National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for intensity improvements moderate

  1. Sustaining Performance Improvements in Energy Intensive Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    operators. Below the surface, process operators and managers have very different goals for when operating the process. These differences cause significant barriers to sustained performance improvements. The magnitude of performance losses can be orders...

  2. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection...

  3. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will develop materials and coatings to reduce corrosion and improve the life span of boiler superheater tubes exposed to high-temperature biomass exhaust. This improvement in...

  4. Spatiotemporal focusing does not always improve axial intensity localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Ya; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Guihua; Zeng, Bin; He, Fei; Chu, Wei; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental comparison on critical intensities of nonlinear self-focusing in air with conventional focusing and spatiotemporal focusing schemes. Our results show that the conventional focusing with the focal lens completely filled with the incident beam allows for the strongest axial intensity confinement against the self-focusing effect. This is because that in the high-numerical-aperture condition, the focal spot will have a compact size which results in a high focal intensity. Meanwhile, the Rayleigh length of the focused beam will be substantially shortened which efficiently postpones the onset of self-focusing.

  5. 5.5-7.5 MeV Proton Generation by a Moderate-Intensity Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Interaction with H{sub 2}O Nanowire Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, A.; Palchan, T.; Bruner, N.; Schleifer, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Henis, Z. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Y. Jr. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the first generation of 5.5-7.5 MeV protons by a moderate-intensity short-pulse laser ({approx}5x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 40 fsec) interacting with frozen H{sub 2}O nanometer-size structure droplets (snow nanowires) deposited on a sapphire substrate. In this setup, the laser intensity is locally enhanced by the snow nanowire, leading to high spatial gradients. Accordingly, the nanoplasma is subject to enhanced ponderomotive potential, and confined charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced over the short scale length, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies.

  6. Predictors of change differ for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity and for weekdays and weekends: a longitudinal analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corder, Kirsten; Craggs, Christopher; Jones, Andrew P; Ekelund, Ulf; Griffin, Simon J; van Sluijs, Esther MF

    2013-05-28

    Sport 2002, 73:206–210.38. Panter JR, Jones AP, Van Sluijs EM, Griffin SJ: Neighborhood, route, and school environments and children’s active commuting. Am J Prev Med 2010, 38:268–278.47. Kahn JA, Huang B, Gillman MW, Field AE, Austin SB, Colditz GA... BioMed Central Commons Attribution License (http://creativec reproduction in any medium, provided the orOpen Access r for moderate and l activity and for a longitudinal analysis , Ulf Ekelund2,4, Simon J Griffin1,2Ltd. This is an Open Access article...

  7. GORDON: AN IMPROVED ARCHITECTURE FOR DATA-INTENSIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... GORDON IS A SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE FOR DATA-CENTRIC APPLICATIONS COMBINING LOW-POWER PROCESSORS, FLASH MEMORY, AND DATA-CENTRIC PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY FOR DATA-CENTRIC of these fronts: For data-centric appli- cations, programming models such as Google's Map-Reduce1 and Microsoft

  8. USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irfanoglu, Ayhan

    USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY distribution estimation of earthquake damage in building stocks is presented. The purpose is to start a strong urban area earthquake. We used a pair of ground motion and building-tag color databases

  9. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Ĺ) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Ĺ) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 Ĺ, the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 46–91% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 Ĺ) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 Ĺ. Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 Ĺ. The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 Ĺ. The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  10. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yovino, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Poppe, Matthew; Jabbour, Salma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); David, Vera; Garofalo, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pandya, Naimesh [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Alexander, Richard; Hanna, Nader [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William F., E-mail: wregine@umm.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  12. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach.

  13. On the origin of super-hot electrons from intense laser interactions with solid targets having moderate scale length preformed plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krygier, A. G.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.

    2014-02-15

    We use particle-in-cell modeling to identify the acceleration mechanism responsible for the observed generation of super-hot electrons in ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions with solid targets with pre-formed plasma. We identify several features of direct laser acceleration that drive the generation of super-hot electrons. We find that, in this regime, electrons that become super-hot are primarily injected by a looping mechanism that we call loop-injected direct acceleration.

  14. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeau, Sylvain [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)]. E-mail: sylvainn@rrsb.nb.ca; Bouchard, Myriam [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Germain, Isabelle [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Raymond, Paul-Emile [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Frederic [Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Roy, Rene [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Gingras, Luc [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie et Centre de recherche de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements.

  15. Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

    1983-01-01

    Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems...

  16. Improvement of load-following capacity based on the flame radiation intensity signal in a power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei Wang; Qunxing Huang; Dong Liu; Jianhua Yan; Kefa Cen [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization

    2008-05-15

    The capability to perform fast load changes has been an important issue due to the increasing commercialization of the power market. In the traditional boiler control system, the feedback signals come from the variations of the steam pressure and the steam flow, which leads to a large time delay. Therefore, a new method for the boiler control system based on radiation intensity for improving the load-following capacity of a coal-fired power plant has been developed in this paper. The system is implemented by adding the radiation intensity of the flame to the existing boiler control system as a complement. The radiation intensity obtained by the sensor can directly reflect the input heat in the boiler, with a faster response and higher sensitivity. Field tests on a 300 MW coal-fired power plant reveal that the improved boiler control system increases the load-following capacity. At the same time, the steam pressure variations are smaller as compared with those of the existing control system. 14 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Computational efficiency improvement with Wigner rotation technique in studying atoms in intense few-cycle circularly polarized pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Minghu; Feng, Liqiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Lü, Rui [Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)] [Laboratory of Pathogenic Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chu, Tianshu, E-mail: tschu@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: tschu008@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2014-02-21

    We show that by introducing Wigner rotation technique into the solution of time-dependent Schrödinger equation in length gauge, computational efficiency can be greatly improved in describing atoms in intense few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses. The methodology with Wigner rotation technique underlying our openMP parallel computational code for circularly polarized laser pulses is described. Results of test calculations to investigate the scaling property of the computational code with the number of the electronic angular basis function l as well as the strong field phenomena are presented and discussed for the hydrogen atom.

  18. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  19. Enhancing Neutron Beam Production with a Convoluted Moderator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, Erik B; Baxter, David V; Muhrer, Guenter; Ansell, Stuart; Gallmeier, Franz X; Dalgliesh, Robert; Lu, Wei; Kaiser, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new concept for a neutron moderating assembly resulting in the more efficient production of slow neutron beams. The Convoluted Moderator, a heterogeneous stack of interleaved moderating material and nearly transparent single-crystal spacers, is a directionally-enhanced neutron beam source, improving beam effectiveness over an angular range comparable to the range accepted by neutron beam lines and guides. We have demonstrated gains of 50% in slow neutron intensity for a given fast neutron production rate while simultaneously reducing the wavelength-dependent emission time dispersion by 25%, both coming from a geometric effect in which the neutron beam lines view a large surface area of moderating material in a relatively small volume. Additionally, we have confirmed a Bragg-enhancement effect arising from coherent scattering within the single-crystal spacers. We have not observed hypothesized refractive effects leading to additional gains at long wavelength. In addition to confirmation of the validity of the Convoluted Moderator concept, our measurements provide a series of benchmark experiments suitable for developing simulation and analysis techniques for practical optimization and eventual implementation at slow neutron source facilities.

  20. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  1. Improvement of the photoluminescent intensity of ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noto, L.L. Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Yagoub, M.Y.A.; Swart, H.C.

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The optimal luminescence intensity was obtained for 0.4 mol% Pr{sup 3+} doped ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}. • The ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} has a colour index matching an ideal red emission. • The cross relaxation process led to a decrease in red emission at higher Pr{sup 3+} concentrations. • The blue emission continues to increase at higher Pr{sup 3+} concentrations. • The persistent luminescent increases with an increase in Pr{sup 3+} concentration. - Abstract: A red emitting ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Pr{sup 3+} phosphor with Commission Internationale de l‘Eclairage coordinates that match those of an ideal red emission was prepared by solid state chemical reaction. X-ray diffraction confirmed that a pure orthorhombic phase of ZnTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} was crystallized. A homogeneous distribution of the Pr{sup 3+} ions was confirmed from the analysis of the time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy overlay images. In addition to the reflectance at 259 nm associated with band-to-band absorption, minor reflectance peaks associated with f-f transitions of Pr{sup 3+} were observed at 420–500 nm. The main red emission peak was split into minor peaks located at 608, 619 and 639 nm that were assigned to {sup 1}D{sub 2} ? {sup 3}H{sub 4}, {sup 3}P{sub 0} ? {sup 3}H{sub 6} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} ? {sup 3}F{sub 2} transitions of Pr{sup 3+}, respectively. With increasing concentration of Pr{sup 3+}, a relatively weak blue emission was observed at 488 nm and this phenomenon maybe attributed to virtual charge transfer or/and inter cross relaxation effects. The decay characteristics of the persistent emission were also calculated.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Vazquez, Esther G.; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  3. The use of reduced-moderation light water reactors for transuranic isotope burning in thorium fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindley, Benjamin A.

    2015-02-03

    -moderation LWRs can improve TRU transmutation performance, but the VC is still severely limiting for these designs. Reduced-moderation pressurized water reactors (RMPWRs) and boiling water reactors (RBWRs) are considered in this study. Using thorium (Th) instead...

  4. Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (IMPACT): A pragmatic effectiveness superiority trial to investigate whether specialised psychological treatment reduces the risk for relapse in adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodyer, Ian M.; Tsancheva, Sonya; Byford, Sarah; Dubicka, Bernadka; Hill, Jonathan; Kelvin, Raphael; Reynolds, Shirley; Roberts, Christopher; Senior, Robert; Suckling, John; Wilkinson, Paul; Target, Mary; Fonagy, Peter

    2011-07-13

    and recurrence in the medium term (i.e. 12 -18 months after treatment). A small study of moderately to severely depressed young people attending clinical services has shown that patients may begin to relapse within 3 months of dis- charge, even in those fully... to treatment allocation. Randomisation procedures and methods to minimise bias After consent has been obtained and the baseline assess- ment has been carried out, a trial ID will be assigned. Ran- domisation will be stratified by age, sex, region and scores...

  5. Family Moderate Income Homeowners In New York State

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Family Moderate Income Homeowners In New York State: Enhancing Resource Accessibility Through Process Improvement and Targeted Outreach," by Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions, July 10, 2012, Arlington, Virginia. Provides an overview of broadening accessibility to financing through process improvement and targeted outreach.

  6. Accessible buildings Moderately accessible buildings*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Campus neighborhood map Moderately accessible paths** Accessible building entrance via parking lot to the University Park campus. This map, provided by UAC, is designed to assist persons with disabilities in finding accessibility. Your observations and suggestions regarding architectural For more information on UAC, you can

  7. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Good, David [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lo, Joseph [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiology and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva K., E-mail: shiva.das@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  8. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  9. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  10. French intensive truck garden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T D

    1983-01-01

    The French Intensive approach to truck gardening has the potential to provide substantially higher yields and lower per acre costs than do conventional farming techniques. It was the intent of this grant to show that there is the potential to accomplish the gains that the French Intensive method has to offer. It is obvious that locally grown food can greatly reduce transportation energy costs but when there is the consideration of higher efficiencies there will also be energy cost reductions due to lower fertilizer and pesticide useage. As with any farming technique, there is a substantial time interval for complete soil recovery after there have been made substantial soil modifications. There were major crop improvements even though there was such a short time since the soil had been greatly disturbed. It was also the intent of this grant to accomplish two other major objectives: first, the garden was managed under organic techniques which meant that there were no chemical fertilizers or synthetic pesticides to be used. Second, the garden was constructed so that a handicapped person in a wheelchair could manage and have a higher degree of self sufficiency with the garden. As an overall result, I would say that the garden has taken the first step of success and each year should become better.

  11. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore »is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  12. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, Lawrence B. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States); Czirr, J. Bart [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.

  13. Building-Level Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  14. Neutrino physics with an intense \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Henning

    2010-11-16

    We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

  15. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  16. Microclimate moderates plant responses to macroclimate warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    Microclimate moderates plant responses to macroclimate warming Pieter De Frennea,b,1 , Francisco of Land Use Systems, Leibniz-ZALF, DE-15374 Müncheberg, Germany; u Beechwood House, St. Briavels Common, Stanford, CA, and approved September 24, 2013 (received for review June 13, 2013) Recent global warming

  17. Cryogenic neutron moderator on mesitylene pellets for IBR-2 reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    and manufacturing of monitoring system of fulfillment of cold moderator (III quarter of 2011 . ) DevelopmentCryogenic neutron moderator on mesitylene pellets for IBR-2 reactor Anan'ev V., Belyakov A, 4.Stationary reflector, 5.Cold moderators, 6.Emergency system, 7.Water moderators, 8.Control rods

  18. Moderate pressure hydrocracking: A profitable conversion alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, M.G. (M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Pappal, D.A. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Pesek, C.L. (Akzo Chemicals, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Moderate Pressure Hydrocracking (MPHC) is a once-through hydrocracking process for the conversion of heavy gas oils to low-sulfur distillates and unconverted oil which is highly upgraded relative to the raw feed. Operating at lower pressure significantly reduces capital investment and results in substantially less hydrogen consumption. Furthermore, the process requirements for MPHC are within the range of many existing vacuum gas oil desulfurization units. Mobil Research and Development Corporation and Akzo Chemicals have been actively engaged in Moderate Pressure Hydrocracking research for more than ten years. Mobil's first commercial MPHC installation was successfully started up in 1983. Mobil operates five hydrocrackers, two of which are partial conversion MPHC designs that process heavy vacuum gas oils into middle distillate products. This research and operating experience has led to an advanced capability to apply hydrocracking conversion technology to heavy feedstocks under moderate pressure conditions. Akzo has commercialized a family of hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts which are combined to achieve the optimal balance between activity and selectivity for each specific refining application. The M.W. Kellogg Co. is a leading technology based international Engineering Construction company and has experience in the design, engineering and construction of 22 hydrocrackers. Mobil, Akzo and Kellogg have formed a partnership to offer MAK-MPHC and other full conversion hydrocracking technologies for license to the refining industry. This paper will present pilot plant and commercial results for Akzo catalysts in Moderate Pressure Hydrocracking applications. Specific process design features, typical refinery applications and the economic incentives for selecting MAK-MPHC will also be discussed.

  19. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore »beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  20. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  1. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Vlahovic, Branislav [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  2. Energy Intensity Strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappolee, D.; Shaw, J.

    2008-01-01

    Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We’ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools we’re using, what goals have been...

  3. Biomineralization of carbonate and phosphate by moderately halophilic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Biomineralization of carbonate and phosphate by moderately halophilic bacteria M ´onica S-calcite; coprecipitated; moderately halophilic bacteria. Abstract We investigated the precipitation of carbonate and phosphate minerals by 19 species of moderately halophilic bacteria using media with variable Mg21 /Ca21

  4. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process employing a moderated ruthenium catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrevaya, H.

    1990-07-31

    A Fischer-Tropsch type process produces hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using a novel catalyst comprising moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation. 1 fig.

  5. HI intensity mapping with FAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigot-Sazy, Marie-Anne; Battye, Richard A; Browne, Ian W A; Chen, Tianyue; Dickinson, Clive; Harper, Stuart; Maffei, Bruno; Olivari, Lucas C; Wilkinson, Peter N

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST $19$-beam L-band receivers ($1.05$--$1.45$ GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters ($w_{0},w_{a}$) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is $6000\\,{\\rm deg}^2$. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift ($0.95$--$1.35$ GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than $2~\\sigma$ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  6. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunchang Shin; W. Mike Snow; Christopher M. Lavelle; David V. Baxter; Xin Tong; Haiyang Yan; Mark Leuschner

    2007-11-19

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures.

  7. Verifica(on of Hurricane Irene, Isaac and Sandy's Storm Track, Intensity, and Wind Radii Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Verifica(on of Hurricane Irene, Isaac and Sandy's Storm Track, Intensity/onal Hurricane Center (NHC). Forecasts of the track have steadily improved over the past, intensity (MWND) and wind radii (WRAD) errors of Hurricane Irene (2011

  8. Measurement and fitting of spectrum and pulse shapes of a liquid methane moderator at IPNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Robinson, R.A.; Taylor, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the absolute intensity, and the energy spectrum, and the pulse shapes as function of neutron energy for the IPNS liquid CH/sub 4/ F moderator, at 108 K. We have fitted the spectrum, corrected for attenuation by aluminum in the beam, using a new cutoff function and fitted the pulse shapes to a new function which is the sum of two decaying exponentials, convoluted with a gaussian, and determined the wavelength variation of the parameters. We present here the results of a preliminary analysis.

  9. High intensity femtosecond enhancement cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abram, Gilberto

    2009-01-01

    To produce extreme ultraviolet radiation via high harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases, light intensities in excess of 1014 W/cm 2 are required. Usually such high intensity are obtained by parametric amplification of ...

  10. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More...

  11. The Denver Energy Challenge-- Serving Moderate Income Residents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of the Denver Energy Challenge and how services were expanded to moderate income residents including challenges and next steps.

  12. Adherence to Adalimumab in Patients with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    with Moderate to Severe Psoriasis Cameron West 1 , MD;and relapsing course of psoriasis is often associated withenrolled patients with psoriasis. J Dermatolog Treatment.

  13. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  14. Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number Ratul Dasgupta I will present some results on undular hydraulic jumps occurring in a two bores (in rivers), where the interface remains horizontal, the moderate Reynolds hydraulic jump shows a linear increase in height due to viscosity

  15. DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS E.M. Hines1 and L.A. Fahnestock2 ABSTRACT The authors propose a design philosophy for steel buildings in moderate seismic regions that draws of the International Building Code has introduced seismic design to regions of North America that heretofore have

  16. industry, intense research is still being conducted to further improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosché, Frédéric

    integrated with other project management systems such as scheduling (for automated updates), codes-of-use, cost, and range of applications. The main current focus is on increasing the level of automation processes themselves. However, with the increasing availability of Building Information Models generated

  17. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discriminationquenchedwithimpact on tropical

  18. Improving complex enterprises with system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemann, Justin M. (Justin Matthew)

    2005-01-01

    Air Force sustainment operations are the focus of an intensive internal effort to improve performance and reduce costs. Past improvement initiatives have often failed to produce the intended results, and have caused ...

  19. An Empirical Analysis of Energy Intensity and Its Determinants at the State Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Empirical Analysis of Energy Intensity and Its Determinants at the State Level Gilbert E. Metcalf* Aggregate energy intensity in the United States has been declining steadily since the mid-1970s and the first oil shock. Energy intensity can be reduced by improving efficiency in the use of energy

  20. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  1. Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment of...

  2. Evolution of gluon TMD at low and moderate x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Balitsky; A. Tarasov

    2014-11-05

    We study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x\\ll 1$ to linear double-logarithmic evolution at moderate $x\\sim 1$.

  3. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Balitsky; A. Tarasov

    2015-09-29

    We study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  4. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  5. Rider Energy Expenditure during High Intensity Horse Activity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Colleen L

    2015-04-29

    (DDR) to determine if playing DDR for 30 min a day could meet minimum exercise requirements. Experienced DDR players as well as inexperienced DDR players were observed to determine if they could meet energy expenditure requirements. This study..., in contradiction with the Nintendo Wii study found that experienced DDR players exhibited exercise of a moderate intensity with mean HR of 161.2 beats per min (bpm) and mean VO2 of 25.2mL·kg -1·min-1 and expended more than 150 kcal in the 30 min exercise which...

  6. Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, Karen E; Ogilvie, David; Ferguson, Neil S; Murray, Jonathan; Wang, Yang; Ellaway, Anne

    2012-05-08

    Epidemiology Unit and UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), Box 296, Institute of Public Health, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0SR, UK. 3Department of Civil Engineering, University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow...

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  11. On the use of Standardized Precipitation Index(SPI) for drought intensity assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M Naresh; Sai, M V R Sesha; Roy, P S

    2015-01-01

    Monthly rainfall data from June to October for 39 years was used to generate Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) values based on Gamma distribution for a low rainfall and a high rainfall district of Andhra Pradesh state, India. Comparison of SPI, with actual rainfall and rainfall deviation from the mean indicated that SPI values under-estimate the intensity of dryness/wetness when the rainfall is very low/very high respectively. As a result, the SPI in the worst drought years of 2002 and 2006 in the low rainfall district has indicated only moderate dryness instead of extreme dryness. The range of SPI values of the high rainfall district indicated better stretching, compared to that of the low rainfall district. Further, the SPI values of longer time scale (2-, 3- and 4- months) showed an extended range compared to 1-month, but the sensitivity in drought years has not improved significantly. To ascertain whether non normality of SPI is a possible reason, normality tests were conducted. The Shapiro-Wilk stat...

  12. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows: SuperMicro X7DBE Xeon Dual Socket Blackford Server Motherboard; 2 Intel Xeon Dual-Core 2.66 GHz processors; 1 GB DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM (2 x 512); 80GB Hard Drive (Seagate SATA II Barracuda). The Fusion board is presently capable of 4X in a PCIe slot. The image resampling benchmark was run on a dual Xeon workstation with NVIDIA graphics card (see Chapter 5 for full specification). An XtremeData Opteron+FPGA was used for the language classification application. We observed that these benchmarks are not uniformly I/O intensive. The only benchmark that showed greater that 50% of the time in I/O was the graph algorithm when it accessed data files over NFS. When local disk was used, the graph benchmark spent at most 40% of its time in I/O. The other benchmarks were CPU dominated. The image resampling benchmark and language classification showed order of magnitude speedup over software by using co-processor technology to offload the CPU-intensive kernels. Our experiments to date suggest that emerging hardware technologies offer significant benefit to boosting the performance of data-intensive algorithms. Using GPU and FPGA co-processors, we were able to improve performance by more than an order of magnitude on the benchmark algorithms, eliminating the processor bottleneck of CPU-bound tasks. Experiments with a prototype solid state nonvolative memory available today show 10X better throughput on random reads than disk, with a 2X speedup on a graph processing benchmark when compared to the use of local SATA disk.

  13. Using air movement for comfort during moderate exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Yongchao; Elsworth, Christopher; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhao, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    temperature setpoints: Simulated energy savings and designand metabolic heat production. Energy and Buildings, SpecialFitness centers are energy-intensive in warm climates,

  14. Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Better Buildings...

