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Sample records for integrity housing units

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Use of central air conditioning equipment for another housing unit also ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Housing units are classified as urban or rural using definitions created by ...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use of ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Use of central air conditioning equipment for another housing unit also ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Cooking includes fuels used by the major cooking equipment (ovens, cooktops, ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ... Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Energy Star is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... central air conditioning equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... for Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... central air conditioning equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  12. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... for Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  16. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied

  17. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Total square footage includes all basements, finished or conditioned (heated ...

  18. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of rent. ... includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of rent. ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...",37.1,13.7,10.9,6,3.2,1.6,0.6,1.1,10.1 "Payment Method for Energy Bills" "All Paid by ... their primary housing unit without payment of rent. 4Participation in assistance ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, ... to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, ...","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63....

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ... Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","M...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ... to 119,999","120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21....

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings ... Housing Unit" ,"RSEs for Housing Units ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings ...

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 ...

  9. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Contact: Robert Latta, Survey Manager (rlatta@eia.doe.gov) World Wide Web: http:www.eia.doe.govemeuconsumption Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, ...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment4" ... 4Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 5Housing ...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing ... (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 ...

  14. Total U.S. Housing Units.................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units ...

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space ... ,,"RSEs for UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"RSEs for Housing Units " "Space ...

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living ... ,,"RSEs for UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"RSEs for Housing Units (millions)" ...

  17. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Unconditioned and unfinished areas in attics and attached garages are excluded. 3Housing units are classified as urban or rural using definitions created by the U.S. Census Bureau, ...

  18. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 5Rented includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of rent. ...

  19. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating Characteristics by UrbanRural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating ...

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Atta...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... unit 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  10. Total U.S. Housing Units...................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing ...

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to ...

  12. Total U.S. Housing Units..................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached ...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes"

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... to 79,999","80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,2...

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    than 4,000 HDD",22.8,11.4,3.1,4.4,3.9 "Type of Housing Unit" "Single-Family Detached",72.1,24.3,12.9,17,17.8 "Single-Family Attached",7.6,4.7,1.2,1.5,"Q" "Apartments in 2-4 Unit ...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit",15.2,7.8,1,1.2,3.3,1.9 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6,"N" "Heat Pump",9.2,7.4,0.3,"Q",0.7,0.5 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,0.8,"Q","Q","Q",0.3 "Other ...

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit",15.2,0.3,1.2,2,4.6,7.1 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,"N","Q","Q","Q",0.5 "Heat Pump",9.2,"Q",0.4,2.7,1.8,4.2 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,"N","Q","Q",0.6,0.7 "Other ...

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit",15.2,4.4,3.8,2.6,2.4,1.9 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Heat Pump",9.2,2.2,3.6,1.5,1.2,0.7 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,0.4,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.3 "Other ...

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Rural",22.3,3.7,4.8,5,5,3.9 "Type of Housing Unit" "Single-Family Detached",72.1,8.1,16.6,16.4,15.5,15.5 "Single-Family Attached",7.6,0.8,2,2.5,1.6,0.7 "Apartments in 2-4 ...

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Indoor Lights

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...5.2,4.4,4.4,2.6,1.5,2.3,3,6 "For Two Housing Units",0.9,0.3,0.4,"Q","Q","N","Q",0.4 "Heat Pump",9.2,1.2,2.2,2,1.3,2.4,0.6,1.9 "Portable Electric Heater",1.6,0.7,0.6,"Q","N","Q",0.4...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)","Census Region" "Appliances",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,23.9,38.2,20.9

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD,

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD"

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... to 79,999","80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing ... to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  17. Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S. Housing Units........................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Units........................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N 0.3 0.8 Have Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.8 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.7 22.0 Use Space Heating Equipment.............................. 109.1 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.2 21.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N Q 0.5 Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)

  18. Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable Housing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable Housing Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable Housing ARIES lab houses. Photo courtesy of The Levy Partnership, Inc. ARIES lab houses. Photo courtesy of The Levy Partnership, Inc. Lead Performer: The Levy Partnership, Inc.-New York, NY Partners: Habitat for Humanity International /Habitat Research Foundation, Atlanta, GA Columbia Count Habitat, NY Habitat of Newburgh, NY Habitat Greater

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  1. Table HC1.1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Housing Unit Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Housing Unit Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,256.5,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Census Region

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Basements" "Basement in Single-Family Homes" "and Apartments in 2-4 Unit ... "Attics" "Attic in Single-Family Homes and" "Apartments in 2-4 Unit ...

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" ...

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S.",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,46.2,18.8,22.5,22.1

  8. Laser housing having integral mounts and method of manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herron, Michael Alan; Brickeen, Brian Keith

    2004-10-19

    A housing adapted to position, support, and facilitate aligning various components, including an optical path assembly, of a laser. In a preferred embodiment, the housing is constructed from a single piece of material and broadly comprises one or more through-holes; one or more cavities; and one or more integral mounts, wherein the through-holes and the cavities cooperate to define the integral mounts. Securement holes machined into the integral mounts facilitate securing components within the integral mounts using set screws, adhesive, or a combination thereof. In a preferred method of making the housing, the through-holes and cavities are first machined into the single piece of material, with at least some of the remaining material forming the integral mounts.

