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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrated Resource Planning: A Dialogue with ELCON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the building of generating units. Planning decisions would now include alternative energy sources 2 and demand side management. Also very important in the IRP process is the evaluation of external impacts of any planning decision with a special focus... and demand resources in electricity markets. In this paper we provide a definition of that concept and discuss two of its main features: Demand-side Management programs and environmental externalities. We also examine a number of positions taken by ELCON...

Treadway, N.; Torrent, G.

5

Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices · Slower load growth · Continued gas reliance · Less wind · More conservation and bigger budgets Existing Resources Avista Load Forecast Energy, Capacity, & RPS Balances New Resource Options & Costs Cost Negative Price Duration Curve -40 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 0.0% 0.5% 1.0% 1.5% 2.0% 2.5% 3.0% 3

6

Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don (University of Chicago, Chicago, IL); Hanson, Jason (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Grimsrud, Kristine (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Thacher, Jennifer (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Broadbent, Craig (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brookshire, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chemak, Janie (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockeril Consulting, Boone, NC); Aragon, Carlos (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarelyobjectively evaluate renewable resources. Planned Renewableamount of planned renewable resource additions. In the case

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DOD Instruction 4715.03 - Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)CrowleyEnergyMasse) Jump to:DEXAScreening Tool Jump(INRMP)

10

Fact Sheet - Renewable Resource Integration Action Plan - June 20, 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOM DRUG TESTING TheMay 2012 BIn August,On

11

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their treatment of renewable resources and the costs andtowards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarelyobjectively evaluate renewable resources. Planned Renewable

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An approach to understanding, representing, and managing uncertainty in integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issue of uncertainty in integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP is a process employed by electric utilities, often at the bellest of Public Utility Commissions (PUCs), to evaluate the acquisition of resources to meet forecast energy demands and other criteria such as energy efficiency and fuel diversity. Uncertainty plagues the preparation of IRPs, from forecasting energy prices and electricity demand to estimating costs and benefits expected from new resource acquisitions. As a result all those involved in the IRP process (including PUC commissioners and staff, utility decision makers, IRP analysts, and experts in particular areas) need to appreciate how uncertainty affects IRP and learn about available techniques to reduce its effects.

Tonn, B.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Introducing the use of integrated Decision Support System in Natural Resources Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The target subject of Natural Resources Planning (NRP) includes various systems and their elements, all of which are centered around the natural resource system. Given this characteristic complexity and a high degree of ...

Park, Hye Yeon, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Business Planning Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Business Planning Resources, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

15

Towards an Integrated Planning and Adaptive Resource Management Architecture for Distributed Real-time Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions change. Key challenges in managing open DRE systems in- clude effective planning and online management of system resources to accommodate for changing mission goals, en- vironmental conditions- source management to control and ensure efficient function- ing of open DRE systems. 1 Introduction

Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

16

Financial Planning Resource Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financial Planning Resource Allocation Human Resources Administrative Services Recruitment Management Leadership Studies Minor Admissions Information Desk & Game Center Fraternity/Sorority Life & Cross-Cultural Support Board Dining Medical Services Liaison for Faculty, Staff & Scholarships Retail

Barrash, Warren

17

Integration of Biodiversity into National Forestry Planning:...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forestry Planning: An Annotated Bibliography of Web-Based Resources, Methods, Experiences, and Case Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration...

18

IDC Integrated Master Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources Technical Assistance Program January 24 th , 2013 2 Agenda 1. Welcome & overview 2. What is a community energy strategic plan and why...

20

Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation for the Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources webinar, presented on January 24, 2013 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program (TAP).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING OPERATING BUDGET UNIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING Manager Sarah Teo OPERATING BUDGET UNIT Deputy Director (Operating, Strategic Initiatives & Consolidated Budgets) Tay Sok Kian Senior Director Ajith Prasad Senior Associate Initiatives & Research Budgets: (Planning & Budget Management) Revenue Policies & Planning: (Grants

Leng, Chenlei

22

Integration of Renewable Resources November 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Renewable Resources November 2007 Transmission and operating issues and recommendations for integrating renewable resources on the California ISO-controlled Grid California Independent System Operator #12;CAISO Integration of Renewable Resources Members of the Renewables Workgroup

23

SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan satisfies the site's Environmental Management System requirement to promote long-term stewardship of cultural resources. The plan summarizes the cultural and historical setting of the site, identifies existing procedures and processes that support protection and preservation of resources, and outlines actions that would be initiated if cultural resources were discovered onsite in the future.3

Larsen, Barbara L.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Resource assessment/commercialization planning meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy and Division of Geothermal Resource Management, sponsored a Resource Assessment/Commercialization Planning meeting in Salt Lake City on January 21-24, 1980. The meeting included presentations by state planning and resource teams from all DOE regions. An estimated 130 people representing federal, state and local agencies, industry and private developers attended.

None

1980-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

Supply-side Resources & Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- station Solar PV (from 6th Plan) 25 MW dc/20 MW net ac output using flat plate non concentrating single) ­ Storage Resource assessment data needs and applications R d f t Resources proposed for assessment Forecasts ProCost 46/19/2013 #12;6/19/2013 3 Resource data & planning assumptions Reference plant (New

27

Hydrogen Posture Plan: An Integrated Research, Development and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hydrogen Posture Plan: An Integrated Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Hydrogen Posture Plan: An Integrated Research, Development and Demonstration Plan The 2006...

28

Natural Resource Management Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood industry, some farming in area of Solar Farm 3 #12;History of Natural Resource Management Formal

Homes, Christopher C.

29

1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration`s primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration's primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Integrated Planning and Performance Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management systems need clarification - Consolidated planning annual timetable needed for efficiency * Organizational rolesresponsibilities need alignment to defined planning...

33

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee -UTDPP1003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee - UTDPP1003 Policy Charge IR Security Planning and Policy Committee Policy Statement The Information Resources Planning, and Policy a security plan to protect information identified as confidential, sensitive or both. 3. Assign management

O'Toole, Alice J.

34

Hanford cultural resources management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

green, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Environmental Planning and Resource Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia

37

System integration test plan for HANDI 2000 business management system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the system integration test plan for the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf, PassPort and PeopleSoft software, and custom software created to work with the COTS products. The PP software is an integrated application for AP, Contract Management, Inventory Management, Purchasing and Material Safety Data Sheet. The PS software is an integrated application for Project Costing, General Ledger, Human Resources/Training, Payroll, and Base Benefits.

Wilson, D.

1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

INTEGRATED PLANNING: UNIVERSITY LIBRARY your library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED PLANNING: UNIVERSITY LIBRARY your library engage, enlighten, explore at library.usask.ca Transforming Library Services, Collections and Facilities: The University Library People Plan SUMMARY VERSION OVERVIEW Central themes in the library strategic plan highlight the critical importance which our people

Peak, Derek

39

Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects From 2006 to...

40

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

GREEN,T.ET AL.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integrated Water Resources Science and Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increasing demand on limited resources. To meet this challenge, the National Oceanic and AtmosphericIntegrated Water Resources Science and Services (IWRSS) June, 2009 In the news nearly every day, water resources are widely considered to be one of the most significant challenges facing societies

42

Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NREL's FY09 CSP Resource Assessment Plans: Solar Resource Assessment Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008 presentation: NREL's FY09 CSP Resource Assessment Plans

Renne, D.

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Materials Sciences Division Integrated Safety Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Sciences Division Integrated Safety Management Plan Revised: February 9, 2012 Prepared by: signed Feb. 9, 2012 Rick Kelly, Facility/EH&S Manager Submitted by: signed Feb. 9, 2012 Miquel Salmeron.1 RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY THROUGH LINE MANAGEMENT............................................................5

45

Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and...

46

Integrating economic costs into conservation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity losses, ecologists and conservation biologists have focused on how conservation plans affectIntegrating economic costs into conservation planning Robin Naidoo1 , Andrew Balmford2 , Paul J. Ferraro3 , Stephen Polasky4 , Taylor H. Ricketts1 and Mathieu Rouget5 1 Conservation Science Program, WWF

Vermont, University of

47

Integrating Timeliner and autonomous planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Timeliner is used to automate tasks in a target system. Timeliner is capable of automating complex sequences of actions, but the desired actions must be planned out and understood in advance by human script-writers. This ...

Swanton, Daniel Reed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

US Army Corps of Engineers

49

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Julie Braun Williams

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Lowrey, Diana Lee

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

Lowrey, Diana Lee

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Operational efficiency through resource planning optimization and work process improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis covers work done at National Grid to improve resource planning and the execution of pipeline construction and maintenance work carried out at the yards. Resource Planning, the art of picking the right jobs for ...

Balwani, Siddharth (Siddharth Vashdev)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Building system integration research: recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan describes the scope, technical content, and resources required to conduct the Building System Integration (BSI) research program during FY 1987 through 1991. System integration research is defined, the need for the research is discussed, its benefits are outlined, and the history of building system integration research is summarized. The program scope, the general approach taken in developing this program plan, and the plan's contents are also described.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Integrated Planning and Performance Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-Infected Macaques through Functional Genomics and

58

Integrated Planning and Performance Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-Infected Macaques through Functional Genomics and

59

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES, and student body." From David Ward, "A Vision for the Future," p. 9. This document lists the human-resource goals and plans of the Office of Human Resources, the Equity and Diversity Resource Center

Sheridan, Jennifer

60

Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Resource Damage Assessment Cooperation and Integration  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq., Executive Order 12580, and CERCLA's implementing regulations in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), 40 CFR Part 300, give the DOE three roles at DOE facilities undergoing environmental cleanup: lead response agency, natural resource trustee, and the party responsible for releases and threatened releases of hazardous substances. Does not cancel other directives.

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Warner College of Natural Resources 2005-2010 Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of renewable and non-renewable resources. #12;SOCIETAL GOALS Human dimensions (human understandingWarner College of Natural Resources 2005-2010 Strategic Plan Executive Summary #12;WARNER COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES 2005-2010 STRATEGIC PLAN Executive Summary Our Vision To be the global leader

63

Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine JANUSZ STARZYK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine Learning JANUSZ STARZYK School@ohio.edu Abstract Water resources planning and management require problem resolution and optimized use of resources. Since many objectives in water management are conflicting, it is hard to devise one optimum strategy

Starzyk, Janusz A.

64

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

Maxwell, Bruce D.

65

BNL-100708-2013 Cultural Resource Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL-100708-2013 Cultural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory May 2013 of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. #12;Cultural Resource Management Cultural Resources CRC Cultural Resources Coordinator CRM Cultural Resource Management CRMP Cultural

66

The plan as a cognitive-resource-saving tool 1 The plan as a cognitive-resource-saving tool: planning and anticipation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The plan as a cognitive-resource-saving tool 1 The plan as a cognitive-resource-saving tool, 33076 Bordeaux, France. hal-00675426,version1-1Mar2012 #12;The plan as a cognitive-resource-saving tool is user-centred: the understanding of the cognitive mechanisms underlying the anticipation process allows

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee -UTDPP1003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee - UTDPP1003 Policy Charge IR Security it is confidential, sensitive, both or neither. 2. Prepare a security plan to protect information identified as confidential, sensitive or both. 3. Assign management responsibility for implementing the security plan. 4

O'Toole, Alice J.

68

2013 Strategic Planning Initiative Market/Demand Resources Index of Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workforce Profile 16. WWAMI Physician Workforce 2005 17. UA Expanding Access to Health Programs (EAHP) Plan 18. State Health Care Workforce Development Planning Grant Planning Alaska's Health Workforce FINAL;2013 Strategic Planning Initiative Market/Demand Resources Title: 2009 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study

Pantaleone, Jim

69

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

Maxwell, Bruce D.

70

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING RESOURCES FOR SMALL-AND MEDIUM-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING RESOURCES FOR SMALL- AND MEDIUM- SIZED BUSINESSES May 2010 Prepared and supported by the Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security Business Continuity Planning Resources for Small- and Medium- Sized Businesses KS Judd AM Lesperance May 14, 2010 #12;DISCLAIMER

71

Role of Smarter Grids in Variable Renewable Resource Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the role of smarter grids in variable renewable resource integration and references material from a forthcoming ISGAN issue paper: Smart Grid Contributions to Variable Renewable Resource Integration, co-written by the presenter and currently in review.

Miller, M.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

& Publications Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Offshore Wind Projects Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development...

73

Review of consolidated Edison`s integrated resource bidding program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Competitive bidding has emerged as the dominant method for procuring new resources by US utilities. In New York, the Public Service Commission (NYPSC) ordered the state`s seven investor-owned utilities to develop bidding programs to acquire supply and DSM resource options. Utilities were allowed significant discretion in program design in order to encourage experimentation. Competitive bidding programs pose formidable policy, design, and management challenges for utilities and their regulators. Yet, there have been few detailed case studies of bidding programs, particularly of those utilities that take on the additional challenge of having supply and DSM resources compete head-to-head for a designated block of capacity. To address that need, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the bidding programs of two utilities that tested the integrated ``all-sources`` approach. This study focuses primarily on Consolidated Edison Company of New York`s (Con Edison) bidding program; an earlier report discusses our review of Niagara Mohawk`s program (Goldman et al 1992). We reviewed relevant Commission decisions, utility filings and signed contracts, interviewed utility and regulatory staff, surveyed DSM bidders and a selected sample of DSM non-bidders, and analyzed the bid evaluation system used in ranking bids based on detailed scoring information on individual bids provided by Con Edison.

Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Baldick, R.; Milne, A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricityindirect costs of renewable resources, as well as resourceamount of planned renewable resource additions. In the case

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Application of XML Languages for Integrating Molecular Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Application of XML Languages for Integrating Molecular Resources Content 1) The Application of XML Languages for Integrating Molecular Resources 2) Georgios V. Gkoutos,a Peter Murray-Rust,b Henry S of Molecular Resources 7) Molecular Integration based on XML 8) The ChemDig Project 9) Chemical Markup Language

Rzepa, Henry S.