  15. Improving Natural Uranium Utilization By Using Thorium in Low Moderation PWRs - A Preliminary Neutronic Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles Youinou; Ignacio Somoza

    2010-10-01

    The Th-U fuel cycle is not quite self-sustainable when used in water-cooled reactors and with fuel burnups higher than a few thousand of MWd/t characteristic of CANDU reactors operating with a continuous refueling. For the other industrially mature water-cooled reactors (i.e. PWRs and BWRs) it is economically necessary that the fuel has enough reactivity to reach fuel burnups of the order of a few tens of thousand of MWd/t. In this particular case, an additional input of fissile material is necessary to complement the bred fissile U-233. This additional fissile material could be included in the form of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) at the fabrication of the Th-U fuel. The objective of this preliminary neutronic scoping study is to determine (1) how much HEU and, consequently, how much natural uranium is necessary in such Th-U fuel cycle with U recycling and (2) how much TRansUranics (TRU=Pu, Np, Am and Cm) are produced. These numbers are then compared with those of a standard UO2 PWR. The thorium reactors considered have a homogeneous hexagonal lattice made up of the same (Th-U)O2 pins. Furthermore, at this point, we are not considering the use of blankets inside or outside the core. The lattice pitch has been varied to estimate the effect of the water-to-fuel volume ratio, and light water as well as heavy water have been considered. For most cases, an average burnup at discharge of 45,000 MWd/t has been considered.

  16. Intensity Based Image Registration By Nonparametric Local Smoothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    features is often a challenging and time-consuming process, intensity-based image registration, by which of this technique is to integrate useful information from different sources (e.g., CT, PET, SPECT, X-ray, ultrasound an important tool for improving the quality of certain image-based technologies [21]. Mathematically, the image

  17. Intensity Based Image Registration By Nonparametric Local Smoothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    features is often a challenging and time­consuming process, intensity­based image registration, by which of this technique is to integrate useful information from different sources (e.g., CT, PET, SPECT, X­ray, ultrasound an important tool for improving the quality of certain image­based technologies [21]. Mathematically, the image

  18. Clinical Studies MLH1 Founder Mutations with Moderate Penetrance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    Clinical Studies MLH1 Founder Mutations with Moderate Penetrance in Spanish Lynch Syndrome Families>A and c.1865T>A (p.Leu622His) of the DNA repair gene MLH1 occur frequently in Spanish Lynch syndrome estimated for other path- ogenic Spanish MLH1 mutations. A common haplotype was associated with each

  19. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  20. Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels

  1. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  2. Moderate-pressure hydrocracking of heavy vacuum gas oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, W.R. Jr.; Tracy, W.J.

    1986-03-01

    Market trends toward increased middle distillate have prompted renewed interest in hydrocracking. Moderate pressure hydrocracking (MPHC) is once-through, single stage hydrocracking process which enables partial conversion of 345 C + vacuum gas oils to low sulfur distillates. Advantages over conventional hydrocracking include lower hydrogen partial pressure and, consequently, much lower hydrogen consumption. Lower pressure is also desirable from the point of view of equipment availability since the process may be operated in low pressure equipment not normally used for hydrocracking. An example of commercial application of a MPHC retrofit of a vacuum gas oil desulfurization unit is given. Catalysts and economics are described for the process. 4 references.

  3. Elastic moderation of intrinsically applied tension in lipid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Lomholt; Bastien Loubet; John H. Ipsen

    2010-10-20

    Tension in lipid membranes is often controlled externally, by pulling on the boundary of the membrane or changing osmotic pressure across a curved membrane. But modifications of the tension can also be induced in an internal fashion, for instance as a byproduct of changing a membranes electric potential or, as observed experimentally, by activity of membrane proteins. Here we develop a theory which demonstrate how such internal contributions to the tension are moderated through elastic stretching of the membrane when the membrane is initially in a low tension floppy state.

  4. Effect Size and Moderators of Effects for Token Economy Interventions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Denise

    2012-02-14

    of this investigation was to Meta-analyze the single case research on TE implemented in school and is the first to offer effect size analysis and identify moderators. The use of TE?s has been widely established as an evidence-based intervention for use in prisons... to implement a TE is needed in our literature. Empirical evidence for the use of a token economy in a classroom is presented along with suggested implementation ideas. Twenty four studies were included in this Meta-analysis with an overall combined Tau...

  5. Experimental transport of intensity diffraction tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Justin Wu

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I perform intensity-based tomographic phase imaging in two ways. First, I utilize the paraxial transport of intensity equation (TIE) to construct phase maps of a phase object at multiple projection angles ...

  6. Control Intensive Planning Planet 2003 Summer School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacchus, Fahiem

    in efficiency. Why not utilize that knowledge! Control Intensive Planning/F. Bacchus ­ p.2/131 #12;Goals Control Intensive planning involves finding ways to build and utilize richer domain models so as to support more utilize Forward Chaining. B C A C C A B A B pickup(A) unstack(B) Control Intensive Planning/F. Bacchus ­ p

  7. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  8. Changes in energy intensity in the manufacturing sector 1985--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-15

    In this report, energy intensity is defined as the ratio of energy consumption per unit of output. Output is measured as the constant dollar of value of shipments and receipts, and two measures of energy consumption are presented in British thermal units (Btu): Offsite-Produced Energy and Total Inputs of Energy. A decrease in energy intensity from one period to another suggests an increase in energy efficiency, and vice versa. Energy efficiency can be defined and measured in various ways. Certain concepts of energy efficiency, especially those limited to equipment efficiencies, cannot be measured over time using changes in energy-intensity ratios. While improved energy efficiency will tend to reduce energy intensity, it is also true that a change in energy intensity can be due to factors unrelated to energy efficiency. For this report, energy intensity is used as a surrogate measure for energy efficiency, based on industry knowledge and current methodological analyses.

  9. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W. [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  10. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  11. Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better...

  12. Energy Intensity Indicators: Terminology and Definitions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Intensity Indicators website uses the following terms with their associated definitions. The terms related to various definitions of energy are discussed first.

  13. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Hewett; H. Weerts; R. Brock; J. N. Butler; B. C. K. Casey; J. Collar; A. de Gouvea; R. Essig; Y. Grossman; W. Haxton; J. A. Jaros; C. K. Jung; Z. T. Lu; K. Pitts; Z. Ligeti; J. R. Patterson; M. Ramsey-Musolf; J. L. Ritchie; A. Roodman; K. Scholberg; C. E. M. Wagner; G. P. Zeller; S. Aefsky; A. Afanasev; K. Agashe; C. Albright; J. Alonso; C. Ankenbrandt; M. Aoki; C. A. Arguelles; N. Arkani-Hamed; J. R. Armendariz; C. Armendariz-Picon; E. Arrieta Diaz; J. Asaadi; D. M. Asner; K. S. Babu; K. Bailey; O. Baker; B. Balantekin; B. Baller; M. Bass; B. Batell; J. Beacham; J. Behr; N. Berger; M. Bergevin; E. Berman; R. Bernstein; A. J. Bevan; M. Bishai; M. Blanke; S. Blessing; A. Blondel; T. Blum; G. Bock; A. Bodek; G. Bonvicini; F. Bossi; J. Boyce; R. Breedon; M. Breidenbach; S. J. Brice; R. A. Briere; S. Brodsky; C. Bromberg; A. Bross; T. E. Browder; D. A. Bryman; M. Buckley; R. Burnstein; E. Caden; P. Campana; R. Carlini; G. Carosi; C. Castromonte; R. Cenci; I. Chakaberia; M. C. Chen; C. H. Cheng; B. Choudhary; N. H. Christ; E. Christensen; M. E. Christy; T. E. Chupp; E. Church; D. B. Cline; T. E. Coan; P. Coloma; J. Comfort; L. Coney; J. Cooper; R. J. Cooper; R. Cowan; D. F. Cowen; D. Cronin-Hennessy; A. Datta; G. S. Davies; M. Demarteau; D. P. DeMille; A. Denig; R. Dermisek; A. Deshpande; M. S. Dewey; R. Dharmapalan; J. Dhooghe; M. R. Dietrich; M. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; S. Dobbs; M. Duraisamy; B. Dutta; H. Duyang; D. A. Dwyer; M. Eads; B. Echenard; S. R. Elliott; C. Escobar; J. Fajans; S. Farooq; C. Faroughy; J. E. Fast; B. Feinberg; J. Felde; G. Feldman; P. Fierlinger; P. Fileviez Perez; B. Filippone; P. Fisher; B. T. Flemming; K. T. Flood; R. Forty; M. J. Frank; A. Freyberger; A. Friedland; R. Gandhi; K. S. Ganezer; A. Garcia; F. G. Garcia; S. Gardner; L. Garrison; A. Gasparian; S. Geer; V. M. Gehman; T. Gershon; M. Gilchriese; C. Ginsberg; I. Gogoladze; M. Gonderinger; M. Goodman; H. Gould; M. Graham; P. W. Graham; R. Gran; J. Grange; G. Gratta; J. P. Green; H. Greenlee; R. C. Group; E. Guardincerri; V. Gudkov; R. Guenette; A. Haas; A. Hahn; T. Han; T. Handler; J. C. Hardy; R. Harnik; D. A. Harris; F. A. Harris; P. G. Harris; J. Hartnett; B. He; B. R. Heckel; K. M. Heeger; S. Henderson; D. Hertzog; R. Hill; E. A Hinds; D. G. Hitlin; R. J. Holt; N. Holtkamp; G. Horton-Smith; P. Huber; W. Huelsnitz; J. Imber; I. Irastorza; J. Jaeckel; I. Jaegle; C. James; A. Jawahery; D. Jensen; C. P. Jessop; B. Jones; H. Jostlein; T. Junk; A. L. Kagan; M. Kalita; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; G. Karagiorgi; A. Karle; T. Katori; B. Kayser; R. Kephart; S. Kettell; Y. K. Kim; M. Kirby; K. Kirch; J. Klein; J. Kneller; A. Kobach; M. Kohl; J. Kopp; M. Kordosky; W. Korsch; I. Kourbanis; A. D. Krisch; P. Krizan; A. S. Kronfeld; S. Kulkarni; K. S. Kumar; Y. Kuno; T. Kutter; T. Lachenmaier; M. Lamm; J. Lancaster; M. Lancaster; C. Lane; K. Lang; P. Langacker; S. Lazarevic; T. Le; K. Lee; K. T. Lesko; Y. Li; M. Lindgren; A. Lindner; J. Link; D. Lissauer; L. S. Littenberg; B. Littlejohn; C. Y. Liu; W. Loinaz; W. Lorenzon; W. C. Louis; J. Lozier; L. Ludovici; L. Lueking; C. Lunardini; D. B. MacFarlane; P. A. N. Machado; P. B. Mackenzie; J. Maloney; W. J. Marciano; W. Marsh; M. Marshak; J. W. Martin; C. Mauger; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; G. McLaughlin; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; B. T. Meadows; R. Mehdiyev; D. Melconian; H. Merkel; M. Messier; J. P. Miller; G. Mills; U. K. Minamisono; S. R. Mishra; I. Mocioiu; S. Moed Sher; R. N. Mohapatra; B. Monreal; C. D. Moore; J. G. Morfin; J. Mousseau; L. A. Moustakas; G. Mueller; P. Mueller; M. Muether; H. P. Mumm; C. Munger; H. Murayama; P. Nath; O. Naviliat-Cuncin; J. K. Nelson; D. Neuffer; J. S. Nico; A. Norman; D. Nygren; Y. Obayashi; T. P. O'Connor; Y. Okada; J. Olsen; L. Orozco; J. L. Orrell; J. Osta; B. Pahlka; J. Paley; V. Papadimitriou; M. Papucci; S. Parke; R. H. Parker; Z. Parsa; K. Partyka; A. Patch; J. C. Pati; R. B. Patterson; Z. Pavlovic; G. Paz; G. N. Perdue; D. Perevalov; G. Perez; R. Petti; W. Pettus; A. Piepke; M. Pivovaroff; R. Plunkett; C. C. Polly; M. Pospelov; R. Povey; A. Prakesh; M. V. Purohit; S. Raby; J. L. Raaf; R. Rajendran; S. Rajendran; G. Rameika; R. Ramsey; A. Rashed; B. N. Ratcliff; B. Rebel; J. Redondo; P. Reimer; D. Reitzner; F. Ringer; A. Ringwald; S. Riordan; B. L. Roberts; D. A. Roberts; R. Robertson; F. Robicheaux; M. Rominsky; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; C. Rott; P. Rubin; N. Saito; M. Sanchez; S. Sarkar; H. Schellman; B. Schmidt; M. Schmitt; D. W. Schmitz; J. Schneps; A. Schopper; P. Schuster; A. J. Schwartz; M. Schwarz; J. Seeman; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. K. Seth; Q. Shafi; P. Shanahan; R. Sharma; S. R. Sharpe; M. Shiozawa; V. Shiltsev; K. Sigurdson; P. Sikivie; J. Singh; D. Sivers; T. Skwarnicki; N. Smith; J. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Soderberg; Y. H. Song; A. Soni; P. Souder; A. Sousa; J. Spitz; M. Stancari; G. C. Stavenga; J. H. Steffen

    2012-05-11

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  14. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewett, J L; Brock, R; Butler, J N; Casey, B C K; Collar, J; de Gouvea, A; Essig, R; Grossman, Y; Haxton, W; Jaros, J A; Jung, C K; Lu, Z T; Pitts, K; Ligeti, Z; Patterson, J R; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ritchie, J L; Roodman, A; Scholberg, K; Wagner, C E M; Zeller, G P; Aefsky, S; Afanasev, A; Agashe, K; Albright, C; Alonso, J; Ankenbrandt, C; Aoki, M; Arguelles, C A; Arkani-Hamed, N; Armendariz, J R; Armendariz-Picon, C; Diaz, E Arrieta; Asaadi, J; Asner, D M; Babu, K S; Bailey, K; Baker, O; Balantekin, B; Baller, B; Bass, M; Batell, B; Beacham, J; Behr, J; Berger, N; Bergevin, M; Berman, E; Bernstein, R; Bevan, A J; Bishai, M; Blanke, M; Blessing, S; Blondel, A; Blum, T; Bock, G; Bodek, A; Bonvicini, G; Bossi, F; Boyce, J; Breedon, R; Breidenbach, M; Brice, S J; Briere, R A; Brodsky, S; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Browder, T E; Bryman, D A; Buckley, M; Burnstein, R; Caden, E; Campana, P; Carlini, R; Carosi, G; Castromonte, C; Cenci, R; Chakaberia, I; Chen, M C; Cheng, C H; Choudhary, B; Christ, N H; Christensen, E; Christy, M E; Chupp, T E; Church, E; Cline, D B; Coan, T E; Coloma, P; Comfort, J; Coney, L; Cooper, J; Cooper, R J; Cowan, R; Cowen, D F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Datta, A; Davies, G S; Demarteau, M; DeMille, D P; Denig, A; Dermisek, R; Deshpande, A; Dewey, M S; Dharmapalan, R; Dhooghe, J; Dietrich, M R; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Dobbs, S; Duraisamy, M; Dutta, B; Duyang, H; Dwyer, D A; Eads, M; Echenard, B; Elliott, S R; Escobar, C; Fajans, J; Farooq, S; Faroughy, C; Fast, J E; Feinberg, B; Felde, J; Feldman, G; Fierlinger, P; Perez, P Fileviez; Filippone, B; Fisher, P; Flemming, B T; Flood, K T; Forty, R; Frank, M J; Freyberger, A; Friedland, A; Gandhi, R; Ganezer, K S; Garcia, A; Garcia, F G; Gardner, S; Garrison, L; Gasparian, A; Geer, S; Gehman, V M; Gershon, T; Gilchriese, M; Ginsberg, C; Gogoladze, I; Gonderinger, M; Goodman, M; Gould, H; Graham, M; Graham, P W; Gran, R; Grange, J; Gratta, G; Green, J P; Greenlee, H; Guardincerri, E; Gudkov, V; Guenette, R; Haas, A; Hahn, A; Han, T; Handler, T; Hardy, J C; Harnik, R; Harris, D A; Harris, F A; Harris, P G; Hartnett, J; He, B; Heckel, B R; Heeger, K M; Henderson, S; Hertzog, D; Hill, R; Hinds, E A; Hitlin, D G; Holt, R J; Holtkamp, N; Horton-Smith, G; Huber, P; Huelsnitz, W; Imber, J; Irastorza, I; Jaeckel, J; Jaegle, I; James, C; Jawahery, A; Jensen, D; Jessop, C P; Jones, B; Jostlein, H; Junk, T; Kagan, A L; Kalita, M; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Karagiorgi, G; Karle, A; Katori, T; Kayser, B; Kephart, R; Kettell, S; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirch, K; Klein, J; Kneller, J; Kobach, A; Kohl, M; Kopp, J; Kordosky, M; Korsch, W; Kourbanis, I; Krisch, A D; Krizan, P; Kronfeld, A S; Kulkarni, S; Kumar, K S; Kuno, Y; Kutter, T; Lachenmaier, T; Lamm, M; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lane, C; Lang, K; Langacker, P; Lazarevic, S; Le, T; Lee, K; Lesko, K T; Li, Y; Lindgren, M; Lindner, A; Link, J; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L S; Littlejohn, B; Liu, C Y; Loinaz, W; Lorenzon, W; Louis, W C; Lozier, J; Ludovici, L; Lueking, L; Lunardini, C; MacFarlane, D B; Machado, P A N; Mackenzie, P B; Maloney, J; Marciano, W J; Marsh, W; Marshak, M; Martin, J W; Mauger, C; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLaughlin, G; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Meadows, B T; Mehdiyev, R; Melconian, D; Merkel, H; Messier, M; Miller, J P; Mills, G; Minamisono, U K; Mishra, S R; Mocioiu, I; Sher, S Moed; Mohapatra, R N; Monreal, B; Moore, C D; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Moustakas, L A; Mueller, G; Mueller, P; Muether, M; Mumm, H P; Munger, C; Murayama, H; Nath, P; Naviliat-Cuncin, O; Nelson, J K; Neuffer, D; Nico, J S; Norman, A; Nygren, D; Obayashi, Y; O'Connor, T P; Okada, Y; Olsen, J; Orozco, L; Orrell, J L; Osta, J; Pahlka, B; Paley, J; Papadimitriou, V; Papucci, M; Parke, S; Parker, R H; Parsa, Z; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Pati, J C; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Paz, G; Perdue, G N; Perevalov, D; Perez, G; Petti, R; Pettus, W; Piepke, A; Pivovaroff, M; Plunkett, R; Polly, C C; Pospelov, M; Povey, R; Prakesh, A; Purohit, M V; Raby, S; Raaf, J L; Rajendran, R; Rajendran, S; Rameika, G; Ramsey, R; Rashed, A; Ratcliff, B N; Rebel, B; Redondo, J; Reimer, P; Reitzner, D; Ringer, F; Ringwald, A; Riordan, S; Roberts, B L; Roberts, D A; Robertson, R; Robicheaux, F; Rominsky, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Rott, C; Rubin, P; Saito, N; Sanchez, M; Sarkar, S; Schellman, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, M; Schmitz, D W; Schneps, J; Schopper, A; Schuster, P; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, M; Seeman, J; Semertzidis, Y K; Seth, K K; Shafi, Q; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Sharpe, S R; Shiozawa, M; Shiltsev, V; Sigurdson, K; Sikivie, P; Singh, J; Sivers, D; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H; Soderberg, M; Song, Y H; Soni, A; Souder, P; Sousa, A; Spitz, J; Stancari, M; Stavenga, G C; Steffen, J H; Stepanyan, S; Stoeckinger, D; Stone, S; Strait, J; Strassler, M; Sulai, I A; Sundrum, R; Svoboda, R; Szczerbinska, B; Szelc, A; Takeuchi, T; Tanedo, P

    2012-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  15. Service Assessment Intense Space Weather Storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Service Assessment Intense Space Weather Storms October 19 ­ November 07, 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Silver Spring, Maryland image. #12;Service Assessment Intense Space Weather Storms October 19 ­ November 07, 2003 April 2004 U

  16. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run IIą

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Fitzgerald, J.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2011-10-06

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. With Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  17. Moderator: Doug Brown, VP CIPS Alberta 04/12/2012 Computer Science Industry Day 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Moderator: Doug Brown, VP CIPS Alberta 04/12/2012 Computer Science Industry, CIO, Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO) Marlo Nielsen, Sr. Recruiting

  18. Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ModelingData-Intensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ChapterXII ModelingData-Intensive Web Sites-by-stepapproachtothedesign,implementation and management of a Data-Intensive Web Site (DIWS). The approach introduces five data formulation is that of "Web fragments," that is an information decomposition technique that aids design, implementation

  19. Axial magnetic field generation by intense circularly polarized laser pulses in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naseri, N.; Rozmus, W. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Bychenkov, V. Yu. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    Axial magnetic field generation by intense circularly polarized laser beams in underdense plasmas has been studied with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and by means of theoretical analysis. Comparisons between analytical models and simulation results have identified an inverse Faraday effect as the main mechanism of the magnetic field generation in inhomogeneous plasmas. The source of azimuthal nonlinear currents and of the axial magnetic field depends on the transverse inhomogeneities of the electron density and laser intensity. The fields reach a maximum strength of several tens of megagauss for laser pulses undergoing relativistic self-focusing and channeling in moderately relativistic regime. Ultrarelativistic laser conditions inhibit magnetic field generation by directly reducing a source term and by generating fully evacuated plasma channels.

  20. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  1. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  2. Energy Intensity Indicators: Commercial Source Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure C1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) commercial building floor space, 2) energy use based on source energy consumption, 3) energy intensity, and 4) the...

  3. Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seater, Robert Morrison

    2009-01-01

    A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

  4. Technical Change, Investment and Energy Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratena, Kurt

    This paper analyzes the role of different components of technical change on energy intensity by applying a Translog variable cost function setting to the new EU KLEMS dataset for 3 selected EU countries (Italy, Finland and ...