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Indoor Lights

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  11. High Performance Residential Housing Units at U.S. Coast Guard Base Kodiak: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, R.; Hickey, J.

    2013-10-01

    The United States Coast Guard (USCG) constructs residential housing throughout the country using a basic template that must meet the minimum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver criteria or better for the units. In Kodiak, Alaska, USCG is procuring between 24 and 100 residential multi-family housing units. Priorities for the Kodiak project were to reduce overall energyconsumption by at least 20% over existing units, improve envelope construction, and evaluate space heating options. USCG is challenged with maintaining similar existing units that have complicated residential diesel boilers. Additionally, fuel and material costs are high in Kodiak. While USCG has worked to optimize the performance of the housing units with principles of improved buildingenvelope, the engineers realize there are still opportunities for improvement, especially within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and different envelope measures. USCG staff also desires to balance higher upfront project costs for significantly reduced life-cycle costs of the residential units that have an expected lifetime of 50 or more years. To answer thesequestions, this analysis used the residential modeling tool BEoptE+ to examine potential energy- saving opportunities for the climate. The results suggest criteria for achieving optimized housing performance at the lowest cost. USCG will integrate the criteria into their procurement process. To achieve greater than 50% energy savings, USCG will need to specify full 2x 6 wood stud R-21 insulationwith two 2 inches of exterior foam, R-38 ceiling insulation or even wall insulation in the crawl space, and R-49 fiberglass batts in a the vented attic. The air barrier should be improved to ensure a tight envelope with minimal infiltration to the goal of 2.0 ACH50. With the implementation of an air source heat pump for space heating requirements, the combination of HVAC and envelope savings inthe residential unit can save

  12. Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental ...

  13. Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005 " ,,"Average Square Feet per--" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Housing Unit",,,"Household Member" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,2171,1618,1031,845,630,401 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,2334,1664,562,911,649,220

  14. Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441

  15. "Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  16. "Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  17. "Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  18. "Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  19. "Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  20. "Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  1. "Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  2. "Table HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More

  3. Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1

  4. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body A peel and stick ...

  5. Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and Automated Fault Detection and Diagnostics - 2014 BTO Peer Review Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit...

  6. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, Christine

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number of days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.

  7. Earth sheltered housing in the south central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater); Grondzik, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of identified, occupied earth sheltered residences in the south central United States has been conducted by the Oklahoma State University. Selected results from this investigation of more than 150 residences in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas are presented, focusing upon the issues of habitability and energy performance of such structures.

  8. EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (United...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EWIS European wind integration study Country United Kingdom Coordinates 55.378052, -3.435973 Loading map......

  9. Table 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950-2009 Year Coal 1 Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Natural Gas Electricity Wood Solar Other 2 None 3 Total Number of Occupied Housing Units<//td> 1950 14,483,420 9,460,560 [4] 975,435 11,121,860 276,240 4,171,690 NA 769,390 1,567,686 42,826,281 1960 6,455,565 17,158,401 [4] 2,685,770 22,851,216 933,023 2,236,866 NA 223,015 480,019 53,023,875 1970 1,821,000 16,473,000 [4] 3,807,000 35,014,000 4,876,000 794,000 NA 266,000

  10. Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New

  11. Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  12. Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  13. Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5

  14. Gore-Mbeki Binational Commission integrated housing program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This report documents the work done under Grant DE-FG36-97GO10209, Innovative Renewable Energy Technology Transfer Program. PEER Consultants, PC, and its subcontractor, PEER Africa (Pty.) Ltd., received an $88,000.00 grant to plan and build two energy efficient homes in the black township of Gugulethu in Cape Town, South Africa. These demonstration homes were given to the people of South Africa as a gesture of goodwill by the US government as part of the Gore-Mbeki Binational Commission (BNC) agreements and cooperation. The BNC is the term used to describe the agreement to work together by the US and the South African governments for economic development of South Africa in the areas of energy, commerce, agriculture, housing, and transportation. The BNC was formed in 1995. This project under the auspices of the BNC started in September 1996. The DOE-funded portion was performed between January 11, 1997 and February 28, 1997.

  15. Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0

  16. Table HC2.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 17.8 3.1 3.7 7.3 3.6 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 54.2 4.5 4.0 9.4 3.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 33.9 3.1 3.0 7.6 2.7 2.............................................................. 16.2 12.7 0.9 0.7 1.4

  17. Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q

  18. Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T.

