein.

  20. Safety and Security at Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety and Security Safety and Security at Trident Laser Facility Enabling world-class science in high-energy density physics and fundamental laser-matter interactions Contact Operations Team Leader Randy Johnson (505) 665-5089 Email Governing Board Contact Ray Leeper (505) 667-3653 Email Safety and security at Trident are of utmost importance. All of our policies and procedures are in conformance with the integrated work management (IWM) policies of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Integrated

  1. Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Annual

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 DOE/NA-0018 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances National Laser Users' Facility High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas A color composite (red=H2, green=HI, blue=OIII) of a small portion of Carina shows the spectacular structures that result when radiation from massive stars interacts with molecular globules that harbour newborn stars. Image Courtesy of Patrick Hartigan, Rice University, taken with the 4-m NOAO telescope at Cerro Tololo, Chile On the cover This report was prepared as an

  2. The Collective Atomic Recoil Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courteille, Ph.W.; Cube, C. avon; Deh, B.; Kruse, D.; Ludewig, A.; Slama, S.; Zimmermann, C.

    2005-05-05

    An ensemble of periodically ordered atoms coherently scatters the light of an incident laser beam. The scattered and the incident light may interfere and give rise to a light intensity modulation and thus to optical dipole forces which, in turn, emphasize the atomic ordering. This positive feedback is at the origin of the collective atomic recoil laser (CARL). We demonstrate this dynamics using ultracold atoms confined by dipole forces in a unidirectionally pumped far red-detuned high-finesse optical ring cavity. Under the influence of an additional dissipative force exerted by an optical molasses the atoms, starting from an unordered distribution, spontaneously form a density grating moving at constant velocity. Additionally, steady state lasing is observed in the reverse direction if the pump laser power exceeds a certain threshold. We compare the dynamics of the atomic trajectories to the behavior of globally coupled oscillators, which exhibit phase transitions from incoherent to coherent states if the coupling strength exceeds a critical value.

  3. Diagnostics for Fast Ignition Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacPhee, A; Akli, K; Beg, F; Chen, C; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Hey, D; Freeman, R; Kemp, A; Key, M; King, J; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Nakamura, N; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Phillips, T; Stephens, R; Town, R; Wei, M; VanWoerkom, L; Mackinnon, A

    2008-05-06

    The concept for Electron Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion demands sufficient laser energy be transferred from the ignitor pulse to the assembled fuel core via {approx}MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer. Recent experiments have simultaneously fielded absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4 and 8keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung and electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight); nuclear activation samples and a picosecond optical probe based interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Augmented with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and pre-pulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insight into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical PIC and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area that is crucial for many applications, particularly fast ignition. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultra high intensity laser plasma interactions are discussed, together with implications for full-scale fast ignition experiments.

  4. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-06-10

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  5. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  6. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  7. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, B.S.; Wetherington, G.R. Jr.

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  8. Science DMZ Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU Science DMZ @ Penn & VTTI Science DMZ @ NOAA Science DMZ @ NERSC Science DMZ @ ALS Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Case Studies » Science DMZ Case Studies Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science

  9. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy Science: A Talk from Paul Alivisatos titled LBNL in the Chu Era Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  10. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  11. Molecular dynamic studies on anisotropic explosion of laser irradiated Xe cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Gaurav; Gupta, N. K.

    2012-09-15

    A three dimensional molecular dynamic model is used to investigate the dynamics of Xe clusters of various radii irradiated by laser of moderate intensities ({approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}). The FWHM pulse duration of the laser is varied from few laser cycles to hundreds of femtosecond. For cluster of radius 50 A irradiated by a laser of 170 fs pulse duration, it is observed that ion yield is more along the direction of laser polarization than perpendicular to it. This trend reverses (more ions are emitted along the direction perpendicular to laser polarization than parallel to it) when laser pulses of few cycles are used. This reversal of anisotropy is explained on the basis of spatial shielding of ions due to the oscillating inner electron cloud along direction of laser electric field. The nature of anisotropy remains same with variations in laser intensity and cluster size.