76

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricity14 4.1 Renewable Resources20 5. Renewable Resource Cost and Performance

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

According to OPM, an individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development. Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career...

79

BSBA IN MANAGEMENT -HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSBA IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 7 in Human Resource Management (HRM), the goal is to provide a foundation of all areas of human resources countries. · Content Delivered in: MGT 350, MGT 405, & MGT 357. · Assessment Method: Culminating exam

Gallo, Linda C.

80

Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

NONE

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Protein Information Resource (PIR): An Integrated Bioinformatics Resource for Functional Proteomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein Information Resource (PIR): An Integrated Bioinformatics Resource for Functional Proteomics-2195 The Protein Information Resource (PIR) is an integrated bioinformatics resource that supports functional proteomics. PIR is a member of UniProt­­Universal Protein Resource­­the central repository of protein

82

Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides `execution year` work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean Marie-Claire St of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in the Caribbean and to address the problems

Barthelat, Francois

84

Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for and NovelFEG-SEM with EDAXforHome IntegratedOfficial

85

Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Work Planning and Control Guidance Document May 15, 2013 Presenters: Steele Coddington, NSTec, Las Vegas, and John McDonald, WRPS, Hanford Topics Covered: Integration of Safety...

86

Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

Daschke, K.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Resource-Optimal Planning For An Autonomous Planetary Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous planetary vehicles, also known as rovers, are small autonomous vehicles equipped with a variety of sensors used to perform exploration and experiments on a planet's surface. Rovers work in a partially unknown environment, with narrow energy/time/movement constraints and, typically, small computational resources that limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling, thus they represent a great challenge in the field of autonomous vehicles. Indeed, formal models for such vehicles usually involve hybrid systems with nonlinear dynamics, which are difficult to handle by most of the current planning algorithms and tools. Therefore, when offline planning of the vehicle activities is required, for example for rovers that operate without a continuous Earth supervision, such planning is often performed on simplified models that are not completely realistic. In this paper we show how the UPMurphi model checking based planning tool can be used to generate resource-optimal plans to control the engine of ...

Della Penna, Giuseppe; Magazzeni, Daniele; Mercorio, Fabio; 10.5121/ijaia.2010.1302

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Criteria for an effective water resource planning process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

Bowers, James Myron

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

90

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, SLH 2007, Part III, "The primary objective of the bioenergy master plan shall be to develop a Hawaii of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

91

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

UMass Amherst Campus Planning INTEGRATED DESIGN BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;UMass Amherst Campus Planning · Hills House · IDB Program Vision · IDB;UMass Amherst Campus Planning Hills House · Exterior cladding failure · Poor airDvity and ecological awareness. #12;UMass Amherst Campus Planning Program Spaces · Studios

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

93

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL. Integrating Renewable Resources in California and thethe Integration of Renewable Resources David S. Watson,the Integration of Renewable Resources. California Energy

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facility Investigation Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication ``Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites`` has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan.

Not Available

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their treatment of renewable resources and the costs andPlanning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricityindirect costs of renewable resources, as well as resource

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservation in a Micro-Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservationa case study watershed. Production Systems Planning (PSP) isWatershed Management, Production Systems Planning (PSP)

Ramakrishna, Nallathiga

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot...

99

2004 Power Marketing Plan - Base Resource Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-on halloweenReliable7O(α, X)CJune

100

A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES BY NICOLAS BENOIT the energy output of a wind farm in a single location and of those in multiple locations. In this way, we for such planning tools. The incorporation of the wind energy model requires the extension of the widely used

Gross, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY LIST OF ON-LINE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY LIST OF ON-LINE RESOURCES Indiana University: How to Recognize Plagiarism http-making flowchart, and examples, as well as a 5-minute quiz on plagiarism. Georgetown University: What, with many real-life examples of situations that students face. American University: Academic Integrity http://www.american.edu/academics/integrity

Mease, Kenneth D.

102

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricityin their treatment of renewable resources and the costs andcost and value of renewable resources, and reflect the fact

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

DAVIS, M.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

An Incentive Compatible Mechanism for Distributed Resource Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process and their economic incentives. If agents are not provided with proper incentives, they mayAn Incentive Compatible Mechanism for Distributed Resource Planning Erhan Kutanoglu Department is that without proper incentives, agents may not reveal this information trufully and they may not behave

Wu, David

105

Integrated Planning and Management for Urban Water Supplies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Positions for Water Supply Reliability ................................. 15 4 Shortage Management Modeling.2: Diagram of Water Supply Reliability Model Structure ..................49 5.3: Steps Used in ShortageIntegrated Planning and Management for Urban Water Supplies Considering Multiple Uncertainties Jay

Pasternack, Gregory B.

106

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piette, LBNL. Integrating Renewable Resources in Californiaprocurement from eligible renewable energy resources to 33%to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources David S.

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Resource conservation and allocation via process integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout the process industry, the conservation and allocation of mass and energy resources plays a pivotal role in the site wide optimization of a plant. Typically, raw materials are transformed into products, byproducts and wastes through...

Harell, Dustin Ashley

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Data and Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and ResourcesOther FederalNicheTechnology

110

Nevada National Security Site Integrated Groundwater Sampling Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan) is to provide a comprehensive, integrated approach for collecting and analyzing groundwater samples to meet the needs and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity. Implementation of this Plan will provide high-quality data required by the UGTA Activity for ensuring public protection in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Plan is designed to ensure compliance with the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). The Plan’s scope comprises sample collection and analysis requirements relevant to assessing the extent of groundwater contamination from underground nuclear testing. This Plan identifies locations to be sampled by corrective action unit (CAU) and location type, sampling frequencies, sample collection methodologies, and the constituents to be analyzed. In addition, the Plan defines data collection criteria such as well-purging requirements, detection levels, and accuracy requirements; identifies reporting and data management requirements; and provides a process to ensure coordination between NNSS groundwater sampling programs for sampling of interest to UGTA. This Plan does not address compliance with requirements for wells that supply the NNSS public water system or wells involved in a permitted activity.

Marutzky, Sam; Farnham, Irene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Information Resources Management Strategic Plan Appendix FY2014-2018  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPosting Thomas F.Needs for Energy, 2008Plan

112

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nutrient Management Educational & Planning Resources The Pennsylvania Nutrient Management Education Program provides a wide array of resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v.08.2011 Nutrient Management Educational & Planning Resources The Pennsylvania Nutrient Management Education Program provides a wide array of resources to nutrient management specialists. These resources serve two purposes: · Education. These factsheets and publications are selected to supplement

Guiltinan, Mark

115

Sandia National Laboratories: integrating distributed energy resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the

116

Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07, 2007What Is

117

MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Proposed resource evaluation plan. Salton Sea scientific drilling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a plan for evaluating the deep geothermal resource in the Salton Sea area of Imperial County, California. The plan is divided into two testing programs, followed by the modeling and evaluation of the underground geothermal resource. The testing program related to geological data collection includes acquiring and analyzing the core, running geophysical and temperature/pressure logs in both the deep well and the injection well, and carrying out extensive mud-logging activities. The flow testing program includes temperature, pressure, and flow measurements made in the well and surface facilities. Sampling and analysis of fluid and scale both in the well and at the surface facilities will also be carried out. 6 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) was developed in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). Volume 1 of the SISMP identifies the technical scope and costs associated with Hanford Site plans to resolve concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. Volume 2 of the SISMP provides the Resource Loaded Integrated Schedules for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project and Plutonium Finishing Plant activities identified in Volume 1 of the SISMP. Appendix A provides the schedules and progress curves related to spent nuclear fuel management. Appendix B provides the schedules and progress curves related to plutonium-bearing material management. Appendix C provides programmatic logic diagrams that were referenced in Volume 1 of the SISMP.

Gerber, E.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07, 2007What Is theEnergyConcept

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integrating Knowledge Management and Human Resources via Skill Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Knowledge Management and Human Resources via Skill Management Norbert Gronau. The human resources department can look for certain skills and compare the skills of an employee [Kreitmeier et al. 2000]. The company is able to save costs that otherwise apply to placing adverts for job

Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

122

Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of major new renewable resource developments. To determinenumber of new renewable resources, which would reducegoals to integrate renewable energy resources and reduce

Budhraja, Vikram

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrogen Posture Plan: An Integrated Research, Development and Demonstration Plan  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Groundto ApplyRoadmapNear-termPiping Experience inPolicy

124

Communication Systems for Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is growing interest in renewable energy around the world. Since most renewable sources are intermittent in nature, it is a challenging task to integrate renewable energy resources into the power grid infrastructure. In this grid integration, communication systems are crucial technologies, which enable the accommodation of distributed renewable energy generation and play extremely important role in monitoring, operating, and protecting both renewable energy generators and power systems. In this paper, we review some communication technologies available for grid integration of renewable energy resources. Then, we present the communication systems used in a real renewable energy project, Bear Mountain Wind Farm (BMW) in British Columbia, Canada. In addition, we present the communication systems used in Photovoltaic Power Systems (PPS). Finally, we outline some research challenges and possible solutions about the communication systems for grid integration of renewable energy resources.

Yu, F Richard; Xiao, Weidong; Choudhury, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy 2. Energy Intensity of Water 3. Water Intensity of Energy 1. Integrated Energy and Water Policy 2. Energy Intensity of Water 3. Water Intensity of Energy #12;Total Water Withdrawals, 2000Total Water at Edmonston #12;Energy Intensity of WaterEnergy Intensity of Water Energy intensity, or embedded energy

Keller, Arturo A.

126

Integrated safeguards and security management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab is committed to scientific excellence and stewardship of its assets. While security principles apply to all work performed at the Laboratory, their implementation is flexible. Berkeley Lab adheres to the following principles: Line management owns security; Security roles and responsibilities are clearly defined and communicated; Security functions are integrated; An open environment supports the Laboratory's Mission; The security program must support the scientific and operational missions of the Laboratory and must be value added; and Security controls are tailored to individual and facility requirements.

Bowen, Sue, editor

2001-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes.

128

Civil Works Planning Overview Civil Works (CW) Planning offers a structured, rational approach to solving water resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the current design and construction program is largely a result of project authorizations. · Planning); and several implementing policies. · CW Planning is the start of the "pipeline" for addressing water resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

129

7.0 - Integrated Acquisition Planning Process  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionof Energy 5of Energy 6.0 (August

130

Information Resources Management Strategic Plan FY2014-2018  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPosting Thomas F.Needs for Energy,

131

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman BartĂĄk Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

Bartak, Roman

132

North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Evans, J.W. (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'GrandUncertainty ofQuality Planning

136

194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS of the indicators, regional reservoir storage vulnerability, is a particularly useful index summarizing (U.S.) to investigate the integrated impacts of potential global warming on water resources. Impacts

Vogel, Richard M.

137

Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans--Update  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides guidelines for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Piette, Integrating Renewable Resources in California andEnable Integration of Renewable Resources,” February 2012.ntegration of Renewable Resources at 20% RPS,” CAISO, August

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. A. Piette, Integrating Renewable Resources in CaliforniaEnable Integration of Renewable Resources,” February 2012.P. Worhach, ”|ntegration of Renewable Resources at 20% RPS,”

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goal.6 Figure 2-2. Accounting for Energy Efficiency2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in LoadFigure 3-1. Plan Energy Efficiency Program Effects: Annual

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Strategic Planning -College -Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Unit Assessment Report -Four Column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Planning - College - Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Unit Assessment Report - Four Column Texas Tech University Priorities Means of Assessment & Criteria / Tasks Results Action & Natural Resources - 2013 Priority 1_Increase Enrollment and Promote Student Success (CASNR - Outcome 1

Zhang, Yuanlin

142

The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

Denney, R.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. Integration of Renewable Resources. Transmissionfor integrating renewable resources on the California ISO-assess the level of renewable resources that can be reliably

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

W. A. Owca

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fact Sheet - Renewable Resource Integration Action Plan - June...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have the nation's great- est wind power potential. California has the most installed wind capacity today with more than 2,000 MW already online, according to the American Wind...

150

Background Information for the Nevada National Security Site Integrated Sampling Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the process followed to develop the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan). It provides the Plan’s purpose and objectives, and briefly describes the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity, including the conceptual model and regulatory requirements as they pertain to groundwater sampling. Background information on other NNSS groundwater monitoring programs—the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan (RREMP) and Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP)—and their integration with the Plan are presented. Descriptions of the evaluations, comments, and responses of two Sampling Plan topical committees are also included.

Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Merrick, D.L.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources, management and clients. The tool is meant to plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at by investors very carefully. It should detail costs, expenses, capital, break-even analysis, estimated cash1 What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources do you get the product to your client(s)? What are the costs to make the product? What should

Johnson, Eric E.

153

Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years.

Kan, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan, volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP). This document describes the DOE`s plans at the Hanford Site to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilites Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This document also identifies plans for other spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventories at the Hanford Site which are not within the scope of DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 for reference purposes because of their interrelationship with plans for SNF within the scope of DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. The SISMP was also developed to assist DOE in initial formulation of the Research and Development Plan and the Integrated Facilities Plan.

Gerber, E.W.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Glenwood Springs Resource Management Plan (1984) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Open EnergyAmendments Jump

157

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Provides overall leadership for and management of the University's human resources strategy. Responsible for planning, organizing, directing, implementing, and administering human resources strategy, policies and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides overall leadership for and management of the University's human resources strategy. Responsible for planning, organizing, directing, implementing, and administering human resources strategy resource matters; collaborates with senior leaders to build a performance based culture that emphasizes

Dasgupta, Dipankar

160

FY 1991--FY 1995 Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has consolidated its plans for Information Systems, Computing Resources, and Telecommunications into a single document, the Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan. The consolidation was done as a joint effort by the Office of ADP Management and the Office of Computer Services and Telecommunications Management under the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Administration, Information, and Facilities Management. This Plan is the product of a long-range planning process used to project both future information technology requirements and the resources necessary to meet those requirements. It encompasses the plans of the various organizational components within the Department and its management and operating contractors over the next 5 fiscal years, 1991 through 1995.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Decision Analysis on Water Resources Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 54 1973 Decision Analysis on Water Recourses Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas C.S. Shih J.H. Dean Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

Shih, C. S.; Dean, J. H.