    1997-08-01

    The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

  19. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

  20. Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found

  1. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds

  2. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  3. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives (March 18, 2015)

  4. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (March 24, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives March 24, 2015

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  6. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  7. Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump for Near-Zero Energy Houses: Technology Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D; Craddick, William G

    2007-09-01

    The energy service needs of a net-zero-energy house (ZEH) include space heating and cooling, water heating, ventilation, dehumidification, and humidification, depending on the requirements of the specific location. These requirements differ in significant ways from those of current housing. For instance, the most recent DOE buildings energy data (DOE/BED 2007) indicate that on average {approx}43% of residential buildings primary energy use is for space heating and cooling, vs. {approx}12% for water heating (about a 3.6:1 ratio). In contrast, for the particular prototype ZEH structures used in the analyses in this report, that ratio ranges from about 0.3:1 to 1.6:1 depending on location. The high-performance envelope of a ZEH results in much lower space heating and cooling loads relative to current housing and also makes the house sufficiently air-tight to require mechanical ventilation for indoor air quality. These envelope characteristics mean that the space conditioning load will be closer in size to the water heating load, which depends on occupant behavior and thus is not expected to drop by any significant amount because of an improved envelope. In some locations such as the Gulf Coast area, additional dehumidification will almost certainly be required during the shoulder and cooling seasons. In locales with heavy space heating needs, supplemental humidification may be needed because of health concerns or may be desired for improved occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that achieving their ZEH goal will require energy service equipment that can meet these needs while using 50% less energy than current equipment. One promising approach to meeting this requirement is through an integrated heat pump (IHP) - a single system based on heat pumping technology. The energy benefits of an IHP stem from the ability to utilize otherwise wasted energy; for example, heat rejected by the space cooling operation can be used for water heating

  8. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  9. Demonstrations of Integrated Advanced Rooftop Unit Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioner units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. ...

  10. Flow units from integrated WFT and NMR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasap, E.; Altunbay, M.; Georgi, D.

    1997-08-01

    Reliable and continuous permeability profiles are vital as both hard and soft data required for delineating reservoir architecture. They can improve the vertical resolution of seismic data, well-to-well stratigraphic correlations, and kriging between the well locations. In conditional simulations, permeability profiles are imposed as the conditioning data. Variograms, covariance functions and other geostatistical indicators are more reliable when based on good quality permeability data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging and Wireline Formation Tests (WFT) separately generate a wealth of information, and their synthesis extends the value of this information further by providing continuous and accurate permeability profiles without increasing the cost. NMR and WFT data present a unique combination because WFTs provide discrete, in situ permeability based on fluid-flow, whilst NMR responds to the fluids in the pore space and yields effective porosity, pore-size distribution, bound and moveable fluid saturations, and permeability. The NMR permeability is derived from the T{sub 2}-distribution data. Several equations have been proposed to transform T{sub 2} data to permeability. Regardless of the transform model used, the NMR-derived permeabilities depend on interpretation parameters that may be rock specific. The objective of this study is to integrate WFT permeabilities with NMR-derived, T{sub 2} distribution-based permeabilities and thereby arrive at core quality, continuously measured permeability profiles. We outlined the procedures to integrate NMR and WFT data and applied the procedure to a field case. Finally, this study advocates the use of hydraulic unit concepts to extend the WFT-NMR derived, core quality permeabilities to uncored intervals or uncored wells.

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics"

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total

  13. Sealed Crawl Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoeller, William; Williamson, James; Puttafunta, Srikanth

    2015-07-30

    One method of code-compliance for crawlspaces is to seal and insulate the crawlspace, rather than venting to the outdoors. However, codes require mechanical ventilation; either via conditioned supply air from the HVAC system, or a continuous exhaust ventilation strategy. As the CARB's building partner, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, intended to use the unvented crawlspace in a recent

  14. High Efficiency Integrated Space Conditioning, Water Heating and Air Distribution System for HUD-Code Manufactured Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry DeLima; Joe Akin; Joseph Pietsch

    2008-09-14

    Recognizing the need for new space conditioning and water heating systems for manufactured housing, DeLima Associates assembled a team to develop a space conditioning system that would enhance comfort conditions while also reducing energy usage at the systems level. The product, Comboflair® was defined as a result of a needs analysis of project sponsors and industry stakeholders. An integrated system would be developed that would combine a packaged airconditioning system with a small-duct, high-velocity air distribution system. In its basic configuration, the source for space heating would be a gas water heater. The complete system would be installed at the manufactured home factory and would require no site installation work at the homesite as is now required with conventional split-system air conditioners. Several prototypes were fabricated and tested before a field test unit was completed in October 2005. The Comboflair® system, complete with ductwork, was installed in a 1,984 square feet, double-wide manufactured home built by Palm Harbor Homes in Austin, TX. After the home was transported and installed at a Palm Harbor dealer lot in Austin, TX, a data acquisition system was installed for remote data collection. Over 60 parameters were continuously monitored and measurements were transmitted to a remote site every 15 minutes for performance analysis. The Comboflair® system was field tested from February 2006 until April 2007. The cooling system performed in accordance with the design specifications. The heating system initially could not provide the needed capacity at peak heating conditions until the water heater was replaced with a higher capacity standard water heater. All system comfort goals were then met. As a result of field testing, we have identified improvements to be made to specific components for incorporation into production models. The Comboflair® system will be manufactured by Unico, Inc. at their new production facility in St. Louis

  15. Sealed Crawl Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoeller, William; Williamson, James; Puttagunta, Srikanth

    2015-07-01

    One method of code-compliance for crawlspaces is to seal and insulate the crawlspace, rather than venting to the outdoors. However, codes require mechanical ventilation; either via conditioned supply air from the HVAC system, or a continuous exhaust ventilation strategy. As the CARB's building partner, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, intended to use the unvented crawlspace in a recent development, CARB was interested in investigating a hybrid ventilation method that includes the exhaust air from the crawlspace as a portion of an ASHRAE 62.2 compliant whole-house ventilation strategy. This hybrid ventilation method was evaluated through a series of long-term monitoring tests that observed temperature, humidity, and pressure conditions through the home and crawlspace.