  5. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  6. Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

    2010-01-01

    Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

  7. Applications in Data-Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Anuj R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Choudhury, Sutanay; Gorton, Ian; Gracio, Deborah K.; Halter, Todd D.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Johnson, John R.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Macduff, Matt C.; Marquez, Andres; Monroe, Matthew E.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Pike, William A.; Scherrer, Chad; Villa, Oreste; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Zuljevic, Nino

    2010-04-01

    This book chapter, to be published in Advances in Computers, Volume 78, in 2010 describes applications of data intensive computing (DIC). This is an invited chapter resulting from a previous publication on DIC. This work summarizes efforts coming out of the PNNL's Data Intensive Computing Initiative. Advances in technology have empowered individuals with the ability to generate digital content with mouse clicks and voice commands. Digital pictures, emails, text messages, home videos, audio, and webpages are common examples of digital content that are generated on a regular basis. Data intensive computing facilitates human understanding of complex problems. Data-intensive applications provide timely and meaningful analytical results in response to exponentially growing data complexity and associated analysis requirements through the development of new classes of software, algorithms, and hardware.

  8. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  9. Asymptotic Analysis of the Structure of Moderately Rich Methane-Air Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsch, Heinz

    Asymptotic Analysis of the Structure of Moderately Rich Methane-Air Flames K. SESHADRI,* X. S. BAI Republic of Germany The asymptotic structure of laminar, moderately rich, premixed methane flames structure of laminar, stoichi- ometric, and lean methane flames [1­6]. For rich flames, these analyses did

  10. Policy on Moderation of Assessment In May 2013, the Senate approved, for implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Policy on Moderation of Assessment In May 2013, the Senate approved, for implementation with effect from 2013/14, a Policy on the Moderation of Assessment. The aim is: To assure the University policies covers: All qualifying assessments contributing to the degree awards associated with a programme

  11. Laser intensity effects in noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Mattias Marklund

    2010-02-17

    We discuss a two-fold extension of QED assuming the presence of strong external fields provided by an ultra-intense laser and noncommutativity of spacetime. While noncommutative effects leave the electron's intensity induced mass shift unchanged, the photons change significantly in character: they acquire a quasi-momentum that is no longer light-like. We study the consequences of this combined noncommutative strong-field effect for basic lepton-photon interactions.

  12. Efficient Materialization of Dynamic Web Data to Improve Web Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient Materialization of Dynamic Web Data to Improve Web Performance Christos Bouras, Agisilaos of performance, response efficiency and data consistency are among the most important ones for data intensive Web a materialization policy that may be applied to data intensive Web sites. Our research relies on the performance

  13. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

  14. Improved aethalometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  15. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  16. CAUSAL ANALYSIS OF THE UNCONTROLLED MODERATOR IN THE HFEF MAIN CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles R. Posegate; Bryan P. Crofts

    2012-12-01

    On 11/07/2012 while investigating the cause of defects in neutron radiography film at HFEF, oil was discovered near the elevator shaft located at the 4M location within the Main Cell. Subsequent investigation identified oil (untracked moderator) in several locations ofthe HFEF Main Cell. Initial analysis determined that oil leaking from a 1M shielding window had leaked past a compensatory containment system resulting in a thin layer of oil found in several locations on the main cell floor. The result of this condition is uncontrolled moderator in moderator controlled zones, which is a violation of Criticality Hazard Control Statements (CHCS) for HFEF.

  17. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Kian Tan; Aik Hui Chan; Christian Kurtsiefer

    2015-12-29

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  18. Industrial Technologies Program Research Plan for Energy-Intensive Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapas, Richard B.; Colwell, Jeffery A.

    2007-10-01

    In this plan, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) identifies the objectives of its cross-cutting strategy for conducting research in collaboration with industry and U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories to develop technologies that improve the efficiencies of energy-intensive process industries.

  19. Minor actinide transmutation in thorium and uranium matrices in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, Zaki; Hyland, B.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, 1 Plant Road, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The irradiation of Th{sup 232} breeds fewer of the problematic minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) than the irradiation of U{sup 238}. This characteristic makes thorium an attractive potential matrix for the transmutation of these minor actinides, as these species can be transmuted without the creation of new actinides as is the case with a uranium fuel matrix. Minor actinides are the main contributors to long term decay heat and radiotoxicity of spent fuel, so reducing their concentration can greatly increase the capacity of a long term deep geological repository. Mixing minor actinides with thorium, three times more common in the Earth's crust than natural uranium, has the additional advantage of improving the sustainability of the fuel cycle. In this work, lattice cell calculations have been performed to determine the results of transmuting minor actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in a thorium matrix. 15-year-cooled group-extracted transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel were used as the fissile component in a thorium-based fuel in a heavy water moderated reactor (HWR). The minor actinide (MA) transmutation rates, spent fuel activity, decay heat and radiotoxicity, are compared with those obtained when the MA were mixed instead with natural uranium and taken to the same burnup. Each bundle contained a central pin containing a burnable neutron absorber whose initial concentration was adjusted to have the same reactivity response (in units of the delayed neutron fraction ?) for coolant voiding as standard NU fuel. (authors)

  20. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  1. Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2008-02-09

    This is the final technical report for a three-site project that is part of an overall program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) and industry partners to obtain the necessary information to assess the feasibility and costs of controlling mercury from coal-fired utility plants. This report summarizes results from tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station and Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station (ISES) and sorbent screening at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center (CBEC) (subsequently renamed Walter Scott Energy Center (WSEC)). Detailed results for Independence and Louisa are presented in the respective Topical Reports. As no full-scale testing was conducted at CBEC, screening updates were provided in the quarterly updates to DOE. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and other industry partners, has conducted evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. An overview of each plant configuration is presented: (1) MidAmerican's Louisa Generating Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in its 700-MW Unit 1 and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal. (2) MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center typically burns PRB coal in its 88-MW Unit 2. It employs a hot-side ESP for particulate control. Solid sorbents were screened for hot-side injection. (3) Entergy's Independence Steam Electric Station typically burns PRB coal in its 880-MW Unit 2. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on 1/8 to 1/32 of the flue gas stream either within or in front of one of four ESP boxes (SCA = 542 ft{sup 2}/kacfm), specifically ESP B. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that although significant mercury control could be achieved by using the TOXECON II{trademark} design, the sorbent concentration required was higher than expected, possibly due to poor sorbent distribution. Subsequently, the original injection grid design was modeled and the results revealed that the sorbent distribution pattern was determined by the grid design, fluctuations in flue gas flow rates, and the structure of the ESP box. To improve sorbent distribution, the injection grid and delivery system were redesigned and the effectiveness of the redesigned system was evaluated. This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase II project with the goal of developing mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. Results from testing at Independence indicate that the DOE goal was successfully achieved. Further improvements in the process are recommended, however. Results from testing at Louisa indicate that the DOE goal was not achievable using the tested high-temperature sorbent. Sorbent screening at Council Bluffs also indicated that traditional solid sorbents may not achieve significant mercury removal in hot-side applications.

  2. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity...

  3. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01

    1 2. World Best Practice Energy IntensityBrussels: IISI. Best practice energy use is also determinedalong with the best practice energy intensity value for

  4. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01

    Best Practice Final and Primary Energy Intensity Values forWorld Best Practice Primary Energy Intensity Values forRecovered Pulp Note: Primary energy includes electricity

  5. 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program Due December 10 November 18, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments)...

  6. EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of...

  7. Measurement of cryogenic moderator temperature effects in a small heterogeneous thermal reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Ball, R.M.; Lewis, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Past papers have described a critical experiment (CX) built at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the neutronic behavior of the particle-bed reactor (PBK). Among the experiments previously reported were tests to measure the reactivity effect of uniform temperature variations between 20 and 80{degree}C. This paper describes additional experiments designed to examine the effects of cryogenic moderator temperatures on core reactivity and neutron spectrum. The general importance of temperature effects to the design of the PBR have been previously discussed. A unique feature of the PBR is that the moderator may be at cryogenic temperatures during reactor startup. Because temperature effects in small, heterogeneous thermal reactors can be significant and because we found no integral measurements with cryogenic moderators in such systems, an experiment with a cryogenic moderator was designed and performed in the CX as an extension to the isothermal measurements previously reported.

  8. Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

    2012-01-01

    Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

  9. Effect of Enzyme Supplementation at Moderate Cellulase Loadings on Initial Glucose and Xylose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ARTICLE Effect of Enzyme Supplementation at Moderate Cellulase Loadings on Initial Glucose-glucosidase supplementation. Furthermore, for the first time, xylobiose and higher xyloo- ligomers were shown to inhibit

  10. Moderators of the Safety Climate-Injury Relationship: A Meta-Analytic Examination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beus, Jeremy M.

    2010-07-14

    and group levels of analysis. Hypotheses were posited regarding the effects of six moderators: study design (i.e., retrospective or prospective), the time frame for gathering injury data, the degree of content contamination and deficiency in safety climate...

  11. On the Importance of Strengthening Moderate Beliefs in Climate Science to Foster Support for Immediate Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendling, Zachary A.; Attari, Shahzeen Z.; Carley, Sanya R.; Krause, Rachel M.; Warren, David C.; Rupp, John A.; Graham, John D.

    2013-12-03

    Whereas many studies focus on climate skeptics to explain the lack of support for immediate action on climate change, this research examines the effect of moderate believers in climate science. Using data from a representative survey of 832 Indiana...

  12. Building equity : the evolution and efficacy of Montgomery County's moderately priced dwelling unit legislation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakabovics, Andrew, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the history of Montgomery County, Maryland's Moderately Priced Dwelling Unit (MPDU) law. Passed in 1973, it is the oldest inclusionary zoning legislation in the country. The law emerged out of three ...

  13. Surface Signature of Flow Past a Sphere at Moderate Reynolds Numbers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qi

    2014-04-29

    The incompressible viscous flow past a sphere is investigated numerically at moderate Reynolds numbers. Periodic vortex shedding happens at these Reynolds numbers. The primary objective is to identify the surface signature when the wake reaches...

  14. MOSFET Operation in Weak and Moderate Inversion R.R. Harrison The MOS Transistor in Weak Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Reid R.

    exponentially with decreasing gate voltage. Depletion Weak inversion Moderate inversion Strong inversion VGB VT0 axis: Weak inversion Moderate inversion Strong inversion VGB VT0 QI = -Cox(VGB ­ VT0) log |QI| QI -exp(VGB

  15. WHERE ARE THE MOST INTENSE THUNDERSTORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    provided unparalleled information on the global distribution of intense convective storms. T he Tropical-alti- tude, non-sun-synchronous orbit permits sampling throughout the diurnal cycle of precipitation. The cloud-top temperature of storms has been measured using infrared (IR) bright- ness temperature (Tb

  16. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet containing detailed data and graphics for specific transportation modes.

  17. Adaptive Background Estimation using Intensity Independent Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Adaptive Background Estimation using Intensity Independent Features Håkan Ardö, Rikard Berthilsson to rapid changes in lighting conditions. Furthermore, the features can be computed very efficiently using reliable way, also in outdoor scenes where the lighting conditions is changing rapidly due to passing

  18. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  19. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  20. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Baranovski, A.; Diesburg, M.; Garzoglio, G.; /Fermilab; Kurca, T.; /Lyon, IPN; Mhashilkar, P.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project.

  1. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore »Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  2. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barnard, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guo, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hosemann, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lidia, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Minor, A. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seidl, P. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schenkel, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  3. Passive, Noiseless, Intensity Amplification of Repetitive Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maram, R; Li, M; Azańa, J

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of signal intensity is essential for initiating physical processes, diagnostics, sensing, communications, and scientific measurement. During traditional amplification, the signal is amplified by multiplying the signal carriers through an active gain process using an external power source. However, for repetitive waveforms, sufficient energy for amplification often resides in the signal itself. In such cases, the unneeded external power is wasted, and the signal is additionally degraded by noise and distortions that accompany active gain processes. We show noiseless, intensity amplification of repetitive optical pulse waveforms with a gain from 2 to ~20 without using active gain, by recycling energy already stored in the input repetitive signal. This "green" method uses dispersion-induced self-imaging (Talbot) effects to precisely re-distribute the original signal energy into fewer replica waveforms. This approach simply requires a suitable manipulation of the input signal's phase profile along t...

  4. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  5. Nuclear astrophysics with intense photon beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    Quasi-monochromatic photon beams generated by inverse Compton scattering of laser light with high energy electrons can be used for precise measurements of photoneutrons and resonant scattered {gamma} rays. Extremely high intensity and small energy spreading width of the photon beam expected at the ELI Nuclear Physics facility would increase the experimental sensitivities considerably. Possible photonuclear reaction measurements relevant to the p-process nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  6. Improved association in a classical density functional theory for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric J. Krebs; Jeff B. Schulte; David Roundy

    2013-09-07

    We present a modification to our recently published SAFT-based classical density functional theory for water. We have recently developed and tested a functional for the averaged radial distribution function at contact of the hard-sphere fluid that is dramatically more accurate at interfaces than earlier approximations. We now incorporate this improved functional into the association term of our free energy functional for water, improving its description of hydrogen bonding. We examine the effect of this improvement by studying two hard solutes: a hard hydrophobic rod and a hard sphere. The improved functional leads to a moderate change in the density profile and a large decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds broken in the vicinity of the solutes.We present a modification to our recently published SAFT-based classical density functional theory for water. We have recently developed and tested a functional for the averaged radial distribution function at contact of the hard-sphere fluid that is dramatically more accurate at interfaces than earlier approximations. We now incorporate this improved functional into the association term of our free energy functional for water, improving its description of hydrogen bonding. We examine the effect of this improvement by studying two hard solutes: a hard hydrophobic rod and a hard sphere. The improved functional leads to a moderate change in the density profile and a large decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds broken in the vicinity of the solutes.

  7. Calculation of integrated intensities in aberration-corrected Z-contrast images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, S. I. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Guerrero, M. P. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Sales, David [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Inclusion of spatial incoherence has been shown to give quantitative agreement between non-aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images and theoretical simulations. Here we show that, using the same approach, a significant improvement in the correlation between calculated and experimental normalized integrated intensities is obtained in the InAsP ternary semiconductor alloy, but residual discrepancies remain. We have demonstrated, in good agreement with experimental intensities obtained in calibrated samples, that normalized integrated intensities show a low dependence on the sample thickness over a wide range of thickness values. This behaviour does not occur in conventional (non-aberration-corrected) images and constitutes a powerful tool for straightforward interpretation of high-resolution images in terms of atomic column-resolved compositional maps.

  8. COLLIMATION OPTIMIZATION IN HIGH INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CATALAN-LASHERAS,N.

    2001-06-18

    In high intensity proton rings, collimation is needed in order to maintain reasonable levels of residual activation and allow hands-on maintenance. Small acceptance to emittance ratio and restrained longitudinal space become important restrictions when dealing with low energy rings. The constraints and specifications when designing a collimation system for this type of machine will be reviewed. The SNS accumulator ring will serve as an examples long which we will illustrate the optimization path. Experimental studies of collimation with 1.3 GeV proton beams are currently under way in the U-70 machine in Protvino. The first results will be presented.

  9. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  10. Quantum Vacuum Experiments Using High Intensity Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattias Marklund; Joakim Lundin

    2009-04-02

    The quantum vacuum constitutes a fascinating medium of study, in particular since near-future laser facilities will be able to probe the nonlinear nature of this vacuum. There has been a large number of proposed tests of the low-energy, high intensity regime of quantum electrodynamics (QED) where the nonlinear aspects of the electromagnetic vacuum comes into play, and we will here give a short description of some of these. Such studies can shed light, not only on the validity of QED, but also on certain aspects of nonperturbative effects, and thus also give insights for quantum field theories in general.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF THERAPY IMPROVEMENT USING REAL-TIME PHOTOACOUSTIC IMAGING GUIDED HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Huizhong

    2013-05-31

    . Although several groups showed that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),[32, 91, 92] thermoacoustic tomography (TAT),[93] ultrasound imaging[25, 94] have the capabilities of monitoring the thermal lesion generated by HIFU in the targeted region, PAI has... modes (such as head and neck imaging), special RF coils are used to fit closely to the patient’s anatomy, and these coils will interfere with HIFU transducer placement. Photoacoustic imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging or thermoacoustic imaging...

  12. Improvement in thermal barriers to intense terahertz generation from photoconductive antennas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ropagnol, X.; Bouvier, Marcel; Reid, M.; Ozaki, T.

    2014-07-28

    We study the generation of free-space terahertz (THz) pulses at low THz frequencies using 6H-SiC and 4H-SiC photoconductive antennas. We investigate the dependence of the THz electric field radiated from the biased SiC emitters on the applied bias field and on the incident optical fluence. In this work, bias fields as high as 32?kV/cm, and optical fluences up to 2.5?mJ/cm{sup 2} (for the 400?nm laser), and 7.5?mJ/cm{sup 2} (for the 800?nm laser) were used. THz generation with back- and front-side illumination of the antennas is also examined. It is found that the SiC antenna, when illuminated from the backside, generates higher THz electric fields. The performance of 6H-SiC and ZnSe photoconductive antennas are compared. We show that, taking advantage of the superior thermal properties of SiC compare with ZnSe, the THz output power generated with the 6H-SiC photoconductive antenna under optimum conditions is 2.3 times larger that with a ZnSe photoconductive antenna.

  13. Improved neutralized compression and focusing of an intense ion beam using a final focus solenoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J.E., Coleman,

    2010-01-01

    of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.

  14. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21,Equipment: EnergyStandardsITCBoilers | Department

  15. Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

    2011-03-21

    Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

  16. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  17. China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

  18. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  19. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    lighting intensities per lighted square foot-hour (Figure 23). * Food service and health care buildings had the highest water-heating intensities per square foot--more than...

  20. Precipitation amount and intensity measurements with the Ott Pluvio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    Precipitation amount and intensity measurements with the Ott Pluvio Wiel Wauben Instrumental Department, INSA-IO, KNMI August 26, 2004 #12;#12;Precipitation amount and intensity measurements................................................................................... 1 2. Precipitation sensors................................................................... 5 2

  1. USING COGNITIVE MODELING TO STUDY BEHAVIOR MODERATORS: PRE-TASK APPRAISAL AND ANXIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Frank

    evaluation of the situation. Task appraisals can be further specified as pre-task or post-task appraisals moderators: Pre-task appraisal and anxiety. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2121-2125. Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. #12;processor, some working memory or activation

  2. Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation using CALIOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation using CALIOP, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D00A19, doi:10] with plans to continue the cloud record using the next generation of polar orbiting sensors. A ``Climate

  3. FRC on the Path to Fusion Energy (Moderate Density Steady-State Approach)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to start from already formed FRC) Plasma measurement in RMF frame of reference so s RMF r Br T *2 22 µ1 FRC on the Path to Fusion Energy (Moderate Density Steady-State Approach) Alan Hoffman Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory University of Washington (FPA Meeting on Fusion Pathways to the Future

  4. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  5. How moderate sea states can generate loud seismic noise in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stutzmann, Eléonore

    the signals recorded at coastal seismic stations. Our interpretation is based on the analysis of noiseHow moderate sea states can generate loud seismic noise in the deep ocean M. J. Obrebski,1 F from two distant storms can be a strong deep-water source of seismic noise, dominating temporarily

  6. Recent Trends in Graduate Software Engineering Mark Ardis (Moderator) Shawn Bohner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardis, Mark

    Recent Trends in Graduate Software Engineering Mark Ardis (Moderator) Shawn Bohner Stevens.sedano@sv.cmu.edu Abstract This panel will discuss recent trends in graduate software engineering programs, including of software engineering to other disciplines, such as computer science and systems engineering. 1. Position

  7. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON ACHIEVING MODERATOR EXCLUSION AND SUPPORTING STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for the foreseeable future. This report proposes supplementing the ongoing research and development work related to potential degradation of used fuel, baskets, poisons, and storage canisters during an extended period of storage with a parallel path. This parallel path can assure criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). Using updated risk assessment insights for additional technical justification and relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal conditions of transportation. A demonstrating testing program supporting a detailed analytical effort as well as updated risk assessment insights can provide the basis for moderator exclusion during hypothetical accident conditions. This report also discusses how this engineered concept can support the goal of standardized transportation.

  8. Coriolis Effect on Dynamic Stall in a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine at Moderate Reynolds Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonius, Tim

    Coriolis Effect on Dynamic Stall in a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine at Moderate Reynolds Number Hsieh-scale Reynolds number in order to investigate the sep- arated flow occurring on a vertical-axis wind turbine SSPM the sinusoidal surging-pitching motion VAWT vertical axis wind turbine I. Introduction Vertical

  9. Mt. Etna tropospheric ash retrieval and sensitivity analysis using Moderate Resolution Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Mt. Etna tropospheric ash retrieval and sensitivity analysis using Moderate Resolution Imaging.pugnaghi@unimore.it, gabriele.gangale@unimore.it Abstract. A retrieval of tropospheric volcanic ash from Mt Etna has been. In order to derive the ash plume optical thickness, the particle effective radius and the total mass

  10. Guiding of cold atoms by a red-detuned laser beam of moderate power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, Universiteit van

    Guiding of cold atoms by a red-detuned laser beam of moderate power B T Wolschrijn, R A Cornelussen laser power (atoms. We systematically study laser power. We systematically study the fraction of guided atoms by varying the main parameters, laser

  11. Proton scattering on carbon nuclei in bichromatic laser field at moderate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. F. Barna; S. Varró

    2015-06-05

    We present the general theory for proton nuclei scattering in a bichromatic laser field. As a physical example we consider proton collision on carbon twelve at 49 MeV/amu moderate energies in the field of a titan sapphire laser with its second harmonic.

  12. Some insight on why Bam (Iran) was destroyed by an earthquake of relatively moderate size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    Some insight on why Bam (Iran) was destroyed by an earthquake of relatively moderate size Michel March 2006; accepted 29 March 2006; published 13 May 2006. [1] The Bam (Iran) earthquake of 2003. Hatzfeld, J. A. Jackson, and E. Haghshenas (2006), Some insight on why Bam (Iran) was destroyed

  13. Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances Jeffrey M. Bergthorson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances Jeffrey M. Bergthorson an experimental and numerical study of impinging, incompressible, axisym- metric, laminar jets, where the jet axis velocities along the centerline of the flow field. The jet-nozzle pressure drop is measured simultaneously

  14. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  15. Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds Oct. 24, 2012 Yan Zhan 1 #12;Outline · Line Plot of TI at the Pipe Exit · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 4 - 9) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ with a weld ­ 2.5M · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 10 - 15) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ without a weld ­ 3

  16. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  17. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Schils, George F. (San Ramon, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789 between the U.S. Department of Energy and AT&T Technologies, Inc.

  18. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2002-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  19. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2001-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  20. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIMM,J.