162

Optimal Integration of Renewable Energy Resources in Data Centers with Behind-the-Meter Renewable Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimal Integration of Renewable Energy Resources in Data Centers with Behind-the-Meter Renewable-- Renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar power, are rapidly becoming generation technologies-temporal variations, the integration of renewable energy resources is usually very challenging. Some of the previously

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

163

State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

164

Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... AgriLife Research, the River Systems Institute at Texas State University, Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research at Tarleton State University, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create the Texas Watershed Planning...

Jensen, Ric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modelling Planning and Scheduling Problems with Time and Resources* ROMAN BARTK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling Planning and Scheduling Problems with Time and Resources* ROMAN BARTÁK Department of sequencing operators to achieve some goal. In STRIPS- like planning, the operator is defined by pre-conditions and effects, i.e., the pre-conditions must be satisfied to use the operator, and the effects hold after using

Bartak, Roman

166

Multiscale Strategic Planning Model for the Design of Integrated Ethanol and Gasoline Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multiscale Strategic Planning Model for the Design of Integrated Ethanol and Gasoline Supply address the design and planning of an integrated ethanol and gasoline supply chain. We assume, distribution centers where blending takes place, and the retail gas stations where different blends of gasoline

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

167

Process Planning Using An Integrated Expert System And Neural Network Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Planning Using An Integrated Expert System And Neural Network Approach 1 Mark Wilhelm-9209424. 2 Corresponding author. #12;Process Planning Using An Integrated Expert System And Neural Network a unique computer aided process planner for metal furniture assembly, welding and painting using a rule

Smith, Alice E.

168

Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Information resources management long-range plan, FY1994--1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes IRM activities and the information technology resources and capabilities of the Department, the future requirements, and the strategies and plans to satisfy the identified requirements. The long-range planning process provides the systematic means to meet this objective and assists the Department in assuring that information technology (IT) support is provided in an efficient, effective, and timely manner so that its programmatic missions can be accomplished. Another important objective of the Plan is to promote better understanding, both within and external to the Department, of its IT environment, requirements, issues, and recommended solutions. This DOE IRM Plan takes into consideration the IRM requirements of approximately 50 different sites. The annual long-range planning cycle for supporting this Plan was initiated by a Call in August 1991 for site plans to be submitted in February 1992 by those Departmental components and contractors with major IRM requirements.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium 1999 plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium is to serve the Texas Panhandle, the State of Texas and the US Department of Energy by: conducting scientific and technical research; advising decision makers; and providing information on nuclear weapons materials and related environment, safety, health, and nonproliferation issues while building academic excellence in science and technology. This paper describes the electronic resource library which provides the national archives of technical, policy, historical, and educational information on plutonium. Research projects related to the following topics are described: Environmental restoration and protection; Safety and health; Waste management; Education; Training; Instrumentation development; Materials science; Plutonium processing and handling; and Storage.

NONE

1999-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Title 43 CFR 1610 Resource Management Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective: Terminology and Index Jump to:Resource

173

Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Resource Integration Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Analysis,Metrology,and Measurements of Renewable Energy Resources Renewable resources can vary considerably from one geographic and Instrumentation Team, provides renewable resource data for U.S. and international locations. Modeling Using, or to define the resource at specific locations where renewable technologies might be installed to meet

174

Planning vs. dynamic control: Resource allocation in corporate clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total op- erational costs of data centers [2]. It is predicted to reach around 4.5 percent of the whole in a static way such that energy costs are minimized. Live migration technology allows for dynamic resource utilization and fewer active servers. Overall, active servers are the main energy consumer · A. Wolke and M

Cengarle, MarĂ­a Victoria

175

The Commission Forecast 1992 Report: Important Resource Planning Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-side management (DSM) programs, power plant life extension, purchased power from other utilities, and TABLE 4 Installed Capacity by Service Areas (MW) Utility 1991 Utility 2001 PUC 2001 TU Electric 19,928 HL&P 13,584 CPL 4,398 CPS 3,901 GSU 6... rate classes. 73 ESL-IE-92-04-12 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 PLANNING ISSUES The Commission staff predicts that present generating reserves, including plants under...

Adib, P.

176

College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Curriculum Committee Planning and Transition Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Curriculum Committee Planning and Transition and how they can be of relevance to contemporary issues of Great Plains land management and resource considerable ecological and cultural diversity, encompassing more than 600 million acres which have been

Powers, Robert

177

Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

Fix, N. J.

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S&T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford`s highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S&T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ``problem owners`` (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S&T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MWCommission| Open Energy

180

India-Natural Resource Management Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Unified Resource Modelling: Integrating knowledge into business processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regardless of their specific manifestation. Resource Business Process Service Contract Characteristic 1 of the performance of a quantifiable service. Contract involves one or more services that a resource offers

183

Algebraic approaches to resource conservation via process integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to identify rigorous targets for minimum usage of fresh resources, maximum recycle of process resources and minimum discharge of waste. These targets are identified a priori and without commitment to the detailed design of the recycle/reuse network...

Almutlaq, Abdulaziz M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi08 to17 2.7

185

CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi08 to17 2.7 i R y R y

186

Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol.Department ofchecklistpurposeVersion) |

187

Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol.Department ofchecklistpurposeVersion) |

188

Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol.Department ofchecklistpurposeVersion) |

189

Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol.Department ofchecklistpurposeVersion) |

190

Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Strategic Planning for Success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are. The mission should neither limit nor overextend the enterprise. It should be as broad as possible without being unrealistic. Setting Goals Once you have defined your mission you can set goals for fulfilling that mission. The best goals are SMART... attainable? How would you measure success or track progress toward such goals? An example of a SMART goal might be: ?To sustain the resource so that it maintains a 1,200 AU per year productiv- ity over my lifetime.? It is specific. It is measurable over...

Fox, William E.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sitesEERE Technologies for Alaska Day

192

Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008District No 3formPermitsEnergy

193

Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Plans | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008District No

194

Appalachian State University Water Resources Planning Committee Impacts of Urbanization on Headwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gradient stream ­ Compromised roadway / structure integrity · Convenient resource for... ­ Research ­ Instruction-minute time series of... Hourly CRONOS data: Precip., Air temp., Wind, Solar Rad., etc... Thanks

Thaxton, Christopher S.

195

Graduate Assessment Strategies 1. Sample assessment plans are online at http://inside.mines.edu/Assessment-Resources. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Assessment Strategies Resources: 1. Sample assessment plans are online at http://inside.mines.edu/Assessment-Resources. The graduate level assessment plans from OSU may be particularly helpful: http://oregonstate.edu/admin/aa/apaa/assessment/graduate-assessment/graduate- assessment-plans 2. A list of best practices is online at http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/Assessment

196

Clemson University Preservation master Plan February 2009 JMa, Inc. Iv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survey and incorporating cultural landscapes as key resources Integrating preservation management Plan will assist Clemson University in its historic resource stewardship by augmenting and complementing existing campus planning and facilities documents by: Updating the existing historic resource

Duchowski, Andrew T.

197

DNFSB recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan - VOLUMES 1-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE's DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP was subsequently supplemented with an Integrated Facilities Plan and a Research and Development Plan, which further develop complex-wide research and development and long-range facility requirements and plans. These additions to the baseline IPP were developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrated facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focused on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IP. The SISMPs supported formulation of the initial versions of the Integrated Facilities Plan and the Research and Development Plan. The SISMPs are periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations. This document constitutes the Hanford SISMP. This document includes the planned work scope, costs and schedules for activities at the Hanford site to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP.

Gerber, E.W.

1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Local government involvement in long term resource planning for community energy systems. Demand side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program was developed to coordinate governmental, research, utility, and business energy savings efforts, and to evaluate future potential actions, based on actual field data obtained during the implementation of Phase I of the State Resource Plan. This has lead to the establishment of a state conservation and energy efficiency fund for the purpose of establishing a DSM Program. By taking a state wide perspective on resource planning, additional savings, including environmental benefits, can be achieved through further conservation and demand management. This effort has already blossomed into a state directive for DSM programs for the natural gas industry.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Local government involvement in long term resource planning for community energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program was developed to coordinate governmental, research, utility, and business energy savings efforts, and to evaluate future potential actions, based on actual field data obtained during the implementation of Phase I of the State Resource Plan. This has lead to the establishment of a state conservation and energy efficiency fund for the purpose of establishing a DSM Program. By taking a state wide perspective on resource planning, additional savings, including environmental benefits, can be achieved through further conservation and demand management. This effort has already blossomed into a state directive for DSM programs for the natural gas industry.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PREPARED TESTIMONY OF ROBERT B. WEISENMILLER, PH.D. Qualifying Facilities: Resource Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology ................................ 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology ................................ 1 Energy and Capacity Payments............................................................................. 15 Qualifying Facilities: Resource Planning and Avoided Costs Methodology 1. CPUC Order Instituting Testimony on Long Run Avoided Cost Methodology for the California Manufacturers Association, Department

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Experiments Integrate ASP-based Planning and Diagnosis with POMDPs for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-POMDP: Integrating Non- monotonic Logical Reasoning and Probabilistic Planning on Mobile Robots. International. Eric Hequet, Shiqi Zhang, and Sri Harsha Atluri, as well as the REU program coordinators Dr. Susan

Sridharan, Mohan

202

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

Tang, Zhenghong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors 14853 USA http://m3.csl.cornell.edu/ ABSTRACT Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling (Cherry by performing aggres- sive resource recycling decoupled from instruction retire- ment, using a checkpoint

Martínez, José F.

204

Drought and Precipitation Monitoring for Enhanced Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought and Precipitation Monitoring for Enhanced Integrated Water Resources Management for water resource management in Jamaica, Grenada and Guyana. A key element to ensuring the success for Water Resources Management, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21111 Lakeshore Rd., Ste. Anne de

Barthelat, Francois

205

Trade, resources and development: the implications of Asian integration Ian Coxhead1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade, resources and development: the implications of Asian integration Ian Coxhead1 Overview 2010), it also affects natural resources (Coxhead 2007; Coxhead and Jayasuriya 2010). Transport. As with the better-known examples of electronics and electrical appliances, the value chain for resource- based

Coxhead, Ian

206

Should different impact assessment instruments be integrated? Evidence from English spatial planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper aims at providing empirical evidence to the question as to whether integration of different instruments is achieving its aim in supporting sustainable decision making, focusing on SEA inclusive sustainability appraisal (SA) and other impact assessments (IAs) currently used in English spatial planning. Usage of IAs in addition to SA is established and an analysis of the integration approach (in terms of process, output, and assessor) as well as its effectiveness is conducted. It is found that while integration enhances effectiveness to some extent, too much integration, especially in terms of the procedural element, appears to diminish the overall effectiveness of each IA in influencing decisions as they become captured by the balancing function of SA. -- Highlights: ? The usage of different impact assessments in English spatial planning is clarified. ? The relationship between integration approach and effectiveness is analyzed. ? Results suggest that integration does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. ? Careful consideration is recommended upon process integration.

Tajima, Ryo, E-mail: tajima.ryo@nies.go.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-9 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokoyama City, Kanagawa, 226-8502 (Japan)] [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-9 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokoyama City, Kanagawa, 226-8502 (Japan); Fischer, Thomas B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition Sylvain: refinery planning and crude-oil operations scheduling. The proposed approach consists of using Lagrangian-study and a larger refinery problem show that the Lagrangian decomposition algorithm is more robust than the other

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

208

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design* Emre.ac.uk kazu@umich.edu .Abstract ­ This paper presents a simulation-based method to aid multi-period production capacity planning by quantifying the trade-off between product quality and production cost. The product

Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

209

The CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC) Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff to provide technical and integration support to CHPRC. This work includes conducting investigations at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and other groundwater operable units, and providing strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. The projects under this Master Project will be defined and included within the Master Project throughout the fiscal year, and will be incorporated into the Master Project Plan. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) and all releases associated with the CHPRC Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Development of approaches to integrated water resources management   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a growing need to manage water resources in a sustainable way, particularly in semi arid areas, with dramatic social and economic development as well as rapid population growth. Optimising water allocation in a ...

Geng, Guoting

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 4. Table 5. Table 6. Utility Resource Plans Included2 Carbon Emission Price Projections in Utility11 Utility Approaches to Incorporating Energy Efficiency

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Review of Utility Resource Plans in the West: Resource Strategies for a  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments onReplyofRetiring ProcurementReturnReview of

215

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management - Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL of Calculus I or MATH 140* (GQ) Calculus With Analytic Geometry I 4 SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soil Science 3 AG 150S (First-Year Seminar) Be a Master Student! 2 SOILS 102 Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1

Omiecinski, Curtis

217

Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems* Fei Su, Sule of droplet- based microfluidic systems for safety-critical biomedical applications. In order to ensure reliability, microsystems incorporating microfluidic components must be tested adequately. In this paper, we

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

218

Make anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health care -- from doctors to dollars You should have the power to select your doctors, find the best prices on what you pay for health care services and choose how you get your health care informationMake anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members: Currently registered

219

DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE`s Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP is being further developed to include complex-wide requirements for research and development and a long-range facility requirements section. The planned additions to the baseline IPP are being developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrates facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focuses on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and to provide a basis for formulating planned additions to the IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs will be periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations.