  16. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2005-04-12

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  17. Electronic Unit Integrated Into A Flexible Polymer Body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2006-01-31

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  18. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2008-03-11

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  19. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2006-04-18

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","Q","Q","N","N","N","N","N" "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","N","N","N","N","N","N","N" ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,1.6,0.1,"Q","Q","N",0.1,0.1,"Q",1.5,1.4,"Q" "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.8,"Q","N","N","N","Q","Q","N",0.8,0.3,0.5 "Main Heating ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N","Q","N","Q","N" "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N","Q","N","Q","N",...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...2,0.2,0.1,0.1,1.7,0.5,0.6,0.6 "Only A Few Times When Needed",19.6,2.7,0.6,0.3,0.3,2.2,0.6,...2.2,0.5,0.2,0.3,1.7,1,0.5,0.2 "Only A Few Times When Needed",13.9,5.9,2.1,1,1,3.8,2.4,0.9,...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...10.1,3.3,1.7,0.8,0.9,1.7,1,0.7,6.7,5,1.8 "Plasma",9.7,2.4,0.6,0.3,0.1,0.2,0.4,0.2,0.1,1.7,...,1.7,0.8,0.3,0.4,0.9,0.6,0.4,3.7,2.8,0.9 "Plasma",3.8,0.9,0.2,0.1,"Q","Q",0.1,0.1,"Q",0.7,...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,10.4,16,7.5,7,5.1 "Plasma",9.7,1.6,3,1.9,1.8,1.6 ... "LCD",25.4,4,8.7,5.2,4.4,3.1 "Plasma",3.8,0.6,1.2,0.6,0.7,0.8 ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,8.8,2.2,1,1.2,6.6,3.2,1.9,1.6 "Plasma",9.7,1.7,0.4,0.2,0.2,1.3,0.5,0.4,0.3 ... "LCD",25.4,5,1.2,0.5,0.7,3.8,1.8,1.1,0.9 "Plasma",3.8,0.7,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.5,0.2,0.2,"Q" ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...2.9,27.8,3.2,1.7,1,0.7,2.4,1.1,6,1.7,0.4 "Plasma",9.7,7.1,2.6,6.1,0.6,0.4,0.2,0.1,0.5,0.2,...17.1,1.8,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.8,0.6,2.2,0.8,0.2 "Plasma",3.8,2.7,1.1,2.4,0.3,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q",...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,31,2.8,3,7.1,2.1 "Plasma",9.7,6.7,0.6,0.7,1.5,0.3 ... "LCD",25.4,18.9,1.5,1.2,2.8,1 "Plasma",3.8,2.7,0.2,0.2,0.6,"Q" ...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,1.4,2.7,1.3,2.2,2.9,1.1,1.8,4.7,3.3,1.4 "Plasma",9.7,3.7,2,0.3,0.2,0.6,0.3,0.5,0.4,0.2,0....,0.9,1.6,0.8,1.1,1.6,0.5,1.1,2.8,1.9,0.9 "Plasma",3.8,1.5,0.7,0.1,0.1,0.2,"Q","Q",0.1,"Q",...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,6.5,9.9,9,6.6,4.7,2.8,6.5,4.7 "Plasma",9.7,1.3,1.8,1.9,1.3,1,0.6,1.8,1 ...CD",25.4,2.9,4.8,4.5,3.7,2.9,1.8,4.7,2.2 "Plasma",3.8,0.4,0.7,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.3,0.8,0.3 ...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,5.5,1.6,5.2,5,7.5,6.6,7.4,7.2 "Plasma",9.7,1,0.5,1,1.1,1.2,1.6,1.5,1.9 ...CD",25.4,2.4,0.9,2.7,2.8,3.9,3.6,4.2,4.8 "Plasma",3.8,0.4,0.2,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.6,0.5,0.9 ...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,15.6,14.9,5.7,7.3,2.4 "Plasma",9.7,3,3.1,1.4,1.7,0.6 ... "LCD",25.4,8.1,8.4,3.2,4.3,1.3 "Plasma",3.8,1,1.2,0.6,0.8,0.2 ...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "LCD",46,8.8,10.4,16.7,10.1 "Plasma",9.7,1.7,2,3.7,2.4 "Projection",5,0.6,0.9... "LCD",25.4,5,5.4,9.6,5.3 "Plasma",3.8,0.7,0.7,1.5,0.9 ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,46,10.4,7,1.7,1.4,0.9,3,3.4,0.9,1.6,0.8 "Plasma",9.7,2,1.4,0.5,0.4,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.2,0.3,0....,5.4,3.6,1.1,0.7,0.4,1.4,1.7,0.6,0.8,0.4 "Plasma",3.8,0.7,0.5,0.2,"Q","Q",0.2,0.2,0.1,0.1,...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar",1.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space ... that use these fuels. However, Consumption and Expenditures estimates only ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar",1.2,0.5,0.1,0.3,0.3,0.1 "Electricity End Uses3" "(more than one may apply)" "Space ... that use these fuels. However, Consumption and Expenditures estimates only ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.5 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space ... that use these fuels. However, Consumption and Expenditures estimates only ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.6,0.2,0.1,0.1 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space ... that use these fuels. However, Consumption and Expenditures estimates only ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....5,1.2,1.3,0.7,2.3,2.4,0.7,1.1,0.6 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,11.6,7.9,2.4...,0.3,0.3,0.2,0.3,0.7,0.2,0.3,0.2 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Access",32.5,15.8,1.8,3.7,7.3,3.9 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,36.4,3.2,3.5... than 8",7.9,6.4,0.4,0.3,0.6,0.3 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....5,5.5,1.2,0.6,0.6,4.3,2.1,1.7,0.5 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,9.6,2.9,1.3,...,1.4,0.4,0.2,0.3,0.9,0.3,0.3,0.3 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Access",32.5,5.5,7.9,13.1,6 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,9.6,11.6,18.... "More than 8",7.9,1.4,1.7,2.8,2 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,1.9,1,1.8,2.6,0.9,1.7,4.2,2.5,1.7 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,18.5,10.4,1....,0.3,0.3,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.8,0.5,0.2 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Access",32.5,14.5,9,3.7,2.5,2.8 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,8.7,16.5,10,... than 8",7.9,0.4,1.3,1.6,2.3,2.4 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....1,1,0.5,0.4,1.1,0.6,0.5,3.9,2.9,1 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,12.1,3.7,1.9...,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.1,1.4,0.9,0.5 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...13,2.9,0.8,1,0.3,3.4,0.5,6.8,2.9,1 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,37.6,14.3,32...,0.2,0.2,"Q",0.3,"Q",0.5,0.2,"Q" "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...32.5,4.4,2,4.4,4.4,5.7,5.2,3.8,2.6 "Have Wireless Internet Access" "Yes",51.9,6.5,2,5.4,5....,0.9,0.3,0.9,0.8,1.2,1.2,1.4,1.3 "Device Charging Pattern" "Always Plugged ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ....9,0.5,1,0.3,0.8,1.3,1,0.3 "Full Bathrooms" ...Q",0.3,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" "Part",5.5,0.8,0.7,0.2,"Q","N",0.... "Some of the Time",36,12.4,6.7,1,1.1,1.4,1.2,...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...Q","Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q" "Full Bathrooms" ....3,0.2,0.2,"N","N","N","N" "Part",5.5,5,0.5,4.7,0.3,0.2,0.1,... "Some of the Time",36,24.2,11.8,19.6,3.1,1.3,...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Homes",6.9,1.6,2.4,0.8,2,0.2 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,7.7,4.5,0.8,0.6,0.... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Homes",6.9,0.5,1.1,3.9,1.4 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,5.6,4.6,2.4,1.9 ... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...",0.3,"Q","Q",0.5,0.2,0.2,0.1 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,4.6,3.5,1,0.8,0.5,... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...5,0.1,"Q","Q",0.4,0.1,0.3,"Q" "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,5.6,1.8,1,0.8,3.8,... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...omes",6.9,1.9,2.1,1.2,0.8,0.9 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,4.8,4.5,2,1.8,1.4 ... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.9,0.8,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.7,2.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.7,10.1,... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,7.2,3.4,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5,3.9,2.9... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.1,0.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line3" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5.4,5.6,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.9,3.7,7... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.9,0.9,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.4,1,2.1... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Air Conditioning",94,40.5,21.2,2.8,3.4,6.7,3.2,5.1,6.9,2.4,4.5,12.4,8.2,4.1 "Water Heating",47.1,27.3,16.1,1.8,1.8,6.2,2.2,4.2,5,1.8,3.1,6.2,4,2.3 "Cooking",71.2,31.7,17.9,2....