    2003-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  1. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care Ii (Mimic-Ii): A Public-Access Intensive Care Unit Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeed, Mohammed

    Objective: We sought to develop an intensive care unit research database applying automated techniques to aggregate high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic data from a large, diverse population of adult intensive care ...

  2. Distilling two-atom distance information from intensity-intensity correlation functions RID A-5077-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jun-Tao; Evers, Joerg; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2006-01-01

    accessible in experiments. For this, we numerically solve the time-evolution equations of the system and calculate the steady-state intensity-intensity correlation by using the Laplace transform and quantum regression theory. By varying the interatomic...

  3. SU-E-T-409: Intensity Modulated Robotic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, B; Jin, L; Li, J; Chen, L; Ma, C; Fan, J; Zhang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: As compared with the IRIS-based models, the MLC-based CyberKnife system allows more efficient treatment delivery due to its improved coverage of large lesions and intensity modulation. The treatment delivery efficiency is mainly determined by the number of selected nodes. This study aimed to demonstrate that relatively small sets of optimally selected nodes could produce high-quality plans. Methods: The full body path of the CyberKnife system consists of 110 nodes, from which we selected various sets for 4 prostate cancer cases using our in-house beamselection software. With the selected nodes we generated IMRT plans using our in-house beamlet-based inverse-planning optimization program. We also produced IMRT plans using the MultiPlan treatment planning system (version 5.0) for the same cases. Furthermore, the nodes selected by MultiPlan were used to produce plans with our own optimization software so that we could compare the quality of the selected sets of nodes. Results: Our beam-selection program selected one node-set for each case, with the number of nodes ranging from 23 to 34. The IMRT plans based on the selected nodes and our in-house optimization program showed adequate target coverage, with favorable critical structure sparing for the cases investigated. Compared with the plans using the nodes selected by MultiPlan, the plans generated with our selected beams provided superior rectum/bladder sparing for 75% of the cases. The plans produced by MultiPlan with various numbers of nodes also suggested that the plan quality was not compromised significantly when the number of nodes was reduced. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that with beamletbased planning optimization, one could produce high-quality plans with an optimal set of nodes for MLC-based robotic radiotherapy. Furthermore, our beam-selection strategy could help further improve critical structure sparing.

  4. Eccentric Braced Frame Design for Moderate Seismic Regions Eric M. Hines, Tufts University, Medford, MA, emhines@lemessurier.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    Eccentric Braced Frame Design for Moderate Seismic Regions Author: Eric M. Hines, Tufts University of low-ductility steel systems designed for moderate seismic regions have generated new interest the 1960's through the 1980's. For these structures, designed prior to modern seismic provisions, eccentric

  5. The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System A Proposal to Operate the Small Telescopes at CTIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) A Proposal to Operate the Small Observatory #12; The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) ABSTRACT We propose to operate four telescopes located at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory (CTIO) for the period from

  6. Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    1 Policy on the Moderation of Assessment: Approved by the Senate, 22 May 2013 Heriot-Watt University Policy on the Moderation of Assessment With diversity in form of assessment across multi in all disciplines, across all Schools and in all modes or locations of study. The University Policy

  7. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of ? ? 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8?×?10{sup 7}?cm/s, and a laser intensity of ?10{sup 15}?W/cm{sup 2}. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  8. Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-12-19

    Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. In this paper, we describe a prototype implementation designed to provide cyber analysts an environment where they can interactively explore a month’s worth of cyber security data. This prototype utilized On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) techniques to present a data cube to the analysts. The cube provides a summary of the data, allowing trends to be easily identified as well as the ability to easily pull up the original records comprising an event of interest. The cube was built using SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), with the interface to the cube provided by Tableau. This software infrastructure was supported by a novel hardware architecture comprising a Netezza TwinFin® for the underlying data warehouse and a cube server with a FusionIO drive hosting the data cube. We evaluated this environment on a month’s worth of artificial, but realistic, data using multiple queries provided by our cyber analysts. As our results indicate, OLAP technology has progressed to the point where it is in a unique position to provide novel insights to cyber analysts, as long as it is supported by an appropriate data intensive architecture.

  9. Intense ultraviolet perturbations on aquatic primary producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Horvath, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the hypothesis that one or more biodiversity drops in the Phanerozoic eon, evident in the geological record, might have been caused by the most powerful kind of stellar explosion so far known (Gamma Ray Bursts) has been discussed in several works. These stellar explosions could have left an imprint in the biological evolution on Earth and in other habitable planets. In this work we calculate the short-term lethality that a GRB would produce in the aquatic primary producers on Earth. This effect on life appears as a result of ultraviolet (UV) re-transmission in the atmosphere of a fraction of the gamma energy, resulting in an intense UV flash capable of penetrating ~ tens of meters in the water column in the ocean. We focus on the action of the UV flash on phytoplankton, as they are the main contributors to global aquatic primary productivity. Our results suggest that the UV flash could cause an hemispheric reduction of phytoplankton biomass in the upper mixed layer of the World Ocean o...

  10. Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

    1995-07-01

    The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

  11. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  12. High Efficiency Burners by Retrofit - A Simple Inexpensive Way to Improve Combustion Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Existing direct fired process heaters and steam boilers can have their efficiencies remarkably improved, and thus cut the fuel bill, by conversion from conventional type natural draft burners to high intensity, "forced draft" type burners...

  13. Economic potential of intensive culture of Penaeus vannamei in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Mora Perez-Arce, Jose Bernardo

    1991-01-01

    operations; these operations included stocking, feeding, monitoring and harvesting of semi- intensively managed ponds stocked with Penaeus vannamei. Also, intensively managed round ponds were studied during my internship; this allowed me to become.... EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Two hypothetical shrimp farms on the Pacific coast of Mexico were designed to allow financial analysis of methods and management technologies developed in the USA for intensive culture of Penaeus vannamei under local conditions in west...

  14. Ionized channel generation of an intense-relativistic electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Leifeste, Gordon T. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A foilless intense relativistic electron beam generator uses an ionized cnel to guide electrons from a cathode passed an anode to a remote location.

  15. Table 6. Energy intensity by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy intensity by State (2000-2011)" "thousand Btu per dollar of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011" "State",1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005...

  16. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Intensities The purpose of this section is to provide information on how energy was used for space conditioning--heating, cooling, and ventilation--in commercial...

  17. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response of High-Tc Superconductor...

  18. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  19. The Fermilab Main Injector: high intensity operation and beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fermilab Main Injector: high intensity operation and beam loss control Authors: Brown, Bruce C. ; Adamson, Philip ; Capista, David ; Chou, Weiren ; Kourbanis, Ioanis ;...

  20. Power Factor Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    and disadvantages of various locations in the electrical network are described including the cost of installation and network capacity improvement. Sizing of capacitors is also covered. Finally, some case studies involving power factor improvement are presented...

  1. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  2. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-27

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experimentmore »in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.« less

  3. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.

  4. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  5. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  6. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  7. Title of Dissertation: LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM John Richardson fusion, spallation neutron sources, free-electron lasers, and other applications. In addition, all beams beams. #12;LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS OF AN INTENSE ELECTRON BEAM By John Richardson Harris. Dissertation

  8. Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Hui Li, Doctor of beam characteristics over long distances. The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), which uses low energy, high current electron beams to model the transport physics of intense space

  9. Vessel tractography using an intensity based tensor model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Vessel tractography using an intensity based tensor model Suheyla Cetin1 , Gozde Unal1 , Ali Demir1 method, which is based on an intensity-based tensor that fits to a vessel. Our model is initialized with a single seed point and it is ca- pable of capturing whole vessel tree by an automatic branch detection

  10. Intensive Summer Spanish Courses in Barcelona for Erasmus & University .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Intensive Summer Spanish Courses in Barcelona for Erasmus & University . 2014 -AUGUST 11th -SEPTEMBER- OCTOBER SpainBcn-Programs in Barcelona, is the best place to learn Spanish fast, in a warm in Barcelona or elsewhere in Spain (many students attending Spanish Universities take a 2/3/4 weeks Intensive

  11. Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge-Intensive Work in the Oil and Gas Industry: A Case Study Thesis for the degree collaborative work practices within a large international oil and gas company (OGC). The work is founded empirical findings, we argue that in knowledge-intensive, interdisciplinary work such as oil and gas

  12. The investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    , access to high temperature states of mat- ter capable of thermonuclear fusion and/or the effi- cientThe investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources for fusion materials. The application of fast pulse, high intensity lasers to drive low cost DT point neutron sources for fusion

  13. LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS G. I. Silvestrov, Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics Novosibirsk, August 1998. #12;1 LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS target of liquid metal. The technical solution is producing the target in the form of flat jet flowing

  14. Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using a windscreen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using a windscreen Wiel Wauben Instrumental Department, INSA-IO, KNMI June 21, 2004 #12;#12;Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using................................................................................... 1 2. Precipitation gauge and measurement setup............................ 3 2.1. KNMI electronic

  15. A Comprehensive System of U.S. Energy Intensity Indicators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes a comprehensive system of energy intensity indicators for the United States that has been developed for the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) over the past decade. This system of indicators is hierarchical in nature, beginning with detailed indexes of energy intensity for various sectors of the economy, which are ultimately aggregated to an overall energy intensity index for the economy as a whole. The aggregation of energy intensity indexes to higher levels in the hierarchy is performed with a version of the Log Mean Divisia index (LMDI) method. Based upon the data and methods in the system of indicators, the economy-wide energy intensity index shows a decline of about 14% in 2011 relative to a 1985 base year.

  16. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  17. Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

    2005-01-01

    of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marineof gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine

  18. Strong words or moderate words: A comparison of the reliability and validity of responses on attitude scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Bruce B.; Edwards, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    A common assumption in attitude measurement is that items should be composed of strongly worded statements. The presumed benefit of strongly worded statements is that they produce more reliable and valid scores than statements with moderate or weak...

  19. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  20. Ergonomic Improvements for Foundries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Peters; Patrick Patterson

    2002-06-18

    The goal of this project was to make improvements to the production systems of the steel casting industry through ergonomic improvements. Because of the wide variety of products, the wide range of product sizes, and the relatively small quantities of any particular product, manual operations remain a vital part of the production systems of the steel casting companies. Ergonomic improvements will assist the operators to more efficiently and consistently produce quality products.

  1. Optical Multi-Channel Intensity Interferometry - or: How To Resolve O-Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trippe, Sascha; Lee, Bangwon; Choi, Changsu; Oh, Junghwan; Lee, Taeseok; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Im, Myungshin; Park, Yong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Intensity interferometry, based on the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect, is a simple and inexpensive method for optical interferometry at microarcsecond angular resolutions; its use in astronomy was abandoned in the 1970s because of low sensitivity. Motivated by recent technical developments, we argue that the sensitivity of large modern intensity interferometers can be improved by factors up to approximately 25,000, corresponding to 11 photometric magnitudes, compared to the pioneering Narrabri Stellar Interferometer. This is made possible by (i) using avalanche photodiodes (APD) as light detectors, (ii) distributing the light received from the source over multiple independent spectral channels, and (iii) use of arrays composed of multiple large light collectors. Our approach permits the construction of large (with baselines ranging from few kilometers to intercontinental distances) optical interferometers at the cost of (very) long-baseline radio interferometers. Realistic intensity interferometer designs are abl...

  2. Channeling of intense laser beams in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feit, M.D.; Garrison, J.C.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1997-09-01

    A hydrodynamic simulation is used to show that intense laser pulses propagating in underdense plasmas create stable, long-lived, and completely evacuated channels. At low intensities, I=10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, self focusing seriously distorts the temporal envelope of the pulse, but channeling still occurs. At high intensities, I=10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, channeling can proceed over many diffraction lengths with significant distortion restricted to the leading edge of the pulse. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  4. Experimental verification of a model describing the intensity distribution from a single mode optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A; Puckett, Anthony D; Todd, Michael D

    2011-01-24

    The intensity distribution of a transmission from a single mode optical fiber is often approximated using a Gaussian-shaped curve. While this approximation is useful for some applications such as fiber alignment, it does not accurately describe transmission behavior off the axis of propagation. In this paper, another model is presented, which describes the intensity distribution of the transmission from a single mode optical fiber. A simple experimental setup is used to verify the model's accuracy, and agreement between model and experiment is established both on and off the axis of propagation. Displacement sensor designs based on the extrinsic optical lever architecture are presented. The behavior of the transmission off the axis of propagation dictates the performance of sensor architectures where large lateral offsets (25-1500 {micro}m) exist between transmitting and receiving fibers. The practical implications of modeling accuracy over this lateral offset region are discussed as they relate to the development of high-performance intensity modulated optical displacement sensors. In particular, the sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and displacement range of a sensor are functions of the relative positioning of the sensor's transmitting and receiving fibers. Sensor architectures with high combinations of sensitivity and displacement range are discussed. It is concluded that the utility of the accurate model is in its predicative capability and that this research could lead to an improved methodology for high-performance sensor design.

  5. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  6. Improved wire chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  7. Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

  8. China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

  9. Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructur...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructured CdSe Networks by Altering the Building-Block Shape Home Author: H. Yu, R. Bellair, R. M. Kannan, S. L....

  10. IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011, Non-linear charged particle dynamics/2 with the arc length along the magnetic field line, at the lowest order in the drift expansion for the charged

  11. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    as buildings of the 1980's. In this section, intensities are based upon the entire building stock, not just those buildings using a particular fuel for a given end use. This...

  12. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular Processes - ISWAMP2 http:iswamp2.jlu.edu.cn July 20-22, 2013; Xi'an, China...

  13. Diurnal analysis of intensity trends in Atlantic tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowch, Roman S

    2013-01-01

    I postulate that a diurnal cycle may exist in observational variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) intensity. Prior studies document a significant diurnal signal in moist convection across tropical regions. Since ...

  14. Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

  15. precipitation frequency & intensity in instantaneous and aggregated data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    precipitation frequency & intensity in instantaneous and aggregated data Michela Biasutti1, Sandra - Ocean Implications (and a suggestion for model diagnostics) Outline #12;4 Minute-by-minute precipitation

  16. Observational tests of hurricane intensity estimations using GPS radio occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergados, Panagiotis

    This study presents a novel approach to estimating the intensity of hurricanes using temperature profiles from Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements. Previous research has shown that the temperature ...

  17. Fluorescence modulation in single CdSe quantum dots by moderate applied electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, Sharonda J. [Department of Physics and Optical Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States); McClanahan, Mason R.; Moyer, Tully; Moyer, Patrick J. [Department of Physics and Optical Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States); Jones, Marcus [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Single molecule time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) under the influence of moderate applied electric fields reveals distributed emission from states which are neither fully on nor off and pronounced changes in the excited state decay. The data suggest that a 54?kV/cm applied electric field causes small perturbations to the QD surface charge distribution, effectively increasing the surface trapping probability and resulting in the appearance of gray states. We present simultaneous blinking and fluorescence decay results for two sets of QDs, with and without an applied electric field. Further kinetic modeling analysis suggests that a single trapped charged cannot be responsible for a blinking off event.

  18. Intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation of 104Sn: Moderate E2 strength decrease approaching 100Sn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Doornenbal; S. Takeuchi; N. Aoi; M. Matsushita; A. Obertelli; D. Steppenbeck; H. Wang; L. Audirac; H. Baba; P. Bednarczyk; S. Boissinot; M. Ciemala; A. Corsi; T. Furumoto; T. Isobe; A. Jungclaus; V. Lapoux; J. Lee; K. Matsui; T. Motobayashi; D. Nishimura; S. Ota; E. C. Pollacco; H. Sakurai; C. Santamaria; Y. Shiga; D. Sohler; R. Taniuchi

    2013-05-13

    The reduced transition probability B(E2) of the first excited 2+ state in the nucleus 104Sn was measured via Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies. A value of 0.163(26) e^2b^2 was extracted from the absolute cross-section on a Pb target, while the method itself was verified with the stable 112Sn isotope. Our result deviates significantly from the earlier reported value of 0.10(4) e^2b^2 and corresponds to a moderate decrease of excitation strength relative to the almost constant values observed in the proton-rich, even-A 106-114Sn isotopes. Present state-of-the-art shell-model predictions, which include proton and neutron excitations across the N=Z=50 shell closures as well as standard polarization charges, underestimate the experimental findings

  19. Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

  20. Solar Forecast Improvement Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For the Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP), the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) is partnering with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and IBM to develop more...

  1. Adequacy of the 123-group cross-section library for criticality analyses of water-moderated uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, C.V.; Wright, R.Q.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In a recent criticality analysis for an array of water-moderated packages containing highly enriched uranium, the 123-group cross-section library in the SCALE system was observed to have a nonconservative discrepancy of approximately 3 to 3.5% when compared with more recently developed libraries. A simple representative system of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O was used to identify that the problem results from a lack of resonance data for {sup 235}U. Only a single set of self-shielded cross sections, most likely corresponding to a water-moderated infinite dilute system, was provided with the original data. The UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O study indicates that this limitation may cause nonconservative discrepancies as high as 5.5% for some water-moderated, highly enriched uranium systems. Characteristics of the systems where the discrepancy is evident are identified and discussed.

  2. Canal dike system improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, W.H.; Asce, M.; Rook, M.E. [GEI Consultants, Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); [New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of New England Power Company`s (NEP) continuing effort to maintain a safe and operable generating facility, significant structural improvements were made between 1992 and 1993 to the Deerfield No. 5 Hydroelectric Development`s 2,750 meter (9,000 feet) long canal dike system. These improvements were the result of extensive geotechnical field exploration and instrumentation programs. To improve stability, expedited construction improvements were made producing over 340 meters (1,100 feet) of improved dikes with stabilization berms and filter blankets for seepage and slope stability protection. Currently, NEP operates the facility with restrictions on maximum allowable water elevations, performs daily inspections and periodic instrument readings to assure continued public safety. A key component to accomplishing the canal dike system improvements in a timely and efficient manner was the level of cooperation established between NEP and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). This cooperation was promoted in part through open discussions on canal dike issues, the owner`s acceptance of obligation, and FERC`s willingness to work with NEP to achieve responsive solutions.

  3. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ? 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was performed with a subsample of 138 stars from the ELODIE stellar library, and the literature atmospheric parameters were recovered within 125 K for T {sub eff}, 0.10 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.29 dex for log g. These precisions are consistent with or better than those provided by the pipelines of surveys operating with similar resolutions. These results show that the spectral indices are a competitive tool to characterize stars with intermediate resolution spectra.

  4. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  5. Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate. During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8% per year from 1973 to 2008. In the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9% from 2008 to 2035.

  6. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  7. Foreground Subtraction in Intensity Mapping with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolz, Laura; Alonso, David; Blake, Chris; Bull, Philip; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Ferreira, Pedro G; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Santos, Marios G; Shaw, Richard

    2015-01-01

    21cm intensity mapping experiments aim to observe the diffuse neutral hydrogen (HI) distribution on large scales which traces the Cosmic structure. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will have the capacity to measure the 21cm signal over a large fraction of the sky. However, the redshifted 21cm signal in the respective frequencies is faint compared to the Galactic foregrounds produced by synchrotron and free-free electron emission. In this article, we review selected foreground subtraction methods suggested to effectively separate the 21cm signal from the foregrounds with intensity mapping simulations or data. We simulate an intensity mapping experiment feasible with SKA phase 1 including extragalactic and Galactic foregrounds. We give an example of the residuals of the foreground subtraction with a independent component analysis and show that the angular power spectrum is recovered within the statistical errors on most scales. Additionally, the scale of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations is shown to be unaffecte...

  8. Simulating the Large-Scale Structure of HI Intensity Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seehars, Sebastian; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations, the halo model, and a phenomenological prescription for assigning HI mass to halos. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 HI. We apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that they agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  9. Analyses of mixed-hydrocarbon binary thermodynamic cycles for moderate-temperature geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1981-02-01

    A number of binary geothermal cycles utilizing mixed hydrocarbon working fluids were analyzed with the overall objective of finding a working fluid which can produce low-cost electrical energy using a moderately-low temperature geothermal resource. Both boiling and supercritical shell-and-tube cycles were considered. The performance of a dual-boiling isobutane cycle supplied by a 280/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource (corresponding to the 5 MW pilot plant at the Raft River site in Idaho) was selected as a reference. To investigate the effect of resource temperature on the choice of working fluid, several analyses were conducted for a 360/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource, which is representative of the Heber resource in California. The hydrocarbon working fluids analyzed included methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, isopentane, hexane, heptane, and mixtures of those pure hydrocarbons. For comparison, two fluorocarbon refrigerants were also analyzed. These fluorocarbons, R-115 and R-22, were suggested as resulting in high values of net plant geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) at the two resource temperatures chosen for the study. Preliminary estimates of relative heat exchanger size (product of overall heat transfer coefficient times heater surface area) were made for a number of the better performing cycles.

  10. 2 x 2 Polyethylene Reflected and Moderated Highly Enriched Uranium System with Rhenium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Nichole Ellis; Jesson Hutchinson; John D. Bess; Dmitry N. Polyakov; Evgeny S. Glushkov; Alexey E. Glushkov

    2010-09-01

    The 2 × 2 array HEU-Re experiment was performed on the Planet universal critical assembly machine on November 4th, 2003 at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For this experiment, there were 10 ˝ units, each full unit containing four HEU foils and two rhenium foils. The top unit contained only two HEU foils and two rhenium foils. A total of 42 HEU foils were used for this experiment. Rhenium is a desirable cladding material for space nuclear power applications. This experiment consisted of HEU foils interleaved with rhenium foils and is moderated and reflected by polyethylene plates. A unit consisted of a polyethylene plate, which has a recess for rhenium foils, and four HEU foils in a single layer in the top recess of each polyethylene plate. The Planet universal criticality assembly machine has been previously used in experiments containing HEU foils interspersed with SiO2 (HEU-MET-THERM-001), Al (HEU-MET-THERM-008), MgO (HEU-MET-THERM-009), Gd foils (HEU-MET-THERM-010), 2 × 2 × 26 Al (HEU-MET-THERM-012), Fe (HEU-MET-THERM-013 and HEU-MET-THERM-015), 2 × 2 × 23 SiO2 (HEU-MET-THERM-014), 2 × 2 × 11 hastalloy plates (HEU-MET-THERM-016), and concrete (HEU-MET-THERM-018). The 2 × 2 array of HEU-Re is considered acceptable for use as a benchmark critical experiment.