Gerber, E.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Protein Information Resource Integrated Protein Informatics Resource for Genomic & Proteomic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research For four decades the Protein Information Resource (PIR) has provided databases and protein-1978]. Currently, PIR major activities include: i) UniProt (Universal Protein Resource) development, ii) i protein sequences for sequence tracking from: Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, PIR-PSD, EMBL, Ensembl, IPI, PDB, Ref

223

A Tool for Integrated Planning of Water Infrastructure Gwendolyn Woods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or inaccurate. Economy of scale for wastewater reclamation (treatment) facilities may conflict with the energy. Yet the need to plan for new water and wastewater infrastructure remains. In the Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States: A Report Prepared for the National Climate Assessment, Theobald et

Fay, Noah

224

Integration of distributed energy resources. The CERTS Microgrid Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evolutionary changes in the regulatory and operational climate of traditional electric utilities and the emergence of smaller generating systems such as microturbines have opened new opportunities for on-site power generation by electricity users. In this context, distributed energy resources (DER)--small power generators typically located at users' sites where the energy (both electric and thermal) they generate is used--have emerged as a promising option to meet growing customer needs for electric power with an emphasis on reliability and power quality. The portfolio of DER includes generators, energy storage, load control, and, for certain classes of systems, advanced power electronic interfaces between the generators and the bulk power provider. This white paper proposes that the significant potential of smaller DER to meet customers' and utilities' needs can be best captured by organizing these resources into MicroGrids.

Lasseter, Robert; Akhil, Abbas; Marnay, Chris; Stephens, John; Dagle, Jeff; Guttromsom, Ross; Meliopoulous, A. Sakis; Yinger, Robert; Eto, Joe

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climate compatible development Jump to:Fraunhofer2002) |

226

Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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227

Integrated Safety Management Safety Culture Resources | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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228

Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Designing a Collaborative Problem Solving Environment for Integrated Water Resource Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our approach for designing a collaborative problem solving environment for hydrologists, water quality planners and natural resource managers, all roles within a natural resource management agency and stakeholders in an integrated water resource management process. We describe our approach in context of the Integrated Water Resource Modeling System (IWRMS), under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Natural Resources and Parks in King County, Washington. This system will integrate a collection of water resource models (watersheds, rivers, lakes, estuaries) to provide the ability to address water, land use, and other natural resource management decisions and scenarios, with the goal of developing an integrated modeling capability to address future land use and resource management scenarios and provide scientific support to decision makers. Here, we discuss the five-step process used to ascertain the (potentially opposing) needs and interests of stakeholders and provide results and summaries from our experiences. The results of this process guide user interface design efforts to create a collaborative problems solving environment supporting multiple users with differing scientific backgrounds and modeling needs. We conclude with a discussion of participatory interface design methods used to encourage stakeholder involvement and acceptance of the system as well as the lessons learned to date.

Thurman, David A.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Taira, Randal Y.; Frodge, Jonathan

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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232

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Transmission Planning and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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233

Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS: An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories’ (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone #3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3?year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

NSTec Mission and Projects Division

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

DNFSB recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 (Conway 1994), which identified concerns related to US Department of Energy (DOE) management of legacy fissile materials remaining from past defense production activities. The DNFSB expressed concern about the existing storage conditions for these materials and the slow pace at which the conditions were being remediated. The DNFSB also expressed its belief that additional delays in stabilizing these fissile materials would be accompanied by further deterioration of safety and unnecessary increased risks to workers and the public. In February 1995, DOE issued the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (O`Leary 1995) to address the concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. The Implementation Plan (IP) identifies several DOE commitments to achieve safe interim storage for the legacy fissile materials, and constitutes DOE`s baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). The IPP describes the actions DOE plans to implement within the DOE complex to convert its excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The IPP was subsequently supplemented with an Integrated Facilities Plan and a Research and Development Plan, which further develop complex-wide research and development and long-range facility requirements and plans. The additions to the baseline IPP were developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrated facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focused on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IP. The SISMPs also supported formulation of the initial versions of the Integrated Facilities Plan and the Research and Development Plan. The SISMPs are periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations. This document is the fifth update of the Hanford SISMP.

McCormack, R.L.

1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design plan for development of the worldwide port system (WPS) regional integrated cargo database (ICDB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB) is a major military computer system that provides visibility over international cargo. Development started in early 1993 and implementation began on the West Coast in August of 1995. The Design Plan coordinated developmental efforts for the ICDB and its related processes. A Design Plan was especially important because the ICDB was developed at multiple sites by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Military Traffic Management Command personnel. A Design Plan was essential to ensure that a consistent design was maintained throughout all modules, that functional and technical requirements were accomplished, that all components and processes worked together successfully, and that the development schedule was met. This plan described ICDB modules and tasks within each module. It documented responsibilities and dependencies by module and presented a schedule for development, testing, and integration.

Truett, L.F.; Rollow, J.P.; Shipe, P.C.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

The integrated tank waste management plan at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE`s Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge has developed an integrated tank waste management plan that combines the accelerated deployment of innovative technologies with an aggressive waste transfer schedule. Oak Ridge is cleaning out waste from aging underground storage tanks in preparation of waste processing, packaging and final safe disposal. During remediation this plan will reduce the risk of environmental, worker, and civilian exposure, save millions of dollars, and cut years off of tank remediation schedules at Oak Ridge.

Billingsley, K. [STEP, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mims, C. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Operations Office; Robinson, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Rich Davies, Kami Lowry, Mike Schlender, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ted Pietrok, Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO). Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development. Work Planning and Control (WP&C) is essential to assuring the safety of workers and the public regardless of the scope of work Research and Development (R&D) activities are no exception.

239

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORT TOJaredKansas1 -

240

Site planning and integration fiscal year 1999 multi-year work plan (MYWP) update for WBS 1.8.2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary mission of the Site Planning and Integration (SP and I) project is to assist Fluor Daniel Project Direction to ensure that all work performed under the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is adequately planned, executed, controlled, and that performance is measured and reported in an integrated fashion. Furthermore, SP and I is responsible for the development, implementation, and management of systems and processes that integrate technical, schedule, and cost baselines for PHMC work.

SCHULTZ, E.A.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improving DOE Project Performance Using the DOD Integrated Master Plan - 12481  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE O 413 measures a project's progress to plan by the consumption of funding, the passage of time, and the meeting of milestones. In March of 2003, then Under Secretary, Energy, Science, Card received a memo directing the implementation of Project Management and the Project Management Manual, including the Integrated Master Plan and Integrated Master Schedule. This directive states 'the integrated master plan and schedule tie together all project tasks by showing their logical relationships and any constraints controlling the start or finish of each task. This process results in a hierarchy of related functional and layered schedules derived from the Work Breakdown Structure that can be used for monitoring and controlling project progress'. This paper shows how restoring the IMP/IMS paradigm to DOE program management increases the probability of program success in ways not currently available using DOD O 413 processes alone. Using DOE O 413 series guidance, adding the Integrated Master Plan and Integrated Master Schedule paradigm would provide a hierarchical set of performance measures for each 'package of work,' that provides measurable visibility to the increasing maturity of the project. This measurable maturity provides the mechanism to forecast future performance of cost, schedule, and technical outcomes in ways not available using just the activities in DOE O 413. With this information project managers have another tool available to address the issues identified in GAO-07-336 and GAO-09-406. (authors)

Alleman, Glen B. [DOD Programs, Project Time and Cost (United States); Nosbisch, Michael R. [Managing Principle, Western Region, Project Time and Cost (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

We have developed an integrated plan to guide implementation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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245

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen toLeveraging National LaboratoriesResearch

246

Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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247

National integrated mitigation planning in agriculture: A review paper |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun JumpMuscoy,Jump9InformationCenter Jump

248

Fermilab | Directorate | Office of Integrated Planning (OIP) | OHAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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249

Hydrogen Posture Plan: An Integrated Research, Development and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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250

Fermilab | Directorate | Office of Integrated Planning & Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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251

Integration of Biodiversity into National Forestry Planning: An Annotated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie,InfieldInstalledResearch

252

Improving the effectiveness of planning EIA (PEIA) in China: Integrating planning and assessment during the preparation of Shenzhen's Master Urban Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enactment and implementation of the 2003 EIA Law in China institutionalised the role of plan environmental impact assessment (PEIA). While the philosophy, methodology and mechanisms of PEIA have gradually permeated through the various levels of government with a positive effect on the process and outcome of urban planning, only a few cities in China have so far carried out PEIA as a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)-type procedure. One such case is the southern city of Shenzhen. During the past three decades, Shenzhen has grown from a small town to a large and booming city as China has successfully and rapidly developed its economy by adopting the 'reform and open door' policy. In response to the challenges arising from the generally divergent processes of rapid urbanisation, economic transformation and environment protection, Shenzhen has incrementally adopted the SEA concept in developing the city's Master Urban Plan. As such, this paper reviews the effectiveness of PEIA in three ways: {center_dot}as a tool and process for achieving more sustainable and strategic planning; {center_dot}to determine the level of integration of SEA within the planning system; and, {center_dot}its effectiveness vis-a-vis implementation. The implementation of PEIA within Shenzhen's Master Urban Plan offers important insights into the emergence of innovative practices in undertaking PEIA as well as theoretical contributions to the field, especially in exploring the relationship between PEIA and SEA and highlighting the central role of local governing institutions in SEA development.

Che Xiuzhen, E-mail: chexiuzhen@sohu.com [Shenzhen Academy of Environmental Science, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); English, Alex [Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University (Australia); Lu Jia [Shenzhen Urban Planning and Research Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Chen, Yongqin David [Department of Geography and Resource Management, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre of Strategic Environmental Assessment for China, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

254

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Integration plan required by performance agreement SM 7.2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. and its major subcontractors are in agreement that environmental monitoring performed under the Project Hanford Management Contract is to be done in accordance with a single, integrated program. The purpose of this Integration Plan for Environmental Monitoring is to document the policies, systems, and processes being put in place to meet one key objective: manage and integrate a technically competent, multi-media ambient environmental monitoring program, in an efficient, cost effective manner. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. and its major subcontractors also commit to conducting business in a manner consistent with the International Standards Organization 14000 Environmental Management System concepts. Because the integration of sitewide groundwater monitoring activities is managed by the Environmental Restoration Contractor, groundwater monitoring it is outside the scope of this document. Therefore, for the purpose of this Integration Plan for Environmental Monitoring, the Integrated Environmental Monitoring Program is defined as applicable to all environmental media except groundwater. This document provides recommendations on future activities to better integrate the overall environmental monitoring program, with emphasis on the near-field program. In addition, included is the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. team review of the environmental monitoring activities on the Hanford Site, with concurrence of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (The narrative provided later in the Discussion Section describes the review and consideration given to each topic.) This document was developed to meet the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract performance agreement (SM7.2) and the tenets of the U.S. Department of Energy's Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Planning Process. This Plan is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Assurance, Permits, and Policy Division to complete the requirements specified in the Performance Expectation 7.2.1, within the SM7 Environmental, Safety, and Health section of the Project Hanford Management Contract.

Diediker, L.P.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

304 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY, VOL. 54, NO. 2, JUNE 2005 Integrating Preventive Maintenance Planning and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

304 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON RELIABILITY, VOL. 54, NO. 2, JUNE 2005 Integrating Preventive Maintenance & Conclusions--Preventive maintenance planning, and production scheduling are two activities that are inter-depen- dent but most often performed independently. Considering that preventive maintenance, and repair affect

Kutanoglu, Erhan

257

HSS Finding D3 Corrective Action Plan for LBNL Integrated ES&H Management Inspection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LNBL CAP HSS Finding D3 Corrective Action Plan for LBNL Integrated ES&H Management Inspection Owner: Ross Fisher Analyst: Weyland Wong Finding Statement D3: LBNL has not established sufficient processes for Correcting Finding: Richard DeBusk LBNL EH&S Division Laboratory Safety Manager (510) 495-2976 REDe

Knowles, David William

258

Corrective Action Plan-Special DSC Meeting LBNL Integrated ES&H Management Inspection 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrective Action Plan-Special DSC Meeting LBNL Integrated ES&H Management Inspection 2009 Presented April 24, 2009 Finding Statement C-4: LBNL has not established effective processes and rigorous documents that consistently and effectively communicate safety expectations and requirements to LBNL

Knowles, David William

259

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable energy Jinxu Ding and Arun Somani Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Email: {jxding,arun}@iastate.edu Abstract--The current energy infrastructure heavily

260

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Load Forecasts to Support WGA and Resource Assessmentin Load Forecasts to Support WGA and Resource AssessmentMingst, 2006, “Resource Assessment in the West: Review of

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

McCarthy, Kathryn A. [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California is on a path to increase utilization of renewable resources. California will need to integrate approximately 30,000 megawatts (MW) of new renewable generation in the next 20 years. Renewable resources are typically located in remote locations, not near the load centers. Nearly two/thirds or 20,000 MW of new renewable resources needed are likely to be delivered to Los Angeles Basin transmission gateways. Integration of renewable resources requires interconnection to the power grid, expansion of the transmission system capability between the backbone power grid and transmission gateways, and increase in delivery capacity from transmission gateways to the local load centers. To scope the transmission, operations, and reliability issues for renewables integration, this research focused on the Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateways where most of new renewables are likely. Necessary actions for successful renewables integration include: (1) Expand Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateway and nomogram limits by 10,000 to 20,000 MW; (2) Upgrade local transmission network for deliverability to load centers; (3) Secure additional storage, demand management, automatic load control, dynamic pricing, and other resources that meet regulation and ramping needed in real time operations; (4) Enhance local voltage support; and (5) Expand deliverability from Los Angeles to San Diego and Northern California.

Eto, Joseph; Budhraja, Vikram; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Mobasheri, Fred; Eto, Joseph

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Identification of Management and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including the inventory and planning control for both surface and ground Water Resource Management of the San Antonio area are presented. Emphasis has been placed upon the identification of the probabilistic nature of various decision-making parameters...

Garner, K.; Shih, C. S.