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Air Conditioning",94,65.8,28.3,54.6,6.5,3.4,2.2,1.1,5.1,2,13.2,4.7,1.2 "Water Heating",47.1,30.8,16.4,23.9,3.6,1.3,1.1,0.3,3,1,7.7,4.2,1 "Cooking",71.2,48.4,22.8,40.8,5....

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3,1.3,0.6,0.7,2.9,1,1.5,0.4 "Air Conditioning",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Water Heating",47.1,5.1,1.4,0.5,0.9,3.7,1.2,2.1,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,10.1,3.6,1.4,2.3,6.5,2.3,3.2,1 ...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Air Conditioning",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7 "Water Heating",47.1,7.6,4.8,0.7,0.8,0.7,2.7,2.8,1,1.4,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,15.4,9.7,1.6,1.9,1.6,4.7...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Air Conditioning",94,14.6,5.7,2.4,0.9,1.4,3.3,2.1,1.2,8.9,6.9,2.1 "Water Heating",47.1,7,2.5,0.9,0.3,0.6,1.6,1.2,0.4,4.5,1.4,3.1 "Cooking",71.2,13.9,5.1,3,1.4,1.6,2...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...5,3.6,2.5,1.5,3.1,3.5 "Air Conditioning",94,18.3,22.3,17.9,11.9,8.1,5.1,10.4,12.8 "Water Heating",47.1,11.4,12.8,8.9,5.6,3.2,1.7,3.5,8.2 "Cooking",71.2,14.2,17.1,13.4,9.2,6,3.5,7.7...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... Midwest",,,..."IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Water Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" ...