  11. Grad's moment method for a granular fluid at moderate densities. Navier-Stokes transport coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicente Garzó

    2013-03-18

    The Navier-Stokes transport coefficients of a granular dense fluid of smooth inelastic hard disks or spheres are explicitly determined by solving the inelastic Enskog equation by means of Grad's moment method. The transport coefficients are explicitly determined as functions of the (constant) coefficient of restitution and the solid volume fraction. In addition, the cooling rate is also calculated to first order in the spatial gradients. The calculations are performed for an arbitrary number of dimensions. The results are not limited to small dissipation and are expected to apply at moderate densities. It is found that the expressions of the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients and the cooling rate agree with those previously obtained from the Chapman-Enskog method by using the leading terms in a Sonine polynomial expansion. This shows the equivalence between both methods for granular fluids in the Navier-Stokes approximation. A comparison with previous results derived from Grad's moment method for inelastic disks and spheres is also carried out.

  12. An Active Gain-control System for Avalanche Photo-Diodes under Moderate Temperature Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kataoka; R. Sato; T. Ikagawa; J. Kotoku; Y. Kuramoto; Y. Tsubuku; T. Saito; Y. Yatsu; N. Kawai; Y. Ishikawa; N. Kawabata

    2006-02-17

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are promising light sensor for various fields of experimental physics. It has been argued, however, that variation of APD gain with temperature could be a serious problem preventing APDs from replacing traditional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in some applications. Here we develop an active gain-control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. As a performance demonstration of the proposed system, we have tested the response of a scintillation photon detector consisting of a 5x5 mm^2 reverse-type APD optically coupled with a CsI(Tl) crystal. We show that the APD gain was successfully controlled under a temperature variation of DT = 20deg, within a time-cycle of 6000 sec. The best FWHM energy resolution of 6.1+-0.2 % was obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, and the energy threshold was as low as 6.5 keV, by integrating data from +20deg - 0deg cycles. The corresponding values for -20deg - 0deg cycles were 6.9+-0.2 % and 5.2 keV, respectively. These results are comparable, or only slightly worse than that obtained at a fixed temperature. Our results suggest new potential uses for APDs in various space researches and nuclear physics. As examples, we briefly introduce the NeXT and Cute-1.7 satellite missions that will carry the APDs as scientific instruments for the first time.

  13. Brazil-nut effect versus reverse Brazil-nut effect in a moderately dense granular fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicente Garzo

    2008-09-03

    A new segregation criterion based on the inelastic Enskog kinetic equation is derived to show the transition between the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) and the reverse Brazil-nut effect (RBNE) by varying the different parameters of the system. In contrast to previous theoretical attempts the approach is not limited to the near-elastic case, takes into account the influence of both thermal gradients and gravity and applies for moderate densities. The form of the phase-diagrams for the BNE/RBNE transition depends sensitively on the value of gravity relative to the thermal gradient, so that it is possible to switch between both states for given values of the mass and size ratios, the coefficients of restitution and the solid volume fraction. In particular, the influence of collisional dissipation on segregation becomes more important when the thermal gradient dominates over gravity than in the opposite limit. The present analysis extends previous results derived in the dilute limit case and is consistent with the findings of some recent experimental results.

  14. Age-dating the Tully-Fisher relation at moderate redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Ziegler, Bodo; Silk, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the Tully-Fisher relation at moderate redshift from the point of view of the underlying stellar populations, by comparing optical and NIR photometry with a phenomenological model that combines population synthesis with a simple prescription for chemical enrichment. The sample comprises 108 late-type galaxies extracted from the FORS Deep Field (FDF) and William Herschel Deep Field (WHDF) surveys at z<1 (median redshift z=0.45). A strong correlation is found between stellar mass and the parameters that describe the star formation history, with massive galaxies forming their populations early (zFOR~3), with star formation timescales, tau1~4 Gyr; although with very efficient chemical enrichment timescales (tau2~1 Gyr). In contrast, the stellar-to-dynamical mass ratio which, in principle, would track the efficiency of feedback in the baryonic processes driving galaxy formation - does not correlate strongly with the model parameters. On the Tully-Fisher plane, no significant age segregation is found a...

  15. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  16. Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RodrĂ­guez, Rodolfo

    Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary to solve transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as data, formulated in terms: Eddy current problems, time-dependent electromagnetic problems, input current intensities, finite

  17. Measurements of integral muon intensity at large zenith angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Dmitrieva; D. V. Chernov; R. P. Kokoulin; K. G. Kompaniets; G. Mannocchi; A. A. Petrukhin; O. Saavedra; V. V. Shutenko; D. A. Timashkov; G. Trinchero; I. I. Yashin

    2006-11-28

    High-statistics data on near-horizontal muons collected with Russian-Italian coordinate detector DECOR are analyzed. Precise measurements of muon angular distributions in zenith angle interval from 60 to 90 degrees have been performed. In total, more than 20 million muons are selected. Dependences of the absolute integral muon intensity on zenith angle for several threshold energies ranging from 1.7 GeV to 7.2 GeV are derived. Results for this region of zenith angles and threshold energies have been obtained for the first time. The dependence of integral intensity on zenith angle and threshold energy is well fitted by a simple analytical formula.

  18. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  19. Improving Stormwater Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    stream_source_info Improving Stormwater Quality.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5574 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Improving Stormwater Quality.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Stormwater QualityStory by Raul L. Garcia tx H2O | pg. 18 The City of Houston, Harris County, theHarris County Flood Control District and the Texas Department of Transportation have teamed up through a Joint Task Force (JTF) to address Houston...

  20. Improved background rejection in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments using a magnetic field in a high pressure xenon TPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Renner; A. Cervera; J. A. Hernando; A. Imzaylov; F. Monrabal; J. Muńoz; D. Nygren; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas

    2015-09-06

    We demonstrate that the application of an external magnetic field could lead to an improved background rejection in neutrinoless double-beta (0nbb) decay experiments using a high pressure xenon (HPXe) TPC. HPXe chambers are capable of imaging electron tracks, a feature that enhances the separation between signal events (the two electrons emitted in the 0nbb decay of 136Xe) and background events, arising chiefly from single electrons of kinetic energy compatible with the end-point of the 0nbb decay (Qbb ). Applying an external magnetic field of sufficiently high intensity (in the range of 0.5-1 Tesla for operating pressures in the range of 5-15 atmospheres) causes the electrons to produce helical tracks. Assuming the tracks can be properly reconstructed, the sign (direction) of curvature can be determined at several points along these tracks, and such information can be used to separate signal (0nbb) events containing two electrons producing a track with two different directions of curvature from background (single-electron) events producing a track that should spiral in a single direction. Due to electron multiple scattering, this strategy is not perfectly efficient on an event-by-event basis, but a statistical estimator can be constructed which can be used to reject background events by one order of magnitude at a moderate cost (approx. 30%) in signal efficiency. Combining this estimator with the excellent energy resolution and topological signature identification characteristic of the HPXe TPC, it is possible to reach a background rate of less than one count per ton-year of exposure. Such a low background rate is an essential feature of the next generation of 0nbb experiments, aiming to fully explore the inverse hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  1. Building Design for Moderate Seismic Regions Peter J. Cheever, LeMessurier Consultants, Cambridge, MA, pcheever@lemessurier.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    Building Design for Moderate Seismic Regions Authors: Peter J. Cheever, LeMessurier Consultants which result in most buildings being designed for Seismic Design Category C, including special seismic detailing consistent with the 1992 AISC Seismic Provisions. Spectral design acceleration values

  2. Distinct osmo-sensing protein kinase pathways are involved in signalling moderate and severe hyper-osmotic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirt, Heribert

    Distinct osmo-sensing protein kinase pathways are involved in signalling moderate and severe hyper-osmotic is severely affected by hyper-osmotic salt conditions. Although a number of salt-induced genes have been and extreme hyper-osmotic conditions. A 46 kDa protein kinase was found to be activated by elevated salt

  3. List of Refereed Journal Publications 1. On the Existence of Moderate-Density-Burst Codes, Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    List of Refereed Journal Publications 1. On the Existence of Moderate-Density-Burst Codes, Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol. 10, 8-12, 1975. 2. On UEP Burst Codes, Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol. 10, 21-27, 1975. 3. Linear Codes having a Sub-block Structure, Journal of Cybernetics, Vol. 6, 263

  4. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

    1999-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions ReductionEnergy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Energy-IntensiveEnergy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Energy-Intensive

  5. Experiments at the Intensity Frontier | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Intensity Frontier High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Facility Ops Experiments at the Energy Frontier Experiments at the Intensity...

  6. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  7. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyashuk, V I

    2015-01-01

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neu...

  8. PNNLs Data Intensive Computing research battles Homeland Security threats

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Thurman; Joe Kielman; Katherine Wolf; David Atkinson

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL's) approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architecture, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  9. Explosive photodissociation of methane induced by ultrafast intense laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Fanao; Luo Qi; Xu Huailiang; Sharifi, Mehdi; Song Di; Chin, See Leang

    2006-10-07

    A new type of molecular fragmentation induced by femtosecond intense laser at the intensity of 2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} is reported. For the parent molecule of methane, ethylene, n-butane, and 1-butene, fluorescence from H (n=3{yields}2), CH (A {sup 2}{delta}, B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup -}, and C {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 2}{pi}), or C{sub 2} (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) is observed in the spectrum. It shows that the fragmentation is a universal property of neutral molecule in the intense laser field. Unlike breaking only one or two chemical bonds in conventional UV photodissociation, the fragmentation caused by the intense laser undergoes vigorous changes, breaking most of the bonds in the molecule, like an explosion. The fragments are neutral species and cannot be produced through Coulomb explosion of multiply charged ion. The laser power dependence of CH (A{yields}X) emission of methane on a log-log scale has a slope of 10{+-}1. The fragmentation is thus explained as multiple channel dissociation of the superexcited state of parent molecule, which is created by multiphoton excitation.

  10. PNNL Data-Intensive Computing for a Smarter Energy Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carol Imhoff; Zhenyu (Henry) Huang; Daniel Chavarria

    2012-12-31

    The Middleware for Data-Intensive Computing (MeDICi) Integration Framework, an integrated platform to solve data analysis and processing needs, supports PNNL research on the U.S. electric power grid. MeDICi is enabling development of visualizations of grid operations and vulnerabilities, with goal of near real-time analysis to aid operators in preventing and mitigating grid failures.

  11. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  12. Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to where they can be integrated of the window, integrated in the window frames, strip-shaped CIGS PV solar cells convert the light the CIGS PV solar cells in the form of strips at the edges of the window in the window frame. These solar

  13. IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    IFTS Intensive Course on Advanced Plasma Physics-Spring 2011, Non-linear charged particle dynamics, the arc length along the magnetic field line and J the second invariant. (iii) In a large aspect ration), Ann. Phys. 41, 302), where the authors show that, when studying the physics of magnetized plasmas

  14. High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka -MuSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka - MuSIC Yoshitaka Kuno Osaka Unviersity, Osaka, Japan ! THB2014 ·Muon Transport ·COMET ·MuSIC facility at Osaka University ·MuSIC stage-I for µSR ·PRISM demonstration at MuSIC ·Phase Rotation at FFAG ·Summary #12;Muon Beam Sources #12;ISIS EM, RIKEN-RAL J-PARC, MUSE

  15. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  16. Surface Intensive Materials Processing for Multi-Functional Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Muntele, C.I.; George, M.A.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.; Larkin, D.J.

    2000-03-06

    We have chosen silicon carbide (SiC) as a multi-functional material to demonstrate the application of surface intensive processing for device fabrication. We will highlight two devices which are produced in house at the Center for Irradiation of materials of Alabama A and M university: (A) High temperature electronic gas sensor, (B) High temperature optical properties/sensor.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

  18. PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  19. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  20. Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University, Princeton Plasma. Temperature of the streams. 2. Lithium jets. 3. Injection into vacuum chamber. 4. Propulsion inside the vacuum chamber. 5. Stability of the lithium streams. 6. Expulsion of the lithium. 7. Summary. PRINCETON PLASMA

  1. Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc mmccull3@nd.edu ABSTRACT: The recent destruction due to hurricanes and the apparent increase in frequency. Warm water holds more energy to fuel hurricanes and may contribute to the conditions needed

  2. Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

  3. Improved solar heating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  4. Searching for minicharged particles via birefringence, dichroism and Raman spectroscopy of the vacuum polarized by a high-intensity laser wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villalba-Chávez, S. Müller, C.

    2013-12-15

    Absorption and dispersion of probe photons in the field of a high-intensity circularly polarized laser wave are investigated. The optical theorem is applied for determining the absorption coefficients in terms of the imaginary part of the vacuum polarization tensor. Compact expressions for the vacuum refraction indices and the photon absorption coefficients are obtained in various asymptotic regimes of interest. The outcomes of this analysis reveal that, far from the region relatively close to the threshold of the two-photon reaction, the birefringence and dichroism of the vacuum are small and, in some cases, strongly suppressed. On the contrary, in a vicinity of the region in which the photo-production of a pair occurs, these optical properties are manifest with lasers of moderate intensities. We take advantage of such a property in the search of minicharged particles by considering high-precision polarimetric experiments. In addition, Raman-like electromagnetic waves resulting from the inelastic part of the vacuum polarization tensor are suggested as an alternative form for finding exclusion limits on these hypothetical charge carriers. The envisaged parameters of upcoming high-intensity laser facilities are used for establishing upper bounds on the minicharged particles. -- Highlights: •Via dichroism and birefringence of the vacuum by a strong laser wave, minicharged particles can be probed. •The discovery potential is the highest in a vicinity of the first pair production threshold. •As alternative observable, Raman scattered waves are put forward.

  5. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  6. Improving Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergy ToolsCoordinationDepartmentImproving Code

  7. LyndellBasell Completes a Major Plant Workover to Dramatically Improve Energy Intensity in LaPorte, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deole, N. R.; Stam, H.

    2015-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-15-06-01.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7070 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-15-06-01.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 lyondellbasell.com 2015... Presented by Nani Deole Equistar Chemicals, LP La Porte Olefins Project Energy Savings 1 ESL-IE-15-06-01 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 lyondellbasell.com LyondellBasell At A Glance...

  8. Modulating emission intensity of GaN-based green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-14

    The asymmetric dual-wavelength (green/blue) coupled InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells were proposed to modulate the green emission intensity. Electroluminescent measurements demonstrate the conspicuous increment of the green light intensity by decreasing the coupled barrier thickness. This was partly attributed to capture of more carriers when holes tunnel across the thinner barrier from the blue quantum wells, as a hole reservoir, to the green quantum wells. While lower effective barrier height of the blue quantum wells benefits improved hole transportation from p-GaN to the active region. Efficiency droop of the green quantum wells was partially alleviated due to the enhanced injection efficiency of holes.

  9. A unified approach for inversion problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Censor, Yair

    intensities (radiation intensity map) deliverable by all beamlets, that would result in a clinically value, however, this radiation intensity map must be implementable, in a clinically acceptable formA unified approach for inversion problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy Yair Censor1

  10. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    mandated envision that blending gasoline (or diesel) withemission intensity as blending gasoline from crude oil with

  11. The Consistent Kinetics Porosity (CKP) Model: A Theory for the Mechanical Behavior of Moderately Porous Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-11-01

    A theory is developed for the response of moderately porous solids (no more than {approximately}20% void space) to high-strain-rate deformations. The model is consistent because each feature is incorporated in a manner that is mathematically compatible with the other features. Unlike simple p-{alpha} models, the onset of pore collapse depends on the amount of shear present. The user-specifiable yield function depends on pressure, effective shear stress, and porosity. The elastic part of the strain rate is linearly related to the stress rate, with nonlinear corrections from changes in the elastic moduli due to pore collapse. Plastically incompressible flow of the matrix material allows pore collapse and an associated macroscopic plastic volume change. The plastic strain rate due to pore collapse/growth is taken normal to the yield surface. If phase transformation and/or pore nucleation are simultaneously occurring, the inelastic strain rate will be non-normal to the yield surface. To permit hardening, the yield stress of matrix material is treated as an internal state variable. Changes in porosity and matrix yield stress naturally cause the yield surface to evolve. The stress, porosity, and all other state variables vary in a consistent manner so that the stress remains on the yield surface throughout any quasistatic interval of plastic deformation. Dynamic loading allows the stress to exceed the yield surface via an overstress ordinary differential equation that is solved in closed form for better numerical accuracy. The part of the stress rate that causes no plastic work (i.e-, the part that has a zero inner product with the stress deviator and the identity tensor) is given by the projection of the elastic stressrate orthogonal to the span of the stress deviator and the identity tensor.The model, which has been numerically implemented in MIG format, has been exercised under a wide array of extremal loading and unloading paths. As will be discussed in a companion sequel report, the CKP model is capable of closely matching plate impact measurements for porous materials.

  12. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  13. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z~2 observed with SINFONI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collet, C; De Breuck, C; Lehnert, M D; Best, P; Bryant, J J; Hunstead, R; Dicken, D; Johnston, H

    2015-01-01

    Most successful galaxy formation scenarios now postulate that the intense star formation in massive, high-redshift galaxies during their major growth period was truncated when powerful AGNs launched galaxy-wide outflows of gas that removed large parts of the interstellar medium. The most powerful radio galaxies at z~2 show clear signatures of such winds, but are too rare to be good representatives of a generic phase in the evolution of all massive galaxies at high redshift. Here we present SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of 12 radio galaxies at z~2 that are intermediate between the most powerful radio and vigorous starburst galaxies in radio power, and common enough to represent a generic phase in the early evolution of massive galaxies. The kinematic properties are diverse, with regular velocity gradients with amplitudes of Delta v=200-400 km s^-1 as in rotating disks as well as irregular kinematics with multiple velocity jumps of a few 100 km s^-1. Line widths are generally high, typically around FWHM=800 km s...

  14. Cross-correlation cosmography with HI intensity mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The cross-correlation of a foreground density field with two different background convergence fields can be used to measure cosmographic distance ratios and constrain dark energy parameters. We investigate the possibility of performing such measurements using a combination of optical galaxy surveys and HI intensity mapping surveys, with emphasis on the performance of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Using HI intensity mapping to probe the foreground density tracer field and/or the background source fields has the advantage of excellent redshift resolution and a longer lever arm achieved by using the lensing signal from high redshift background sources. Our results show that, for our best SKA-optical configuration of surveys, a constant equation of state for dark energy can be constrained to $\\simeq 8\\%$ for a sky coverage $f_{\\rm sky}=0.5$ and assuming a $\\sigma(\\Omega_{\\rm DE})=0.03$ prior for the dark energy density parameter.

  15. Fusion neutron yield from high intensity laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G.M.; Velikovich, A.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The fusion neutron yield from a compact neutron source is studied. Laser-irradiated deuterium clusters serve as a precursor of high-energy deuterium ions, which react with the walls of a fusion reaction chamber and produce copious amounts of neutrons in fusion reactions. The explosion of deuterium clusters with initial radius of 50-200 A irradiated by a subpicosecond laser with intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} is examined theoretically. We studied the conversion efficiency of laser energy to ion kinetic energy, the mean and maximum ion kinetic energy, and ion energy distribution function by a molecular dynamics model. A yield of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} neutrons/J is obtainable for a peak laser intensity of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} and clusters with an initial radius of 200-400 A.

  16. Dynamic characteristic of intense short microwave propagation in an atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Mayhall, D.J.; Madsen, N.K.; Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of an intense microwave pulse which propagates through the atmosphere will be presented. Our theoretical results are obtained by solving Maxwell's equations, together with the electron fluid equations. Our calculations show that although large portions of the initial energy are absorbed by the electrons that are created through the avalanche process, a significant amount of energy is still able to reach the earth's surface. The amount of energy that reaches the earth's surface as a function of initial energy and wave shape after having propagated through 100 km in the atmosphere are investigated. Results for the air breakdown threshold intensity as a function of the pressure for different pulse widths and different frequencies will also be presented. In addition, we will present a comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results for the pulse shape of a short microwave pulse after it has traveled through a rectangular wave guide which contains a section of air. 23 references, 9 figures.

  17. A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun

    2011-06-22

    Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic â??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemâ?ť during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossâ??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCâ??08 and SCâ??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesâ?? resources.

  18. Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance Albert (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-15

    A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

  19. CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

    2011-12-31

    This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

  20. A measurement of the relative intensities of some vibronic bands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyd, Coleman Monroe

    1955-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . 1 II ~ EXPERIMENTAL ~ III ~ PROCEDURE FOR INTENSITI NEASUREHENTS . IV. EXPERINENTAL RESULTS FOR CHLORINE DIOXIDE ~ ~ ~ ~ 5 14 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 19 V. EXPERIHENTAL RESULTS FOR SULPHUR DIOXIDE. . . . 26 VI. CONCLUSIONS...INE DIOXIDE APPARATUS ~ . o . . . ~ 9 4. TOP VIEW OF CH1 CRINE DIOXIDE APPARATUS . 5 ~ CHLORINE DIOXIDE ABSORPTION SPECTROGRAM WITH CAI IBRATION BLANKS ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ 6, CHLORINE DIOXIDE DECONPOSITION IiN PROGRESS 10 . 11 7. H AND D CURVE FOil...

  1. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

    2015-04-13

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

  2. Energy Intensity Indicators: Methodology Downloads | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesyEducation Data JamDepartment2 AEnergy Intensity

  3. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  4. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  5. Improved ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  6. Improved cycling cryopump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1984-12-04

    The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

  7. Record Improvement Guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepley, Toby

    2000-09-06

    Clover (Opportunities Handbook): a list of the current recordbook categories and recordbook objectives. Record Improvement Guide (Guide for Completing a Recordbook): guidelines and rules for assembling a 4-H record keeping system. Member Achievement Plan... to the current year?s Texas 4-H Clover available from your county Extension office or the Texas 4-H Web site. When choosing a category, remember that you will want to enter your recordbook in the category in which you have been most active or in which you have a...

  8. Improving ATLAS reprocessing software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    For my CERN Summer Student programme I have been working with ATLAS reprocessing group. Data taken at ATLAS experiment is not only processed after being taken, but is also reprocessed multiple times afterwards. This allows applying new alignments, calibration of detector and using improved or faster algorithms. Reprocessing is usually done in campaigns for different periods of data or for different interest groups. The idea of my project was to simplify the definition of tasks and monitoring of their progress. I created a LIST configuration files generator script in Python and a monitoring webpage for tracking current reprocessing tasks.

  9. Improving Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OF DESIGN CODES TO ACCOUNT FOR ACCIDENT THERMAL EFFECTS

  10. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  11. Improved liquid-film electron stripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gavin, B.F.

    1984-11-01

    An improved liquid-film electron stripper particularly for high intensity heavy ion beams which produces constant regenerated, stable, free-standing liquid films having an adjustable thickness between 0.3 to 0.05 microns. The improved electron stripper is basically composed of at least one high speed, rotating disc with a very sharp, precision-like, ground edge on one side of the disc's periphery and with highly polished, flat, radial surface adjacent the sharp edge. A fine stream of liquid, such as oil, impinges at a 90/sup 0/ angle adjacent the disc's sharp outer edge. Film terminators, located at a selected distance from the disc perimeter are positioned approximately perpendicular to the film. The terminators support, shape, and stretch the film and are arranged to assist in the prevention of liquid droplet formation by directing the collected film to a reservoir below without breaking or interfering with the film. One embodiment utilizes two rotating discs and associated terminators, with the discs rotating so as to form films in opposite directions, and with the second disc being located down beam-line relative to the first disc.

  12. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  13. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore »in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  14. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  15. Study of Pyrex and quartz insulators contamination effect on the X-ray intensity in a 4-kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M. Sharifi, R.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-12-15

    The variation of the X-ray intensity has been investigated with the Pyrex and quartz insulators surface contamination in a 4-kJ plasma focus device with argon gas at 11.5-kV charging voltage. Elemental analysis (EDAX) showed that the Cu evaporated from the electrode material and was deposited on the sleeve surface improves the breakdown conditions. A small level of sleeve contamination by copper is found to be essential for good focusing action and high HXR intensity. The SEM imaging showed the grain-type structure of Cu formed on the surface and it changed the surface property. Resistance measurements of original and coated Pyrex surface proved that the copper deposition on the sleeve surface will reduce its resistance as compared to the almost infinitely large resistance of the uncontaminated sleeve. As the contamination is surpassed to some critical level, the HXR intensity from the device is deteriorated.

  16. Improving automotive battery sales forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in sales forecasting allows firms not only to respond quickly to customers' needs but also to reduce inventory costs, ultimately increasing their profits. Sales forecasts have been studied extensively to improve ...

  17. Continuous Improvement Plan Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Continuous Improvement Plan Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum #12;Plan for the Assessment and Continuous Improvement of the Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering Florida Atlantic University April 4, 2001 (latest modification 3

  18. Field assessment of an aluminum intensive passenger car

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Ford Motor Co. has made a small batch of ``aluminum intensive vehicles`` (AIV), consisting of mid-size cars (Taurus/Sable) with all-aluminum bodies. The first twenty vehicles were made for internal evaluation at Ford, but the second batch of twenty has been placed on the hands of selected independent users, primarily automotive suppliers, for long term field assessment. The mass reduction achieved in the body of an AIV is shown, and compared with an equivalent standard steel body. Argonne obtained one of these vehicles last October; this is an assessment of the fuel consumption and other operational characteristics of this type of car to date.

  19. Assessing Internet energy intensity: A review of methods and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coroama, Vlad C.; Hilty, Lorenz M.; Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstr. 5, 9014 St. Gallen; Centre for Sustainable Communications, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Lindstedtsvägen 5, 100 44 Stockholm

    2014-02-15

    Assessing the average energy intensity of Internet transmissions is a complex task that has been a controversial subject of discussion. Estimates published over the last decade diverge by up to four orders of magnitude — from 0.0064 kilowatt-hours per gigabyte (kWh/GB) to 136 kWh/GB. This article presents a review of the methodological approaches used so far in such assessments: i) top–down analyses based on estimates of the overall Internet energy consumption and the overall Internet traffic, whereby average energy intensity is calculated by dividing energy by traffic for a given period of time, ii) model-based approaches that model all components needed to sustain an amount of Internet traffic, and iii) bottom–up approaches based on case studies and generalization of the results. Our analysis of the existing studies shows that the large spread of results is mainly caused by two factors: a) the year of reference of the analysis, which has significant influence due to efficiency gains in electronic equipment, and b) whether end devices such as personal computers or servers are included within the system boundary or not. For an overall assessment of the energy needed to perform a specific task involving the Internet, it is necessary to account for the types of end devices needed for the task, while the energy needed for data transmission can be added based on a generic estimate of Internet energy intensity for a given year. Separating the Internet as a data transmission system from the end devices leads to more accurate models and to results that are more informative for decision makers, because end devices and the networking equipment of the Internet usually belong to different spheres of control. -- Highlights: • Assessments of the energy intensity of the Internet differ by a factor of 20,000. • We review top–down, model-based, and bottom–up estimates from literature. • Main divergence factors are the year studied and the inclusion of end devices. • We argue against extending the Internet system boundary beyond data transmission. • Decision-makers need data that differentiates between end devices and transmission.

  20. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmitted More OftenFrontier Intensity

  1. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  2. Air-Stable High-Efficiency Solar Cells Using Improved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Air-Stable High-Efficiency Solar Cells Using Improved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films Kehang intensities. The high efficiency and stability demonstrated in this study make SWNT/Si solar cell very front contact KEYWORDS: Single-walled carbon nanotube, solar cell, high efficiency, stability, SWNT

  3. IMPROVED SEMI-PARAMETRIC TIME SERIES MODELS OF AIR POLLUTION AND MORTALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    we provide improvements in semi-parametric regression directly relevant to risk estimation in time of an intense national debate, that has led to a high profile research agenda (National Research Council, 1998, 1999, 2001). In the United States and elsewhere, evidence

  4. Sensorimotor Training in a Virtual Reality Environment: Does It Improve Functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of

    Sensorimotor Training in a Virtual Reality Environment: Does It Improve Functional Recovery the effectiveness of computerized virtual reality (VR) training of the hemiparetic hand of patients poststroke using. Conclusions. It is difficult in current service delivery models to provide the intensity of practice

  5. Spark-gap atomic emission microscopy. II. Improvements in resolution P. G. Van Patten,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Spark-gap atomic emission microscopy. II. Improvements in resolution P. G. Van Patten,a) J. D. Noll which enhance performance in spark-gap atomic emission microscopy SGAEM experiments. SGAEM is a recent as small as 5 V, and intense atomic emission has been observed in such sparks. Small 1 nF , high

  6. Phase-change materials to improve solar panel's performance Pascal Biwole1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail:phbiwole@unice.fr Abstract: High operating temperatures induce a loss of efficiency in solar photovoltaic and thermal panels. Introduction The efficiency of solar panels depends on three factors: the intensity of the solar radiation flux-change materials to improve solar panel's performance Pascal Biwole1,2,* , Pierre Eclache3 , Frederic Kuznik3 1

  7. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  8. Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

  9. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  10. Clustering of moderate luminosity X-ray-selected type 1 and type 2 AGNs at z ? 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Civano, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Cappelluti, N. [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Shankar, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada (Mexico); Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Lanzuisi, G. [National Observatory of Athens I. Metaxa and Vas. Pavlou St. GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institute für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Elvis, M. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, J. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwashi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-11-20

    We investigate, for the first time at z ? 3, the clustering properties of 189 Type 1 and 157 Type 2 X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) of moderate luminosity ((L {sub bol}) = 10{sup 45.3} erg s{sup –1}), with photometric or spectroscopic redshifts in the range 2.2 < z < 6.8. These samples are based on Chandra and XMM-Newton data in COSMOS. We find that Type 1 and Type 2 COSMOS AGNs at z ? 3 inhabit DMHs with typical mass of log M{sub h} = 12.84{sub ?0.11}{sup +0.10} and 11.73{sub ?0.45}{sup +0.39} h {sup –1} M {sub ?}, respectively. This result requires a drop in the halo masses of Type 1 and 2 COSMOS AGNs at z ? 3 compared to z ? 2 XMM-COSMOS AGNs with similar luminosities. Additionally, we infer that unobscured COSMOS AGNs at z ? 3 reside in 10 times more massive halos compared to obscured COSMOS AGNs, at the 2.6? level. This result extends to z ? 3 the results found in COSMOS at z ? 2, and rules out the picture in which obscuration is purely an orientation effect. A model which assumes that the AGNs activity is triggered by major mergers is quite successful in predicting both the low halo mass of COSMOS AGNs and the typical mass of luminous SDSS quasars at z ? 3, with the latter inhabiting more massive halos respect to moderate luminosity AGNs. Alternatively we can argue, at least for Type 1 COSMOS AGNs, that they are possibly representative of an early phase of fast (i.e., Eddington limited) BH growth induced by cosmic cold flows or disk instabilities. Given the moderate luminosity, these new fast growing BHs have masses of ?10{sup 7-8} M {sub ?} at z ? 3 which might evolve into ?10{sup 8.5-9} M {sub ?} mass BHs at z = 0. Following our clustering measurements, we argue that this fast BH growth at z ? 3 in AGNs with moderate luminosity occurs in DMHs with typical mass of ? 6× 10{sup 12} h {sup –1} M {sub ?}.

  11. Effect of variable suckling intensity upon serum luteinzing hormone in brangus heifers and effect of varible suckling intensity and estrogen administration upon serum luteinizing hormone in brahman cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Philip Kent

    1979-01-01

    EFFECT OF VARIABLE SUCKLING INTENSITY UPON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN BRANGUS HEIFERS AND EFFECT OF VARIABLE SUCKLING INTENSITY AND ESTROGEN ADMINISTRATION UPON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN BRAHMAN COWS A Thesis by PHILIP KENT FORREST... HORMONE IN BRANGUS HEIFERS AND EFFECT OF VARIABLE SUCKLING INTENSITY AND ESTROGEN ADMINISTRATION UPON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN BRAHMAN COWS A Thesis by PHILIP KENT FORREST Approved as to sty1e and content by: (+M Chairman of Committee) Head...

  12. Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    increase of X-ray intensities from thin foils irradiated with a 200 TW femtosecond laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonlinear increase of X-ray intensities...

  13. February 11, 1997 Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Intensity Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    . INTRODUCTION The prospects for an x-ray Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) intensity interferometry experiment using Hanbury Brown and Twiss #12;3 experiment with visible light,[10] in which the correlation of the intensity

  14. Detecting Hazardous Intensive Care Patient Episodes Using Real-time Mortality Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hug, Caleb

    2009-08-26

    The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

  15. Detecting hazardous intensive care patient episodes using real-time mortality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hug, Caleb W. (Caleb Wayne)

    2009-01-01

    The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

  16. Optically Interconnected Data Center Architecture for Bandwidth Intensive Energy Efficient Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Optically Interconnected Data Center Architecture for Bandwidth Intensive Energy Efficient will either be prohibitively costly, overly complex, or result in unsustainable energy requirements. Network of communication-intensive applications. Recent network architectures based on optical circuit switching leverage

  17. Strategies for the Commercialization & Deployment of GHG Intensity-Reducing Technologies & Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report looks at the best methods of commercializing and deploying energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas intensity.

  18. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  19. Moderation of effects of AAC based on setting and types of aided AAC on outcome variables: An aggregate study of single-case research with individuals with ASD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Rispoli, Mandy J.; Mason, Rose A.; Hong, Ee Rea

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the potential moderating effects of intervention setting and type of aided AAC on outcome variables for students with autism spectrum disorders. Methods: ...

  20. Rapid sintering of TiO{sub 2} photoelectrodes using intense pulsed white light for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Hwa-Young; Kim, Jae-Yup; Ah Lee, Jin; Lee, Kwangsoo; Yoo, Kicheon; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, BongSoo; Young Kim, Jin; Kim, Honggon; Jung Son, Hae; Kim, Jihyun; Ah Lim, Jung E-mail: mjko@kist.re.kr; Jae Ko, Min E-mail: mjko@kist.re.kr

    2014-04-07

    Intense pulsed white light (IPWL) sintering was carried out at room temperature, which is suitable dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabrication process on plastic substrates for the mass production. Five seconds irradiation of IPWL on TiO{sub 2} electrode significantly improves the photocurrent density and power conversion efficiency of DSSCs by more than 110% and 115%, respectively, compared to the DSSCs without IPWL treatment. These improvements were mainly attributed to the enhanced interconnection between the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles induced by IPWL illumination, which is confirmed by the impedance spectra analysis.

  1. Energy Policy 30 (2002) 151163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Energy Policy 30 (2002) 151­163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying and interpretation of energy intensity indicators are a continuing source of debate in the field of energy policy the performance of energy-related policies. Energy intensity indicators continue to be used for monitoring

  2. Adaptive optics simulation performance improvements using reconfigurable logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alastair Basden

    2006-11-09

    A technique used to accelerate an adaptive optics simulation platform using reconfigurable logic is described. The performance of parts of this simulation have been improved by up to 600 times (reducing computation times by this factor) by implementing algorithms within hardware and enables adaptive optics simulations to be carried out in a reasonable timescale. This demonstrates that it is possible to use reconfigurable logic to accelerate computational codes by very large factors when compared with conventional software approaches, and this has relevance for many computationally intensive applications. The use of reconfigurable logic for high performance computing is currently in its infancy and has never before been applied to this field.

  3. CBR for Advice Giving in a Data-Intensive Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    oil well drilling logs are continuously monitored, interpreted, and used to check if previous are developing a system that will assist oil well personnel during drilling operations in improving the quality of their normal work oil well drilling engineers and other operational personnel both offshore and in support

  4. Can we detect "Unruh radiation" in the high intensity lasers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

    2011-02-23

    An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, which is called the Unruh effect. Due to an interaction with the thermal bath, the particle moves stochastically like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. It has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle may emit extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) besides the Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. In this reports, we review our recent analysis on the issue of the Unruh radiation. In this report, we particularly consider the thermalization of an accelerated particle in the scalar QED, and derive the relaxation time of the thermalization.

  5. Overview of High Intensity Linac Programs in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garoby, R

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen a boost in the support by the European Union (EU) of accelerator research in Europe. Provided they coordinate their efforts and define common goals and strategies, laboratories and institutions from the member states can receive a financial support reaching 50% of the total project cost. In the field of High Intensity Linacs, the EU has already supported the EURISOL initiative for nuclear physics, which this year is applying for funding of a Design Study, and the development of linacs for Waste Transmutation. More recently, an initiative for high-energy physics has been approved, which includes a programme for the development of pulsed linac technologies. The coordination and synergy imposed by the EU rules increase the benefit of the allocated resources. Combined with the ongoing internal projects in the partner laboratories, these European initiatives represent a strong effort focussed towards the development of linac technologies. This paper summarises the requests from the various E...

  6. Lifetime Analysis at High Intensity Colliders Applied to the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvachua, B; Bruce, R; Burkart, F; Redaelli, S; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The beam lifetime is one of the main parameters to define the performance of a collider. In a super-conducting machine like the LHC, the lifetime determines the intensity reach for a given collimation cleaning. The beam lifetime can be calculated from the direct measurement of beam current. However, due to the noise in the beam current signal only an average lifetime over several seconds can be calculated. We propose here an alternative method, which uses the signal of the beam loss monitors in the vicinity of the primary collimators to get the instantaneous beam lifetime at the collimators. In this paper we compare the lifetime from the two methods and investigate the minimum lifetime over the LHC cycle for all the physics fills in 2011 and 2012. These data provide a reference for estimates of performance reach from collimator cleaning.

  7. Simulations for single-dish intensity mapping experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigot-Sazy, M -A; Battye, R A; Browne, I W A; Ma, Y -Z; Maffei, B; Noviello, F; Remazeilles, M; Wilkinson, P N

    2015-01-01

    HI intensity mapping is an emerging tool to probe dark energy. Observations of the redshifted HI signal will be contaminated by instrumental noise, atmospheric and Galactic foregrounds. The latter is expected to be four orders of magnitude brighter than the HI emission we wish to detect. We present a simulation of single-dish observations including an instrumental noise model with 1/f and white noise, and sky emission with a diffuse Galactic foreground and HI emission. We consider two foreground cleaning methods: spectral parametric fitting and principal component analysis. For a smooth frequency spectrum of the foreground and instrumental effects, we find that the parametric fitting method provides residuals that are still contaminated by foreground and 1/f noise, but the principal component analysis can remove this contamination down to the thermal noise level. This method is robust for a range of different models of foreground and noise, and so constitutes a promising way to recover the HI signal from the ...

  8. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  9. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sheppard, J. C. [SLAC, Standford University, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  10. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­?energy-­? density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­?energy-­? density plasma the ideas for steady-­?state current drive developed for low-­?energy-­? density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­?energy-­?density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  11. Adaptive RF Transient Reduction for HIGH Intensity Beams with Gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    When a high-intensity beam with bunch-trains and gaps passes a cavity with a high-gain vector feedback enforcing a constant voltage, large transients appear, stressing the RF high power hardware and increasing the trip rate. By modulating the cavity voltage with a varying periodic waveform (set-function), the RF power can be made constant while still preserving the high feedback gain. The average cavity voltage is conserved but bunches have to settle at slightly shifted positions. A method is derived to obtain this set-function in practice while making no assumptions or measurements of the beam or RF parameters. Adiabatic iterations are made including the whole machine as an analog computing device, using all parameters as they are. A computer simulation shows the success of the method.

  12. Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Wolbers, S.

    2013-10-25

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  13. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  14. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  15. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; et al

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting schememore »is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.« less

  16. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P., E-mail: pli@sqnc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Information Engineering, Shangqiu Normal University, Shangqiu 476000 (China); Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lei, M.K., E-mail: surfeng@dlut.edu.cn [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu, X.P. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-06-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} A modified layer about 30 {mu}m thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. {yields} Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. {yields} More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. {yields} The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. {yields} Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  17. Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Improving Solar Cell Efficiency October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share The two-dimensional grazing...

  18. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  19. Superefficient Refrigerators: Opportunities and Challenges for Efficiency Improvement Globally

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Nihar; Park, Won Young; Bojda, Nicholas; McNeil, Michael A.

    2014-08-01

    As an energy-intensive mainstream product, residential refrigerators present a significant opportunity to reduce electricity consumption through energy efficiency improvements. Refrigerators expend a considerable amount of electricity during normal use, typically consuming between 100 to 1,000 kWh of electricity per annum. This paper presents the results of a technical analysis done for refrigerators in support of the Super-efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment (SEAD) initiative. Beginning from a base case representative of the average unit sold in India, we analyze efficiency improvement options and their corresponding costs to build a cost-versus-efficiency relationship. We then consider design improvement options that are known to be the most cost effective and that can improve efficiency given current design configurations. We also analyze and present additional super-efficient options, such as vacuum-insulated panels. We estimate the cost of conserved electricity for the various options, allowing flexible program design for market transformation programs toward higher efficiency. We estimate ~;;160TWh/year of energy savings are cost effective in 2030, indicating significant potential for efficiency improvement in refrigerators in SEAD economies and China.

  20. Improving Design with Agents, Improving Agents by Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David C.

    DCB 1 WPI Improving Design with Agents, or, Improving Agents by Design David C. Brown AI in Design ASSUMPTION Ă? Assume that the design environment is built using agents. i.e., situated, autonomous, flexible Ă?'s future design and synthesis environment will be built as a real multi-agent system. In what follows, we

  1. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  2. 3, 435470, 2006 Improved surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 3, 435­470, 2006 Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract near real time surface wind resolution over the Mediterranean Sea A. Bentamy, H.-L. Ayina, P Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  3. IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING PALAEOCLIMATE DATA A community White Paper for consideration by the Natural Environment Research Council, UK #12;#12;IMPROVING FUTURE CLIMATE PREDICTION USING Climate Symposium 2008 - Earth's Climate: Past, Present and Future", convened by H. Elderfield, M. Bickle

  4. A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton and Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy for Pediatric Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Adams, Judith; Krejcarek, Stephanie J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: tyock@partners.org

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: We compared tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of proton radiation therapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for pediatric parameningeal rhabdomyosarcomas (PRMS). Methods and Materials: To quantify dosimetric differences between contemporary proton and photon treatment for pediatric PRMS, proton beam plans were compared with IMRT plans. Ten patients treated with proton radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital had IMRT plans generated. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Proton and IMRT plans provided acceptable and comparable target volume coverage, with at least 99% of the CTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. Improved dose conformality provided by proton therapy resulted in significant sparing of all examined normal tissues except for ipsilateral cochlea and mastoid; ipsilateral parotid gland sparing was of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.05). More profound sparing of contralateral structures by protons resulted in greater dose asymmetry between ipsilateral and contralateral retina, optic nerves, cochlea, and mastoids; dose asymmetry between ipsilateral and contralateral parotids was of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.05). Conclusions: For pediatric PRMS, superior normal tissue sparing is achieved with proton radiation therapy compared with IMRT. Because of enhanced conformality, proton plans also demonstrate greater normal tissue dose distribution asymmetry. Longitudinal studies assessing the impact of proton radiotherapy and IMRT on normal tissue function and growth symmetry are necessary to define the clinical consequences of these differences.

  5. Stress Intensity of Delamination in a Sintered-Silver Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVoto, D. J.; Paret, P. P.; Wereszczak, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    In automotive power electronics packages, conventional thermal interface materials such as greases, gels, and phase-change materials pose bottlenecks to heat removal and are also associated with reliability concerns. The industry trend is toward high thermal performance bonded interfaces for large-area attachments. However, because of coefficient of thermal expansion mismatches between materials/layers and resultant thermomechanical stresses, adhesive and cohesive fractures could occur, posing a reliability problem. These defects manifest themselves in increased thermal resistance. This research aims to investigate and improve the thermal performance and reliability of sintered-silver for power electronics packaging applications. This has been experimentally accomplished by the synthesis of large-area bonded interfaces between metalized substrates and copper base plates that have subsequently been subjected to thermal cycles. A finite element model of crack initiation and propagation in these bonded interfaces will allow for the interpretation of degradation rates by a crack-velocity (V)-stress intensity factor (K) analysis. A description of the experiment and the modeling approach are discussed.

  6. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  7. Peanuts at an Angle: Detecting and Measuring the Three-Dimensional Structure of Bars in Moderately Inclined Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We show that direct detection and measurement of the vertically thickened parts of bars (so-called "boxy" or "peanut-shaped" bulges) is possible not only for edge-on galaxies but also for galaxies with moderate inclinations (i peanut can usually be detected for inclinations as low as i ~ 40 deg -- and in exceptional cases down to i ~ 30 deg. In agreement with the predictions from N-body simulations, the signature is most easily detectable when the bar's position angle is within ~ 50 deg of the galaxy major axis; in particular, galaxies where the bar lies very close to the minor axis do not show the signature clearly or at all. For galaxies with i = 40--65 deg and relative angles peanut struc...

  8. MOLYBDENUM, RUTHENIUM, AND THE HEAVY r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN MODERATELY METAL-POOR MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Ruth C. [Astrophysical Advances, 607 Marion Place, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The ratios of elemental abundances observed in metal-poor stars of the Galactic halo provide a unique present-day record of the nucleosynthesis products of its earliest stars. While the heaviest elements were synthesized by the r- and s-processes, dominant production mechanisms of light trans-ironic elements were obscure until recently. This work investigates further our 2011 conclusion that the low-entropy regime of a high-entropy wind (HEW) produced molybdenum and ruthenium in two moderately metal-poor turnoff stars that showed extreme overabundances of those elements with respect to iron. Only a few, rare nucleosynthesis events may have been involved. Here we determine abundances for Mo, Ru, and other trans-Fe elements for 28 similar stars by matching spectral calculations to well-exposed near-UV Keck HIRES spectra obtained for beryllium abundances. In each of the 26 turnoff stars with Mo or Ru line detections and no evidence for s-process production (therefore old), we find Mo and Ru to be three to six times overabundant. In contrast, the maximum overabundance is reduced to factors of three and two for the neighboring elements zirconium and palladium. Since the overproduction peaks sharply at Mo and Ru, a low-entropy HEW is confirmed as its origin. The overabundance level of the heavy r-process elements varies significantly, from none to a factor of four, but is uncorrelated with Mo and Ru overabundances. Despite their moderate metallicity, stars in this group trace the products of different nucleosynthetic events: possibly very few events, possibly events whose output depended on environment, metallicity, or time.

  9. Optimization of micro-aeration intensity in acidogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digester treating food waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Suyun; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W.C.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Effect of micro-aeration on acidogenesis and hydrolysis of food waste was investigated. • Micro-aeration at 258 L-air/kg TS/d increased the VFAs production 3-fold. • High aeration leads to loss of substrate through microbial biomass and respiration. • Optimum aeration increased methane recovery while high aeration intensity reduced methane yield. - Abstract: Micro-aeration is known to promote the activities of hydrolytic exo-enzymes and used as a strategy to improve the hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The effect of different micro-aeration rates, 0, 129, 258, and 387 L-air/kg TS/d (denoted as LBR-AN, LBR-6h, LBR-3h and LBR-2h, respectively) on the solubilization of food waste was evaluated at 35 °C in four leach bed reactors (LBR) coupled with methanogenic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Results indicate that the intensity of micro-aeration influenced the hydrolysis and methane yield. Adequate micro-aeration intensity in LBR-3h and LBR-2h significantly enhanced the carbohydrate and protein hydrolysis by 21–27% and 38–64% respectively. Due to the accelerated acidogenesis, more than 3-fold of acetic acid and butyric acid were produced in LBR-3h as compared to the anaerobic treatment LBR-AN resulting in the maximum methane yield of 0.27 L CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added} in the UASB. The performance of LBR-6h with inadequate aeration was similar to that of LBR-AN with a comparable hydrolysis degree. Nevertheless, higher aeration intensity in LBR-2h was also unfavorable for methane yield due to significant biomass generation and CO{sub 2} respiration of up to 18.5% and 32.8% of the total soluble hydrolysate, respectively. To conclude, appropriate micro-aeration rate can promote the hydrolysis of solid organic waste and methane yield without undesirable carbon loss and an aeration intensity of 258 L-air/kg TS/d is recommended for acidogenic LBR treating food waste.

  10. Intense Pulsed Neutron Emission from a Compact Pyroelectric Driven Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, V; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Kerr, P; Rusnak, B; Morse, J

    2008-10-08

    Intense pulsed D-D neutron emission with rates >10{sup 10} n/s during the pulse, pulse widths of {approx}100's ns, and neutron yields >10 k per pulse are demonstrated in a compact pyroelectric accelerator. The accelerator consists of a small pyroelectric LiTaO{sub 3} crystal which provides the accelerating voltage and an independent compact spark plasma ion source. The crystal voltage versus temperature is characterized and compare well with theory. Results show neutron output per pulse that scales with voltage as V{approx}1.7. These neutron yields match a simple model of the system at low voltages but are lower than predicted at higher voltages due to charge losses not accounted for in the model. Interpretation of the data against modeling provides understanding of the accelerator and in general pyroelectric LiTaO{sub 3} crystals operated as charge limited negative high voltage targets. The findings overall serve as the proof-of-principle and basis for pyroelectric neutron generators that can be pulsed, giving peak neutron rates orders of magnitude greater than previous work, and notably increase the potential applications of pyroelectric based neutron generators.

  11. Quasiperiodic and chaotic motions in intense field multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih-I Chu

    1987-09-25

    The question of the behavior of quantum systems in time-dependent fields whose classical counterparts exhibit chaotic behavior is addressed. For any nondissipative bounded quantum system under the influence of polychromatic (i.e., quasiperiodic) fields, it is proved by means of the many-mode Floquet theory that the auto-correlation function will recur infinitely often in the course of time, indicating no strict quantum stochasticity is possible. In particular, for an N-level quantum system undergoing multiphoton transitions, its dynamic behavior is described by the quasiperiodic motion of an (N/sup 2/--1)-dimensional coherence vector S-arrow-right in accord with the SU(N) dynamic symmetries. On the other hand, for any dissipative quantum system, SU(N) symmetries are broken, and non-quasiperiodic behavior is observed as the coherence vector S-arrow-right evolves from an initially (N/sup 2/--1)-dimensional space to a lower-dimensional space. The dynamical behaviors are illustrated for two- and three-level quantum systems driven by intense bichromatic laser fields.

  12. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01

    the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings ToolZhou. 2008. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values forpublications/world-best-practice-energy- intensity-values-

  13. Bacteria Runoff BMPs for Intensive Beef Cattle Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin; Redmon, Larry; Gentry, Terry

    2010-01-01

    , and heavily stocked improved pastures. On October 5, 2007, TWRI and AgriLife Extension selected a site at the Beef Cattle Systems Center for construction of three 1-hectare (2.5 acres) watersheds to evaluate grazing management (Fig. 1). 11 Figure 1... varied substantially at each of the grazed sites throughout the project (Table 1), a better method for assessing the data is to evaluate the relation of stocking rate to E. coli EMC for each event (Fig. 10). The 12-month SR was selected...

  14. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  15. Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators Improved Geothermometry...

  16. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  17. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  18. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  19. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  20. Local Option- Special Improvement Districts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment...

  1. Local Option- Local Improvement Districts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessme...

  2. Monitoring I/O on Data-Intensive Clusters Visualizing Disk Reads...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clinton, Mike Mason, Graham Van Heule - HPC 3 1 LA---UR---14---26019 Background Motivation: - IO Intensive Jobs * Large amounts of scientific data 2 Background Motivation: -...

  3. Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the economy by State (2000-2011)" "metric tons energy-related carbon dioxide per million dollars of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  4. Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by State (2000...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon intensity of the energy supply by State (2000-2011)" "kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011"...

  5. Intense Super-radiant X-rays from a Compact Source using a Nanocathode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    periodically bunched at the wavelength of interest enabling in-phase super-radiant emission that is far more intense than from unbunched electrons. The periodic bunching is...

  6. Generation of Stable (3+1)-dimensional High-intensity Ultrashort Light Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, T. P.; Koprinkov, I. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorova, M. E. [College of Energetics and Electronics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, M. D. [Faculty of Appl. Math. and Informatics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-11-25

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses is studied within a rigorous physical model. The pulse propagation is described by the nonlinear envelope equation. The propagation and the material equations are solved self-consistently at realistic physical conditions. Self-compression of the pulse around single-cycle regime and dramatic increase of the pulse intensity is found. At certain conditions, the peak intensity, transversal width, time duration, and the spatiotemporal pulse shape remain stable with the propagation of the pulse, resembling a soliton formation process. This, to our knowledge, is the first simulation of high-intensity ultrashort soliton formation dynamics in the (3+1)-dimensional case.

  7. Structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus orphan ORF AF1382 determined by sulfur SAD from a moderately diffracting crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jin-Yi; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Chen, Lirong; Xu, Hao; Chrzas, John; Rose, John Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2012-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 11.14 kDa orphan ORF 1382 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AF1382) has been determined by sulfur SAD phasing using data collected from a moderately diffracting crystal and 1.9 Ĺ synchrotron X-rays. The crystal structure of the 11.14 kDa orphan ORF 1382 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AF1382) has been determined by sulfur SAD phasing using a moderately diffracting crystal and 1.9 Ĺ wavelength synchrotron X-rays. AF1382 was selected as a structural genomics target by the Southeast Collaboratory for Structural Genomics (SECSG) since sequence analyses showed that it did not belong to the Pfam-A database and thus could represent a novel fold. The structure was determined by exploiting longer wavelength X-rays and data redundancy to increase the anomalous signal in the data. AF1382 is a 95-residue protein containing five S atoms associated with four methionine residues and a single cysteine residue that yields a calculated Bijvoet ratio (?F{sub anom}/F) of 1.39% for 1.9 Ĺ wavelength X-rays. Coupled with an average Bijvoet redundancy of 25 (two 360° data sets), this produced an excellent electron-density map that allowed 69 of the 95 residues to be automatically fitted. The S-SAD model was then manually completed and refined (R = 23.2%, R{sub free} = 26.8%) to 2.3 Ĺ resolution. High-resolution data were subsequently collected from a better diffracting crystal using 0.97 Ĺ wavelength synchrotron X-rays and the S-SAD model was refined (R = 17.9%, R{sub free} = 21.4%) to 1.85 Ĺ resolution. AF1382 has a winged-helix–turn–helix structure common to many DNA-binding proteins and most closely resembles the N-terminal domain (residues 1–82) of the Rio2 kinase from A. fulgidus, which has been shown to bind DNA, and a number of MarR-family transcriptional regulators, suggesting a similar DNA-binding function for AF1382. The analysis also points out the advantage gained from carrying out data reduction and structure determination on-site while the crystal is still available for further data collection.

  8. A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Intensity GJ/t kgce/t Primary Energy Intensity* GJ/t kgce/tIntensity GJ/t kgce/t Primary Energy Intensity* GJ/t kgce/Scenarios 1, 4 and 6 the primary energy value includes T&D

  9. ISSUANCE 2015-12-02: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps, Final Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps, Final Determination

  10. 2d-PIC simulation of atomic clusters in intense laser fields F. Greschik and H.-J. Kull,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kull, Hans-Jörg

    Title page Full title 2d-PIC simulation of atomic clusters in intense laser fields Authors F of atomic clusters in intense laser fields Abstract Collective absorption of intense laser pulses by atomic by electron emission increases as a power law with the laser intensity. The absorbed energy per electron

  11. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

    2006-10-27

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the energy efficiency and reduced emissions that can be obtained with a dual torch DC plasma transferred arc-melting system. Plasmelt Glass Technologies, LLC was formed to solicit and execute the project, which utilize a full-scale test melter system. The system is similar to the one that was originally constructed by Johns Manville, but Plasmelt has added significant improvements to the torch design and melter system that has extended the original JM short torch lives. The original JM design has been shown to achieve melt rates 5 to 10 times faster than conventional gas or electric melting, with improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. This project began on 7/28/2003 and ended 7/27/06. A laboratory scale melter was designed, constructed, and operated to conduct multiple experimental melting trials on various glass compositions. Glass quality was assessed. Although the melter design is generic and equally applicable to all sectors within the glass industry, the development of this melter has focused primarily on fiberglass with additional exploratory melting trials of frits, specialty, and minerals-melting applications. Throughput, energy efficiency, and glass quality have been shown to be heavily dependent on the selected glass composition. During this project, Plasmelt completed the proof-of-concept work in our Boulder, CO Lab to show the technical feasibility of this transferred-arc plasma melter. Late in the project, the work was focused on developing the processes and evaluating the economic viability of plasma melting aimed at the specific glasses of interest to specific client companies. Post project work is on going with client companies to address broader non-glass materials such as refractories and industrial minerals. Exploratory melting trials have been conducted on several glasses of commercial interest including: C-glass, E-glass, S-Glass, AR-Glass, B-glass, Lighting Glass, NE-Glass, and various frits. Exploratory melts of non-glassy materials, such as wollastonite, zirconium silicate, and alumino-silicate melts were successfully done indicating that plasma melting has potential application beyond glass. Experimental results were generated that show the high quality of plasma-melted fiberglass compositions, such as E-glass, can result in good fiberizing performance. Fiberizing performance and tensile strength data were achieved during the project to support this conclusion. High seed counts are a feature of the current lab scale melter and must be dealt with via other means, since fining work was outside the scope of this project.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Myriam [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Fortin, Andre [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Germain, Isabelle [Departement de Radio-oncologie et Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada)], E-mail: isabelle.germain@chuq.qc.ca

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  13. Production of high intensity {sup 48}Ca for the 88-Inch Cyclotron and other updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M. Strohmeier, M.; Thullier, T.; Todd, D.; Xie, D.; Franzen, K. Y.

    2014-02-15

    Recently the Versatile ECR for NUclear Science (VENUS) ion source was engaged in a 60-day long campaign to deliver high intensity {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+} beam to the 88-Inch Cyclotron. As the first long term use of VENUS for multi-week heavy-element research, new methods were developed to maximize oven to target efficiency. First, the tuning parameters of VENUS for injection into the cyclotron proved to be very different than those used to tune VENUS for maximum beam output of the desired charge state immediately following its bending magnet. Second, helium with no oxygen support gas was used to maximize the efficiency. The performance of VENUS and its low temperature oven used to produce the stable requested 75 e?A of {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+} beam current was impressive. The consumption of {sup 48}Ca in VENUS using the low temperature oven was checked roughly weekly, and was found to be on average 0.27 mg/h with an ionization efficiency into the 11+ charge state of 5.0%. No degradation in performance was noted over time. In addition, with the successful operation of VENUS the 88-Inch cyclotron was able to extract a record 2 p?A of {sup 48}Ca{sup 11+}, with a VENUS output beam current of 219 e?A. The paper describes the characteristics of the VENUS tune used for maximum transport efficiency into the cyclotron as well as ongoing efforts to improve the transport efficiency from VENUS into the cyclotron. In addition, we briefly present details regarding the recent successful repair of the cryostat vacuum system.

  14. Title of dissertation: Precision Control of Intense Electron Beams in a Low-Energy Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: Precision Control of Intense Electron Beams in a Low-Energy Ring ELECTRON BEAMS IN A LOW-ENERGY RING by Chao Wu Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of particle accelerators require beams with high intensity and low emittance in a stable fashion. An important

  15. A Computational Model of Knowledge-Intensive Learning and Problem Solving1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    1 A Computational Model of Knowledge-Intensive Learning and Problem Solving1 Agnar Aamodt Knowledge. If knowledge-based systems are to become more competent and robust in solving real world problems, they need model - a framework -for knowledge-intensive problem solving and learning from experience. The model has

  16. Second-Best Instruments for Near-Term Climate Policy: Intensity Targets vs. the Safety Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Second-Best Instruments for Near-Term Climate Policy: Intensity Targets vs. the Safety Valve Mort Keywords: Uncertainty, climate change, instrument choice, safety valve, intensity target. Abstract Current to be preferred over a safety valve. 1 #12;1. Introduction As many countries prepare to begin their implementation

  17. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  18. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  19. Initial ultraviolet-B intensity data at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Smith, G.J. [New Zealand Inst. for Industrial Research and Development, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1993-10-01

    A measurement of UV-B reaching the ground has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The instrument is the same as those operated by the National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research in their network in New Zealand. The wavelength response of the radiometer is similar to the response of human skin to UV-B. Intensity data are collected by averaging meter readings over 10 minutes from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm Pacific Standard Time, then converting to effective UV-B intensity normalized at 310 nm. This report checks the intensities obtained at LLNL from November 1992 to July 1993 against the expected results: Increased solar zenith angle, whether from the daily cycle or from the yearly cycle in solar position, should decrease UV-B intensity at the ground due to increased optical path; and, intervening cloud cover should decrease ground UV-B intensity. Three additional findings are reported here: Maximum UV-B intensity on cloudless days does not always follow a smooth curve, but instead varies either high or low to some extent; Morning UV-B intensities are less than those in the afternoon at comparable solar zenith angles at certain times of year; LLNL wintertime daily-averaged UV-B intensities are somewhat higher than those observed at Auckland, New Zealand in their winter of 1992.

  20. The Effect of Topography on Storm-Track Intensity in a Relatively Simple General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seok-Woo

    The Effect of Topography on Storm-Track Intensity in a Relatively Simple General Circulation Model The effect of topography on storm-track intensity is examined with a set of primitive equation model flow impinging on the topography. If the background flow consists of a weak double jet, higher

  1. Issues and R&D Required for the Intensity Frontier Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Henderson, S.; Hurh, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.

    2013-09-26

    Operation, upgrade and development of accelerators for Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges in order to satisfy both the near-term and long-term Particle Physics program. Here we discuss key issues and R&D required for the Intensity Frontier accelerators.

  2. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, Me-intensity lasers has made it pos- sible to study extreme physics on a tabletop. Among the studies, the generation

  3. A hybrid approach to beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsimas, Dimitris

    Linear programming Computational experiments a b s t r a c t Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Optimization) is an important problem and is today often based on human experience. In this context, we faceA hybrid approach to beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy D. Bertsimas

  4. Plasma discreteness eects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma discreteness eects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse V.I. Savchenko, intense laser pulse are investigated. Although, for most plasmas of interest, the damping of the laser pulse is due to collective plasma eects, in certain regimes the energy absorbed in the plasma micro#12

  5. Plasma discreteness effects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma discreteness effects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse V. I. Savchenko irradiated by an ultrashort, intense laser pulse are investigated. Although, for most plasmas of interest, the damping of the laser pulse is due to collective plasma effects, in certain regimes the energy absorbed

  6. Plasma discreteness effects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma discreteness effects in the presence of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse V.I. Savchenko, intense laser pulse are investigated. Although, for most plasmas of interest, the damping of the laser pulse is due to collective plasma effects, in certain regimes the energy absorbed in the plasma

  7. Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil protozoa--An intensive study of population dynamics and community structure in an upland intensive investigation of soil protozoan diversity sponsored by the Natural Environment Research Council within the context of the fractal character of the soil. We developed methods for estimating

  8. Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser of methylamine (CH3NH2 + ), methanol (CH3OH+ ), and methyl fluoride (CH3F+ ) cations by short, intense laser 7 m laser pulses. This work is motivated by recent studies of methanol cations by Yamanouchi and co

  9. The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross-Capital-Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Güting, Ralf Hartmut

    The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross-Capital-Intensity Structural Change by Denis Stijepic://www.fernuni-hagen.de/ls_wagner/en/ #12;The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross- Capital-Intensity Structural Change* Denis Stijepic The Kuznets-Kaldor stylized facts are one of the most striking empirical observations about the development

  10. Light intensity, prey detection and foraging mechanisms of age 0 year yellow perch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mensinger, Allen F.

    Light intensity, prey detection and foraging mechanisms of age 0 year yellow perch H. E. RICHMOND feeding trials at varying light intensities. Perch were highly effective predators and captured Daphnia pulicaria with 94% overall foraging success at light levels ranging from 0 to 3400lx. Maximum average

  11. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4041 Long-Term Cosmic Ray Intensities: Physical Reconstruc-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    model of the heliosphere, we calculate the expected differential spectra and integral intensity of galactic cosmic rays at the Earth's orbit since 1610. The calculated cosmic ray integral intensity. (2000) have recently calculated the open solar magnetic flux for the last 400 years from sunspot data

  12. Vasco: A Visual Approach to Explore Object Churn in Framework-intensive Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufour, Bruno

    Vasco: A Visual Approach to Explore Object Churn in Framework-intensive Applications Fleur Duseau,dufour,sahraouh}@iro.umontreal.ca Abstract--Bloat, and particularly object churn, is a common performance problem in framework-intensive applications. Ob- ject churn consists of an excessive use of temporary objects. Identifying and understanding

  13. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  14. Electrochemical Control of the Time-Dependent Intensity Fluctuations in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensities were recorded from a roughened silver electrode the applied potential. The potential-controlled distribution of SERS intensities was interpreted by considering the modulation of the surface coverage of the adsorbed dye by the interfacial electric field

  15. Development status of triple-junction solar cells optimized for low intensity low temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development status of triple-junction solar cells optimized for low intensity low temperature triple-junction solar cells manufactured by AZUR SPACE Solar Power GmbH under low intensity low unusable for deep space missions. Fig. 1: Example of a flat spot effect present in a triple- junction solar

  16. Oecologia (2000) 124:270279 Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity, and areal ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    2000-01-01

    Oecologia (2000) 124:270­279 © Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity The intensity, frequency, and area of disturbance may de- termine the abundance and species richness of an assem for recoloniza- tion. If disturbance frequency is greater than the rate of competitive exclusion, diversity may

  17. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 52675286 The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Energy Policy 35 (2007) 5267­5286 The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity for long-run CO2 emission projections Ian Sue Winga,Ă, Richard S. Eckausb a Center for Energy 2007 Abstract This paper analyzes the influence of the long-run decline in US energy intensity

  18. Improving OpenMP Scaling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact Assessments ImpactImplicationsImprovedNewImproving

  19. PERI - Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels for Multicore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H; Williams, Samuel; Datta, Kaushik; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine; Bailey, David H

    2008-06-24

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to Sparse Matrix Vector Multiplication (SpMV), the explicit heat equation PDE on a regular grid (Stencil), and a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD). We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Xeon Clovertown, AMD Opteron Barcelona, Sun Victoria Falls, and the Sony-Toshiba-IBM (STI) Cell. Rather than hand-tuning each kernel for each system, we develop a code generator for each kernel that allows us to identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned kernel applications often achieve a better than 4X improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we analyze a Roofline performance model for each platform to reveal hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  20. Hot film/wire calibration for low to moderate flow velocities This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hirtum, Annemie

    Hot film/wire calibration for low to moderate flow velocities This article has been downloaded from fluid flow dynamic properties by deducing instantaneous velocities from local heat transfer information) or the characteristics of a laminar pipe flow (Yue and Malmstrom 1998). Despite the complexity of some techniques

  1. Thomas, J.R. and Clem, A.W, 1991, PWR moderator temperature coefficient via noise analysis: time series methods, Proceedings of SMORNVI, Gatlinburg, 34.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    .M.R., 1974, Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors, Pergamon Press, Oxford #12; ­ 35 ­ Ku, C.C., Lee K.Y., and Edwards R.M., 1991, Neural network for adapting nuclear power plant control for wide­range operation, Noise Analysis Method for Monitoring the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Pressurized Water Reactors

  2. P.L. 100-615, "Federal Energy Management Improvement Act" (1988)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-13

    Requires agencies to improve construction designs for Federal buildings so that the energy consumption per gross square foot in use during FY 1995 is at least ten percent less than that of FY 1985. Sets forth implementation steps to meet such goal. Exempts from such requirement buildings in which energy intensive activities are implemented. Redescribes procedures involved in the establishment and use of life cycle cost methods for Federal buildings.

  3. Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1983-06-29

    Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes for use therein, particularly electrodes employing amorphous silicon or polyacetylene coating are produced by a process which includes filling pinholes or porous openings in the coatings by electrochemical oxidation of selected monomers to deposit insulating polymer in the openings.

  4. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Tao, Luan (Havertown, PA); Zhang, Yuying (New Hope, PA); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); McCutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); McCole, Laura (East Fallowfield, PA); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

    2011-08-16

    Strains of Zymomonas were engineered by introducing a chimeric xylose isomerase gene that contains a mutant promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. The promoter directs increased expression of xylose isomerase, and when the strain is in addition engineered for expression of xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase, improved utilization of xylose is obtained.

  6. Improving the Models, SACOG Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    forecasting, Vehicle emissions, Health outcomes, RHNA allocations. #12;What is the state of the models? · Tour-based models implemented in larger MPOs are a significant improvement. · Trip-based models still used in other of models and data in the SCS process is not sufficient. · Transportation has early costs and later benefits

  7. TURBINE BURNERS: Engine Performance Improvements;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heydari, Payam

    the expansion through the turbine for turbojet , turbofan , and stationary - power gas - turbine engines. StudyTURBINE BURNERS: Engine Performance Improvements; Mixing, Ignition, and Flame-Holding in High/WEIGHT Range highly undesirable Desirable Not Good #12;TURBINE BURNER CONCEPT Turbine burning has advantage

  8. Improving primary science great science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving primary science Developing great science subject leadershipGreat ideas for primary science leaders from schools that value science. #12;2 | Primary science Where science has a good profile, investigative science with access to high-quality expertise, children are likely to enjoy learning the subject

  9. What are Improvement Partnerships? "VCHIPisaperfectexampleofhowstategroupscancometogetheraroundacommongoaland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    ; and · Informing policy. improvement partnerships inform health policy By collaborating to share resources and family health, measure performance, and develop and disseminate tools. Practice-level support and a focus Partnerships (IP) are a durable state or regional collaboration of public and private partners that uses

  10. February 2010 Border Crossing Improvements,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShea, Daniel W.

    ], 2008a) (Figure 1). As border traffic grows, public agencies continue to try to identify innovative ways makers better understand and prioritize ways to improve border crossing benefit-cost analysis. Figure 1), the central idea is that policies that lower travel prices (e.g., reduce congestion) are likely to encourage

  11. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005deermay.pdf More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and...

  12. Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  13. Improving Tor performance through better path selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Fallon Ting

    2010-01-01

    S. Rollyson, “Improving tor onion routing client latency,”approach in “Improving Tor Onion Routing Client Latency” [C. Pasquale, Chair Tor, the Onion Router, is a popular

  14. POLYMERIC MIRROR FILMS: DURABILITY IMPROVEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IMPROVEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN NEW COLLECTOR DESIGNS POLYMERIC MIRROR FILMS: DURABILITY IMPROVEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN NEW COLLECTOR DESIGNS This presentation was...

  15. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    customers, and improve overall service reliability to reduce customer losses from power disruptions. This report presents findings on smart grid improvements in outage...

  16. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff...

  17. Integrated Surface Engineering for Improving Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surface Engineering for Improving Energy Efficiency Integrated Surface Engineering for Improving Energy Efficiency Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies...

  18. HUD Home Improvements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources, and updates related to home improvements and insurance for manufactured housing. Author: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Home Improvements...

  19. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  20. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  1. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  2. Intense terahertz emission from relativistic circularly polarized laser pulses interaction with overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Li, Xiao-Ya [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-10-15

    During the interaction of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse with an overdense plasma target, the longitudinal motion of bunches of electrons under the action of light pressure and electrostatic restore force can emit intense terahertz (THz) pulses. This mechanism allows high pump laser intensity and large electron number participating in the emission. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to investigate the THz emission. The results suggest that such a source can produce remarkably intense THz pulses with energy of several mJ/sr and power of tens of gigawatts, which could find applications in nonlinear studies and relativistic laser-plasma interaction diagnostics.

  3. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert; Metcalf, R Benton

    2015-01-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect HI clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the HI density $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$, the HI bias $b_{\\rm HI}$ and the galaxy-HI correlation coefficient $r_{\\rm HI-g}$.

  4. Improved Hardy-Sobolev inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Balinsky; W. D. Evans; D. Hundertmark; R. T. Lewis

    2007-10-21

    The main result includes features of a Hardy-type inequality and an inequality of either Sobolev or Gagliardo-Nirenberg type. It is inspired by the method of proof of a recent improved Sobolev inequality derived by M. Ledoux which brings out the connection between Sobolev embeddings and heat kernel bounds. Here Ledoux's technique is applied to the operator $L:= {\\bf{x}} \\cdot \

  5. Nanolubricants to Improve Chiller Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX FOrigin ofAllenDepartmentNYSERDANanolubricants to Improve

  6. Decommissioning the Romanian Water-Cooled Water-Moderated Research Reactor: New Environmental Perspective on the Management of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barariu, G.; Giumanca, R. [Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activity (RAAN), Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (SITON), 111 Atomistilor St., Bucuresti-Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies were performed for decommissioning of the water-cooled water-moderated research reactor (WWER) located in Bucharest - Magurele, Romania. Using these studies as a starting point, the preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as for the rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and for the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and ecological reconstruction of the grounds need to be provided for, in accordance with national and international regulations. In accordance with IAEA recommendations at the time, the pre-feasibility study proposed three stages of decommissioning. However, since then new ideas have surfaced with regard to decommissioning. Thus, taking into account the current IAEA ideology, the feasibility study proposes that decommissioning of the WWER be done in one stage to an unrestricted clearance level of the reactor building in an Immediate Dismantling option. Different options and the corresponding derived preferred option for waste management are discussed taking into account safety measures, but also considering technical, logistical and economic factors. For this purpose, possible types of waste created during each decommissioning stage are reviewed. An approximate inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the recommended international basic safety standards identified in the previous phase of the project. The existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (RWTP) from the Horia Hulubei Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering (IFIN-HH), which has been in service with no significant upgrade since 1974, will need refurbishing due to deterioration, as well as upgrading in order to ensure the plant complies with current safety standards. This plant will also need to be adapted to treat wastes generated by WWER dismantling. The Baita-Bihor National Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility consists of two galleries in an abandoned uranium mine located in the central-western part of the Bihor Mountains in Transylvania. The galleries lie at a depth of 840 m. The facility requires a considerable overhaul. Several steps recommended for the upgrade of the facility are explored. Environmental concerns have lately become a crucial part of the radioactive waste management strategy. As such, all decisions must be made with great regard for land utilization around nuclear objectives. (authors)

  7. JOB DESCRIPTION Title: Continuous Improvement Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    or Six Sigma-based continuous improvement methods. Certification: Six Sigma Black Belt or Green Belt

  8. Improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casting is an energy-intensive manufacturing process within the metal casting and aluminum industries, requiring natural gas to melt aluminum and electricity to run equipment. The higher-than...

  9. Manpower planning and cycle-time reduction of a labor-intensive assembly line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Shao Chong

    2010-01-01

    The demand for Gas Lift Mandrels(GLM) in the oil and gas industry is expected to increase over the next few years, requiring Schlumberger's GLM assembly line to increase their manufacturing capacity. Given the labor-intensive ...

  10. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, L., E-mail: xialiansheng@caep.cn; Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J. [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2–3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  11. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-07

    AMO is developing advanced technologies that cut energy use and carbon emissions in some of the most energy-intensive processes within U.S. manufacturing. The brochure describes the AMO R&D projects that address these challenges.

  12. Laser enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound thrombolysis: An in vitro study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Huizhong; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-17

    Laser-enhanced thrombolysis by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment was studied in vitro with bovine blood clots. To achieve laser-enhanced thrombolysis, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Magnesium-Intensive Front End Sub-Structure Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about magnesium-intensive front end sub...

  14. Hybrid intensity and time-of-flight signal processing techniques for intelligent distance sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi, Itariu

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of "smart" consumer electronics, distance sensing is an increasingly important field in optical sensing. A novel approach to active infrared(IR) 1D distance sensing is proposed, employing both intensity and ...

  15. Determinants of energy intensity in industrialized countries : a comparison of China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Feiya

    2006-01-01

    The amount of final energy per unit of economic output (usually in terms of gross domestic product, or GDP), known as energy intensity, is often used to measure the effectiveness of energy use and the consumption patterns ...

  16. Correlation of intensity fluctuations in beams generated by quasi-homogeneous sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    of intensity fluctuations (the Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect) that occurs in electromagnetic beams.1364/JOSAA.31.002152 1. INTRODUCTION In the mid-1950s Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) deter- mined the angular

  17. Generation and search of axion-like light particle using intense crystalline field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Liao

    2011-07-19

    Intense electric field $\\sim 10^{10}-10^{11}$ V/cm in crystal has been known for a long time and has wide applications. We study the conversion of axion-like light particle and photon in the intense electric field in crystal. We find that the conversion of axion-like particle and photon happens for energy larger than keV range. We propose search of axion-like light particle using the intense crystalline field. We discuss the solar axion search experiment and a variety of shining-through-wall experiment using crystalline field. Due to the intense crystalline field which corresponds to magnetic field $\\sim 10^4-10^5$ Tesla these experiments are very interesting. In particular these experiments can probe the mass range of axion-like particle from eV to keV.

  18. [19] OSCILLATIONMETHOD 211 breaks down, and the most intense reflections will be systematically un-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    intensities from crystals of large unit cell. The problems imposed by the need to analyze the digitized data of two perpendicular bent mirrors, providing glancing-angle reflection in horizontal and vertical planes

  19. Bulk ablation of soft tissue with intense ultrasound: Modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    , the thermal de- struction of large tissue volumes is most commonly per- formed using radiofrequency RF ablation electromagnetic radiation in the 400­700 kHz range .3,4 Intense ultrasound treatment, first

  20. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, I.D.

    2010-01-01

    2002). J.D. Lawson, “Physics of Charged Particles Beams”, (B. Kusse, J. Moschella, Physics of Fluids 30 , 245 (1987).Davidson and H. Qin, “ Physics of Intense Charged Particle

  1. The emergence of negotiated family care in intensive care - a grounded theory approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kean, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes a qualitative enquiry into the experiences of families visiting an adult intensive care unit (ICU) during a critical illness of a family member and nurses’ perceptions of families in this environment. ...

  2. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  3. Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    of both biofuel and fossil fuel and thereby increases totalof proof to show world fossil fuel price decreases under anyGHG intensity among fossil fuels. We ?nd that the relative

  4. Extreme rainfall intensities and long-term rainfall risk from tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langousis, Andreas, 1981-

    2009-01-01

    We develop a methodology for the frequency of extreme rainfall intensities caused by tropical cyclones (TCs) in coastal areas. The mean rainfall field associated with a TC with maximum tangential wind speed Vmax, radius ...

  5. Energy Intensity Changes by Sector, 1985-2011 – Alternative Measures by Type of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Further insight with regard to the comparison of intensity changes by sector can be gained by looking at how they differ with respect to different definitions of energy use. Source energy...

  6. Zone folding effect in Raman G-band intensity of twisted bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    The G-band Raman intensity is calculated for twisted bilayer graphene as a function of laser excitation energy based on the extended tight binding method. Here we explicitly consider the electron-photon and electron-phonon ...

  7. Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Mahbub; Boyle, Diane K.; Crosser, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs...

  8. Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometrics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xiaoyu

    2006-01-01

    Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has ...

  9. Intensity-resolved Above Threshold Ionization Yields of Atoms with Ultrashort Laser Pulses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Nathan Andrew

    2012-10-19

    The above threshold ionization (ATI) spectra provide a diversity of information about a laser-atom ionization process such as laser intensity, pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and atomic energy level spacing. However, the spatial distribution...

  10. Photoionization dynamics and angular squeezing phenomenon in intense long-wavelength laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Zhou, Zhongyuan

    2011-03-11

    We develop a coherent-state Ehrenfest trajectory (CSET) approach for the nonperturbative study of full electronic and nuclear dynamics of molecules interacting with intense laser fields. In this approach, electrons and ...

  11. Generation of Ultra-intense Gamma-ray Train by QED Harmonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Tongjun; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-01-01

    When laser intensity exceeds 10^22W/cm^2, photons with energy above MeV can be generated from high-order harmonics process in the laser-plasma interaction. We find that under such laser intensity, QED effect plays a dominating role in the radiation pattern. Contrast to the gas and relativistic HHG processes, both the occurrence and energy of gamma-ray emission produced by QED harmonics are random and QED harmonics are usually not coherent, while the property of high intensity and ultra-short duration is conserved. Our simulation shows that the period of gamma-ray train is half of the laser period and the peak intensity is 1.4e22W/cm^2. This new harmonic production with QED effects are crucial to light-matter interaction in strong field and can be verified in experiments by 10PW laser facilities in the near future.

  12. Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometric study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xiaoyu, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., physical energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product ...

  13. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  14. Sub-Orbital Scale variations in the Intensity of the Arabian Sea Monsoon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanochko, Tara S

    A high-resolution multi-proxy reconstruction of the Arabian Sea Summer Monsoon (ASSM) intensity over the past 90,000 years has been determined using two marine sediment cores: one from the Somali margin and one from the ...

  15. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica�s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the interplay of rate effects with the effects of annealing, to accurately predict the fibers� reliability and expected lifetime

  16. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, Mikhail A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  17. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  18. Nighttime atmospheric stability changes and their effects on the temporal intensity of a mesoscale convective complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jeffrey Scott

    1988-01-01

    NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Meteorology NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Approved as to style...

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of ionization stabilization of atoms in intense laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Norman; C. Chandre; T. Uzer; Peijie Wang

    2014-12-06

    We revisit the stabilization of ionization of atoms subjected to a superintense laser pulse using nonlinear dynamics. We provide an explanation for the lack of complete ionization at high intensity and for the decrease of the ionization probability as intensity is increased. We investigate the role of each part of the laser pulse (ramp-up, plateau, ramp-down) in this process. We emphasize the role of the choice for the ionization criterion, energy versus distance criterion.

  20. Measuring the impact of an intensive commodity price risk management education program on agricultural producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean Alexander

    2005-08-29

    -1 MEASURING THE IMPACT OF AN INTENSIVE COMMODITY PRICE RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS A Dissertation by DEAN ALEXANDER MCCORKLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2005 Major Subject: Agricultural Education MEASURING THE IMPACT OF AN INTENSIVE COMMODITY PRICE RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS A Dissertation by DEAN ALEXANDER MCCORKLE...

  1. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  2. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  3. Tone-evoked Fos labeling in the central auditory pathway : effects of stimulus intensity and auditory fear conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Teresa P. G

    2006-01-01

    Understanding intensity coding and auditory learning are basic concerns of research on the auditory central pathway. There is no unifying model of intensity coding but several mechanisms have been proposed to play a role. ...

  4. Comparison of the Evolution of Energy Intensity in Spain and in the EU15. Why is Spain Different?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocańa, Carlos

    Energy intensity in Spain has increased since 1990, while the opposite has happened in the EU15. Decomposition analysis of primary energy intensity ratios has been used to identify which are the key sectors driving the ...

  5. Hadron correlators with improved fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. W. Stephenson

    1994-11-11

    We investigate point-to-point correlation functions for various mesonic and baryonic channels using the ${\\cal O}(a)$-improved Wilson action due to Sheikholeslami and Wohlert. We consider propagators to both time slices 0 and 1. We find that discretisation effects are more pronounced than those reported with unimproved Wilson fermions, but that the same procedure for removing finite size effects is successful. Extrapolating to the chiral limit, we see the notable features predicted phenomenologically: the ratio of interacting to free correlators in the vector channel is roughly constant to about 1 fm, while in the pseudoscalar channel the ratio increases markedly due to the strong binding.

  6. Improving Rainfall Effectiveness on Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Thurow, Thomas L.; Taylor Jr., Charles A.

    2000-01-11

    little effective mois- ture for plant growth because it is rapidly lost through evaporation. Other factors affecting evap- oration from the soil surface include soil texture, L-5029 Improving Rainfall Effectiveness On Rangeland Allan McGinty, Thomas L..., an aggres- sive woody invader of moist pastures, rangelands and riparian habitats can use from 0.1 to 0.4 inch of water per day and from 48 to 156 inches of water per year (Davenport, et al., 1982). Perennial grasses are generally more efficient users...

  7. Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

    2014-02-26

    Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

  8. Superalloy material with improved weldability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B.; Wagner, Gregg P.; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-02-24

    A fusion weldable superalloy containing 0.005-0.5 wt. % scandium. In one embodiment, the superalloy may have a composition similar to IN-939 alloy, but having added scandium and having only 0.005-0.040 wt. % zirconium. A gas turbine component may be formed by an investment casting of such a scandium-containing superalloy, and may include a fusion weld repaired area. A scandium-containing nickel-based superalloy coated with an MCrAlY bond coat will have improved cyclic oxidation resistance due to the sulfur-gettering effect of the scandium.

  9. Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turpish, W.

    2013-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-13-05-08.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7120 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-13-05-08.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Cooling Towers... in Process Applications Improving Process Cooling Tower Efficiency By: William (Bill) Turpish, PE, CEM, PEM, CEA W J Turpish and Associates, PC Shelby, North Carolina Rev 1.10 ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...

  10. Steam Cracker Furnace Energy Improvements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandler, T.

    2010-01-01

    ? Energy efficiency improvements Overview Baytown Olefins Plant Page 3 Baytown Complex ?One of world?s largest integrated, most technologically advanced petroleum/petrochemical complexes ?~3,400 acres along Houston Ship Channel, ~ 25 mi. east... Furnace tube hydrocarbon + steam 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1 2 time C o k e l a y e r Page 8 Steam Cracker Furnace Energy Efficiency ? Overall energy efficiency of furnace depends on ? Run length or % of time furnace is online (more...

  11. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  12. Improvements of biomass deconstruction enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and DSM Innovation, Inc. collaborated on the investigation of the structure and function of cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Sandia's role was to use its expertise in protein structure determination and X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of these enzymes in their native state and in their substrate and product bound states. Sandia was also tasked to work with DSM to use the newly solved structure to, using computational approaches, analyze enzyme interactions with both bound substrate and bound product; the goal being to develop approaches for rationally designing improved cellulases for biomass deconstruction. We solved the structures of five cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Several of these were also solved with bound substrate/product, which allowed us to predict mutations that might enhance activity and stability.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of IMRT patients (p = 0.046); logistic regression analysis also confirmed this observation (p = 0.040). Conclusions: When used in combination with brachytherapy, IMRT offers less Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding, less acute urinary toxicities, and is associated with a higher QOL compared with 3D-CRT.

  14. Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Solar cells made with low-cost, nontoxic copper-based quantum dots can achieve...

  15. Productivity Improvement of a Manual Assembly Line 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerasi, Pranavi

    2012-10-19

    The current project addresses the productivity improvement of a manual assembly line by making use of operations analysis in the framework of Lean production. A methodology is proposed that helps to improve the productivity of any production process...

  16. Improving recognition performance by modelling pronunciation variation. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessens, Judith M; Wester, Mirjam

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method for improving the performance of a continuous speech recognizer by modelling pronunciation variation. Although the improvements obtained with this method are small, they are in line with those ...

  17. Georgia Power- Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia Power offers up to $2,575 in rebates to customers who choose to improve home performance with whole building BPI certified efficiency measures or up to $700 for individual improvements from...

  18. Foreground contamination in Ly? intensity mapping during the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta; Santos, Mario G.

    2014-04-10

    The intensity mapping of Ly? emission during the epoch of reionization will be contaminated by foreground emission lines from lower redshifts. We calculate the mean intensity and the power spectrum of Ly? emission at z ? 7 and estimate the uncertainties according to the relevant astrophysical processes. We find that the low-redshift emission lines from 6563 Ĺ H?, 5007 Ĺ [O III], and 3727 Ĺ [O II] will be strong contaminants on the observed Ly? power spectrum. We make use of both the star formation rate and luminosity functions to estimate the mean intensity and power spectra of the three foreground lines at z ? 0.5 for H?, z ? 0.9 for [O III], and z ? 1.6 for [O II], as they will contaminate the Ly? emission at z ? 7. The [O II] line is found to be the strongest. We analyze the masking of the bright survey pixels with a foreground line above some line intensity threshold as a way to reduce the contamination in an intensity mapping survey. We find that the foreground contamination can be neglected if we remove pixels with fluxes above 1.4 × 10{sup –20} W m{sup –2}.

  19. Intensity-resolved ionization yields of aniline with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Hart, N.; Zhu, F.; Nava, R.; Pham, F.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Paulus, G. G.; Schuessler, H. A.; Mohamed, T.; Schroeder, H.

    2011-12-15

    We present experimental results for the ionization of aniline and benzene molecules subjected to intense ultrashort laser pulses. Measured parent molecular ions yields were obtained using a recently developed technique capable of three-dimensional imaging of ion distributions within the focus of a laser beam. By selecting ions originating from the central region of the focus, where the spatial intensity distribution is nearly uniform, volumetric-free intensity-dependent ionization yields were obtained. The measured data revealed a previously unseen resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI)-like process. Comparison of benzene, aniline, and Xe ion yields demonstrates that the observed intensity-dependent structures are not due to geometric artifacts in the focus. Finally for intensities greater than {approx}3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, we attribute the ionization of aniline to a stepwise process going through the {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state which sits three photons above the ground state and two photons below the continuum.

  20. Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security at Nuclear Weapons Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...