267

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost effective energy projects at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Patrick AFB which is located south of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume.2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance, and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value and value index of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Elliott, D.B.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The EM SSAB Annual Work Plan Process: Focusing Board Efforts and Resources - 13667  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most daunting tasks for any new member of a local board of the Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) is to try to understand the scope of the clean-up activities going on at the site. In most cases, there are at least two or three major cleanup activities in progress as well as monitoring of past projects. When planning for future projects is added to the mix, the list of projects can be long. With the clean-up activities involving all major environmental media - air, water, soils, and groundwater, new EM SSAB members can find themselves totally overwhelmed and ineffective. Helping new members get over this initial hurdle is a major objective of EM and all local boards of the EM SSAB. Even as members start to understand the size and scope of the projects at a site, they can still be frustrated at the length of time it takes to see results and get projects completed. Many project and clean-up timelines for most of the sites go beyond 10 years, so it's not unusual for an EM SSAB member to see the completion of only 1 or 2 projects over the course of their 6-year term on the board. This paper explores the annual work planning process of the EM SSAB local boards, one tool that can be used to educate EM SSAB members into seeing the broader picture for the site. EM SSAB local work plans divide the site into projects focused on a specific environmental issue or media such as groundwater and/or waste disposal options. Projects are further broken down into smaller segments by highlighting major milestones. Using these metrics, local boards of the EM SSAB can start to quantify the effectiveness of the project in achieving the ultimate goal of site clean-up. These metrics can also trigger board advice and recommendations for EM. At the beginning of each fiscal year, the EM SSAB work plan provides a road map with quantifiable checkpoints for activities throughout the year. When the work plans are integrated with site-specific, enforceable regulatory milestones, they can provide a comprehensive work plan for not only the board, but also regulators, site contractors, and DOE. Because the work plans are reviewed and approved by DOE, they carry some weight in holding local boards of the EM SSAB accountable. This structure provides the basis for local boards to achieve their primary function, to provide DOE with information, advice, and recommendations concerning issues affecting the EM program at the site. (authors)

Young, Ralph [Paducah Citizens Advisory Board (United States)] [Paducah Citizens Advisory Board (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Semantic-based Grid Resource Discovery and its Integration with the Grid Service Broker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Semantic-based Grid Resource Discovery and its Integration with the Grid Service Broker Thamarai Chromepet, Chennai ­ 600044, India Email : stselvi@annauniv.edu 2 Grid Computing and Distributed Systems :mohanram@cdacb.ernet.in Abstract: This paper addresses the need of semantic component in the grid

Melbourne, University of

273

Developmental Integrative BiologyForensic Science A complement of specialized resources, equipment, and talent guides forensic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developmental Integrative BiologyForensic Science A complement of specialized resources, equipment, and talent guides forensic science research at UNT, with a multidisciplinary infrastructure encompassing research in natural sciences and diverse areas--from the development of detection sensors and forensic

Tarau, Paul

274

Sustainable water resources development in Kuwait : an integrated approach with comparative analysis of the case of Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis assesses the water resource status of Kuwait and Singapore, both countries considered as water scarce. The institutional aspect of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) efforts in both countries is closely ...

Nazerali, Nasruddin A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Employment Opportunity at Plan-It Geo Natural Resources Technician ($13-16/hour dep. on qualifications/experience)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, water resources analysis, and decision support systems. We are seeking a full-time, entry-level team or background in forestry, urban ecology, ecosystems management, water/natural resources inventory, or land use involving GIS, remote sensing, and web- based solutions for urban forest planning, cost/benefit analysis

276

Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integrated Energy-Water Planning in the Western and Texas Interconnections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While long-term regional electricity transmission planning has traditionally focused on cost, infrastructure utilization, and reliability, issues concerning the availability of water represent an emerging issue. Thermoelectric expansion must be considered in the context of competing demands from other water use sectors balanced with fresh and non-fresh water supplies subject to climate variability. An integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) is being developed that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water availability and cost for long-range transmission planning. The project brings together electric transmission planners (Western Electricity Coordinating Council and Electric Reliability Council of Texas) with western water planners (Western Governors’ Association and the Western States Water Council). This paper lays out the basic framework for this integrated Energy-Water DSS.

Vincent Tidwell; John Gasper; Robert Goldstein; Jordan Macknick; Gerald Sehlke; Michael Webber; Mark Wigmosta

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Portland General Electric (PGE), 2004. “Final Action Plan:Electric Co. Portland General Electric Public Service of NewPG&E) • Portland General Electric (PGE) • Public Service of

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

1 Statewide Imprisonment of Black Men in Wisconsin | A Resource Paper for Workforce Planning Statewide Imprisonment of Black Men in Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Statewide Imprisonment of Black Men in Wisconsin | A Resource Paper for Workforce Planning Statewide Imprisonment of Black Men in Wisconsin A resource paper for workforce planning prepared by Lois M for Workforce Planning 2. When prison records were examined for the state as a whole, they showed that by 2012

Saldin, Dilano

283

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

Collins, E.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) System: An Expanding Comparative Analysis Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system serves as a community resource for comparative analysis of publicly available genomes in a comprehensive integrated context. IMG contains both draft and complete microbial genomes integrated with other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and reviewing the annotations of genes and genomes in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through regular releases. Several companion IMG systems have been set up in order to serve domain specific needs, such as expert review of genome annotations. IMG is available at .

Markowitz, Victor M.; Chen, I-Min A.; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Szeto, Ernest; Grechkin, Yuri; Ratner, Anna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

Bascietto, J.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US). RCRA/CERCLA Div.; Dunford, R.W. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (US); Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of an Integrated Waste Plan for Chalk River Laboratories - 13376  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To further its Strategic Planning, the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) required an effective approach to developing a fully integrated waste plan for its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Production of the first Integrated Waste Plan (IWP) for Chalk River was a substantial task involving representatives from each of the major internal stakeholders. Since then, a second revision has been produced and a third is underway. The IWP remains an Interim IWP until all gaps have been resolved and all pathways are at an acceptable level of detail. Full completion will involve a number of iterations, typically annually for up to six years. The end result of completing this process is a comprehensive document and supporting information that includes: - An Integrated Waste Plan document summarizing the entire waste management picture in one place; - Details of all the wastes required to be managed, including volume and timings by waste stream; - Detailed waste stream pathway maps for the whole life-cycle for each waste stream to be managed from pre-generation planning through to final disposition; and - Critical decision points, i.e. decisions that need to be made and timings by when they need to be made. A waste inventory has been constructed that serves as the master reference inventory of all waste that has been or is committed to be managed at CRL. In the past, only the waste that is in storage has been effectively captured, and future predictions of wastes requiring to be managed were not available in one place. The IWP has also provided a detailed baseline plan at the current level of refinement. Waste flow maps for all identified waste streams, for the full waste life cycle complete to disposition have been constructed. The maps identify areas requiring further development, and show the complexities and inter-relationships between waste streams. Knowledge of these inter-dependencies is necessary in order to perform effective options studies for enabling facilities that may be necessary for multiple related waste streams. The next step is to engage external stakeholders in the optioneering work required to provide enhanced confidence that the path forward identified within future iterations of the IWP will be acceptable to all. (authors)

Jones, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 5.0 Systems Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Systems Integration section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

289

Integrity assessment plan for PNL 300 area radioactive hazardous waste tank system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, operates tank systems for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), that contain dangerous waste constituents as defined by Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040(18). Chapter 173-303-640(2) of the WAC requires the performance of integrity assessments for each existing tank system that treats or stores dangerous waste, except those operating under interim status with compliant secondary containment. This Integrity Assessment Plan (IAP) identifies all tasks that will be performed during the integrity assessment of the PNL-operated Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems (RLWS) associated with the 324 and 325 Buildings located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. It describes the inspections, tests, and analyses required to assess the integrity of the PNL RLWS (tanks, ancillary equipment, and secondary containment) and provides sufficient information for adequate budgeting and control of the assessment program. It also provides necessary information to permit the Independent, Qualified, Registered Professional Engineer (IQRPE) to approve the integrity assessment program.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Teacher Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teacher Resources For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Teacher Resources Scavenger...

291

Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of major new renewable resource developments. To determinenumber of new renewable resources, which would reduceintegrate renewable energy resources and reduce greenhouse

Budhraja, Vikram

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

A planning study of simultaneous integrated boost with forward IMRT for multiple brain metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose conformity and feasibility of whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for 10 patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases on Pinnacle 6.2 Treatment Planning System. The prescribed dose was 30 Gy to the whole brain (planning target volume [PTV]{sub wbrt}) and 40 Gy to individual brain metastases (PTV{sub boost}) simultaneously, and both doses were given in 10 fractions. The maximum diameters of individual brain metastases ranged from 1.6 to 6 cm, and the summated PTVs per patient ranged from 1.62 to 69.81 cm{sup 3}. Conformity and feasibility were evaluated regarding conformation number and treatment delivery time. One hundred percent volume of the PTV{sub boost} received at least 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. The maximum doses were less than 110% of the prescribed dose to the PTV{sub boost}, and all of the hot spots were within the PTV{sub boost}. The volume of the PTV{sub wbrt} that received at least 95% of the prescribed dose ranged from 99.2% to 100%. The mean values of conformation number were 0.682. The mean treatment delivery time was 2.79 minutes. Ten beams were used on an average in these plans. Whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in 1 to 3 brain metastases is feasible, and treatment delivery time is short.

Liang, Xiaodong, E-mail: lxdctopone@sina.com [Taizhou Central Hospital, Zhejiang Province (China); Ni, Lingqin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Ying, Shenpeng; Gong, Qiangjun; Liu, Yanmei [Taizhou Central Hospital, Zhejiang Province (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects of the program. The report also outlines a process for establishing a database for the fusion research program that will indicate how each research element fits into the overall program. This database will also include near-term milestones associated with each research element, and will facilitate assessments of the balance within the program at different levels. The Office of Fusion Energy Sciences plans to begin assembling and using the database in the Spring of 2001 as we receive proposals from our laboratories and begin to prepare our budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2003.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

296

Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged for teaching integrated STEM and provide a relevant context for teaching STEM content. Workplace presentations made by place-based STEM experts and provided teachers field trips to place-base STEM industries and business such as manufacturing plants, waste water treatment systems, mines, nature parks, food processing plants, research, hospitals, and laboratory facilities. We researched the 425 participants’ conceptions of place-based STEM prior to and after their taking part in the summer institutes, which included fieldtrips. Our findings revealed substantial increase in our participants’ knowledge, interest, and plans to use place-based resources for teaching integrated STEM. We detail the data analysis and provide a theoretical foundation and justification for the importance of place-based STEM to address the STEM pipeline for the future workforce.

Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Systems Approaches and CommunitySystems Approaches and Community Approaches for Coastal PlanningApproaches for Coastal Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Communities · Social/Economic/Cultural Environment · The Resource Management System: · Policy and Planning · Integrated Coastal Management · Development and Research #12;External Environment Policy and Planning Resource Management Resource Development Resource Research NATURAL ECOSYSTEM Community MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Charles, Anthony

298

The University of Montana continues its commitment to increased accountability and linkage of Planning, Resource Allocation, and Assessment. This second annual Institutional Assessment Report illustrates not only that commitment,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Planning, Resource Allocation, and Assessment. This second annual Institutional Assessment Report. Strategic planning, budgeting, implementation, and assessment are essential components of the resource illustrates not only that commitment, but also the positive outcomes of strategic resource management

Vonessen, Nikolaus

299

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K RENEWABLE RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA The renewable resource confirmation agenda is a set of coordinated research and wind resources. The activities include resource assessment, conflict resolution and renewable-power objectives. Table K-1 Status and Recommendations Regarding the Renewable Resources Confirmation Agenda

300

Abstract--The issue of controlled and reliable integration of distributed energy resources into microgrids and large power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources (DER), many of them based on renewable energies, have experimented an unprecedented growth of the renewable energy sources, and its integration into power systems. One of the main technical issues to be addressed in the process of integration is the control and management of the non-dispatchable renewable

Cańizares, Claudio A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Design basis integrated operations plan (Title I design)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) will be a fully integrated, pilotscale facility for the demonstration of low-level, organic-matrix mixed waste treatment technologies. It will provide the bridge from bench-scale demonstrated technologies to the deployment and operation of full-scale treatment facilities. The MWMF is a key element in reducing the risk in deployment of effective and environmentally acceptable treatment processes for organic mixed-waste streams. The MWMF will provide the engineering test data, formal evaluation, and operating experience that will be required for these demonstration systems to become accepted by EPA and deployable in waste treatment facilities. The deployment will also demonstrate how to approach the permitting process with the regulatory agencies and how to operate and maintain the processes in a safe manner. This document describes, at a high level, how the facility will be designed and operated to achieve this mission. It frequently refers the reader to additional documentation that provides more detail in specific areas. Effective evaluation of a technology consists of a variety of informal and formal demonstrations involving individual technology systems or subsystems, integrated technology system combinations, or complete integrated treatment trains. Informal demonstrations will typically be used to gather general operating information and to establish a basis for development of formal demonstration plans. Formal demonstrations consist of a specific series of tests that are used to rigorously demonstrate the operation or performance of a specific system configuration.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

303

Integration of Rooftop Photovoltaic Systems in St. Paul Ford Sites Redevelopment Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-Infected MacaquesIntegration of Rooftop

304

Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix I: Generating Resources -Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 10 Transmission to access remote resources.................................................................................................................... 51 Waste Heat Energy Recovery Cogeneration

306

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 9: Developing a Resource Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................................... 18 Renewable Energy Production Incentives ................................................................................ 18 Renewable Energy Credits........................................................................................................................ 19 Existing Renewable Portfolio Standard Resources

307

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) INFORM: Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management System for Northern California, Aris Georgakakos PI Water Resources Institute GWRI mission is to help improve water resources management in Georgia, the US planning and management framework for Georgia. The GWRI planning tools are used to (i) determine flow

308

Analytical Frameworks to Incorporate Demand Response in Long-term Resource Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost- effectiveness of Demand Response. ” Prepared for theon the National Action Plan on Demand Response, February.Role of Automated Demand Response. ” LBNL-4189E, November.

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - aid resource planning Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

perfmgt525plan.pdf ... Source: Howat, Ian M. - Byrd Polar Research Center & School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University Collection: Geosciences 3 Student Name...