  19. Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump for Near-Zero Energy Houses: Technology Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D; Craddick, William G

    2007-07-01

    This report documents the development of an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) through the third quarter of FY2007. It describes the design, analyses and testing of the AS-IHP, and provides performance specifications for a field test prototype and proposed control strategy. The results obtained so far continue to support the AS-IHP being a promising candidate to meet the energy service needs for DOE's development of a Zero Energy Home (ZEH) by the year 2020.

  20. Building America Case Studies for Existing Homes: Philadelphia Housing Authority Energy-Efficiency Turnover Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Philadelphia Housing Authority worked with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program to integrate energy-efficiency measures into the refurbishment process that each unit normally goes through between occupancies.

  1. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate.

  2. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  3. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols Islip, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Islip Housing Authority Unit Turnover Retrofit Program Location: Islip, NY Partners: Islip Housing Authority, http://www.rhaonline.com/ Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), http://levypartnership.com/ Building Component: Whole building Application: Retrofit; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of

  4. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation Patchogue, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  6. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Crawled Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated a hybrid ventilation method that included the exhaust air from the crawl space as part of an ASHRAE 62.2-compliant whole-house ventilation strategy.

  7. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  8. Energy House

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students learn about energy conservation and efficiency by using various materials to insulate a cardboard house.

  9. Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Crawl Space with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Zoeller, J. Williamson, and S. Puttagunta

    2015-09-01

    The Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated a hybrid ventilation method that included the exhaust air from the crawl space as part of an ASHRAE 62.2-compliant whole-house ventilation strategy. The CARB team evaluated this hybrid ventilation method through long-term field monitoring of temperature, humidity, and pressure conditions within the crawl spaces of two homes (one occupied and one unoccupied) in New York state.

  10. Unit commitment with wind power generation: integrating wind forecast uncertainty and stochastic programming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M.

    2009-10-09

    We present a computational framework for integrating the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the WRF model with adjoint sensitivity analysis capabilities and a sampling technique implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We use these capabilities through an ensemble approach to model the uncertainty of the forecast errors. The wind power realizations are exploited through a closed-loop stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulation. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework. In addition, we validate the framework using real wind speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We also build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

  11. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 17, 2015, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  12. Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  13. Optimal integrated design of air separation unit and gas turbine block for IGCC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, R.; Grossman, I.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine

  14. Optimal Integrated Design of Air Separation Unit and Gas Turbine Block for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindra S. Kamath; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Lorenz T. Biegler; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine

  15. Education Office Housing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc...

  16. Building America Case Study: Sealed Crawl Spaces with Integrated Whole-House Ventilation in a Cold Climate, Ithaca, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    "9One method of code-compliance for crawlspaces is to seal and insulate the crawlspace, rather than venting to the outdoors. However, codes require mechanical ventilation; either via conditioned supply air from the HVAC system, or a continuous exhaust ventilation strategy. As the CARB's building partner, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, intended to use the unvented crawlspace in a recent development, CARB was interested in investigating a hybrid ventilation method that includes the exhaust air from the crawlspace as a portion of an ASHRAE 62.2 compliant whole-house ventilation strategy. This hybrid ventilation method was evaluated through a series of long-term monitoring tests that observed temperature, humidity, and pressure conditions through the home and crawlspace. Additionally, CARB worked with NREL to perform multi-point tracer gas testing on six separate ventilation strategies - varying portions of 62.2 required flow supplied by the crawlspace fan and an upstairs bathroom fan. The intent of the tracer gas testing was to identify effective Reciprocal Age of Air (RAoA), which is equivalent to the air change rate in well-mixed zones, for each strategy while characterizing localized infiltration rates in several areas of the home.

  17. DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California | Department of Energy Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California 1 of 14 Mutual Housing built this 62-unit multifamily affordable housing development near Sacramento, California, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 14 In addition to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home, the high-efficiency construction meets the requirements of

  18. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",5.6,1991,1428,573,826,5... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  19. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...4.1,2090,1718,523,752,618,188 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",10.1,2603,1836,963,1002... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  20. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...3.9,1128,1008,894,423,378,335 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",2.4,2048,1477,1138,828,... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  1. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...",1.4,995,867,466,369,322,173 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",1.9,1646,1077,274,671,4... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  2. Integration of Photovoltaics into Building Energy Usage through Advanced Control of Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Nutaro, James J; Irminger, Philip; Ollis, Benjamin; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Fugate, David L

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to forecast photovoltaic (PV) power in kW based on a neural network linkage of publicly available cloud cover data and on-site solar irradiance sensor data. We also describe a control approach to utilize rooftop air conditioning units (RTUs) to support renewable integration. The PV forecasting method is validated using data from a rooftop PV panel installed on the Distributed Energy, Communications, and Controls (DECC) laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The validation occurs in multiple phases to ensure that each component of the approach is the best representation of the actual expected output. The control of the RTU is based on model predictive methods.