  12. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jupiter laser facility Jupiter Laser Facility The commissioning of the Titan Petawatt-Class laser to LLNL's Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) has provided a unique platform for the use of petawatt (PW)-class lasers to explore laser-matter interactions under extreme conditions. The JLF includes the Janus, Callisto, Europa, Titan, and COMET lasers and associated target chambers (see Laser Facilities). Commissioned in 2007, Titan was the first to offer synchronized operation of both a short-pulse PW

  13. Science and Technology Review March 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Pruneda, J H

    2000-03-01

    The contents of this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory newsletter include the following: (1) The Laboratory in the News; (2) Commentary by George Miller--Reaping Unexpected Benefits from the Petawatt Laser Breakthrough; (3) The Amazing Power of the Petawatt--For three years, the Petawatt laser was the most powerful laser in the world, pushing electrons toward the speed of light and accomplishing some remarkable science in the process; (4) Building a Virtual Time Machine--A powerful new computer code simulates geologic changes eons into the future at Yucca Mountain, a potential underground nuclear waste repository; (5) Research Highlight: Dead Sea Explosions Trigger International Cooperation; and (6) Patents and Awards; (7) Abstracts.

  14. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Scudiere, Matthew B.

    1993-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  15. NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaic Program and DOE Basic Energy Sciences Program. Materials Science. The Materials Science Group's research...

  16. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ware, Kenneth D.; Jones, Claude R.

    1986-01-01

    Exploding conducting film laser optical pumping apparatus. The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-.mu.m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  17. National Security Science Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science NSS Archive National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Archive National Security Science magazine...

  18. Basic Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences Supporing research to understand, predict and ... The DOE Office of Science's Basic Energy Sciences program equips scientists with a ...

  19. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  20. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser (10) is formed of a vanadium (12) and titanium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions (32).

  1. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, J.

    1992-05-26

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

  2. Laser barometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  3. Laser telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, L.K.; Peron, M.C.

    1982-10-12

    A projectile carries a laser transmitter which directs its output beam to the rear through an aperture in the projectile. The beam is coded (Modulated) in accordance with the start or stop of events or flight conditions being monitored by one or more transducers in the projectile. The beam is initially pulsed at a known reference rate from a thermal battery automatically activated by the launching acceleration of the projectile. Thus, occurrence of an event or condition will change the laser frequency to a new predetermined rate. The beam can be decoded at a receiving station in the vicinity of the launching site.

  4. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  5. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & ANALYSIS www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 339 8 FEBRUARY 2013 635 Steven Chu, the fi rst Nobel-winning scien- tist to lead the sprawling U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has rarely...

  6. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Optical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Sciences The focus of the Optical Sciences thrust is to understand and exploit the elegant interaction between light and matter. Our research portfolio encompasses the generation, transmission, manipulation, and detection of light and the development of optical materials with user defined characteristics. We emphasize innovative work in laser and optical materials development, nonlinear optics, spectroscopy, remote sensing, and photon-material interactions. In partnership with our DOE,

  7. Physical Sciences and Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our work in fundamental and applied physics, chemistry, and materials science provides a foundation for unparalleled collaborations. More VIdeo Highlight Argonne Outloud Promo: The End of Water as We Know It (Jan. 28, 2016) Recent Research Highlights Argonne Distinguished Fellow Linda Young was awarded the Helmholtz International Fellow Award for her leading work in the field of X-ray science. Young awarded Helmholtz International Fellow leading up to start of powerful new X-ray laser

  8. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum July 22, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum is opening two new exhibits July 26 as part of the Laboratory's 70th Anniversary celebration. One is a nanotechnology exhibit featuring the Laboratory's Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) and the other is an algae biofuel exhibit from the Laboratory and the New Mexico Consortium. An opening

  9. Science Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Science Facilities The focal point for basic and applied R&D programs with a primary focus on energy but also encompassing medical, biotechnology, high-energy physics, and advanced scientific computing programs. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies» Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT)» Electron Microscopy Lab» Ion Beam Materials Lab» Isotope Production Facility» Los Alamos Neutron Science Center» Lujan Center» Matter-Radiation Interactions in

  10. Measurement Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wins 2016 Joseph F. Keithley Award for Advances in Measurement Science October 15, 2015 Honors to Albert Migliori, developer of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 15, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist Albert Migliori, having led the development of a powerful tool for important measurements in condensed matter physics including superconductivity, is being given the Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science, the top instrumentation prize of the

  11. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  12. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  13. Isotope Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Production 35 years of experience in isotope production, processing, and applications. Llllll Committed to the safe and reliable production of radioisotopes, products, and services. Contact: Kevin John LANL Isotope Program Manager kjohn@lanl.gov 505-667-3602 Sponsored by the Department of Energy National Isotope Program http://www.nuclear.energy.gov/isotopes/nelsotopes2a.html Isotopes for Environmental Science Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used as

  14. Chemical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty acids, and, in turn, to new industrial applications and new products. <a href

  15. Energy Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure

  16. Fermilab | Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo Science Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Leadership and Organization Leadership Organizational chart Committees and Councils Photo and Video Gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Related Links DOE FRA UChicago URA Newsroom Spotlight Press releases Fact sheets and brochures symmetry Interactions.org Photo and video archive Resources for ... Employees Researchers, postdocs and

  17. OSTIblog Articles in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observatory (LIGO) Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Topic Incredible Laser Interferometers by Kathy Chambers 12 Aug, 2016 in ligo_300.jpg Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Livingston, LA. Image credit: LIGO Laboratory Interferometers are investigative tools used in many fields in science and engineering. They work by merging two or more sources of light or

  18. Intense microwave pulses II. SPIE Volume 2154

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    The primary purpose of this conference was to present and critically evaluate new and ongoing research on the generation and transmission of intense microwave pulses. Significant progress was reported on high-power, high-current relativistic klystron amplifier research and design. Other work presented at the conference, include research on a high-power relativistic magnetron driven by a high-current linear induction accelerator, derivation of a Pierce-type dispersion relation describing the interaction of an intense relativistic electron beam with a corrugated cylindrical slow-wave structure, experiments on an X-band backward-wave cyclotron maser oscillator, and observation of frequency chirping in a free electron laser amplifier. Other presentations included work on multiwave Cerenkov generator experiments, analysis of resonance characteristics of slow-wave structures in high-power Cerenkov devices, linear analysis and numerical simulation of Doppler-shifted cyclotron harmonics in a cyclotron autoresonance klystron, high-power virtual cathode oscillator theory and experiments, design of a sixth-harmonic gyrofrequency multiplier as a millimeter-wave source, and experiments on dielectric-loaded and multiwave slotted gyro-TWT amplifiers. A review was presented on innovative concepts which employ high-power microwaves in propulsion of space vehicles. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers of this conference.

  19. Direct High-Power Laser Acceleration of Ions for Medical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2008-04-18

    Theoretical investigations show that linearly and radially polarized multiterawatt and petawatt laser beams, focused to subwavelength waist radii, can directly accelerate protons and carbon nuclei, over micron-size distances, to the energies required for hadron cancer therapy. Ions accelerated by radially polarized lasers have generally a more favorable energy spread than those accelerated by linearly polarized lasers of the same intensity.

  20. Final report for the NSF/DOE partnership in basic plasma science grant DE-FG02-06ER54906 'Laser-driven collisionless shocks in the Large Plasma Device'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph; Gekelman, W.; Winske, D.; Larsen, D.

    2012-12-14

    We have performed several thousand high-energy laser shots in the LAPD to investigate the dynamics of an exploding laser-produced plasma in a large ambient magneto-plasma. Debris-ions expanding at super-Alfvenic velocity (up to MA=1.5) expel the ambient magnetic field, creating a large (> 20 cm) diamagnetic cavity. We observed field compressions of up to B/B{sub 0} = 1.5 at the edge of the bubble, consistent with the MHD jump conditions, as well as localized electron heating at the edge of the bubble. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations reproduce these measurements well and show that the majority of the ambient ions are energized by the magnetic piston to super-Alfvenic speeds and swept outside the bubble volume. Nonlinear shear-Alfven waves ({delta}B/B{sub 0} > 25%) are radiated from the cavity with a coupling efficiency of 70% from magnetic energy in the bubble to the wave. While the data is consistent with a weak magneto-sonic shock, the experiments were severely limited by the low ambient plasma densities (10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}). 2D hybrid simulations indicate that future experiments with the new LAPD plasma source and densities in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} will drive full-blown collisionless shocks with MA>10 over several c/wpi and shocked Larmor radii. In a separate experiment at the LANL Trident laser facility we have performed a proof-of-principle experiment at higher densities to demonstrate key elements of collisionless shocks in laser-produced magnetized plasmas with important implications to NIF. Simultaneously we have upgraded the UCLA glass-laser system by adding two large amplitude disk amplifiers from the NOVA laser and boost the on-target energy from 30 J to up to 1 kJ, making this one of the world’s largest university-scale laser systems. We now have the infrastructure in place to perform novel and unique high-impact experiments on collision-less shocks at the LAPD.

  1. What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website ...

  2. Self-focusing and frequency broadening of laser pulse in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.; Verma, Updesh

    2014-11-15

    An analytical model for the avalanche breakdown of water by an intense short laser pulse of finite spot size is developed. Initially, the laser undergoes self-focusing due to Kerr nonlinearity. As it acquires large intensity, it causes heating and avalanche breakdown of water. The plasma thus created on the laser axis causes nonlinear refraction induced defocusing of the laser. Thermal conduction tends to flatten the temperature profile and reduce the nonlinear refraction. The plasma density modification leads to frequency broadening of the laser.

  3. Properties of laser radiation scattering by a laser-induced spark plasma revisited after 40 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyutin, A A

    2008-05-31

    Experimental studies of a laser-induced spark produced in air by 1.05-{mu}m, 100-ns pulses with spatial TEM{sub 00}, TEM{sub 01} and TEM{sub 02} modes are described. It is found that when the spark is observed at an angle of 90{sup 0} to the laser beam axis, the scattered radiation has the maximal intensity outside the beam waist. The intensity ratio of the scattered laser radiation for two orthogonal polarisations is {approx}100, and the spatial structures of their depolarisation considerably differ. These properties are explained by using a model of the Fresnel reflection from the spherical front of the plasma-undisturbed gas interface. (laser radiation scattering)

  4. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  5. Science Drivers of Particle Physics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Drivers of Particle Physics High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical and Computational Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator Stewardship Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  6. Possibility of transmutation of {sup 135}Cs by ultraintense laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takashima, R.; Hasegawa, S.; Nemoto, K.; Kato, K.

    2005-01-03

    The possibility of photo-transmutation of long-lived nuclide {sup 135}Cs by ultrashort ultraintense laser was analytically evaluated. The yield of {sup 135}Cs({gamma},n) {sup 134}Cs was strongly dependent on the laser intensity at around 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. If {sup 135}Cs were irradiated by such a laser with the intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} and 10 Hz for 30 min, characteristic {gamma}-ray counting rate was estimated to be 3 Bq.

  7. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-02-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities. The apparatus comprises a focused and pulsed laser, a photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  8. Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

  9. New X-Ray Matter Interaction Observed at Ultra-High Intensity | U.S. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science (SC) New X-Ray Matter Interaction Observed at Ultra-High Intensity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 08.05.16 New

  10. (Applied mass spectrometry in the health sciences)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glish, G.L.

    1990-05-03

    The traveler attended the 2nd International Symposium on Applied Mass Spectrometry in the Health Sciences and presented and invited paper. Papers presented that were of interest to ORNL mass spectrometry programs involved ionization of large molecules by electrospray and laser desorption. Other papers of interest included applications of MS/MS for structural elucidation and new instrumentation.

  11. Range imaging laser radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  12. Range imaging laser radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  13. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stockpile stewardship focus of 70th anniversary lecture December 12, 2013 Last in year-long series of public talks at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 12, 2013-The role Los Alamos National Laboratory plays in stockpile stewardship is the focus of the final 70th Anniversary Lecture Dec. 18 at the Bradbury Science Museum. Jon Ventura, Los Alamos's executive staff advisor to the Principal Associate Director for Weapons Programs, will give the talk beginning at 5:30 p.m. "For 70

  14. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early social history of Los Alamos focus of 70th anniversary lecture at Bradbury Science Museum May 2, 2013 NMSU history professor Jon Hunner speaks May 8 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 2, 2013-The early social history of Los Alamos during Los Alamos National Laboratory's Manhattan Project beginnings will be discussed at a talk by Jon Hunner at 5:30 p.m., May 8 at the Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is part of the Laboratory's 70th anniversary lecture series. Hunner heads the Department of

  15. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maintaining nuclear stability in times of transition focus of talk at Bradbury Science Museum January 9, 2014 First in series of evening lectures open to public LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan. 9, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory Senior Fellow Houston "Terry" Hawkins talks about the role that the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile plays in maintaining the nation's defense - and that of our allies - in a talk at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 15 at the Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is the first in a

  16. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emerging threats to global security focus of March 12 talk at Bradbury Science Museum March 6, 2014 Terry Wallace to address Lab's role in helping the government meet national security challenges LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 6, 2014-Terry Wallace, principal associate director for Global Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will talk about potential emerging threats in a lecture at 5:30 p.m., March 12 at the Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is the third in a series of evening lectures planned

  17. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Science Highlights Science highlights feature research conducted by staff and users at the ALS. If a Power Point summary slide or a PDF handout of the highlight is available, you will find it linked beneath the highlight listing and on the highlight's page. You may also print a version of a highlight by clicking the print icon associated with each highlight. New Catalyst Boosts Selective Formation of Olefins from Syngas Print Wednesday, 10 August 2016 00:00 Experiments at the ALS have

  18. Improved generation of ion fluxes by a long laser pulse using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Rosi?ski, M.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Torrisi, L.; Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, 98166 S. Agata, Messina

    2013-09-16

    Generation of ion fluxes in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) scheme is investigated by the time-of-flight method and compared with the one in the conventional laser-planar target interaction scheme. It is shown that the ion current density and intensity of the ion flux produced in the LICPA scheme from CD{sub 2} foil target irradiated by a 0.3-ns laser pulse of intensity ?10{sup 14}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} are by an order of magnitude higher and the mean and maximum ion energies by a factor 45 higher than those for the conventional scheme.

  19. Ponderomotive self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in warm collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari Milani, M. R.; Niknam, A. R.; Farahbod, A. H.

    2014-06-15

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam through warm collisional plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive force nonlinearity and the complex eikonal function. By introducing the dielectric permittivity of warm unmagnetized plasma and using the WKB and paraxial ray approximations, the coupled differential equations defining the variations of laser beam parameters are obtained and solved numerically. Effects of laser and plasma parameters such as the collision frequency, the initial laser intensity and its spot size on the beam width parameter and the axis laser intensity distribution are analyzed. It is shown that, self-focusing of the laser beam takes place faster by increasing the collision frequency and initial laser spot size and then after some distance propagation the laser beam abruptly loses its initial diameter and vastly diverges. Furthermore, the modified electron density distribution is obtained and the collision frequency effect on this distribution is studied.

  20. Waves in Nature, Lasers to Tsumanis and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2008-05-01

    Waves are everywhere. Microwaves, laser beams, music, tsunamis. Electromagnetic waves emanating from the Big Bang fill the universe. Learn about the similarities and difference in all of these wavy phenomena with Ed Moses and Rick Sawicki, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11541

  1. Waves in Nature, Lasers to Tsumanis and Beyond

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01

    Waves are everywhere. Microwaves, laser beams, music, tsunamis. Electromagnetic waves emanating from the Big Bang fill the universe. Learn about the similarities and difference in all of these wavy phenomena with Ed Moses and Rick Sawicki, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11541

  2. Laser Faraday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faraday rotation measurement of current density fluctuations and electromagnetic torque (invited) W. X. Ding, a) D. L. Brower, and B. H. Deng Electrical Engineering Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 D. Craig, S. C. Prager, and V. Svidzinski Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (Presented on 19 April 2004; published 1 October 2004) Far-infrared laser polarimetry with time response up to ϳ1 ␮s and spatial

  3. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Wyeth, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  4. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  5. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  6. Resonantly photo-pumped nickel-like erbium X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped X-ray laser (10) that enhances the gain of seve laser lines that also lase because of collisional excitations and recombination processes, is described. The laser comprises an aluminum (12) and erbium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like erbium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from hydrogen-like aluminum ions (32).

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  11. FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The BES Materials Science program at Sandia Albuquerque has the central theme of Scientifically Tailored Materials. The major objective of this program is to combine Sandia's expertise and capabilities in the areas of solid state sciences, advanced atomic-level diagnostics and materials-processing science to produce new classes of tailorable materials for the US energy industry, the electronics industry and for defense needs. Current research in this program includes the physics and chemistry of ceramics, the use of energetic particles for the synthesis and study of materials, high-temperature and organic superconductors, tailored surfaces for materials applications, chemical vapor deposition sciences, strained-layer semiconductors, advanced growth techniques for improved semiconductor structures and boron-rich very high temperature semiconductors. A new start just getting underway deals with the atomic level science of interfacial adhesion. Our interdisciplinary program utilizes a broad array of sophisticated, state-of-the-art experimental capabilities provided by other programs. The major capabilities include several molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical-vapor-deposition facilities, electron- and ion-beam accelerators, laser-based diagnostics, advanced surface spectroscopies, unique combined high-pressure/low-temperature/high-magnetic-field facilities, and the soon to be added scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies.

  12. Laser Detection of Actinides and Other Elements | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Laser Detection of Actinides and Other Elements Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: Email Us More Information » 09.01.15 Laser Detection of Actinides and Other Elements

  13. Tailoring femtosecond laser pulse filamentation using plasma photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suntsov, Sergiy; Abdollahpour, Daryoush; Panagiotopoulos, Paris; Papazoglou, Dimitrios G.; Tzortzakis, Stelios; Couairon, Arnaud

    2013-07-08

    We demonstrate experimentally that by using transient plasma photonic lattices, the attributes of intense femtosecond laser filaments, such as peak intensity and length, can be dynamically controlled. The extended plasma lattice structure is generated using two co-propagating non-diffracting intense Bessel beams in water. The use of such transient lattice structures to control the competition between linear and nonlinear effects involved in filamentation opens the way for extensive control of the filamentation process.

  14. Making the Old New Again: Measuring Ultrashort X-ray Laser Pulses | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) Making the Old New Again: Measuring Ultrashort X-ray Laser Pulses Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information »

  15. Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  16. Creating a Well-focused Laser-accelerated Proton Beam as a Driver for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Fast Ignition | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Creating a Well-focused Laser-accelerated Proton Beam as a Driver for Proton Fast Ignition Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  17. Laser-driven plasma waves in capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojda, F.; Cassou, K.; Cros, B.; Genoud, G.; Burza, M.; Glinec, Y.; Lundh, O.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; Vieux, G.; Brunetti, E.; Shanks, R. P.; Jaroszynski, D.; Andreev, N. E.

    2009-12-15

    The excitation of plasma waves over a length of up to 8 cm is demonstrated using laser guiding of intense laser pulses through hydrogen-filled glass capillary tubes. The plasma waves are diagnosed by spectral analysis of the transmitted laser radiation. The dependence of the spectral redshift--measured as a function of filling pressure, capillary tube length, and incident laser energy - is in excellent agreement with simulation results. The longitudinal accelerating field inferred from the simulations is in the range of 1-10 GV/m.

  18. Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 05-08.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of Defense Science May 2008 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Advanced Certification 3 Delivering High Energy Density Physics Data on the National Ignition Facility to Validate Predictive Physics Models 5 Texas Petawatt Laser Achieves Power Milestone 6 Sandia Light Gas Gun Tests Demonstrate the Ability to Deliver an Engineered Shock Wave Using a Graded-Density Thermal Spray Coating 7 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium Highlights 9

  19. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  20. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  1. PARTIAL SUPPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF ATOMIC, MOLECULAR, AND OPTICAL SCIENCES Final Report for the period September 30, 2008 to June 30, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, James

    2015-06-29

    This report is the final report for the 2008-2014 cycle of DOE support for the Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences. Highlights of the committee’s activities over this period included: • Meetings of the committee were held semiannually (Washington, DC in April and Irvine, CA in October) for four of the six years and annually the last two years (Washington, DC in April). • Committee meetings included half-day focus sessions on each of the areas identified in the last AMO decadal survey as having great scientific promise and short summaries of the focus session were prepared and delivered to sponsoring agencies. • CAMOS initiated a study that has been funded on high intensity lasers. DOE support for CAMOS has been of central importance to the committee’s ability to continue to fulfill its mandate to the Board on Physics and Astronomy and to the wider atomic, molecular, and optical sciences research community.

  2. National Ignition Facility & Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    how do Lasers work? how Do Lasers work? A laser can be as small as a microscopic computer ... Clearly size has nothing to do with what makes a laser. "laser" is an acronym for light ...

  3. National Security Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Showcasing Los Alamos National Laboratory's work on nuclear...

  4. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  5. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid-scanning technology boosts airport security science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research...

  6. ORISE: Forensic Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forensic Science Forensic Science The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides direct forensic analytical support, consulting and training services to United...

  7. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RAPTOR telescope witnesses black hole birth science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research...

  8. Science & Technology Review June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

  9. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  10. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting the broad community of high-energy-density researchers The Jupiter Laser ... flexibility and high laser shot rates, and to allow direct user operation of experiments. ...

  11. Dual effects of stochastic heating on electron injection in laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Z. G.; Wang, X. G.; Yang, L.; Zhou, C. T.; Yu, M. Y.; Ying, H. P.

    2014-08-15

    Electron injection into the wakefield of an intense short laser pulse by a weaker laser pulse propagating in the opposite direction is reconsidered using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations as well as analytical modeling. It is found that for linearly polarized lasers the injection efficiency and the quality of the wakefield accelerated electrons increase with the intensity of the injection laser only up to a certain level, and then decreases. Theory and simulation tracking test electrons originally in the beat region of the two laser pulses show that the reduction of the injection efficiency at high injection-laser intensities is caused by stochastic overheating of the affected electrons.

  12. Fire Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  13. Discovery Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    universe Discovery Science Since the beginning of civilization, humans have marveled at the night sky and pondered the vast stretches of the universe. The invention of telescopes in the 17th century revealed the first details of the Moon and the planets in our solar system. Four hundred years later, space-based observatories such as NASA's Hubble and Kepler regularly capture amazing vistas of billions of galaxies millions of light years away. Despite these advances, astronomers have only been

  14. Science Pillars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pillars Harnessing our scientific capabilities for national security solutions Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-15-27068 Benefits of the Science Pillars The Laboratory's greatest strength is in our multidisciplinary capabilities. The Pillars draw on these capabilities- across traditional organizational and disciplinary boundaries-to help us accomplish our missions. The LDRD Strategic Investment Plan is built around the Pillars. The Laboratory's External Reviews are organized by Pillar.

  15. Information Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Information Sciences Uncovering actionable knowledge and generating insight into exascale datasets from heterogeneous sources in real time Leadership Group Leader Amy Larson (Acting) Email Deputy Group Leader Gowri Srinivasan (Acting) Email Contact Us Administrator Yvonne McKelvey Email Conceptual illustration of futuristic data stream processing. Developing methods and tools for understanding complex interactions and extracting actionable information from massive data streams. Basic and

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Semianalytic Technique to Speed Up Successive Order of Scattering Model for Optically Thick Media Duan, M. and Min, Q., Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A semianalytic technique has been developed to speed up integration of radiative transfer over optically thick media for the successive order of scattering method. Based on characteristics of internal distribution of scattering intensity,

  17. Omega Laser Facility - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  18. OMEGA Laser Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  19. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  20. Higher-order paraxial theory of the propagation of ring rippled laser beam in plasma: Relativistic ponderomotive regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, Gunjan Rawat, Priyanka; Chauhan, Prashant; Mahmoud, Saleh T.

    2015-05-15

    This article presents higher-order paraxial theory (non-paraxial theory) for the ring ripple formation on an intense Gaussian laser beam and its propagation in plasma, taking into account the relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. The intensity dependent dielectric constant of the plasma has been determined for the main laser beam and ring ripple superimposed on the main laser beam. The dielectric constant of the plasma is modified due to the contribution of the electric field vector of ring ripple. Nonlinear differential equations have been formulated to examine the growth of ring ripple in plasma, self focusing of main laser beam, and ring rippled laser beam in plasma using higher-order paraxial theory. These equations have been solved numerically for different laser intensities and plasma frequencies. The well established experimental laser and plasma parameters are used in numerical calculation. It is observed that the focusing of the laser beams (main and ring rippled) becomes fast in the nonparaxial region by expanding the eikonal and other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r. The splitted profile of laser beam in the plasma is observed due to uneven focusing/defocusing of the axial and off-axial rays. The growths of ring ripple increase when the laser beam intensity increases. Furthermore, the intensity profile of ring rippled laser beam gets modified due to the contribution of growth rate.

  1. Bradbury Science Museum - Science on Wheels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, technology, engineering and mathematics and promote public understanding and ... science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and the work of Los Alamos National ...

  2. OMEGA Laser - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE Building Map Partnerships Careers Education Undergraduate Program Graduate Program High School Program Faculty Contacts Computational Astrophysics H-E-D Physics Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Radiative Hydrodynamics Plasma Astrophysics Organization Director's Office Laser Development and

  3. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of

  4. Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ ...

  5. Faces of Science: Roger Wiens

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger Wiens March 4, 2015 Wiens' passion for space has no limits At nine years old, Roger Wiens built a telescope to sketch the features of Mars. 1:23 Faces of Science: Roger Wiens - 2 - Forty years later he returned to the Red Planet, this time as part of a team that invented ChemCam, a device aboard the rover Curiosity. Using a laser that packs the energy of a million light bulbs into a spot the size of a pinhead, ChemCam blasts pieces of Martian rock in search of elements like carbon and

  6. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  7. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  8. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  9. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (∼10{sup 15–16} W.cm{sup –2}) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  10. Science and Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Innovation Science and Innovation Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop solutions to complex problems, and to support partners and collaborators, all with the goal of strengthening national security and making a safer world. Science & Engineering Capabilities» Science Programs» Science Facilities» Features» Science Pillars» Faces of Science The people behind our science Radical Supercomputing Extreme speeds, big data,

  11. Science Brief Submission Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Brief Submission Form Science Brief Submission Form Print Tuesday, 01 May 2007 00:00 Loading... < Prev

  12. Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences programs: FWP executive summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vook, F.L.; Samara, G.A.

    1989-02-01

    The goals of our Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Materials Science Program at Sandia are: (1) Perform basic, forefront interdisciplinary research using the capabilities of several organizations. (2) Choose programs broadly complementary to Sandia's weapons laboratory mission, but separably identifiable. (3) Perform research in a setting which enhances technological impact because of Sandia's spectrum of basic research, applied research and development engineering. (4) Use large, capital-intensive research facilities not usually found at universities. The BES Materials Science program at Sandia Albuquerque has the central theme of Scientifically Tailored Materials. The major objective of this program is to combine Sandia's expertise and capabilities in the areas of solid state sciences, advanced atomic-level diagnostics, and materials-processing science to produce new classes of tailorable materials for the US energy industry, the electronics industry and for defense needs. Current research in this program includes ion-implantation-modified materials, physics and chemistry of ceramics, tailored surfaces for materials applications, strained-layer semiconductors, chemical vapor deposition, surface photo kinetics, organic and high-temperature superconductors, advanced growth techniques for improved semiconductor structures and boron-rich very high temperature semiconductors.

  13. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Anmin; Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 ; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing; State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  14. Experiments | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intensity Frontier » Experiments High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Experiments Cosmic Frontier Theoretical and Computational Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator Stewardship Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  15. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  16. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAY 2013 VOL 340 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org 914 EIGHT NUCLEAR ENGINEERS SIT IN HIGH- backed leather chairs, their laptop comput- ers perched on sleek wood consoles. The lights are so low that the corners of the room fade to black. Up front, a roomwide video screen shows a half-dozen other researchers from locations around the country. A cryptic conversation rattles on: "Rod, we have to be careful. Right now the Cobra to de Novo isn't even using DTK." Welcome to the Consortium for

  17. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe-s image » Links Scientific Highlight Peters Lab MSU News e! Science News Physorg.com » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces The Structure of an Algal Hydrogenase Reveals the Assembly and Evolution of Complex Metalloenzymes summary written by Raven Hanna The potential for using biological enzymes to make hydrogen to use as a renewable energy source is a hot topic, but little is known about how these complex enzymes assemble and work. The [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme binds

  18. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H1N1 Flu » Links Scientific Highlight Wilson Lab Scripps Press Release Scripps Philanthrophy Science Magazine Vanderbilt Reporter » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Structural Basis for Senior Immunity to the Current H1N1 Flu summary written by Raven Hanna An unusual property of the last year's H1N1 "swine flu" virus pandemic is that it disproportionately affected the young. People over the age of around 65 showed much less vulnerability than to more typical

  19. Science Cafe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cafés Science Cafe April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years Janos Kirz, ALS Abstract Röntgen's great discovery became an instant public sensation. Fascination with the "new kind of rays" that could reveal the structure of opaque objects swept the world in 1896. Fifty years later it was widely recognized that the short wavelength of the radiation should open

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Highlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highlights Energy Intensity Indicators: Highlights This page highlights the major changes in the overall energy intensity for the United States, as well as summarizing changes in energy intensity for major sectors. Economywide Energy Intensity Figure H1 below reports total energy use, GDP, and two alternative indexes to reflect overall changes in U.S. energy intensity, the first based on the energy-GDP ratio, and the second built up as part of the DOE-EERE system of energy intensity indicators.