310

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring two low-level radioactive waste disposal sites at the Nevada Test Site.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Migrating data from TcSE to DOORS : an evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes our evaluation of the T-Plan Integrator software application as it was used to transfer a real data set from the Teamcenter for Systems Engineering (TcSE) software application to the DOORS software application. The T-Plan Integrator was evaluated to determine if it would meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories to migrate our existing data sets from TcSE to DOORS. This report presents the struggles of migrating data and focuses on how the Integrator can be used to map a data set and its data architecture from TcSE to DOORS. Finally, this report describes how the bulk of the migration can take place using the Integrator; however, about 20-30% of the data would need to be transferred from TcSE to DOORS manually. This report does not evaluate the transfer of data from DOORS to TcSE.

Post, Debra S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Manzanares, David A.; Taylor, Jeffrey L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 20,000 MW of renewable resources to be developed will greater utilization of renewable  resources and meeting the of renewable resources. ..16 Table 8.

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential for Algal Biofuels at the National Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Costs, emissions, and resource availability were modeled for the production of 5 billion gallons yr-1 (5 BGY) of renewable diesel in the United States from Chlorella biomass by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). The HTL model utilized data from a continuous 1-L reactor including catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous phase, and catalytic hydrotreatment of the HTL oil. A biophysical algae growth model coupled with weather and pond simulations predicted biomass productivity from experimental growth parameters, allowing site-by-site and temporal prediction of biomass production. The 5 BGY scale required geographically and climatically distributed sites. Even though screening down to 5 BGY significantly reduced spatial and temporal variability, site-to-site, season-to-season, and inter-annual variations in productivity affected economic and environmental performance. Performance metrics based on annual average or peak productivity were inadequate; temporally and spatially explicit computations allowed more rigorous analysis of these dynamic systems. For example, 3-season operation with a winter shutdown was favored to avoid high greenhouse gas emissions, and economic performance was harmed by underutilized equipment during slow-growth periods. Thus, analysis of algal biofuel pathways must combine spatiotemporal resource assessment, economic analysis, and environmental analysis integrated over many sites when assessing national scale performance.

Davis, Ryan; Fishman, Daniel; Frank, Edward D.; Johnson, Michael C.; Jones, Susanne B.; Kinchin, Christopher; Skaggs, Richard; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Recent Developments in the Regulation of Electric Utility Resource Planning in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Legislature has charged the Public Utility Commission of Texas with the responsibility to license utility power plants and transmission lines, and develop a statewide electrical energy plan. Related duties include the encouragement...

Totten, J.; Adib, P.; Matlock, R.; Treadway, N.

320

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch GeneResources Resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Applying Retirement-Planning Strategy to Sensor Networks: An Integrated Approach to Energy-Aware Medium Access  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lifetime, energy efficiency, cross-layer design. #12;TECHNICAL REPORT TR-06-01, UC DAVIS, MAY 2006. 2 I among #12;TECHNICAL REPORT TR-06-01, UC DAVIS, MAY 2006. 3 nodes. We show that protocols exploitingApplying Retirement-Planning Strategy to Sensor Networks: An Integrated Approach to Energy

Islam, M. Saif

322

Overseas Affairs and Planning Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact: Overseas Affairs and Planning Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (i Cell-Material Sciences, iCeMS for short, I welcome you to the Seventh iCeMS International Symposium to develop them through evolution. They are also very important to design and create various novel "smart

Takada, Shoji

323

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Public involvement in integrated resource planning: A study of demand-side management collaboratives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many utilities and nonutility parties (NUPs) across the country have tried a new approach to reaching agreement on Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design and policy issues. Through this, which is called the DSM collaborative process, parties who have often been adversaries in the past attempt to reach consensus rather than using traditional litigation to resolve differences. We examined nine cases of DSM collaboration involving 24 utilities and approximately 50 NUPs in 10 states. This is the first comprehensive, in-depth review and assessment of collaboratives and it allows conclusions to be drawn about the collaborative process and the factors that contribute to successful efforts of this type. Collaboratives are described in terms of four major contextual and organizational characteristics: regulatory and legal history, parties involved and parties excluded, collaborative scope, and the collaborative process itself.

Raab, J. [Raab (J.), Boston, MA (United States); Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrogen Strategies: an Integrated Resource Planning Analysis for the Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts and knowledge in hydrogen energy systems and theirdevelop alternative hydrogen-energy scenarios. The scenariosof alternative hydrogen energy pathways to characterize an

Pigneri, Attilio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydrogen Strategies: an Integrated Resource Planning Analysis for the Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts and knowledge in hydrogen energy systems and theirInternational Hydrogen Energy Congress and Exhibition IHECthe Development of Hydrogen Energy Infrastructures Attilio

Pigneri, Attilio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Options on Renewables Integration ..28Issues and Action Items for Renewables Integration.additional energy from renewables will be  needed to meet 

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Document 2006-17 September 19, 2006 Pacific Northwest Resource Adequacy Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinating Council (WECC) is developing guidelines to recommend appropriate methodologies for assessing resource adequacy. Although the NERC and WECC efforts act as drivers, momentum is also building within

330

Document 2006-22 November 15, 2006 Pacific Northwest Resource Adequacy Warning Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinating Council (WECC) is developing guidelines to recommend appropriate methodologies for assessing resource adequacy. Although the NERC and WECC efforts act as drivers, momentum is also building within

331

A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Methods: Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E + IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. Results: The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E + IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E + IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E + IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. Conclusions: The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery hardware, a mixed electron/photon planning technique (E + IMRT) can decrease the normal tissue integral dose compared to a photon-only IMRT plan. Different planning approaches can be enabled by the use of an electron beam directed toward organs at risk distal to the target, which are still spared due the rapid dose fall-off of the electron beam. Examples of such cases are the lateral electron beams in the thoracic region that do not irradiate the heart and contralateral lung, electron beams pointed toward kidneys in the abdominal region, or beams treating brain lesions pointed toward the brainstem or optical apparatus. For brain, electron vertex beams can also be used without irradiating the whole body. Since radiation retreatments become more and more common, minimizing the normal tissue integral dose and the dose delivered to tissues surrounding the target, as enabled by E + IMRT type techniques, should receive more attention.

Rosca, Florin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Danvers, Massachusetts 01923 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A

333

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all remote resource  (renewable and non?renewable) to the all remote resource  (renewable  and non?renewable) to the utilization of renewable  resources and meeting the RPS.  

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Accelerating value capture of SAP enterprise resource planning (ERP) system : governance model and process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raytheon produces a diverse range of defense products using a wide range of business systems and tools that are not currently integrated. To achieve the corporate vision of "one company", in 2005, Raytheon began to deploy ...

Shih, Ting-Chih

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydroelectric power: Technology and planning. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning hydroelectric power technology and planning. Reservoir, dam, water tunnel, and hydraulic gate design, construction, and operation are discussed. Water supply, flood control, irrigation programs, and environmental effects of hydroelectric power plants are presented. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The New Approach to Strategic Energy Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE NEW APPROACH TO STRATEGIC ENERGY PLANNING N. RICHARD FRIEDMAN Chairman Resource Dynamics Corporation Vienna, Virginia ABSTRACT The changing industrial energy market is placing a new emphasis on the strategic element of energy... planning. No longer a "lowest-cost analysis" discipline, successful energy planning today involved a sophisticated approach that integrated energy decisions into the development of overall corporate business strategy. The integration of strategic...

Friedman, N. R.

339

Implications of U.S. experience for water resource planning in Egypt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be developed to fit Egypt's unique needs. ReferencesFOR RESOURCE PLAl'JNING IN EGYPT by Gordon C. Rausser andWA'lER RESOORCE PLANNI~ IN EGYPT by Gordon C. Rausser .and

Rausser, Gordon C.; Caswell, Margriet F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 12: Capacity and Flexibility Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................ 6 Flexibility Issues Raised By Wind Generation system capacity and flexibility a new priority. Wind generation needs back-up, flexible resources new wind generation with a more constrained hydrosystem, there are solutions. The first step

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fort Irwin National Training Center integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most difficult problems encountered at federal sites in reducing energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where energy is being used and what technologies can be employed to decrease energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, the energy manager may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This limitation can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has been tasked by the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is assisting FEMP in this effort. This is part of a model program that PNL has developed to provide a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities. The program (1) identifies the building groups and end uses using the most energy (not just having the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a road map to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites.

Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Beta Test Plan for Advanced Inverters Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a preliminary (beta) test plan for grid interconnection systems of advanced inverter-based DERs. It follows the format and methodology/approach established by IEEE Std 1547.1, while incorporating: 1. Upgraded tests for responses to abnormal voltage and frequency, and also including ride-through. 2. A newly developed test for voltage regulation, including dynamic response testing. 3. Modified tests for unintentional islanding, open phase, and harmonics to include testing with the advanced voltage and frequency response functions enabled. Two advanced inverters, one single-phase and one three-phase, were tested under the beta test plan. These tests confirmed the importance of including tests for inverter dynamic response, which varies widely from one inverter to the next.

Hoke, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Basso, T.; Coddington, M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is a form of utility regulation that strengthens the financial incentives to lower rates, lower costs, or improve nonprice performance relative traditional regulation, which the authors call cost-of-service, rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. Although the electric utility industry has considerable experience with incentive mechanisms that target specific areas of performance, implementation of mechanisms that cover a comprehensive set of utility costs or services is relatively rare. In recent years, interest in PBR has increased as a result of growing dissatisfaction with COS/ROR and as a result of economic and technological trends that are leading to more competition in certain segments of the electricity industry. In addition, incentive regulation has been used with some success in other public utility industries, most notably telecommunications in the US and telecommunications, energy, and water in the United Kingdom. In this report, the authors analyze comprehensive PBR mechanisms for electric utilities in four ways: (1) they describe different types of PBR mechanisms, (2) they review a sample of actual PBR plans, (3) they consider the interaction of PBR and utility-funded energy efficiency programs, and (4) they examine how PBR interacts with electric utility resource planning and industry restructuring. The report should be of interest to technical staff of utilities and regulatory commissions that are actively considering or designing PBR mechanisms. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Hill, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch Gene

345

New York City Energy-Water Integrated Planning: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New York City Energy-Water Integrated Planning Pilot Study is one of several projects funded by Sandia National Laboratories under the U.S. Department of Energy Energy-Water Nexus Program. These projects are intended to clarify some key issues and research needs identified during the Energy-Water Nexus Roadmapping activities. The objectives of the New York City Pilot Project are twofold: to identify energy-water nexus issues in an established urban area in conjunction with a group of key stakeholders and to define and apply an integrated energy and water decision support tool, as proof-of-concept, to one or more of these issues. During the course of this study, the Brookhaven National Laboratory project team worked very closely with members of a Pilot Project Steering Committee. The Steering Committee members brought a breadth of experience across the energy, water and climate disciplines, and all are well versed in the particular issues faced by an urban environment, and by New York City in particular. The first task was to identify energy-water issues of importance to New York City. This exercise was followed by discussion of the qualities and capabilities that an ideal decision support tool should display to address these issues. The decision was made to start with an existing energy model, the New York City version of the MARKAL model, developed originally at BNL and now used globally by many groups for energy analysis. MARKAL has the virtue of being well-vetted, transparent, and capable of calculating 'material' flows, such as water use by the energy system and energy requirements of water technology. The Steering Committee members defined five scenarios of interest, representing a broad spectrum of New York City energy-water issues. Brookhaven National Laboratory researchers developed a model framework (Water-MARKAL) at the desired level of detail to address the scenarios, and then attempted to gather the New York City-specific information required to analyze the scenarios using Water-MARKAL. This report describes the successes and challenges of defining and demonstrating the decision tool, Water-MARKAL. The issues that the stakeholders perceive for New York City are listed and the difficulties in gathering required information for Water-MARKAL to analyze these issues at the desired level of detail are described.

Bhatt,V.; Crosson, K. M.; Horak, W.; Reisman, A.

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Strategic Plan for Utilizing Low Cost Engineering Resources at Generic Aerospace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these methods are costly and may cause other issues, such as inconsistent output, high turnover and resource constraints for other sites. One concept that is being more readily adopted is the use of Low Cost Engineering Services (LCES) offered by third party...

Veach, Michael

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Perceptions of Human Resource Development Professionals Toward their Professional Association's Standards on Ethics and Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizations must recognize the impact that professional context variables have on ethical decision making. The purpose of this study was to examine Human Resource Development professional’s perceptions of the Academy of Human Resource Development’s Standards...

Claus, Vanessa A

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sustainable feeding systems based on the use of local resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable feeding systems based on the use of local resources PP Roggero S Bellon M Rosales3 1 of organisation and planning of the use of renewable local resources. The multiple use of a specific feed resource considered as examples of diversification and exploitation of local resources. The integration

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

An Integrated Science Plan for the Lake Tahoe Basin: Conceptual Framework and Research Strategies Patricia N. Manley,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

always accompany the best efforts of environmental and resource managers. They are inescapable principles and practices in an integrated fashion to acquire objective and verifiable information to fill knowledge gaps, thereby reducing uncertainties. Scientific principles and practices employed to generate new

Standiford, Richard B.

350

Delaware's Energy Efficiency Potential and Program Scenarios to Meet Its Energy Efficiency Resource Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, state, federal and international agencies and nonprofit organizations. The Center is composed and development, environmental justice, conservation and renewable energy options, integrated resource planningDelaware's Energy Efficiency Potential and Program Scenarios to Meet Its Energy Efficiency Resource

Delaware, University of

351

Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities in Canada  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan,Information FeedColombia:| Open Energy

352

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy efficiency and renewable resources, which serves onewith New Renewable Resources 18Portfolios with New Renewable Resources No. of Candidate

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with New Renewable Resources 18Portfolios with New Renewable Resources No. of Candidateportfolios with new renewable resources comprising, at most,

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Proposed Resource Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ely District  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronicNORTH LAS VEGASEly District Record of

355

Report: Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department of Energy onACQUISITIONReport: IG-0449|

356

A CULTURAL RESOURCES MONITORING AND DISCOVERY PLAN FOR MAINTENANCE AND MINOR CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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357

BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of Decision for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: EnergyAustin Energy Place: TexasAvoyellesdeA SBIOPARSolar Energy

358

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ ContractEndstatesEnergy Corridors on FederalUrinals

359

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessinSupporting JobsClean EnergyAcrossinput to the National

360

"Just do it (replicate)" with Plans, Tools, and Resources | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research PetroleumDepartmentWomen @Zappos.com6.pdfMr. O F F I CCOVEREnergy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OPUC Flexibility Planning Guidelines Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Demand management ­ smart grid controllable "withdrawal" and "recharge" #12;Jim Hicks Energy Strategies Jim Hicks Energy Strategies West, LLC #12;OPUC's New IRP Guidelines* · Integrated Resource Plans operational view of planning, including comprehensive multi-faceted VER integration strategy #12;Daily Wind

362

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map of Solar Resource Potential in California,  [http://maps/solar_potential.html].   California Energy Solar Thermal—Barstow, Mohave, and Central California  For 

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Strategic Energy Planning | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Resources Energy Resource Library Strategic Energy Planning Strategic Energy Planning Below are resources for Tribes on strategic energy planning. Alaska Strategic Energy...

364

Plan Your School Visit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

365

DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the plans of the Hanford Site for the safe interim storage of fissile materials. Currently, spent nuclear fuels reside in storage basins that have leaked in the past and are projected to leak in the future. Other problems in the basins include; sludge from decomposition, degraded cladding of fuel elements, and construction defects which make the basins seismically unsafe. This management plan describes the time and cost that it will take to implement a safe interim storage plan for the fissile materials.

McCormack, R.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Integrated method to create optimal dynamic strategic plans for corporate technology start-ups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an innovative method for evaluating and dynamically planning the development of uncertain technology investments. Its crux centers on a paradigm shift in the way managers assess investments, toward an ...

Mikati, Samir Omar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

Clark, T.G.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Integrating regional strategic transportation planning and supply chain management : along the path to sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systems perspective for regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP) for freight movements involves an understanding of Supply Chain Management (SCM). This thesis argues that private sector freight shippers and ...

Sgouridis, Sgouris P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Implementation of the Integrated Planning Concept to Strengthen Indonesian Radiation Emergency Response Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear power has been included in Indonesian national plan as an alternative solution for electricity production. However, Indonesia lies within the Pacific Ring of Fire with around 129 active volcanoes along its region. In addition, the Indonesian...

Volia, Merinda Fitri

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL AND GAS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five sub-contractors that have taken place during the first six months (January 1, 2003--June 30, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Gnomon, Inc. and all five (5) subcontractors have agreed on a process for the framework of this two-year project. They have also started gathering geomorphological information and entering cultural resource data into databases that will be used to create models later in the project. This data is being gathered in both the Power River Basin of Wyoming, and the Southeastern region of New Mexico. Several meetings were held with key players in this project to explain the purpose of the research, to obtain feedback and to gain support. All activities have been accomplished on time and within budget with no major setbacks.

Peggy Robinson

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

372

Plan  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronicNORTH LAS VEGAS POLICESpecialPiprocess or

373

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy; Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment contains a summary of the proposed water resources protection strategy developed to achieve compliance with US EPA ground water protection standards for the remedial action plan at the Slick Rock, CO uranium mill tailings sites. Included are the conceptual design considerations such as climate and infiltration, surface and subsurface drainage, and features for water resources protection such as disposal cell cover components, transient drainage and control of construction water, subsidence and disposal cell longevity. The disposal and control of radioactive materials and nonradioactive contaminants as it relates to ground water protection standards is discussed, and the plan for cleanup and control of existing contamination is outlined.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the Laboratory Scientific Vision and operations goals. The Initiatives section describes some of the specific new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Department of Energy and Berkeley Lab. The Operations Strategic Planning section describes our strategic thinking in the areas of human resources; site and cyber security; workforce diversity; communications and trust; integrated safety management; and technology transfer activities. The Infrastructure Strategic Planning section describes Berkeley Lab's facilities planning process and our site and facility needs. The Summary of Major Issues section provides context for discussions at the Institutional Planning On-Site Review. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for Berkeley Lab's research programs.

Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning for Deep Submicron Processor Design Mongkol integration (VLSI) process tech- nology migrates to nanoscale with a feature size of less than 100 nm, global

Lim, Sung Kyu

376

Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant issues can arise with the timing, location, and volume of surface water withdrawals associated with hydraulic fracturing of gas shale reservoirs as impacted watersheds may be sensitive, especially in drought years, during low flow periods, or during periods of the year when activities such as irrigation place additional demands on the surface supply of water. Significant energy production and associated water withdrawals may have a cumulative impact to watersheds over the short-term. Hence, hydraulic fracturing based on water withdrawal could potentially create shifts in the timing and magnitude of low or high flow events or change the magnitude of river flow at daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly time scales. These changes in flow regimes can result in dramatically altered river systems. Currently little is known about the impact of fracturing on stream flow behavior. Within this context the objective of this study is to assess the impact of the hydraulic fracturing on the water balance of the Fayetteville Shale play area and examine the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on river flow regime at subbasin scale. This project addressed that need with four unique but integrated research and development efforts: 1) Evaluate the predictive reliability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model based at a variety of scales (Task/Section 3.5). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate the across-scale water balance and the respective impact of hydraulic fracturing. A second hypothetical scenario was designed to assess the current and future impacts of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing on the flow regime and on the environmental flow components (EFCs) of the river. The shifting of these components, which present critical elements to water supply and water quality, could influence the ecological dynamics of river systems. For this purpose, we combined the use of SWAT model and Richter et al.’s (1996) methodology to assess the shifting and alteration of the flow regime within the river and streams of the study area. 2) Evaluate the effect of measurable land use changes related to gas development (well-pad placement, access road completion, etc.) on surface water flow in the region (Task/Section 3.7). Results showed that since the upsurge in shale-gas related activities in the Fayetteville Shale Play (between 2006 and 2010), shale-gas related infrastructure in the region have increase by 78%. This change in land-cover in comparison with other land-cover classes such as forest, urban, pasture, agricultural and water indicates the highest rate of change in any land-cover category for the study period. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) flow model of the Little Red River watershed simulated from 2000 to 2009 showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. A forecast scenario based on the assumption that 2010 land-cover does not see any significant change over the forecast period (2010 to 2020) also showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. Further analyses showed that this change in the stream-flow regime for the forecast period is attributable to the increase in land-cover as introduced by the shale-gas infrastructure. 3) Upgrade the Fayetteville Shale Information System to include information on watershed status. (Tasks/Sections 2.1 and 2.2). This development occurred early in the project period, and technological improvements in web-map API’s have made it possible to further improve the map. The current sites (http://lingo.cast.uark.edu) is available but is currently being upgraded to a more modern interface and robust mapping engine using funds outside this project. 4) Incorporate the methodologies developed in Tasks/Sections 3.5 and 3.7 into a Spatial Decision Support System for use by regulatory agencies and producers in the play. The resulting system is available at http://fayshale.cast.uark.edu and is under review the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission.

Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integration of renewable energy sources: reliability-constrained power system planning and operations using computational intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cost, power dispatchability, and environmental impact. For instance, the intermittency of some renewable energy sources may compromise the system reliability when they are integrated into the traditional power grids. Thus, multiple issues should...

Wang, Lingfeng

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

WORK INTEGRATED LEARNING | Case Study One of the more interesting reasons engineering and resources services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Australia, NSW Business Chamber, Tasmanian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and VictorianParsons is a leading provider of professional services to the energy, resource and complex process industries in Australia. It is one of Australia's largest employers of professional engineers and, with employee growth

379

Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation into the feasibility of using SWAT at the sub-basin level for simulating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation the potential for use in agricultural water scarcity management. Keywords: Hydrology, Streamflow, Basin., 2005). A pro-active approach to agricultural water scarcity management needs to take place through

Barthelat, Francois

380

Exploration and Resource Assessment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Using an Integrated Team Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home AFB.

Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Oberholster, S. [USDA Forest Service, Montgomery, AL (United States); Parr, P.; Mann, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Rosensteel, B. [JAYCOR Environmental, Vienna, VA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex.

SINCLAIR, J.C.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

SUGGESTED RESOURCES Career planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.wisi.com/ramainnew.htm) Yahoo! Finance (www.finance.yahoo.com) Resume development Career Resumes (www.career-resumes.com) CRS Resume Service (www.crsresume.com) National Resume Writing Association (www.nraweb.com) Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches (www.parw.com) Professional Resume Writing and Research

Puglisi, Joseph

384

Landscape and Urban Planning 78 (2006) 5070 Room for rivers: An integrative search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for floodplain restoration S. Rohdea,, M. Hostmannb, A. Peterc, K.C. Ewaldd a Swiss Federal Institute for Forest restoration aims to re-establish the ecological integrity of a river ecosystem. However, restoration measures to identify stream systems where present environmental (e.g. natural flow, sufficient bed load material

385

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet), Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputingCollector/Receiver

387

Reducing the Vulnerability of Societies to Water Related Risks at the Basin Scale (Proceedings of the third International Symposium on Integrated Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the third International Symposium on Integrated Water Resources Management, Bochum, Germany, September 2006). IAHS Publ. 317, 2007. 18 Moisture recycling over the Nile basin Y. A. MOHAMED1,2 , B. J. J. M. VAN DEN, water resources system analysis should consider all components of the regional water cycle. Measurements

Haak, Hein

388

An Integrated Web Resource for Cotton Alan R. Gingle,* Hongyu Yang, Peng W. Chee, O. Lloyd May, Junkang Rong, Daryl T. Bowman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Web Resource for Cotton Alan R. Gingle,* Hongyu Yang, Peng W. Chee, O. Lloyd May Cotton Diversity Database'' (http://cotton.agtec.uga.edu) is a Web resource for cotton (Gossypium spp to begin with a cotton accession and obtain all available data. The phenotypic data displays include

Chee, Peng W.

389

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

390

Institutional plan. FY 1997-2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1997-2002 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. Of particular significance this year is the role of computing sciences in supporting a broad range of research activities, at Berkeley Lab in particular and throughout the entire Department of Energy system in general. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s mission and programs and is an element of Department of Energy`s strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (one site is in Area 3 and the other is in Area 5) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV). The current DOE Order governing management of radioactive waste is 435.1. Associated with DOE Order 435.1 is a Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) and Guidance (DOE G 435.1-1). The Manual and Guidance specify that preliminary closure and monitoring plans for a low-level waste (LLW) management facility be developed and initially submitted with the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for that facility. The Manual and Guidance, and the Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued for the Area 3 RWMS further specify that the preliminary closure and monitoring plans be updated within one year following issuance of a DAS. This Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) fulfills both requirements. Additional updates will be conducted every third year hereafter. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring both RWMSs, and is based on guidance issued in 1999 by the DOE for developing closure plans. The plan does not follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance in order to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. The closure and monitoring plans were integrated because much of the information that would be included in individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation and program management. The ICMP identifies the regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment where they are located, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the sites.

S. E. Rawlinson

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

LeRoy Sievers, Agency Legal Counsel Nebraska Department of Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to NRD - Variances #12;Nebraska Water Law #12;LB 962 and Integrated Management Plans Nebraska Water Law #12;LB 962 and Integrated Management Plans Nebraska Water Law Natural Resources Districts worki Ground Reservoir - Location of use - Contract with the owners of the reservoir Intentionally Stored

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

393

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

Ketelle R.H.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Plan for integrated testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] non EQ3/6 data base portion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the Integrated Testing Task are to develop laboratory data on thermodynamic properties for actinide and fission product elements for use in the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling code; to determine the transport properties of radionuclides in the near-field environment; and develop and validate a model to describe the rate of release of radionuclides from the near-field environment. Activities to achieve the firs item have been described in the Scientific Investigation Plan for EQ3/6, where quality assurance levels were assigned to the acitivities. This Scientific Investigation Plan describes activities to achieve the second and third purposes. The information gathered in these activities will be used to assess compliance with the performance objective for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) to control the rate of release of radionuclides if the repository license application includes part of the host rock; to provide a source term for release of radionuclides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in showing compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and to provide a source term for release of radionculides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in doing calculations of cumulative releases of radionuclides from the repository over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process. 5 refs.

Oversby, V.M.

1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan Needs Geothermal Small Hydro or Upgrade Biomass Windwith geothermal, and four with small hydro or upgrades toexpiring geothermal, small hydro, and biomass contracts).

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potential for Energy Efficiency. San Francisco, Calif. :Economics. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. 2007.Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies.

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Potential for Energy Efficiency. San Francisco, Calif. :Economics. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. 2007.Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies.

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 4. Water Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global warming will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply a suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios that could occur over the next century as atmospheric CO2 concentrations reach double the pre-industrial level to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States. In Part 4 we examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the US as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The changes in water yield driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than +/-50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest US. Interannual variability is likely to increase with reduced water yield but decrease with wetter conditions.

Thomson, Allison M.; Brown, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

DOE/NV/11718--449-REV1 INTEGRATED CLOSURE AND MONITORING PLAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement Analysis (SA) for5285

403

Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona, New Jersey:012225°,(EC-LEDS) |

404

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study Volume I.NREL). 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and TransmissionAvista Corporation Wind Integration Study. March. http://

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Environmental and Resource Studies Program/ Department of Geography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential and for the design of appropriate and sustainable soil management and conservation strategies are linked to the health of soils. Proper management and conservation of soil resources ensure the attainment Soil Management Plan: The design of an integrated soil management plan of a finite geographical

Fox, Michael

407

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrated Task Plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, FY 1992 through May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to (1) determine the project's appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups), (2) determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project, (3) complete model and data development, and (4) estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), representative individuals, and special populations as described herein. The plan for FY 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on August 19--20, 1991, and April 23--25, 1992. The activities can be divided into four broad categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2)additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4)technical and communication support.

Shipler, D.B.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Identification of Water Resources Planning Problems in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio and its Associated Counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agencies, river authorities and interest groups in water resources management have evolved into a complicated system in this area. Thus, it was realized that an overview embedded with the systems approach for the current water resources problems is needed...

Garner, J. K.; Shih, C. S.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Strategic Energy Planning Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Attendees will learn about developing a strategic energy plan, identifying key aspects of successful energy planning, and using available information and resources, including archived webinars in...

413

Effective early planning and integration of NEPA into the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers several key challenges and lessons learned in a federal agency assignment to educate the decision makers in NEPA and then to effectuate decisions early in the decision-making process based on the information derived from the NEPA process participants and documentation. Many of the key challenges faced by these federal decision makers stem, in part, from unfamiliarity with NEPA requirements and the benefits that can be derived by utilizing the process to support making an informed decision. Secondly, federal managers, at times believe that the process is a hindrance to accomplishing their mission. Lastly, there was a genuine belief that the public and other organizations within the agency should have no part in evaluating or commenting on the proposed action. Using the knowledge gained from drafting and reviewing EISs and EAs, Booz, Allen devised a systematic process that effectively: educated management on NEPA requirements; developed a management tool to guide and integrate the process; and encouraged the early and effective use of environmental and social information into all decision-making processes.

Hannon, W.C.; Gensler, J.D. (Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

Hutson, N.D.

1992-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon intensity of utilities’ preferred resource portfolios to EIA’s projectionscarbon intensity of the utilities’ preferred portfolios and EIA’s projectioncarbon intensity of the set of utility preferred portfolios and EIA’s projections

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 2001-2005 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd, editors

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Business Plans for Agricultural Producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural resources Z Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities ? and threats (SWOT) Mission statement ? Objectives and goals ? Production plan ? Financial plan ? Market plan ? Legal and liability issues ? Insurance ? Succession and estate planning...

McCorkle, Dean; Bevers, Stan

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

LBNL Institutional Plan, FY 1996--2001. Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1996-2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

423

Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of studies have recently evaluated the opportunities for the large-scale integration of wind energy into the US power system. These studies have included, but are not limited to, "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to US Electricity Supply", the "Western Wind and Solar Integration Study", and the "Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study." Each of these US based studies have evaluated a variety of activities that can be undertaken by utilities to help integrate wind energy.

Jones, Lawrence E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Goeltom, Diana. Debtwatch Indonesia coordinator. PersonalGrant. Republic of Indonesia: Integrated Citarum WaterDevelopment in Jakarta, Indonesia”, Human Development Report

Cavelle, Jenna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Distribution Grid Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

426

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response”, May 2007. LBNL-59975 38the Role of Automated Demand Response, 2010. Watson, D. , N.Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mixed-use at the landscape scale : integrating agriculture and water management as a case study for interdisciplinary planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixed-use planning is now a standard practice in city design and development. It is believed to support diverse and mutually reinforcing elements within a neighborhood. Agricultural landscapes present an analogous opportunity ...

Horne, Christopher (Christopher John)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

California Energy Commission Public Interest EnergyResearch/Energy System Integration -- Transmission-Planning Research&Development Scoping Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Public Interest Energy Research (PIER)scoping project is to identify options for public-interest research and development (R&D) to improve transmission-planning tools, techniques, and methods. The information presented was gathered through a review of current California utility, California Independent System Operator (ISO), and related western states electricity transmission-planning activities and emerging needs. This report presents the project teams findings organized under six topic areas and identifies 17 distinct R&D activities to improve transmission-planning in California and the West. The findings in this report are intended for use, along with other materials, by PIER staff, to facilitate discussions with stakeholders that will ultimately lead to development of a portfolio of transmission-planning R&D activities for the PIER program.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard; Widergren, Steven

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Walkability Planning in Jakarta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated accessibility strategy and design Legibility Integrated activity Shared spaces Strategy 1: Policy Pedestrian planning as constituency buildingIntegrated activity study Inclusive road designation WikiPlaces pedestrian network mapping Vernacular placemaking and Asian shared street design Pedestrian planning as constituency building

Lo, Ria S. Hutabarat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Workforce Planning | One Washington Square | San José of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will make a determination of the type of temporary

Su, Xiao

431

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update, Basedperformed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group and theand in particular, wind generators are the primary resources

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The integrated workstation: A common, consistent link between nuclear plant personnel and plant information and computerized resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing use of computer technology in the US nuclear power industry has greatly expanded the capability to obtain, analyze, and present data about the plant to station personnel. Data concerning a power plant's design, configuration, operational and maintenance histories, and current status, and the information that can be derived from them, provide the link between the plant and plant staff. It is through this information bridge that operations, maintenance and engineering personnel understand and manage plant performance. However, it is necessary to transform the vast quantity of data available from various computer systems and across communications networks into clear, concise, and coherent information. In addition, it is important to organize this information into a consolidated, structured form within an integrated environment so that various users throughout the plant have ready access at their local station to knowledge necessary for their tasks. Thus, integrated workstations are needed to provide the inquired information and proper software tools, in a manner that can be easily understood and used, to the proper users throughout the plant. An effort is underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address this need by developing Integrated Workstation functional requirements and implementing a limited-scale prototype demonstration. The integrated Workstation requirements will define a flexible, expandable computer environment that permits a tailored implementation of workstation capabilities and facilitates future upgrades to add enhanced applications. The functionality to be supported by the integrated workstation and inherent capabilities to be provided by the workstation environment win be described. In addition, general technology areas which are to be addressed in the Integrated Workstation functional requirements will be discussed.

Wood, R.T.; Knee, H.E.; Mullens, J.A.; Munro, J.K. Jr.; Swail, B.K.; Tapp, P.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The integrated workstation: A common, consistent link between nuclear plant personnel and plant information and computerized resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing use of computer technology in the US nuclear power industry has greatly expanded the capability to obtain, analyze, and present data about the plant to station personnel. Data concerning a power plant`s design, configuration, operational and maintenance histories, and current status, and the information that can be derived from them, provide the link between the plant and plant staff. It is through this information bridge that operations, maintenance and engineering personnel understand and manage plant performance. However, it is necessary to transform the vast quantity of data available from various computer systems and across communications networks into clear, concise, and coherent information. In addition, it is important to organize this information into a consolidated, structured form within an integrated environment so that various users throughout the plant have ready access at their local station to knowledge necessary for their tasks. Thus, integrated workstations are needed to provide the inquired information and proper software tools, in a manner that can be easily understood and used, to the proper users throughout the plant. An effort is underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address this need by developing Integrated Workstation functional requirements and implementing a limited-scale prototype demonstration. The integrated Workstation requirements will define a flexible, expandable computer environment that permits a tailored implementation of workstation capabilities and facilitates future upgrades to add enhanced applications. The functionality to be supported by the integrated workstation and inherent capabilities to be provided by the workstation environment win be described. In addition, general technology areas which are to be addressed in the Integrated Workstation functional requirements will be discussed.

Wood, R.T.; Knee, H.E.; Mullens, J.A.; Munro, J.K. Jr.; Swail, B.K.; Tapp, P.A.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Director Human Resources Assoc Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Director ­ Human Resources Assoc Director Workforce Planning & Organisational Change Director) - Organisational change - Workforce planning - Grievance & performance mgt support - Performance management line and not a formal Branch ** Includes Classifications ANU Search Workforce Planning* Remunerations

Botea, Adi

435

RESOURCE INVENTORY AND MONITORING CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of monitoring intensity with program needs · Integration with resource management plans and NEPA documents I and interfaces · GPS applications and data dictionary development · Data quality assurance and control, and data collection technology is used to support this process. Results also can be integrated with GIS

436

An Integrated Grid Portal for Managing Energy Resources Promita Chakraborty, Gabrielle Allen Adam Lewis, Ian Chang-Yen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensor network (WSN) infrastructure to collect and process real- time data from production locations of Louisiana is the Exploration and Production (E&P) of energy resources in the Gulf of Mexico. It is the goal of the oil and gas pro- ducers in Louisiana to develop an economically optimized E&P system based

Allen, Gabrielle

437

Business Model Resources | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Run a Program Getting Started Business Model Resources Business Model Resources Business Models Guide Business Model Planning Resources - Working with Partners Sample Program...

438

Modeling Techniques to Assess Long-term Reliability of Environmental Flows in Basin Scale Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Planning Thesis directed by Edith Zagona One aspect of integrated water resources management of the rivers but management can help sustain the river ecosystem through modifications to reservoir operations be incorporated into the model to capture reservoir operations. Finally, after addressing the integration of new

439

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

OPERATIONAL BUDGET ADJUSTMENTS: FOCUSING RESOURCES TO 2016 AND BEYOND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATIONAL BUDGET ADJUSTMENTS: FOCUSING RESOURCES TO 2016 AND BEYOND EMMA LAKE KENDERDINE CAMPUS. This decision, while difficult, was necessary in a time of budget restraint. In addition to saving budget, in 2008 the Provost's Committee on Integrated Planning (PCIP) began providing an annual

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

Wayne Penrod

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Integrating Long-Term Avian Studies with Planning and Adaptive Management: Department of Energy Lands as a Case Study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term bio-monitoring of avian communities have been initiated, but they often lack a management component. Integration of the managers needs at an early stage is suggested as a means to increase the use of the data. Variation in community structure is important in understanding impacts. In addition, reference site must be carefully selected.

Burger, J.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Review of Variable Generation Integration Charges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of wind and solar generation in the United States, and the expectation of continued growth of these technologies, dictates that the future power system will be operated in a somewhat different manner because of increased variability and uncertainty. A small number of balancing authorities have attempted to determine an 'integration cost' to account for these changes to their current operating practices. Some balancing authorities directly charge wind and solar generators for integration charges, whereas others add integration charges to projected costs of wind and solar in integrated resource plans or in competitive solicitations for generation. This report reviews the balancing authorities that have calculated variable generation integration charges and broadly compares and contrasts the methodologies they used to determine their specific integration charges. The report also profiles each balancing authority and how they derived wind and solar integration charges.

Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Buckley, M.; Rogers, J.; Hodge, B. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Geothermal Resources and Transmission Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project addresses transmission-related barriers to utility-scale deployment of geothermal electric generation technologies.

449

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

451

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Commercial and Industrial Base Intermittent Resource Management Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Renewable Resources: Transmission andhas been the dominant renewable resource in California’sIRR – Integration of Renewable Resources MPM-RRD - Market

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

State Lands Management Plan Rosemary Hill Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources . . . . . . . . . 21. Plans for Non-renewable Natural and Cultural Resources . . . . 22 and Improvements . . . . . . . . . 4. Proximity to Significant Public Resources . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RESOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Resources Listed in the Florida Natural Areas Inventory . . . . 9

Slatton, Clint

455

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 5.0 Systems Integration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety, Codes and Standards Multi-YearMarketPage

458

One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology – routing – water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

RECRUITMENT SEARCH FIRMS HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECRUITMENT SEARCH FIRMS HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINES Workforce Planning | Washington Square, San by the Workforce Planning Unit in Human Resources at SJSU. Process Consistent, defensible processes for evaluating of the recruitment. - At this meeting, the Workforce Planning analyst can provide contact information for search

Su, Xiao

460

Medical Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuringMedical Plans Medical Plans

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated resource plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Strategic Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic Plan The strategic planning process1/7/2010

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Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Action Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................... 19 Smart Grid ............................................................................................. 10 Adequacy of System Integration Services-free generation. The region is increasing its efforts to accomplish conservation through integrated resource

463

EMERGENCY HIRE GUIDELINES HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY HIRE GUIDELINES HUMAN RESOURCES Workforce Planning · One Washington Square · San José, Ca: Workforce Planning; Sr. Workforce Planning Analyst DATE: May 2, 2008 I. PURPOSE / DESCRIPTION The Emergency. B. The Workforce Planning Analyst will work with the hiring manager/HR contact to identify and hire

Su, Xiao

464

SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

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Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and...

466

University of Washington School of Forest Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limited staff and financial resources Opportunities: Where are opportunities facing you; i1 University of Washington School of Forest Resources Communications Plan 2010-2011 6 resource programs in the country, the School of Forest Resources (SFR) provides world class

Borenstein, Elhanan

467

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk Manager 2687 Hospital Quality Assurance 3153 Hospital Clinical Engineering 2954 Human Resources #12;5. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 5.1 General Standard Operating Procedures 5.1.1 General Rules 5

Oliver, Douglas L.

468

Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page INTRODUCTION. Interpretation Defined Project Description. 2 3 THE AGENCY PLAN Mission Statement Park Operations Statement Past, Present, and Future Interpretation. RESOURCE INVENTORY 4 5 5 Flora and Fauna Cultural Resources. Park... Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program t for Lea Plan gl Plan g2 Plan g 3 Plan 44 Plan $5 Plan g6 Plan g7 Plan g8 Plan g9 Plan N10 Plan /11...

Herrick, Tommie L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Abstract This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing energy storage, economics of energy storage technologies, power system planning, renewable integration requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW

470

Clean Energy Resource Teams (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) are community-based groups stemming from a state, university, and nonprofit partnership to encourage community energy planning and clean energy project...

471

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

472

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

473

Workforce planning for reconfiguration and downsizing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office (DOE-AL) to develop a workforce assessment and transition planning tool to support integrated decision making at a single DOE installation. The planning tool permits coordinated, integrated workforce planning to manage growth, decline, or transition within a DOE installation. The tool enhances the links and provides commonality between strategic, programmatic, and operations planners and human resources. Successful development and subsequent scent complex-wide implementation of the model also will facilitate planning at the national level by enforcing a consistent format on data that are now collected by installations in corporate-specific formats that are not amenable to national-level analyses. The workforce assessment and transition planning tool consists of two components: the Workforce Transition Model and the Workforce Budget Constraint Model. The Workforce Transition Model, the preponderant of the two, assists decision makers identify and evaluate alternatives for transitioning the current workforce to meet the skills required to support projected workforce requirements. The Workforce Budget Constraint Model helps estimate the number of personnel that will be effected by a given a workforce budget increase or decrease and assists in identifying how the corresponding hirings or layoffs should be distributed across the COCS occupations.

Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Ross, T.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water resources planning in an era of climate uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water Academy (carpediemwestacademy.org). It reviews and characterizes over 100 extant tools, training resources

Miami, University of

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