  3. Meadowlark House

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Greensburg GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes Meadowlark House in Greensburg, Kansas.

  4. Open House Archive | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open House Archive 2014 Open House 2012 Open House 2010 Open House 2007 Open House 2005 Open House 2003 Open House 2001 Open House Back to the main Open House Page

  5. Student Housing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In order to create a profile you will need a temporary access password. If you would like to take advantage of this housing resource you can request an access password at: ...

  6. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

  7. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEBARON GJ

    2008-11-25

    This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether

  8. U.S. and EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost Jobs, Growth and Competitiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Bush Administration hosted the second informal U.S.-EU economic ministerial meeting to discuss transatlantic economic integration and shared economic challenges. ...

  9. Education Office Housing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc program housing The Lab's postdoc program has a postdoc housing listing. If you are interested in posting a housing opportunity, send an email with the pertinent information to postdocprogram@lanl.gov. Housing listings will be posted for 1 month. If you wish for the listing to remain on the web site longer, please contact

  10. Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable Housing Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable Housing ARIES lab houses. Photo courtesy of The Levy ...

  11. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) Input Coal Analyses and Off-Gass Filter (OGF) Content Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Missimer, David M.; Guenther, Chris P.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; VanEssendelft, Dirk T.; Means, Nicholas C.

    2015-04-23

    A full engineering scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) system is being used at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) to stabilize acidic Low Activity Waste (LAW) known as Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW). The INTEC facility, known as the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), underwent an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) in March 2014. The IWTU began non-radioactive simulant processing in late 2014 and by January, 2015 ; the IWTU had processed 62,000 gallons of simulant. The facility is currently in a planned outage for inspection of the equipment and will resume processing simulated waste feed before commencing to process 900,000 gallons of radioactive SBW. The SBW acidic waste will be made into a granular FBSR product (carbonate based) for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In the FBSR process calcined coal is used to create a CO2 fugacity to force the waste species to convert to carbonate species. The quality of the coal, which is a feed input, is important because the reactivity, moisture, and volatiles (C,H,N,O, and S) in the coal impact the reactions and control of the mineralizing process in the primary steam reforming vessel, the Denitration and Mineralizing Reformer (DMR). Too much moisture in the coal can require that additional coal be used. However since moisture in the coal is only a small fraction of the moisture from the fluidizing steam this can be self-correcting. If the coal reactivity or heating value is too low then the coal feedrate needs to be adjusted to achieve the desired heat generation. Too little coal and autothermal heat generation in the DMR cannot be sustained and/or the carbon dioxide fugacity will be too low to create the desired carbonate mineral species. Too much coal and excess S and hydroxide species can form. Excess sulfur from coal that (1) is too rich in sulfur or (2) from overfeeding coal can promote wall scale and contribute to corrosion

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Islip Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York | Department of Energy Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York In this project, ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHA) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement at the time when units

  13. Communal spaces: aggregation and integration in the Mogollon Region of the United States Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisengard, Jennifer E.

    2006-12-01

    Aggregation and integration are processes that occur in human societies throughout the globe. An informative example of population aggregation and social integration can be observed in the North American desert borderlands from A.D. 250 to 1450 in the area known as the Mogollon region. In fact, Mogollon communities oscillated from smaller social groups into larger ones and dispersed into smaller groups only to form larger ones again. For this reason, examining the groups of people living in the Mogollon region provides a magnified view of social change over a substantial period. Understanding patterns of aggregation and integration provides researchers with the promise for research into the nature of these phenomena. In general, the Mogollon region is characterized by limited water supplies and low average annual precipitation. However, pockets of the Mogollon area, including the Mimbres valley and the Gila River valley, represent oases, where permanent rivers and their associated tributaries allowed for the pursuit of agricultural endeavors and access to a wide variety of wild plant and animal resources. The areas with these kinds of potential became population centers for previously dispersed groups of people living in the region. These people exploited natural resources and practiced agriculture in areas surrounding their communities. Over time, more organized aggregated and socially integrated communities were established throughout the region. Using ancient Mogollon communal architecture, commonly called kivas, this study examines issues of, and evidence for, population aggregation and social integration.

  14. Forward House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space Heating and Ventilation Forward House UW-Madison UW-Milwaukee Faculty Advisors Professor Mark Keane | UW-Milwaukee Dr. Michael Cheadle | UW-Madison Professor Lesley Sager | UW-Madison Nic Dan Laura Jake Rob Jonnie Nasim Drew 1 2 Industry Partners Special Thanks to Professionals Professor Linda Keane | The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Cozette Moffatt | Interior Designer Students Emily Cruz | UW-Madison Marilyn Grace Cervantes | UW-Madison Rebecca Cohn | UW-Madison S t o r y A r c

  15. Designing and Building Houses that are Solar Ready

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Builders considering adding photovoltaic (PV) systems to new houses after initial construction is completed can save time and money by following new house Solar Ready design guidelines. Solar Ready houses are designed and built with integrated electrical and mechanical features that streamline the integration of PV systems.

  16. Critical issues for the application of integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies to inertial measurement units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.H.; Ellis, J.R.; Montague, S.; Allen, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    One of the principal applications of monolithically integrated micromechanical/microelectronic systems has been accelerometers for automotive applications. As integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies such as those developed by U.C. Berkeley, Analog Devices, and Sandia National Laboratories mature, additional systems for more sensitive inertial measurements will enter the commercial marketplace. In this paper, the authors will examine key technology design rules which impact the performance and cost of inertial measurement devices manufactured in integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies. These design parameters include: (1) minimum MEMS feature size, (2) minimum CMOS feature size, (3) maximum MEMS linear dimension, (4) number of mechanical MEMS layers, (5) MEMS/CMOS spacing. In particular, the embedded approach to integration developed at Sandia will be examined in the context of these technology features. Presently, this technology offers MEMS feature sizes as small as 1 {micro}m, CMOS critical dimensions of 1.25 {micro}m, MEMS linear dimensions of 1,000 {micro}m, a single mechanical level of polysilicon, and a 100 {micro}m space between MEMS and CMOS. This is applicable to modern precision guided munitions.

  17. Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

    2011-09-01

    This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

  18. Total integrated NOx compliance for existing pulverized coal-fired units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camody, G.; Lewis, R.; Cohen, M.B.; Buschmann, J.; Hilton, R.; Larsson, A.C.; Tobiasz, R.

    1999-07-01

    The EPA Title 1 NOx emission limits along with the corresponding OTR regulations are mandating coal-fired NOx emission levels below 0.15 lb/MBtu. For tangentially fired units, experience has shown that the technology is currently available to achieve these limits. The question for each unit owner-operator becomes; what is the most economical technology or combination of technologies to achieve the required results? This paper provides a brief overview of Combustion Engineering, Inc.'s (ABB C-E) latest NOx control technologies, both in-furnace and post-combustion, for tangential coal-fired steam generators. The paper further reviews options of both stand-alone and combined multiple technologies to achieve the most cost-effective NOx compliance, while maintaining the high levels of unit efficiency and performance that is required to by successful in their deregulated power industry. Current operational data of both in-furnace and SCR NOx reduction systems are presented, as well as the latest historical cost data for the systems.

  19. Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

  20. Superinsulated houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurcliff, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Superinsulation is a direct response to the fast-rising cost of home heating. Of the many kinds of responses, superinsulation is proving to be the simplest and most cost-effective. Until the oil embargo of 1973 there was little interest in saving heat. When the oil shortage arrived and fuel costs doubled and redoubled, many architects responded, at first, by invoking solar energy. They examined the designs of existing solar-heated houses and proposed a great variety of new designs, most of which appeared - to the uninitiated - to have great promise. Most of the early designs were of the active type; some were of the passive type; a few were of the hybrid design.

  1. Environmental implications associated with integrated resource planning by public utilities in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.C.; Haber, G.S.; Cothran, J.N.; Hand, M.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Western Area Power Administration is about to impose integrated resource planning requirements on its 612 public-power customers as part of its Energy Planning and Management Program (EPAM) and consistent with the Energy Policy Act of 1992. EPAM will affect public utilities over a 15-state region stretching from Minnesota to California, Montana to Texas. In this study, an assessment is made of the environmental impacts of the IRP requirements. Environmental impacts are calculated based on modeled changes in electric power generation and capacity additions.

  2. DOE ZERH Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Housing California, Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, CA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project of 62 affordable-housing...

  3. 2015 Arizona Housing Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 12th annual Arizona Housing Forum provides a platform for affordable housing professionals to network and share ideas to improve and create housing choices for Arizona. Registration is $350.

  4. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  5. Review and Status of Wind Integration and Transmission in the United States. Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Acker, T.; Ahlstrom, M.; Frew, B.; Goggin, M.; Lasher, W.; Marquis, M.; Osborn, D.

    2015-03-01

    The objective in electric power system operation is to use generation and transmission resources within organizational constraints and operational rules and regulations to reliably and costeffectively balance load and generation. To meet this objective, system operational practices have been created to accommodate the innate variability and uncertainty that comes from a variety of sources, such as uncertainty of demand forecasts, whether a specific generating unit will be available when called upon, the variability of demand from many different types of customers, and others. As more wind power is connected to the power system, operating experiences acquired during the past several years have generally confirmed the findings of wind integration studies: wind energy increases the level of variability and uncertainty that a system operator must manage.

  6. Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Suzette

    2008-08-01

    Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

  7. Protocol for House Parties

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Protocol for House Parties, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  8. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-03-01

    This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

  9. CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) and its partners created Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) to promote home energy upgrades in single-family homes, multifamily housing units, and commercial buildings to help the region meet its 2008 Chicago Climate Action Plan and longer term GO TO 2040 Strategic Plan. EI2 enlisted the help of the Elevate Energy, a

  10. ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review | Department of Energy ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jordan Dentz, Levy Partnership View the Presentation ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review (3.34 MB) More Documents & Publications ARIES lab houses. Photo courtesy of The Levy Partnership, Inc. Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution