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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lighting Group: Controls: Systems Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Integration Building Control Systems Integration Objective This research project investigates how diverse building control systems can be integrated to provide seamless...

2

Performance modeling of daylight integrated photosensor-controlled lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some building energy codes now require the incorporation of daylight into buildings and automatic photosensor-controlled switching or dimming of the electric lighting system in areas that receive daylight. This paper describes enhancements to the open-source ...

Richard G. Mistrick; Craig A. Casey

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Lighting Group: Controls: IBECS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBECS IBECS Integrated Building Environmental Communications System Objective The overall technical goal of the IBECS project is to develop an integrated building equipment communications network that will allow appropriate automation of lighting and envelope systems to increase energy efficiency, improve building performance, and enhance occupant experience in the space. This network will provide a low-cost means for occupants to control local lighting and window systems, thereby improving occupant comfort, satisfaction and performance. A related goal is to improve existing lighting control components and accelerate development of new daylighting technologies that will allow daylighting to be more extensively applied to a larger proportion of building floor space.

4

The design and evaluation of integrated envelope and lighting control strategies for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates control strategies for coordinating the variable solar-optical properties of a dynamic building envelope system with a daylight controlled electric lighting system to reduce electricity consumption and increase comfort in the perimeter zone of commercial buildings. Control strategy design can be based on either simple, instantaneous measured data, or on complex, predictive algorithms that estimate the energy consumption for a selected operating state of the dynamic envelope and lighting system. The potential benefits of optimizing the operation of a dynamic envelope and lighting system are (1) significant reductions in electrical energy end-uses - lighting, and cooling due to solar and lighting heat gains - over that achieved by conventional static envelope and lighting systems, (2) significant reductions in peak demand, and (3) increased occupant visual and thermal comfort. The DOE-2 building energy simulation program was used to model two dynamic envelope and lighting systems, an automated venetian blind and an electrochromic glazing system, and their control strategies under a range of building conditions. The energy performance of simple control strategies are compared to the optimum performance of a theoretical envelope and lighting system to determine the maximum potential benefit of using more complex, predictive control algorithms. Results indicate that (1) predictive control algorithms may significantly increase the energy-efficiency of systems with non-optimal solar-optical properties such as the automated venetian blind, and (2) simpler, non-predictive control strategies may suffice for more advanced envelope systems 1 incorporating spectrally selective, narrow-band electrochromic coatings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corridors. The overall range of savings was six to 80 percent. The Advanced Lighting Guidelines On-Line Edition New Buildings Institute 2011 presents a table of lighting energy...

6

Lighting Group: Controls and Communications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Communications Controls and Communications The Controls and Communications research activity investigates how digital technologies, such as Bluetooth, can be applied to building lighting control systems to increase building efficiency and improve occupant comfort and productivity. Projects range from embedded device networks applied to building lighting systems, to WiFi and environmental sensing and monitoring. light switch Current Projects IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) Wireless Lighting Controls (with DUST Networks) HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Building Control Systems Integration Completed Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects 450 Golden Gate Project New Publications Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Devices: A Role for

7

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Lighting Group: Controls: Wireless Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Controls Wireless Lighting Control System (with DUST Networks) Objective The project objectives are to: 1. Demonstrate that wireless technology can be cost-effectively...

9

Integrated simulation environment for lighting design  

SciTech Connect

Lighting design involves the consideration of multiple performance criteria, from the earliest stages of conceptual design, through various stages of controls and operation in a project's life cycle. These criteria include: (1) the quantitative analysis of illuminance and luminance distribution due to daylighting and electric lighting; (2) qualitative analysis of the lighting design with photometrically accurate renderings of the designed environment; (3) analysis of energy implications of daylighting and electric lighting design and operation;, and (4) analysis of control strategies and sensor placement for maximizing energy savings from lighting control while providing visual comfort. In this paper we describe the development of an integrated decision-making environment that brings together several different tools, and provides the data management and process control required for a multi-criterion support of the design and operation of daylighting and electric lighting systems. The result is a powerful design and decision-making environment to meet the diverse and evolving needs of lighting designers and operators.

Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls.  With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and...

13

Lighting Group: Controls: PIER Lighting Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIER Lighting Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects Objective Lighting controls are often expensive, complex, hard to commission properly and difficult to...

14

AUTOMATIC LIGHT CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for a projection kinescope used in a facsimile scanning system and, in particular, meams for maintaining substantially constant the light emanating from the flying spot on the face of the kinescope are described. In general, the invention provides a feeler member disposed in such a position with respect to a projecting lens as to intercept a portion of the light striking the lens. Suitable circuitry in conjunction with a photomultiplier tube provides a signal proportional to the light intensity of the flying spot. The grid bias on the kinescope is controlled by this signal to maintain the intensity of the spot substantially constant.

Artzt, M.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

15

Integrated simulation environment for lighting design  

SciTech Connect

Lighting design involves the consideration of multiple performance criteria, from the earliest stages of conceptual design, through various stages of controls and operation in a project's life cycle. These criteria include: (1) the quantitative analysis of illuminance and luminance distribution due to daylighting and electric lighting; (2) qualitative analysis of the lighting design with photometrically accurate renderings of the designed environment; (3) analysis of energy implications of daylighting and electric lighting design and operation;, and (4) analysis of control strategies and sensor placement for maximizing energy savings from lighting control while providing visual comfort. In this paper we describe the development of an integrated decision-making environment that brings together several different tools, and provides the data management and process control required for a multi-criterion support of the design and operation of daylighting and electric lighting systems. The result is a powerful design and decision-making environment to meet the diverse and evolving needs of lighting designers and operators.

Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Integrating Sphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Sphere Integrating Sphere integrating sphere Integrating Sphere Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer The integrating sphere is used to quickly measure the total light output of a lamp. The lamp being tested is placed in the center of the integrating sphere. At one side of the sphere is a light meter which measures the light output of the lamp. Between the lamp and the light meter there is a baffle to prevent the meter from seeing any direct light from the lamp. The inside of the sphere (including the baffle) is coated with a very white paint that reflects all wavelengths equally. This allows us to get very accurate measurements. The light from the lamp bounces around the sphere until it reaches the light meter. It is important that nothing else is in the sphere besides the lamp and the

17

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Façade and Dimmable Lighting Control Systems Eleanorand integrated façade and lighting system that operatesof these cases, electric lighting should be controlled to

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

19

A New Digital Lighting Control System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Digital Lighting Control System A New Digital Lighting Control System Speaker(s): Charles Knuffke Date: June 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Francis Rubinstein When various Lighting Controls components are discussed, they're usually slotted into separate "silos" - Occupancy Sensors, Relay Panels, Dimming Controls, and Daylighting Controls. Trying to combine two or more of these into a single system usually requires a fair amount of technical expertise and often help from different manufacturers. Combine that with the need under LEED to get these systems commissioned, often without detailed sequence of operation information, and that helps to explains why many view Lighting Controls as overly complex. And try to integrate the Lighting Controls into a larger overall building management system so their

20

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Typical Lighting Control Applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Adaptive Street Lighting Controls to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components.

22

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Integrated Envelope and Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

25

Distributed Control for Smart Lighting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, we investigate designing a smart lighting system. By extending and enhancing the centralized and distributed control algorithms we try to address the… (more)

Phadke, Swanand Shripad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Path integration for light transport in volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating the transport of light in volumes such as clouds or objects with subsurface scattering is computationally expensive. We describe an approximation to such transport using path integration. Unlike the more commonly used diffusion approximation, ...

Simon Premože; Michael Ashikhmin; Peter Shirley

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Integrated fuses for OLED lighting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An embodiment of the present invention pertains to an electroluminescent lighting device for area illumination. The lighting device is fault tolerant due, in part, to the patterning of one or both of the electrodes into strips, and each of one or more of these strips has a fuse formed on it. The fuses are integrated on the substrate. By using the integrated fuses, the number of external contacts that are used is minimized. The fuse material is deposited using one of the deposition techniques that is used to deposit the thin layers of the electroluminescent lighting device.

Pschenitzka, Florian (San Jose, CA)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Developing integrated envelop and lighting systems for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Integrated envelope and lighting systems achieve significant energy, peak demand, and cost savings over typical component-by-component design practice by leveraging the interactive energy balance between electric lighting energy use and cooling due to lighting and solar radiation. We discuss how these savings can be achieved using conventional glazing and lighting components by taking an integrated systems design approach. We describe integrated dynamic envelope and lighting systems, currently under development, that actively achieve this energy balance through the use of intelligent control systems. We show how prototypical daylighting systems can be used to increase the efficacy and distribution of daylight throughout the space for the same or less glazing area as a typical window, while achieving greater energy savings with increased visual comfort. Energy performance simulations and field tests conducted to date illustrate significant energy savings, peak demand reductions, and potential practical implementation of these proposed systems.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Klems, J.H.; Beltran, L.O.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Sullivan, R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Lighting Controls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use dimmers to save energy and add ambience to a room Check the packages of CFL and LED lightbulbs to see if they are compatible with dimmers Use lighting controls to...

30

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

31

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Task Report to Lighting Systems Research,Berkeley Laboratory, "Lighting Control System Market1980). Task Report to Lighting Systems Research, Lawrence

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Lighting Control Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process Low Standby Power Energy & Cost Savings Calculators Model Acquisitions Language Working Group Resources Technology Deployment Renewable Energy

33

Integrating preconcentrator heat controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the electric resistance heating of a metallic chemical preconcentrator screen, for example, used in portable trace explosives detectors. The length of the heating time-period is automatically adjusted to compensate for any changes in the voltage driving the heating current across the screen, for example, due to gradual discharge or aging of a battery. The total deposited energy in the screen is proportional to the integral over time of the square of the voltage drop across the screen. Since the net temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, of the screen, from beginning to end of the heating pulse, is proportional to the total amount of heat energy deposited in the screen during the heating pulse, then this integral can be calculated in real-time and used to terminate the heating current when a pre-set target value has been reached; thereby providing a consistent and reliable screen temperature rise, .DELTA.T.sub.s, from pulse-to-pulse.

Bouchier, Francis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Arakaki, Lester H. (Edgewood, NM); Varley, Eric S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

34

Lumental : web-based tunable lighting control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamically adjusting the light spectrum of spectrum-tunable light fixtures promises significant energy savings over binary or incremental dimming control. To enable this level of controllability, lighting must evolve from ...

Hall, Harrison King

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lighting ControlsSensors Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Lighting...

36

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Control The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into the harmonization of ZigBee, BACnet-or building automation and control network-and DALI-or digital addressable lighting interface-systems in wireless dimming lighting controls. Four proposed modules will enable "plug-and-play" capabilities for all DALI-compatible controls and BACnet-compatible systems. Project Description This project seeks to develop "plug-and-play" capabilities for lighting as an integrated component of a whole-building control system. Verified Energy, LLC, attempts to demonstrate the benefits of implementing wireless control in dimming applications using plug-and-play principles.

37

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of lighting control technologies continues at rapid rates in efforts to reduce energy usage and improve quality of light and color. Utilities, efficiency engineers, and end users should be aware of emissions and immunity performance of a lighting device before it is accepted for use in incentive and rebate programs prior to deployment in customer facilities. Continuing its efforts in evaluating new lighting control technologies, EPRI, within its Program 170, has tested four lighting control p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

Cole, Jr., Edward I. (Albuquerque, NM); Soden, Jerry M. (Placitas, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Also provided is a portable document format version of How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings. Typical Lighting Control Applications Type of Control Private Office Open Office - Daylit Open Office - Interior Occupancy Sensors ++ ++ ++ Time Scheduling + ++ ++ Daylight Dimming ++ ++ 0 Bi-Level Switching ++ + + Demand Lighting + ++ ++ ++ = good savings potential + = some savings potential 0 = not applicable Back to Top Occupancy Sensors Occupancy sensors are the most common lighting control used in buildings today. Two technologies dominate: infrared and ultrasonic. Infrared sensors

40

BIM-Based Digital Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry has been slow to embrace new technologies and concepts, and electrical installers are largely unfamiliar with digital control technologies. For a lighting controls...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lighting Controls | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

42

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Title Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6171E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fernandes, Luis L., Eleanor S. Lee, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, and Andrew McNeil Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 68 Issue A Pagination 498-514 Date Published 01/2014 Keywords Building energy-efficiency, daylighting, lighting control systems Abstract Digital addressable, dimmable lighting controls were introduced to the US market in the early 2000s with the promise of facilitating capture of potential energy savings with greater flexibility over their historic, typically unreliable, analog counterpart. The New York Times Company installed this emerging technology, after having tested the system thoroughly prior to procurement, in their new building in New York, New York. Four years after full occupancy in 2007, the owner agreed to participate in a post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting system to verify actual performance in the field. Annual lighting energy savings from daylighting, setpoint tuning and occupancy controls were determined for the daylit, open-plan office areas on three typical floors (6, 11, and 20th floors) of the 51-story high-rise tower. Energy savings were calculated from ballast control signal and occupancy data recorded by the manufacturer's lighting control system. The ballast data were calibrated with independent measurements of lighting energy consumption. Savings from dimming controls (daylighting and setpoint tuning) were 12.6 kWh/m2-yr (1.17 kWh/ft2-yr) for the daylit spaces on the three floors overall, or 20%, relative to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Compared to the prescriptive code in effect at the time of the building's construction (ASHRAE 90.1-2001), savings were 21.0 kWh/m2-yr (1.95 kWh/ft2-yr) or 28%. Annual lighting energy use with all lighting control strategies was 33.9 kWh/m2-yr (3.15 kWh/ft2-yr) in the daylit, open plan zones on average for the three floors. A simple payback analysis was conducted.

43

Integrated LED-based luminare for general lighting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting apparatus and methods employing LED light sources are described. The LED light sources are integrated with other components in the form of a luminaire or other general purpose lighting structure. Some of the lighting structures are formed as Parabolic Aluminum Reflector (PAR) luminaires, allowing them to be inserted into conventional sockets. The lighting structures display beneficial operating characteristics, such as efficient operation, high thermal dissipation, high output, and good color mixing.

Dowling, Kevin J.; Lys, Ihor A.; Roberge, Brian; Williamson, Ryan C.; Roberts, Ron; Datta, Michael; Mollnow, Tomas; Morgan, Frederick M.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy saving through effective lighting control  

SciTech Connect

The energy savings associated with various lighting control strategies was investigated at the World Trade Center in New York using a relay-based lighting control system. By reducing after-hours lighting loads to one-third of daytime levels, a 32% energy savings was realized. Combining a very tight lighting schedule with lighting-load shedding in daylit areas reduced energy consumption for lighting 52% relative to baseline operation. The dependency of energy savings on the size of the switching zone was also investigated.

Peterson, D.; Rubinstein, F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for Existing Plants The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was developed for the National Energy Technology...

46

SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that present preliminary concepts for integrating the diverse set of control systems to be used within the subsurface repository facility (Presented in Section 7.3). (5) Develop initial concepts for an overall subsurface data communication system that can be used to integrate critical and data-intensive control systems (Presented in Section 7.4). (6) Discuss technology trends and control system design issues (Presented in Section 7.5).

C.J. Fernado

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy-saving lighting control technologies are valuable tools for reducing the amount of electricity required to deliver sufficient light levels to consumers. Many new lighting controls have been developed in recent years which provide users with a wide variety of features past ON and OFF switching. Such features include but are not limited to: scheduled dimming, lumen sensing, wireless control, demand response, color temperature adjustment, and bi-level dimming.  These features provide ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

49

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Information Resources: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, CA, and Kelly Cunningham of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis discussed their experiences as early adopters of these smart street lighting systems. In Part II, presenters Laura Stuchinsky of the City of San Jose, CA, and Michael Poplawski of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory explored the MSSLC's recently released Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires. Part I: Experiences and Benefits June 11, 2013 View the presentation slides Part II: Reviewing the MSSLC's Model Specification

51

System Compatibility of Modern Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of the energy industry combined with growing economic pressures will drive accelerated use of energy-efficient dimmable lighting devices and control systems. While penetration and application will be different across customer sectors, the goal is to dynamically reduce lighting load without compromising productivity and the quality of light and life in a timely manner. Continual improvement of dimmable devices and controls is paramount to achieving that goal. EPRI research concepts in system com...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Standardization of user interfaces for lighting controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standardization of human-machine interfaces has proved beneficial in a number of technology areas. Lighting control is a home and office technology that is of central importance in energy efficiency and could potentially benefit from standardization, ... Keywords: CIE, Concepts, HVAC, IEANA, IEC, ISO, Indicators, LED, Lighting controls, NEMA, SAE, Standards, Symbols, User interfaces

Bruce Nordman; Jessica Granderson; Kelly Cunningham

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Integrated control system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated control system for use with an engine connected to a generator providing electrical power to a switchgear is disclosed. The engine receives gas produced by a gasifier. The control system includes an electronic controller associated with the gasifier, engine, generator, and switchgear. A gas flow sensor monitors a gas flow from the gasifier to the engine through an engine gas control valve and provides a gas flow signal to the electronic controller. A gas oversupply sensor monitors a gas oversupply from the gasifier and provides an oversupply signal indicative of gas not provided to the engine. A power output sensor monitors a power output of the switchgear and provide a power output signal. The electronic controller changes gas production of the gasifier and the power output rating of the switchgear based on the gas flow signal, the oversupply signal, and the power output signal.

Wang, Paul Sai Keat; Baldwin, Darryl; Kim, Myoungjin

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

54

Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao preference and requirements vary · among individuals · with tasks · with time and age Lighting satisfaction occupants sharing an office? · Ethernet infrastructure How will the energy savings and user satisfaction

Agogino, Alice M.

56

Controlling statistical properties of stored light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical properties of outgoing light pulses are studies after they have been stored in a medium of atoms in the tripod configuration. A generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, storing of squeezed states and homodyne signal analysis are discussed in the context of their dependence on the parameters of the control fields used for light storage and release.

A. Raczynski; K. Slowik; J. Zaremba; S. Zielinska-Kaniasty

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intelligent light control using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals ... Keywords: active sensing, intelligent buildings, light control, sensor networks

Vipul Singhvi; Andreas Krause; Carlos Guestrin; James H. Garrett, Jr.; H. Scott Matthews

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Systems Integration at Kansas City Power and Light Using API and ICCP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application Program Interfaces (API) and the Inter-Control Center Communications Protocol (ICCP) offer tools for integrating utility information systems. This report documents the efforts of Kansas Power & Light (KCPL) to integrate several of its operations systems, including its energy management system (EMS) and distribution management system.

1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced integrated controls for building operations and seeking to validate energy savings strategies by simulations. Project Description This project will develop an advanced, integrated control for the following building systems: Cooling and heating Lighting Ventilation Window and blind operation. A variety of operation and energy saving control strategies will be evaluated on a building equipped with alternative cooling and heating methods, including fan coil units, radiant mullions, and motorized window and blinds. Project Partners Research is being undertaken by DOE, Siemens Corporate Research, Siemens

60

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 20% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years. At 30% market penetration saturation, a cumulative 695 Billion kWh of energy could be saved through 2025, a cost savings of $52 Billion.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated Emissions Control -- Process Review Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of multi-pollutant control processes previously evaluated in EPRI report 1006876, "Integrated Emissions Control -- Process Review."

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sensor Control Unit Light Submitted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing need to conserve energy, more people are becoming conscious of energy consumption and are looking for ways to reduce costly waste associated with electricity. Though most consumers do not think about lighting until the light bulb fails or the power goes out, expenses incurred due to lighting have been found to be a large part of overall energy consumption and lighting has now become the focus of efforts aimed at reducing the high cost of electricity. The purpose of our project is to design an Automatic Light Control Device (ALCD) to help curb the high cost of internal lighting while creating a convenient effortlessly lighted environment for the consumer. Today, energy saving devices, such as occupancy or motion sensors, is used by a multiple of people for the conservation of power. Motion detectors cause lights to turn on after entering the room and off after no movement is detected for a certain amount of time. This unit is efficient; however, energy is loss due to the presence and absence of movement in a particular room by the sensor continuously activating on or off. Unneeded cycling uses more power and defeats the intended purpose of saving energy. The ALCD will save energy by eliminating false conditions, thereby minimizing light

Professor Joseph Picone; Ece Senior Design I; John Thompson; Marshalia Green; Brad Lowe; Lutrisha Johnson; Automatic Light Control Device

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration and cooperation with related industry R&D programs. The LWRS Program provides technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants, utilizing the unique capabilities of the national laboratory system. Sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets

64

GALAXY EVOLUTION FROM 'DIS' INTEGRATED LIGHT  

SciTech Connect

Masking the horizontal branch and giant stars allows unambiguous measurements of mean age and metallicity in simple old stellar populations from metal and hydrogen line strengths. Billion year resolution is possible in the luminous halos of early-type galaxies, constraining formation models. Most of the nuisance parameters in stellar evolution are avoided by isolating the main sequence for analysis. The initial mass function and s-process element diagnostics may also be accessible. Integral field spectrographs have a significant advantage for this work, which is confusion limited by the presence of bright stars in medium to high surface brightness applications.

Mould, Jeremy, E-mail: jmould@swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Integrated lighting approach saves energy in post office facilities  

SciTech Connect

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has made numerous efforts to improve the lighting quality and efficiency in their facilities. These efforts have included both traditional retrofits such as the transition to T8 lamps/electronic ballasts and more experimental approaches such as light pipes and sulfur lamps. However, these efforts have focused primarily on their industrial and plant facilities and have had little impact on their small and medium sized facilities, which comprise roughly 90% of their total building stock. These efforts have also neglected the affinity between task and ambient lighting functions.The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate an integrated lighting system that saves energy while improving the lighting distribution and quality in small and medium sized USPS facilities. Work included the evolution of a novel task lighting fixture designed explicitly to improve the light distribution within the carrier case letter sorting station. The new t ask light system was developed to work in combination with a high efficiency, low-glare ambient lighting system mounted on the ceiling. The use of high-performance task lighting allowed the ambient lighting component to be reduced, thereby limiting the amount of glare produced and reducing the amount of energy consumed.

Mitchell, Jeffrey C.; Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Eric R.; Gauna, Kevin W.; Avery, Douglas A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vehicle Technologies Office: Thermal Control and System Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Control and System Integration The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the...

67

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light...

68

Intelligent Light Control using Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals simultaneously. In this paper, we present a novel utility-based building control strategy that optimizes the tradeo# between meeting user comfort and reduction in operation cost by reducing energy usage. We present an implementation of the proposed approach as an intelligent lighting control strategy that significantly reduces energy cost. Our approach is based on a principled, decision theoretic formulation of the control task. We demonstrate the use of mobile wireless sensor networks to optimize the tradeo # between fulfilling di#erent occupants' light preferences and minimizing energy consumption. We further extend our approach to optimally exploit external light sources for additional energy savings, a process called daylight harvesting. Also we demonstrate that an active sensing approach can maximize the mobile sensor network's lifetime by sensing only during most informative situations. We provide e#cient algorithms for solving the underlying complex optimization problems, and extensively evaluate our proposed approach in a proof-of-concept testbed using MICA2 motes and dimmable lamps. Our results indicate a significant improvement in user utility and reduced energy expenditure.

Vipul Singhvi Civil; Vipul Singhvi; Civil Engineering Dept; James H. Garrett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lighting Control Design | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Design Design Jump to: navigation, search Name Lighting Control & Design Place Glendale, California Zip CA 91201 Product California-based manufacturer of digital lighting controls and software. Coordinates 43.125946°, -87.928409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.125946,"lon":-87.928409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

71

iCheat: a representation for artistic control of indirect cinematic lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thanks to an increase in rendering efficiency, indirect illumination has recently begun to be integrated in cinematic lighting design, an application where physical accuracy is less important than careful control of scene appearance. This paper presents ...

Juraj Obert; Jaroslav K?ivánek; Fabio Pellacini; Daniel Sykora; Sumanta Pattanaik

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Lighting Control Testbeds at the General Services Administration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Testbeds at the General Services Administration: Showing Promise for Lighting Energy Reductions NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab...

73

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the impact of lighting management systems that dynamically control lights in accordance with the needs of occupants. Various control strategies are described: scheduling, tuning, lumen depreciation, and daylighting. From initial experimental results, the energy savings provided by each of the above strategies are estimated to be 26, 12, 14, and 15%, respectively. Based upon a cost of $0.05-0.10 per kWh for electric energy and a 2-, 3-, or 4-yr payback, target costs for a simple and a sophisticated lighting management system are found to be $0.24 and 1.89 per ft{sup 2}, respectively, for a cost-effective investment. A growth model, based upon an extrapolation of the increase in building stock since 1975, indicates that the commercial and industrial (C and I) building stock will grow from 40 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} in 1980 to about 67 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} by the year 2000. Even with the use of more efficient lighting components, the energy required for this additional C and I stock will be 307 x 10{sup 9} kWh, an increase of only 13 x 10{sup 9} kWh above current use. The specified information is used to analyze the economic impacts that using these systems will have on the lighting industry, end users, utility companies, and the nation's economy. A $1 - 4 x 10{sup 9} annual lighting control industry can be generated, creating many jobs. The estimated return on investment (ROI) for controls for end users would be between 19 and 38%. Utilities will be able to make smaller additions to capacity and invest less capital at 7-10% ROI. Finally, the annual energy savings, up to $3.4 x 10{sup 9} for end users and about $5 x 10{sup 9} for utilities, representing unneeded generating capacity, will be available to capitalize other areas of the economy.

Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide a low-energy “standby” light level while another,through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interioruse LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A comprehensive approach to integrated envelope and lighting systems for new commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The authors define a comprehensive approach to integrated envelope and lighting systems design as one that balances energy efficiency with an equal regard to the resultant environmental quality. By integrating envelope components (glazing, shading, and daylighting), lighting components (fixtures and controls) and building HVAC/energy management control systems, they create building systems that have the potential to achieve significant decreases in electricity consumption and peak demand while satisfying occupant physiological and psychological concerns. This paper presents results on the development, implementation, and demonstration of two specific integrated envelope and lighting systems: (1) a system emphasizing dynamic envelope components and responsive electric lighting systems, that offer the potential to achieve energy efficiency goals and a near optimum comfort environment throughout the year by adapting to meteorological conditions and occupant preferences in real time, and (2) perimeter daylighting systems that increase the depth of daylight penetration from sidelight windows and improves visual comfort with the use of a small inlet aperture. The energy performance of the systems was estimated using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Field tests with reduced scale models were conducted to determine daylighting and thermal performance in real time under actual weather conditions. Demonstrations of these integrated systems are being planned or are in progress in collaboration with utility programs to resolve real-world implementation issues under complex site, building, and cost constraints. Results indicate that integrated systems offer solutions that not only achieve significant peak demand reductions but also realize consistent energy savings with added occupant comfort and satisfaction.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Klems, J.H.; Beltran, L.O.; DiBartolomeo, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Building Technologies Program

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Innovative Lighting-Control and Demand-Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI technical update continues the technical assessment of modern lighting-control and demand-response (DR) systems in the following product areas: programmable timer switches, scalable lighting-control systems, Zigbee-based add-on control systems, and Z-Wave–based lighting controllers. This research helps to demonstrate that there is a wide variety of advanced lighting controls entering the marketplace each year, and it describes how they respond to a range of DR and power-quality ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Program Plan Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas- emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow by more than 30% from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license, for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power

78

Power reduction control for inductive lighting installation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for continuously, selectively reducing power consumption in an inductive lighting installation energized from an A.C. power source, the installation including at least one gas discharge lamp such as a fluorescent lamp energized through any of a plurality of different types of electromagnetic ballast having different harmonic distortion characteristics, the control system is described comprising: load energizing circuit means, including a signal-actuated normally-closed primary switch, for connecting an A.C. power source to the lighting installation; a signal-actuated, normally-open secondary switch connected in parallel with the lighting installation; actuation means for generating actuation signals and applying such actuation signals to the primary and secondary switches to actuate the primary switch open and to actuate the secondary switch closed in approximate time coincidence in each half-cycle of the A.C. power; zero-crossing detector means for generating zero-crossing signals at times TX indicative of zero-voltage transitions in the A.C. power; and program means, connected to the zero-crossing detector means and to the actuation means, programming the actuation means to generate (a) power reduction actuation signals at times T1 and T2 in each half-cycle of the A.C. power, (b) a first filter actuation signal at a time T3 prior to each zero-crossing time TX, and (c) a second filter actuation signal at a time T4 following each zero-crossing time TX; the program means including a plurality of programs each establishing a set of times T1, T2, T3 and T4 for several different power reduction levels for a particular type of ballast; and selection means for selecting a program to match the ballast type of the load.

Falk, K.R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

A living laboratory study in personalized automated lighting controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an experimental case study of personalized lighting controls built on top of an infrastructure designed to enable rapid development of applications in commercial buildings. Our personalized lighting controls (PLC) use an existing standard ... Keywords: energy management, lighting controls, web interface

Andrew Krioukov; Stephen Dawson-Haggerty; Linda Lee; Omar Rehmane; David Culler

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Bülent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Integrated envelope and lighting systems for commercial buildings: a retrospective  

SciTech Connect

Daylighting systems in use world-wide rarely capture the energy-savings predicted by simulation tools and that we believe are achievable in real buildings. One of the primary reasons for this is that window and lighting systems are not designed and operated as an integrated system. Our efforts over the last five years have been targeted toward (1) development and testing of new prototype systems that involve a higher degree of systems integration than has been typical in the past, and (2) addressing current design and technological barriers that are often missed with component-oriented research. We summarize the results from this body of cross-disciplinary research and discuss its effects on the existing and future practice of daylighting in commercial buildings.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reviewing the role of photosensors in lighting control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of innovative technologies of automatic control in lighting systems gains daily the interest of engineers, constructors and users. The main purpose of these applications is the energy savings. Daylight control is a form of automatic control ... Keywords: daylight, lighting controls, photosensor

L. Doulos; A. Tsangrassoulis; F. V. Topalis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Intelligent lighting control principles. Report for oct 78-apr 79  

SciTech Connect

It is generally recognized that compared to illumination from ceiling-mounted electric lighting, an equal amount of daylight illumination from windows can be about three times more effective in producing visibility. If this is true, then visibility-based lighting controls will result in greater energy conservation than will illumination-based lighting controls. A mathematical technique has been developed suitable for an intelligent microprocessor-based equi-visibility lighting control system. In an example room, a computer simulation compares the energy consumption for on-off, high-low-off, equi-illumination, and equi-visibility lighting controls systems.

Pierpoint, W.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Vehicle Technologies Office: Thermal Control and System Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Control and System Integration to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Thermal Control and System Integration on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies...

88

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

89

Section 5.4.4 Lighting Controls: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dimming ballasts can lower the lighting power to as little as 1-10%, depending on the ballast type. Ev- ery time the lights are dimmed, energy is saved. DAYLIGHT CONTROLS...

90

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

91

Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predictive Demand Response Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into integrated predictive demand response (IPDR) controllers. The project team will attempt to design an IPDR controller so that it can be used in new or existing buildings or in collections of buildings. In the case of collections of buildings, they may be colocated on a single campus or remotely located as long as they are served by a single utility or independent service operator. Project Description This project seeks to perform the necessary applied research, development, and testing to provide a communications interface using industry standard open protocols and emerging National Institute of Standards and Technology

92

Integrated Safety Management (ISM) - Work Planning and Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Planning and Control Integrated Safety Management (ISM) ism logo NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes - January 2006...

93

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

94

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode… (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On the calibration and commissioning of lighting controls  

SciTech Connect

Lighting controls have the potential to capture significant energy savings in commercial buildings if properly specified, installed, commissioned and maintained. Proper commissioning is often absent in lighting projects and the lack of commissioning can significantly reduce a project`s energy savings potential. The paper focuses on the importance of good commissioning practice for obtaining satisfactory performance from lighting control systems and discusses the difficulties of commissioning today`s systems. Some practical suggestions for commissioning lighting controls is offered as well as advice to specifiers and early adopters to aid them in selecting controls that are most appropriate to their requirements.

Rubinstein, F.; Avery, D.; Jennings, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Blanc, S. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States). Customer Energy Management Dept.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions...

97

Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of… (more)

Royal, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results. Final report, July 1991  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Dynamic Electron Control using Light and Nanostructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The advent of nano-technology has made possible the manipulation of electron or light through nanostructures. For example, a nano-tip in near-field optical microscopy allows imaging… (more)

Huang, Cheng-Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) Speaker(s): Bernie Kotlier Date: March 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote CALCTP is a broad based partnership that is dedicated to advancing the California State policy of energy conservation as the first priority for serving the state's future energy needs. CALCTP is supported, operated and directed by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, the California Energy Commission, the California Community College system, investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high efficiency lighting and lighting control systems. The mission of the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP) is to make

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. ” Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template – Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

103

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

104

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

List of Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Incentives Sensors Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 493 Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 493) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit

106

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depreciation, and Daylighting This control system is moresystem can provide (scheduling, lumen depre- ciation, tuning, daylighting), andSystem Performance Scheduling Lumen Maintenance Tuning Daylighting

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a simple energy management system (scheduling strategy)that all new energy management systems will employ all fourpresented on energy management systems, control strategies,

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Face equipment lighting: integrated vs. add-on  

SciTech Connect

The problems of providing lighting on face equipment are examined. In the US, some equipment manufacturers are building-in lighting systems to their machinery; others will install lighting systems as add-on or retrofitted items. The pros and cons of each method are examined and the views of manufacturers are quoted.

Scott, F.E.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as ��a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilities��. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

None

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Dragan...

111

Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed.

Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

CVG-venalum Potline Control and Supervisory Integrated System ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfill these targets, CVG-Venalum developed an aluminum reduction pot control and supervisory integrated system (VEN-PCSIS). The central control unit of ...

113

Continuous Controls: Lighting Energy Management for Retrofit and New Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rising interest of specifiers and end-users in Lighting Energy Management (LEM) control equipment has led to an increased need for further education in the selection, capabilities and applications of such equipment. This paper addresses these and related points for a particular type of LEM equipment referred to as "continuous controls." More specifically, the need for such equipment and its performance are reviewed. The remainder of the paper discusses the capabilities and applications of continuous control equipment for retrofit and new construction projects. Particular attention is drawn to the need for specifiers and end-users to become more control conscious as continuous controls become more fully integrated into building design.

Schuett, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Light control of the flow of phototactic microswimmer suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some micro-algae are sensitive to light intensity gradients. This property is known as phototaxis: the algae swim toward a light source (positive phototaxis). We use this property to control the motion of micro-algae within a Poiseuille flow using light. The combination of flow vorticity and phototaxis results in a concentration of algae around the center of the flow. Intermittent light exposure allows analysis of the dynamics of this phenomenon and its reversibility. With this phenomenon, we hope to pave the way toward new algae concentration techniques (a bottleneck challenge in hydrogen algal production) and toward the improvement of pollutant bio-detector technology.

Xabel Garcia; Salima Rafaď; Philippe Peyla

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, and Francis M. Rubinstein Pagination 14 Date Published May Publisher LBNL-5895E Abstract Lighting has the largest estimated technical potential for energy savings of any U.S. building end-use. A significant fraction of that potential is believed to lie in lighting system controls. While controls are incorporated in national model building codes, their adoption and enforcement are spotty, and controls have been largely ignored in energy efficiency standards, leaving much potential untapped. The development of sound energy policy with respect to lighting controls depends on improved quantification of potential savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years, but results vary widely. This meta-analysis of energy savings potential used 240 savings estimates from 88 published sources, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy-based strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an average of savings estimates based on the entire literature, this research added successive analytical filters to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. We obtained relatively robust final estimates of average savings: 24% for occupancy, 28% for daylighting, 31% for personal tuning, 36% for institutional tuning, and 38% for combined approaches. Using these data and estimates of current and full penetration of controls, we calculated national energy savings potential on the order of 19%.

118

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

119

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light. However, it has been unclear whether similar optical control schemes could be used to modify how x rays interact with matter. In a dramatic breakthrough demonstration at the ALS, a Berkeley Lab-Argonne National Laboratory group has now used powerful visible-light lasers to render a nominally opaque material transparent to x rays. While x-ray transparency will have immediate applications at x-ray light sources, the important result is that the findings lay a foundation for a broader spectrum of applications.

120

AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to use existing simulation tools to quantify the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings. An EnergyPlus medium office benchmark simulation model (V1.0_3.0) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) was used as a baseline model for this study. The baseline model was modified to examine the energy savings benefits of three possible control strategies compared to a benchmark case across 16 DOE climate zones. Two controllable subsystems were examined: (1) dimming of electric lighting, and (2) controllable window transmission. Simulation cases were run in EnergyPlus V3.0.0 for building window-to-wall ratios (WWR) of 33percent and 66percent. All three strategies employed electric lighting dimming resulting in lighting energy savings in building perimeter zones ranging from 64percent to 84percent. Integrated control of electric lighting and window transmission resulted in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) energy savings ranging from ?1percent to 40percent. Control of electric lighting and window transmission with HVAC integration (seasonal schedule of window transmission control) resulted in HVAC energy savings ranging from 3percent to 43percent. HVAC energy savings decreased moving from warm climates to cold climates and increased when moving from humid, to dry, to marine climates.

Hong, T.; Shen, E.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPGâ??s program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPGâ??s high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are at par with the standard diffuser sheets used by OLED manufacturers. For an internal extraction layer (IEL), PPG tested two concepts combining nanoparticles either in a solgel coating inserted between the anode and OLED or anode and glass interface, or incorporated into the internal surface of the glass. Efficacy enhancements of 1.31x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for the IEL by itself and factors of 1.73x were attained for an IEL in combination of thick acrylic block as an EEL. Recent offline measurements indicate that, with further optimization, factors over 2.0x could be achieved through an IEL alone.

Scott Benton; Abhinav Bhandari

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cliffside 6 integrated emissions control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article takes an inside look into the environmental hardware going into one of the highest profile coal-fired power plants projects in the US, a new 800 MW supercritical coal-fired facility at Cliffside, NC, Unit C6. This is currently under construction and scheduled to be in commercial service in 2012. To evaluate the alternative air quality control system (AQCS) options, Duke Energy established a cross-functional team and used a decision analysis process to select the 'best balanced choice'. Alstom's integrated AQCS which combines dry and wet flue gas desulfurization systems was the best balanced choice. Replacing an ESP with a spray dryer absorber achieved major cost savings and eliminated the need for wastewater treatment. 1 ref., 2 photos.

McGinnis, D.G.; Rader, P.C.; Gansley, R.R.; Wang, W. [Duke Energy, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

New lighting and controls to save 67% at mall  

SciTech Connect

A metal halide lighting system and a Staco control system that dims lighting in response to sunlight should save a Dallas hotel and office mall 67% in electricity costs. The new system replaces quartz lamps in the 160-foot-high atrium. The savings are a combination of state tax credits and lower air conditioning costs, which will pay for the $25,000 project in about 18 months. The metal halide system was chosen over sodium lighting in order to have more attractive color rendition and because it provides about twice as many lumens per watt as the quartz lamps. The Staco system will dim lamps in response to outdoor light and turn lights above a skating rink on and off at prescribed times.

Kennedy, K.

1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

High-frequency Light Reflector via Low-frequency Light Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the momentum of light can be reversed via the atomic coherence created by another light with one or two orders of magnitude lower frequency. Both the backward retrieval of single photons from a time-ordered Dicke state and the reflection of continuous waves by high-order photonic band gaps are analyzed. A proof-of-principle experiment with thermal Rb vapor is proposed based on presently available techniques. This holds promise for X-ray reflectors controlled by low-frequency light.

Wang, Da-Wei; Evers, Joerg; Scully, Marlan O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Documentation of the Irvine Integrated Corridor Freeway Ramp Metering and Arterial Adaptive Control Field Operational Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control FieldIntegrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control FieldTest Plan," Integrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control

McNally, M. G.; Moore, II, James E.; MacCarley, C. Arthur

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Integrated Inverter Control for Multiple Electric Machines  

engine volume to house them all. To improve options for motor design, ORNL researchers invented an integrated

129

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Integrated Building Energy and Control Systems: Challenges, Needs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD Safety Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Integrated Building Energy and Control Systems: Challenges, Needs and Opportunities Speaker(s):...

131

Integrated Forecasting and Inventory Control for Seasonal Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2008 ... Abstract: We present a data-driven forecasting technique with integrated inventory control for seasonal data and compare it to the traditional ...

132

Multi-intersection Traffic Light Control Using Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the traffic light control problem for multiple intersections in tandem by viewing it as a stochastic hybrid system and developing a Stochastic Flow Model (SFM) for it. Using Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis (IPA), we derive on-line gradient estimates of a cost metric with respect to the controllable green and red cycle lengths. The IPA estimators obtained require counting traffic light switchings and estimating car flow rates only when specific events occur. The estimators are used to iteratively adjust light cycle lengths to improve performance and, in conjunction with a standard gradient-based algorithm, to obtain optimal values which adapt to changing traffic conditions. Simulation results are included to illustrate the approach.

Geng, Yanfeng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Self-Assembly Strategies for Integrating Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In natural photosynthesis, organisms optimize solar energy conversion through organized assemblies of photofunctional chromophores and catalysts within proteins that provide specifically tailored environments for chemical reactions. As with their natural counterparts, artificial photosynthetic systems for practical solar fuels production must collect light energy, separate charge, and transport charge to catalytic sites where multielectron redox processes will occur. While encouraging progress has been made on each aspect of this complex problem, researchers have not yet developed self-ordering and self-assembling components and the tailored environments necessary to realize a fully-functional artificial system. Previously researchers have used complex, covalent molecular systems comprised of chromophores, electron donors, and electron acceptors to mimic both the light-harvesting and the charge separation functions of photosynthetic proteins. These systems allow for study of the dependencies of electron transfer rate constants on donor?acceptor distance and orientation, electronic interaction, and the free energy of the reaction. The most useful and informative systems are those in which structural constraints control both the distance and the orientation between the electron donors and acceptors. Self-assembly provides a facile means for organizing large numbers of molecules into supramolecular structures that can bridge length scales from nanometers to macroscopic dimensions. The resulting structures must provide pathways for migration of light excitation energy among antenna chromophores, and from antennas to reaction centers. They also must incorporate charge conduits, that is, molecular 'wires' that can efficiently move electrons and holes between reaction centers and catalytic sites. The central scientific challenge is to develop small, functional building blocks with a minimum number of covalent linkages, which also have the appropriate molecular recognition properties to facilitate self-assembly of complete, functional artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we explore how self-assembly strategies involving ?-stacking can be used to integrate light harvesting with charge separation and transport.

Wasielewski, Michael R. (NWU)

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies Program: hotel guest room energy controls. Sanhotel and institutional bathroom lighting. [CEC] California Energy

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Integrated environmental control and monitoring in the intelligent workplace. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project involved the design and engineering of the control and monitoring of environmental quality - visual, thermal, air - in the Intelligent Workplace. The research objectives were to study the performance of the individual systems, to study the integration issues related to each system, to develop a control plan, and to implement and test the integrated systems in a real setting. In this project, a control strategy with related algorithms for distributed sensors, actuators, and controllers for negotiating central and individual control of HVAC, lighting, and enclosure was developed in order to maximize user comfort, and energy and environmental effectiveness. The goal of the control system design in the Intelligent Workplace is the integration of building systems for optimization of occupant satisfaction, organizational flexibility, energy efficiency and environmental effectiveness. The task of designing this control system involves not only the research, development and demonstration of state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems, but also their integration. The ABSIC research team developed functional requirements for the environmental systems considering the needs of both facility manager and the user. There are three levels of control for the environmental systems: scheduled control, sensor control, and user control. The challenges are to achieve the highest possible levels of energy effectiveness simultaneously with the highest levels of user satisfaction. The report describes the components of each system, their implementation in the Intelligent Workplace and related control and monitoring issues.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chip-Scale Power Conversion for LED Lighting: Integrated Power Chip Converter for Solid-State Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: Teledyne is developing cost-effective power drivers for energy-efficient LED lights that fit on a compact chip. These power drivers are important because they transmit power throughout the LED device. Traditional LED driver components waste energy and don't last as long as the LED itself. They are also large and bulky, so they must be assembled onto a circuit board separately which increases the overall manufacturing cost of the LED light. Teledyne is shrinking the size and improving the efficiency of its LED driver components by using thin layers of an iron magnetic alloy and new gallium nitride on silicon devices. Smaller, more efficient components will enable the drivers to be integrated on a single chip, reducing costs. The new semiconductors in Teledyne's drivers can also handle higher levels of power and last longer without sacrificing efficiency. Initial applications for Teledyne's LED power drivers include refrigerated grocery display cases and retail lighting.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings Title The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-2514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Dmitriy Bolotov, Mark S. Levi, Kevin Powell, and P. Schwartz Conference Name 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Volume 78 Call Number LBNL-2514E Abstract A dual-cathode arc plasma source was combined with a computer-controlled bias amplifier such as to synchronize substrate bias with the pulsed production of plasma. In this way, bias can be applied in a material-selective way. The principle has been applied to the synthesis metal-doped diamond-like carbon films, where the bias was applied and adjusted when the carbon plasma was condensing, and the substrate was at ground when the metal was incorporated. In doing so, excessive sputtering by too-energetic metal ions can be avoided while the sp3/sp2 ratio can be adjusted. It is shown that the resistivity of the film can be tuned by this species-selective bias. The principle can be extended to multiple-material plasma sources and complex materials.

139

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 4.5 Integrated Classroom Lighting System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting system must be flexible and able to adjust to different daylight conditions. Adding automated levels based on the amount of daylight in the classroom. The system should use a separate switch for each the ICLS that was developed in Project 4.5. - Luminaires: i. An indirect luminaire with an optical system

140

Lighting professionals have long struggled with ensuring proper integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and metrics, 4th VELUX Daylight Symposium, 2011, Lausanne Abstract Complex fenestration systems composed systems. These measurements indicate how much and in what direction the daylight flux is redirected illuminances, glare risks calculations, daylighting autonomy and advanced user control of the rendering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Incoherent light as a control resource: a route to complete controllability of quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the use of incoherent light as a resource to control the atomic dynamics and review the proposed in Phys. Rev. A 84, 042106 (2011) method for a controlled transfer between any pure and mixed states of quantum systems using a combination of incoherent and coherent light. Formally, the method provides a constructive proof for an approximate open-loop Markovian state-transfer controllability of quantum system in the space of all density matrices---the strongest possible degree of quantum state control.

Alexander Pechen

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Active Power Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Power Controls Active Power Controls NREL has teamed with the Electric Power Research Institute, the Colorado School of Mines, the University of Colorado, and other industry members to research the potential of wind turbines and power plants to provide active power control (also known as real power or frequency control) to the electric power system. Under this multiyear project, researchers will perform simulations and field tests at the National Wind Technology Center to analyze system benefits and impacts on the operations of wind turbines and the electric power system. The project considers five topics: Steady state and economics Dynamic interconnection stability Controls design and simulation Controls testing and loads and structural impacts Dissemination of results.

145

Integrated Inverter Control for Multiple Electric Machines ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27 ... control for directing multiple inverters with a single ... 57, 62), which may include a three-phase main ...

146

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

147

Status of Integrated Emission Control Process Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants.

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of standards. WILA’s ergonomic lighting forms the basis forachievement with motivating and health enhancing lighting.We create professional lighting for professionals. DALI

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Integration of Asset Information into Control Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the 2012 results of a multi-year R&D project, the long-term goal of which is to facilitate the development and integration of information, communication, and visualization analytics and tools that leverage the state-of-the-art equipment sensor technologies, in order to provide grid operators real-time information on key pieces of transmission equipment across the power system of interest. In recent years, transmission operators have expressed keen interest in having such ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Control-flow integrity principles, implementations, and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current software attacks often build on exploits that subvert machine-code execution. The enforcement of a basic safety property, control-flow integrity (CFI), can prevent such attacks from arbitrarily controlling program behavior. CFI enforcement is ... Keywords: Binary rewriting, control-flow graph, inlined reference monitors, vulnerabilities

Martín Abadi; Mihai Budiu; Úlfar Erlingsson; Jay Ligatti

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Integrated System Of White Led Visible-Light Communication And Power-Line Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White LEDs offer advantageous properties such as high brightness, reliability, lower power consumption and long lifetime. The biggest potential application for white LEDs will be general illumination and lighting. Indoor wireless optical communication systems employing white LED lighting have been proposed. This system will enable high QoS by the high power from this lighting equipment. But, it is difficult for existing offices communication using existing power-line is proposed. This system is emitted as visible-light from LED lighting according to the transmitted signal waveform without demodulating the signal from the power-line. This system is expected to be applicable from the existing illuminant easily like exchanging electric bulbs. This integrated system will surely have a big impact as a new signal transmission system and its economical effect will be great. The basic performance of this system is analyzed. The actual system is built and its feasibility is shown through experiments.

Toshihiko Komine; Masao Nakagawa

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If you could change the lighting in your office, what wouldapply. Highly-Controlled Lighting 50 of 50 April 19, 2010Europa 2009, 11th European Lighting Conference, Istanbul,

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Integrated Language Approach to Simulation and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winning,D.J. Davie,H. Siebert,J.P. Grant,N.F. Aitken,K.H. IEE Fourth International Conference on Trends in On-Line Computer Control, 1982, University of Warwick, England.

Winning, D.J.; Davie, H.; Siebert, J.P.

154

Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs.

Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Why Agencies Should Buy Efficient Products s Executive Order 13123 and FAR section 23.704 direct agencies to purchase products in the upper 25% of energy efficiency, including all models that qualify for the EPA/DOE ENERGY STAR ® product labeling program. s Agencies that use these guidelines to buy efficient products can realize substantial operating cost savings and help prevent pollution. s As the world's largest consumer, the federal government can help "pull" the entire U.S. market towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions Daylight dimming employs sensors that detect ambient light levels and then allow ballasts to

156

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving  

SciTech Connect

we developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource Uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplaceâ??s northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance were measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building occupants and the building operator. Lifecycle cost analyses of the advanced building control were performed, and a Building Control System Guide was prepared and published to inform owners, architects, and engineers dealing with new construction or renovation of buildings.

Dr. Zhen Song, Prof. Vivian Loftness, Dr. Kun Ji, Dr. Sam Zheng, Mr. Bertrand Lasternas, Ms. Flore Marion, Mr. Yuebin Yu

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Field Buses Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications Prepared By: Ed Koch, Akua Controls Francis Rubinstein, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared For: Broadata Communications Torrence, CA May 15, 2005 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name,

158

Light Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals Using Azoxy-Based Host Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% ZhK-440 and 25% ZLI-2011. Light Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals 129 #12;cholesteric systemsLight Control of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals Using Azoxy-Based Host Materials G. Chilaya A, Swarthmore, PA, USA The characteristics of cholesteric liquid crystals can be controlled by light irradiation

Collings, Peter

159

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Vehicle Technologies Office: Thermal Control and System Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Control and System Integration Thermal Control and System Integration The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies. Thermal control is a critical element to enable power density, cost, and reliability of Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM). Current hybrid electric vehicle systems typically use a dedicated 65°C coolant loop to cool the electronics and electric machines. A primary research focus is to develop cooling technologies that will enable the use of coolant temperatures of up to 105°C. Enabling the higher-temperature coolant would reduce system cost by using a single loop to cool the PEEM, internal combustion engine or fuel cell. Several candidate cooling technologies are being investigated along with the potential to reduce material and component costs through the use of more aggressive cooling. Advanced component modeling, fabrication, and manufacturing techniques are also being investigated.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Integrated optics for astronomical interferometry. II. First laboratory white-light interferograms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report first white-light interferograms obtained with an integrated optics beam combiner on a glass plate. These results demonstrate the feasability of single-mode interferometric beam combination with integrated optics technology presented and discussed in paper I. The demonstration is achieved in laboratory with off-the-shelves components coming from micro-sensor applications, not optimized for astronomical use. These two-telescope beam combiners made by ion exchange technique on glass substrate provide laboratory white-light interferograms simultaneously with photometric calibration. A dedicated interferometric workbench using optical fibers is set up to characterize these devices. Despite the rather low match of the component parameters to astronomical constraints, we obtain stable contrasts higher than 93% with a 1.54-\\micron laser source and up to 78% with a white-light source in the astronomical H band. Global throughput of 27% for a potassium ion exchange beam combiner and of 43% for a silver one are reached. This work validates our approach for combining several stellar beams of a long baseline interferometer with integrated optics components.

J. -P. Berger; K. Rousselet-Perraut; P. Kern; F. Malbet; I. Schanen-Duport; F. Reynaud; P. Haguenauer; P. Benech

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm climates such as Florida, it has become common practice in windowed spaces to specify blinds and glazing with high shading coefficients to control glare and minimize heat gain. However, this practice reduces the effectiveness of lighting systems that dim automatically. Improved systems are needed to capture natural daylight and distribute it uniformly throughout a space while controlling heat gain and glare. One such system is the light shelf. Light shelves shade the space from direct sunlight and reflect this sunlight onto the ceiling for a deeper and more uniform distribution. While this is not a new idea, little unbiased empirical data has been collected, outside the laboratory, that compares the performance (energy savings, uniformity, and level) of an automatic daylighting system. This study measures the effectiveness of light shelves and manually controlled horizontal blinds in an automatic daylighting system. Power consumption and interior work-plane lighting levels were compared in four essentially identical private offices. Two offices were configured with an interior light shelf, one with a white diffuse top surface and the other with a specular surface. The third office had no window treatment and the fourth office had horizontal blinds, which were manually adjusted by the user. All offices had two lamp fluorescent luminaires with dimming ballasts (min. 20%) controlled by a ceiling mounted photosensor. The study showed that daytime savings ranged from 29% to 46%, with the largest savings from the office with the light shelves. The office with horizontal blinds showed the poor savings (32%) and also the poorest light uniformity and level.

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 3.3 Classroom Photocell and Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a prototype of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control of an advanced daylighting control system for classrooms. This system integrated dimming control with On the concept of an advanced daylighting control system. #12;Deliverable 3.3.15 Final Report TWS

165

INTEGRATED DESIGN AND CONTROL OF HEAT EXCHANGER NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATED DESIGN AND CONTROL OF HEAT EXCHANGER NETWORKS #12; by Knut Wiig Mathisen A Thesis examples in their research attitudes. Truls also introduced me to heat exchanger networks, and has been have worked closely together with John Ulvøy on a paper on heat exchanger network synthesis

Skogestad, Sigurd

166

Medical Image Integrity Control Combining Digital Signature and Lossless Watermarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Image Integrity Control Combining Digital Signature and Lossless Watermarking W. Pan1,3 , G protection of medical content becomes a major issue of computer security. Since medical contents are more proposed as a com- plementary mechanism for medical data protection. In this paper, we focus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Integrative path planning and motion control for handling large components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For handling large components a large workspace and high precision are required. In order to simplify the path planning for automated handling systems, this task can be divided into global, regional and local motions. Accordingly, different types of ... Keywords: integrative production, motion control, path planning, robotic assembly application

Rainer Müller; Martin Esser; Markus Janssen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integration of building envelope and services via control technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade offered the foundation of several seminal concepts, which although natively composite and complex, amply demonstrate the potential of 21st century technology to affect important societal trends. Among notable candidates, the convergence ... Keywords: A/V ratio, EIB- KONNEX technology, bioclimatic architecture, bits, building envelope, building facades, bytes, communication protocols, control technologies, data telegram, integration, power line technology, services

Chris J. Koinakis; John K. Sakellaris

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and produced a maximum demand reduction Proceedings of the 41st Hawaii International Conference on SystemAn Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control Michael LeMay, Rajesh,gross,cgunter}@uiuc.edu Abstract In the competitive electricity structure, demand re- sponse programs

Gross, George

170

Integration of fluctuating energy by electricity price control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of fluctuating energy by electricity price control Master Thesis Olivier Corradi can be activated by means of a varying electricity price. We will focus on the appliances that offer results in a price that may be characterised as the market price of electricity in the Nordic countries

171

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

172

Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires, V1.0 on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Model Specification for Adaptive Control

173

Research report of street lighting controls for the City of Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report examines various types of lighting controls for roadways these needs. Three types of control were explored: (1) ''Solid State ''Photocontrols; (2) Photocontrols with Partial Night Turn-off features; and (3) Variable Lighting Controls.

Qualmann, W.

1985-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, lighting Abstract The paper presents...

175

The California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

176

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

177

Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices: A Role for IEEE P1451  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controller Controller sensor actuator sensor sensor actuator actuator Building equipment Building equipment Building equipment Environmental Variables: Temperature Light Airflow Occupancy CO 2 É Fire É Figure 1. Shown is a generic diagram of the relationship between controller, actuators and sensors in a typical building control application. Sensors detect the key environmental parameters, while the controller "decides" which actuator is to be controlled and how. The actuators operate the building equipment, which, in turn affects the building environment. The physical connection between controller and actuator and controller and sensor usually takes place over wires carrying an analog signal. Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices A Role for IEEE P1451

178

Design of a Personalized Lighting Control System Enabled by a Space Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on a research effort to develop a prototype of a personalized lighting control system that adjusts the visual environment based on user preferences. Lighting controllers query a space model to retrieve lighting objects that are near given user locations and map user preferences into control actions for these lighting objects. A user scenario illustrates the concept of personalized lighting control. The scenario is used to develop functional and non-functional system requirements which inform system design. The structure of a proposed space model and space model queries are described and illustrated with examples. Implementation environments for system modules and data communication between modules are discussed. System and user tests are outlined that will be performed for initial feedback on the feasibility of personalized lighting control.

Suter, G.; Petrushevski, F.; Sipetic, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting, daylighting, and heating systems via Simulink (performance of the daylighting control system. Energy andbuildings through daylighting control systems in New York

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Oxy-fuel combustion with integrated pollution control  

SciTech Connect

An oxygen fueled integrated pollutant removal and combustion system includes a combustion system and an integrated pollutant removal system. The combustion system includes a furnace having at least one burner that is configured to substantially prevent the introduction of air. An oxygen supply supplies oxygen at a predetermine purity greater than 21 percent and a carbon based fuel supply supplies a carbon based fuel. Oxygen and fuel are fed into the furnace in controlled proportion to each other and combustion is controlled to produce a flame temperature in excess of 3000 degrees F. and a flue gas stream containing CO2 and other gases. The flue gas stream is substantially void of non-fuel borne nitrogen containing combustion produced gaseous compounds. The integrated pollutant removal system includes at least one direct contact heat exchanger for bringing the flue gas into intimated contact with a cooling liquid to produce a pollutant-laden liquid stream and a stripped flue gas stream and at least one compressor for receiving and compressing the stripped flue gas stream.

Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL); Ochs, Thomas Lilburn (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy Ann (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul Chandler (Independence, OR)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Integrated safeguards & security for material protection, accounting, and control.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional safeguards and security design for fuel cycle facilities is done separately and after the facility design is near completion. This can result in higher costs due to retrofits and redundant use of data. Future facilities will incorporate safeguards and security early in the design process and integrate the systems to make better use of plant data and strengthen both systems. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the integration of materials control and accounting (MC&A) measurements with physical security design for a nuclear reprocessing plant. Locations throughout the plant where data overlap occurs or where MC&A data could be a benefit were identified. This mapping is presented along with the methodology for including the additional data in existing probabilistic assessments to evaluate safeguards and security systems designs.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Cipiti, Benjamin B.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

COMPARISON OF CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOTING MODELS AND THEIR IMPACT ON ABUNDANCES FROM INTEGRATED LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY OF YOUNG (<3 Gyr) STAR CLUSTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing program to measure detailed chemical abundances in nearby galaxies, we use a sample of young- to intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ages of 10 Myr-2 Gyr to evaluate the effect of isochrone parameters, specifically core convective overshooting, on Fe abundance results from high-resolution, integrated light spectroscopy. In this work we also obtain fiducial Fe abundances from high-resolution spectroscopy of the cluster individual member stars. We compare the Fe abundance results for the individual stars to the results from isochrones and integrated light spectroscopy to determine whether isochrones with convective overshooting should be used in our integrated light analysis of young- to intermediate-age (10 Myr-3 Gyr) star clusters. We find that when using the isochrones from the Teramo group, we obtain more accurate results for young- and intermediate-age clusters over the entire age range when using isochrones without convective overshooting. While convective overshooting is not the only uncertain aspect of stellar evolution, it is one of the most readily parameterized ingredients in stellar evolution models, and thus important to evaluate for the specific models used in our integrated light analysis. This work demonstrates that our method for integrated light spectroscopy of star clusters can provide unique tests for future constraints on stellar evolution models of young- and intermediate-age clusters.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A., E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

A smart GUI based air-conditioning and lighting controller for energy saving in building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will concentrate on the algorithm and control strategies where the air-conditioners and lighting system can be controlled using microcontroller; a microcontroller is chosen due to its low cost and high flexibility. Conceptually, the controller ... Keywords: energy saving control system, graphic LCD, graphical user interface (GUI), microcontroller

M. F. Abas; N. MD. Saad; N. L. Ramli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Title Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3831E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., and Abby I. Enscoe Date Published 04/2010 Abstract An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirect pendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several months demonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to the baseline. Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

186

Design criteria for lighting and controls modifications OSW, CTF, COS buildings  

SciTech Connect

This project will retrofit the lighting systems in three (3) buildings at the Mound Plant. The buildings are Central Operational Support (COS), Component Test Facility (CTF) and operational Support West (OSW). This project consists of the installation of occupancy sensors in private offices, break areas and laboratories, automatic control lighting, (occupied/unoccupied) with the existing DDC system, removing selected light fixtures, replacing incandescent lighting and reprogramming some of the software controlling the operation of the air handling units in the a forementioned buildings.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Slow-light solitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of soliton with controllable speed is constructed generalizing the theory of slow-light propagation to an integrable regime of nonlinear dynamics. The scheme would allow the quantum-information transfer between optical solitons and atomic media.

Ulf Leonhardt

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building energy analysis using EnergyPlus. The benchmarkenergy savings benefits of integrated control using the medium office building benchmark

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

INFORMATION INTEGRATION IN CONTROL ROOMS AND TECHNICAL OFFICES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants Report prepared within the framework of the

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FCC-70 FCC-70 Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems John Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The air-conditioning (A/C) system compressor load can significantly impact the fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric automobiles. With the increasing emphasis on fuel economy, it is clear that the A/C compressor load needs to be reduced. In order to accomplish this goal, more efficient climate control delivery systems and reduced peak soak temperatures will be necessary to reduce the impact of vehicle A/C systems on fuel economy and tailpipe emissions. Good analytical techniques are important in identifying promising concepts. The goal at

191

Design of a step-down DC-DC controller integrated circuit with adaptive dead-time control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constant-frequency peak current mode synchronous step-down DC-DC controller integrated circuit has been designed with adaptive dead-time control. The adaptive dead-time control circuitry is implemented as digital ...

Li, Zhipeng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Efficient light coupling from integrated single-mode waveguides to supercollimating photonic crystals on silicon-on-insulator platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose rib waveguides as an efficient and practical solution to the coupling of light from integrated single-mode waveguides to supercollimating planar photonic crystals. By three-dimensional simulations, we demonstrate transmission efficiencies higher than 90 % at wavelengths close to 1.55 microns in a device that can be fabricated on conventional silicon-on-insulator platforms. This approach constitutes a significant step toward the integration of supercollimating structures on photonic chips.

Vynck, K; d'Yerville, M Le Vassor; Cassagne, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Controlled storage of light in silicon cavities Ali W. Elshaari*, Abdelsalam Aboketaf, and Stefan F. Preble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Khan, S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, H. A. Haus, and J. D. Joannopoulos, "Coupling of modes analysis demonstration of quantum memory for light," Nature 432(7016), 482­486 (2004). 2. A. Politi, M. J. Cryan, J. G­649 (2008). 3. V. R. Almeida, C. A. Barrios, R. R. Panepucci, and M. Lipson, "All-optical control of light

Zanibbi, Richard

194

Patterned three-color ZnCdSeZnCdMgSe quantum-well structures for integrated full-color and white light emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This result demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating integrated full-color light emitting diode and laser American Institute of Physics. S0003-6951 00 04149-8 Light emitting diodes LEDs and laser diodes LDs having

195

IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

Richard Zhang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Propagation of light in serially coupled plasmonic nanowire dimer: Geometry dependence and polarization control  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally studied plasmon-polariton-assisted light propagation in serially coupled silver nanowire (Ag-NW) dimers and probed their dependence on bending-angle between the nanowires and polarization of incident light. From the angle-dependence study, we observed that obtuse angles between the nanowires resulted in better transmission than acute angles. From the polarization studies, we inferred that light emission from junction and distal ends of Ag-NW dimers can be systematically controlled. Further, we applied this property to show light routing and polarization beam splitting in obtuse-angled Ag-NW dimer. The studied geometry can be an excellent test-bed for plasmonic circuitry.

Singh, Danveer; Raghuwanshi, Mohit; Pavan Kumar, G. V. [Photonics and Optical Nanoscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune 411008 (India)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dynamic MLC leaf sequencing for integrated linear accelerator control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Leaf positions for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy must be closely synchronized with MU delivery. For the Varian C3 series MLC controller, if the planned trajectory (leaf position vs. MU) requires velocities exceeding the capability of the MLC, the leaves fall behind the planned positions, causing the controller to momentarily hold the beam and thereby introduce dosimetric errors. We investigated the merits of a new commercial linear accelerator, TrueBeam, that integrates MLC control with prospective dose rate modulation. If treatment is delivered at dose rates so high that leaves would fall behind, the controller reduces the dose rate such that harmony between MU and leaf position is preserved. Methods: For three sets of DMLC leaf trajectories, point doses and two-dimensional dose distributions were measured in phantom using an ionization chamber and film, respectively. The first set, delivered using both a TrueBeam and a conventional C3 controller, comprised a single leaf bank closing at planned velocities of 2.4, 7.1, and 14 cm/s. The maximum achievable leaf velocity for both systems was 3 cm/s. The remaining two sets were derived from clinical fluence maps using a commercial treatment planning system for a range of planned dose rates and were delivered using TrueBeam set to the maximum dose rate, 600 MU/min. Generating trajectories using a planned dose rate that is lower than the delivery dose rate effectively increased the leaf velocity constraint used by the planning system for trajectory calculation. The second set of leaf trajectories was derived from two fluence maps containing regions of zero fluence obtained from representative beams of two different patient treatment plans. The third set was obtained from all nine fields of a head and neck treatment plan. For the head and neck plan, dose-volume histograms of the spinal cord and target for each planned dose rate were obtained. Results: For the single closing leaf bank trajectories, the TrueBeam control system reduced the dose rate such that the leaf velocity was less than the maximum. Dose deviations relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory were less than 3%. For the conventional controller, the leaves repeatedly fell behind the planned positions until the beam hold threshold was reached, resulting in deviations of up to 19% relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory. For the two clinical fluence maps, reducing the planned dose rate reduced the dose in the zero fluence regions by 15% and 24% and increased the delivery time by 5 s and 14 s. No significant differences were noted in the high and intermediate dose regions measured using film. The DVHs for the head and neck plan showed a 10% reduction in cord dose for 20 MU/min relative to 600 MU/min sequencing dose rate, which was confirmed by measurement. No difference in target DVHs were observed. The reduction in cord dose increased total treatment time by 1.8 min. Conclusions: Leaf sequencing algorithms for integrated control systems should be modified to reflect the reduced importance of maximum leaf velocity for accurate dose delivery.

Popple, Richard A.; Brezovich, Ivan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35249-6832 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Developing a dynamic envelope/lighting control system with field measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of an intelligent venetian blind/lighting control system was tested in a 1:3 scale model outdoors under variable sun and sky conditions. The control algorithm, block direct sun and meet the design workplane illuminance level, was implemented using commercially available and custom designed blind and lighting systems hardware. While blocking direct sunlight, the blinds were properly controlled to maintain the design workplane illuminance within a tolerance of -10%, +25% when there was sufficient daylight. When daylight levels alone were inadequate, the electric lighting control system maintained the design workplane illuminance. The electric lighting could be turned off if a user-specified time period at minimum power was exceeded. Lighting energy savings of 51-71% (southwest) and 37-75% (south) was attained for the period from 8:00 to 17:00 on clear sunny days, compared to a fixed, partially closed blind with the same lighting system. Practical details for implementation and commissioning are discussed. The impact of control variations, such as profile angle, time step interval, and control area, on energy demand is investigated.

DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Lee, E.S.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Argonne CNM News: Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Shedding Light on Nature's Nanoscale Control of Solar Energy Scanning tunneling microscopy tips A schematic of the Rhodobacter sphaerodes hexameric core, featuring the "special pair" (P) of degenerate bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules, and the active (a) and inactive (b) arms of BChl and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules. The transient absorption (ΔA) spectra acquired following selective excitation of P are shown. Nature's process for storing solar energy occurs in light-absorbing protein complexes called photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Across billions of years of evolution, Nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric cofactor core for carrying out the very first chemical reaction of photosynthesis, the light-induced electron transfer across approximately 3

200

Economic analysis of the daylight-linked lighting control system in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to perform an economic analysis of the daylight-linked automatic on/off lighting control system installed for the purpose of energy savings in office buildings. For this, a building was chosen as a typical example, and the energy cost was calculated by using the daylight and building energy analysis simulation. When the lighting control was utilized, an economic analysis was performed using a payback period that was calculated by comparing the initial cost of installing the lighting control system with the annual energy cost which was reduced thanks to the application of the lighting control. The results showed that the lighting energy consumption, when the lighting control was applied, was reduced by an average of 30.5% compared with the case that there was not lighting control applied. Also, the result for total energy consumption showed that, when lighting control was applied, this was reduced by 8.5% when the glazing ratio was 100%, 8.2% for 80%, and 7.6% for 60% when compared to non-application. The payback period was analyzed in terms of the number of floors in a building; 10 floors, 20 floors, 30 floors, and 40 floors. Hence, the building with 40 floors and glazing ratio 100% resulted in the shortest payback period of 8.8 years, the building with 10 floors and glazing ratio 60% resulted in the longest period of 12.7 years. In other words, the larger the glazing ratio and the number of building floors are, the shorter the payback period is. (author)

Yang, In-Ho; Nam, Eun-Ji [Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, Dongguk University, 26-3, Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Illuminac: simultaneous naming and configuration for workspace lighting control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore natural and calm interfaces for configuring ubiquitous computing environments. A natural interface should enable the user to name a desired configuration and have the system enact that configuration. Users should be able to use familiar names ... Keywords: environment control, natural speech interfaces, non-negative matrix factorization

Ana Ramírez Chang; John Canny

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated shading and daylighting control systems have been commercially available for decades. The new challenge is to provide a fully functional and integrated fagade and lighting system that operates appropriately for all environmental conditions and meets a range of occupant subjective desires and objective performance requirements. These rigorous performance goals must be achieved with solutions that are cost effective and can operate over long periods with minimal maintenance. It will take time and effort to change the marketplace for these technologies and practices, particularly in building a series of documented success stories, and driving costs and risks to much lower levels at which their use becomes the norm. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly-transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies. We believe it is possible to accelerate product market transformation by developing projects where technical advances and the interests of motivated manufacturers and innovative owners converge. In this paper we present a case study example that explains a building owner's decision-making process to use dynamic window and dimmable daylighting controls. The case study project undertaken by a major building owner in partnership with a buildings R&D group was designed explicitly to use field test data in conjunction with the market influence of a major landmark building project in New York City to stimulate change in manufacturers' product offerings. Preliminary observations on the performance of these systems are made. A cost model that was developed with the building owner is explained.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Market transformation opportunities for emerging dynamic facade and dimmable lighting control systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated shading and daylighting control systems have been commercially available for decades. The new challenge is to provide a fully functional and integrated fagade and lighting system that operates appropriately for all environmental conditions and meets a range of occupant subjective desires and objective performance requirements. These rigorous performance goals must be achieved with solutions that are cost effective and can operate over long periods with minimal maintenance. It will take time and effort to change the marketplace for these technologies and practices, particularly in building a series of documented success stories, and driving costs and risks to much lower levels at which their use becomes the norm. In recent years, the architectural trend toward highly-transparent all-glass buildings presents a unique challenge and opportunity to advance the market for emerging, smart, dynamic window and dimmable daylighting control technologies. We believe it is possible to accelerate product market transformation by developing projects where technical advances and the interests of motivated manufacturers and innovative owners converge. In this paper we present a case study example that explains a building owner's decision-making process to use dynamic window and dimmable daylighting controls. The case study project undertaken by a major building owner in partnership with a buildings R&D group was designed explicitly to use field test data in conjunction with the market influence of a major landmark building project in New York City to stimulate change in manufacturers' product offerings. Preliminary observations on the performance of these systems are made. A cost model that was developed with the building owner is explained.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Hughes, Glenn D.; Thurm, David A.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

204

Controlling of grid connected photovoltaic lighting system with fuzzy logic  

SciTech Connect

In this study, DC electrical energy produced by photovoltaic panels is converted to AC electrical energy and an indoor area is illuminated using this energy. System is controlled by fuzzy logic algorithm controller designed with 16 rules. Energy is supplied from accumulator which is charged by photovoltaic panels if its energy would be sufficient otherwise it is supplied from grid. During the 1-week usage period at the semester time, 1.968 kWh energy is used from grid but designed system used 0.542 kWh energy from photovoltaic panels at the experiments. Energy saving is determined by calculations and measurements for one education year period (9 months) 70.848 kWh. (author)

Saglam, Safak; Ekren, Nazmi; Erdal, Hasan [Technical Education Faculty, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Power Quality Hotline Call-of-the-Month for November 2009: Failure of a Lighting-Control System Caused by Electrical Fast Transients (EFTs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses the basics of lighting-control systems, a recent failure of a lighting-control system caused by a common electrical disturbance, and some solutions to resolving compatibility problems with lighting-control systems.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

System and Battery Charge Control for PV-Powered AC Lighting Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews a number of issues specific to stand-alone AC lighting systems. A review of AC lighting technology is presented, which discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various lamps. The best lamps for small lighting systems are compact fluorescent. The best lamps for intermediate-size systems are high- or low-pressure sodium. Specifications for battery charging and load control are provided with the goal of achieving lamp lifetimes on the order of 16,000 to 24,000 hours and battery lifetimes of 4 to 5 years. A rough estimate of the potential domestic and global markets for stand-alone AC lighting systems is presented. DC current injection tests were performed on high-pressure sodium lamps and the test results are presented. Finally, a prototype system was designed and a prototype system controller (with battery charger and DC/AC inverter) was developed and built.

Kern, G.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Recycle of LWR (Light Water Reactor) actinides to an IFR (Integral Fast Reactor)  

SciTech Connect

A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

26.3 / Y.-P. Huang 26.3: Multidirectional Asymmetrical Microlens-Array Light Control Films for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, leads to a ~5x gain in brightness over the MgO standard white and 12:1 contrast ratio for color STN advantages of the MAMA light control film. In this paper, we demonstrate the performances of MAMA light is poor. Adding a MAMA light control film not only shifts the peak reflectance of the STN panel from 300

Wu, Shin-Tson

212

Integrated Forecasting and Inventory Control for Seasonal Demand ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a data-driven forecasting technique with integrated inventory ... ponents of inventory management: the random demand is first estimated using ...

213

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Francis M. Rubinstein, and Erik Page Series Title LBNL-5095E Pagination 25 Date Published September Keywords controls, daylighting, occupancy sensors, tuning Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of estimates of energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, this paper adds successive analytical filters to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on the meta-analysis, the best estimates of average energy savings potential are 24% for occupancy, 28% for daylighting, 31% for personal tuning, 36% for institutional tuning, and 38% for multiple approaches. The results suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10%) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

214

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

SciTech Connect

An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Lighting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

Sue A. Carter

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method and system for controlling the position of a beam of light  

SciTech Connect

An method and system for laser beam tracking and pointing is based on a conventional position sensing detector (PSD) or quadrant cell but with the use of amplitude-modulated light. A combination of logarithmic automatic gain control, filtering, and synchronous detection offers high angular precision with exceptional dynamic range and sensitivity, while maintaining wide bandwidth. Use of modulated light enables the tracking of multiple beams simultaneously through the use of different modulation frequencies. It also makes the system resistant to interfering light sources such as ambient light. Beam pointing is accomplished by feeding back errors in the measured beam position to a beam steering element, such as a steering mirror. Closed-loop tracking performance is superior to existing methods, especially under conditions of atmospheric scintillation.

Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (San Francisco, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Relative Entropy and Free Energy Dualities: Connections to Path Integral and KL control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relative Entropy and Free Energy Dualities: Connections to Path Integral and KL control Evangelos A and the fundamental dualities between free energy and relative entropy. We derive the path integral optimal control on Dynamic Programming with PI based on the duality between free energy and relative entropy. Moreover we

Anderson, Richard

218

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered, the limited-energy issue typical with other wireless sensor networks powered by batteries is non energy usage of the entire system, and to reinforce the wireless network links and compensate for lostEnergy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao

Agogino, Alice M.

219

PICOntrol: using a handheld projector for direct control of physical devices through visible light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's environments are populated with a growing number of electric devices which come in diverse form factors and provide a plethora of functions. However, rich interaction with these devices can become challenging if they need be controlled from a ... Keywords: handheld projector, physical devices, visible light communication

Dominik Schmidt; David Molyneaux; Xiang Cao

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Integrated photonic structures for light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the mechanisms for an efficient light trapping structure for thin-film silicon solar cells. The design combines a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and periodic gratings. Using photonic band theories and numerical ...

Sheng, Xing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Exact Admission-Control for Integrated Aperiodic and Periodic Tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Admission controllers are used to prevent overload in systems with dynamically arriving tasks. Typically, these admission controllers are based on sufficient (but not necessary) capacity bounds in order to maintain a low computational complexity. In ...

Bjorn Andersson; Cecilia Ekelin

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Light brown apple moth’s arrival in California worries commodity groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DG. 1991. Integrated control of light brown apple moth, Epi-and Ag- riculture. 2007a. Light brown apple moth host list.6 p. CDFA. 2007b. Light brown apple moth project:

Varela, Lucia G.; Johnson, Marshall W; Strand, Larry; Wilen, Cheryl A; Pickel, Carolyn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Technical Evaluation of Emerging Integrated Environmental Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneously with the goal of developing in...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

HTGR-GT and electrical load integrated control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion of the control and operation of the HTGR-GT power plant is presented in terms of its closely coupled electrical load and core cooling functions. The system and its controls are briefly described and comparisons are made with more conventional plants. The results of analyses of selected transients are presented to illustrate the operation and control of the HTGR-GT. The events presented were specifically chosen to show the controllability of the plant and to highlight some of the unique characteristics inherent in this multiloop closed-cycle plant.

Chan, T.; Openshaw, F.; Pfremmer, D.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting  

SciTech Connect

We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Control of systems integrating logic, dynamics, and constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a framework for modeling and controlling systems described by interdependent physical laws, logic rules, and operating constraints, denoted as mixed logical dynamical (MLD) systems. These are described by linear dynamic equations ... Keywords: Binary logic systems, Boolean logic, Dynamic models, Hybrid systems, Mixed-integer programming, Optimization problems, Predictive control

Alberto Bemporad; Manfred Morari

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Exact admission-control for integrated aperiodic and periodic tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Admission-controllers are used to prevent overload in systems with dynamically arriving tasks. Typically, these admission-controllers are based on sufficient (but not necessary) capacity bounds in order to maintain a low computational complexity. In ... Keywords: AVL tree, Earliest-deadline-first, Lazy evaluation, Online scheduling, Operating systems, Real-time systems, Schedulability analysis

Björn Andersson; Cecilia Ekelin

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Building Integrated Remote Control Systems for Electronics Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses several aspects of implementing a remote control system for a large number of electronics boards in order to perform remote Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programming, hardware configuration, data register access, and monitoring, as well as interfacing it to an expert system. The paper presents a common strategy for the representation of the boards in the abstraction layer of the control system, and generic communication protocols for the access to the board resources. In addition, an implementation is proposed in which the mapping between the functional parameters and the physical registers of the different boards is represented by descriptors in the board representation such that the translation can be handled automatically by a generic translation manager. Using the Distributed Information Management (DIM) package for the control communication with the boards, and the industry SCADA system PVSS II from ETM, a complete control system has been built for the Timing and Fast Control ...

Jacobsson, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Integrated system for control and monitoring in real time of efficient electrical and thermal energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated monitoring and driving system is made of main distributed components: - first level:_one or two computers placed in the control room which monitors the thermal and electrical processes based on the datas provided by the second level via ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, distribution management system, electric power systems, optimization, process control, real time systems, simulation

Ion Miciu; Florin Hartescu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Building Integrated Remote Control Systems for Electronic Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses several aspects of implementing a remote control system for a large number of electronics boards in order to perform remote Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programming, hardware configuration, data register access, and monitoring, as well as interfacing it to a configuration database and an expert system. The paper presents a common strategy for the representation of the boards in the abstraction layer of the control system, and generic communication protocols for the access to the board resources. In addition, an implementation is proposed in which the mapping between the functional parameters and the physical registers of the different boards is represented by descriptors in the board representation such that the translation can be handled automatically by a generic translation manager. Using the Distributed Information Management (DIM) package for the control communication with the boards, and the industry SCADA system PVSS II from ETM, a complete control system has been built for...

Jacobsson, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Chaplygin gas in light of recent Integrated Sachs--Wolfe effect data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of constraining Chaplygin dark energy models with current Integrated Sachs Wolfe effect data. In the case of a flat universe we found that generalized Chaplygin gas models must have an energy density such that $\\Omega_c >0.55$ and an equation of state $w 0.55$ and $w gas.

Tommaso Giannantonio; Alessandro Melchiorri

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optimization Design of Supervising and Controlling on the SOFC Integration System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimized design of the SOFC integration system is put forward with a three-layer structure, which consists of data communication, data processing and Human-machine interaction. The key for the optimized design in the system is data communication ... Keywords: SOFC, integrated control, optimum design, data schedule

Suying Yang; Meng Wang; Jianying Lin; Kuijun Meng

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Plenary lecture VIII: a survey of some automotive integrated-starter-generators and their control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated starter generator (ISG) uses one machine to replace conventional starter and alternator onboard vehicles and provides greater electrical generation capacity and improves the fuel economy and emissions. The main requirements of the ISG control ...

Dorin Dumitru Lucache

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Integrated Dry NOx/SO2 Emissions Control System, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Integrated Dry NO X SO 2 Emissions Control System A DOE Assessment October 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry...

235

Fiber-optic, anti-cycling, high pressure sodium street light control. Final technical progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the Final Technical Progress Report on a project to develop and market a Fiber-Optic Anti-Cycling High Pressure Sodium Street Light Control. The field test units are now being made with a single vertical PC board design and contains a computer-on-a-chip or PROM IC to take the place of the majority of the components previously contained on the upper logic board. This will reduce the final costs of the unit when it is in production and increase the control`s flexibility. The authors have finished the soft tooling and have made the 400 plastic cases for the field test units. The new configuration of the cases entails a simplified design of the control shell which will have the lenses cast in place. The shell and base plastics are now finished and in final assembly awaiting the completion of the PC boards.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Proportional and Proportional-Integral Controllers for a Nonlinear Hydraulic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a nonlinear hydraulic network of a reduced-size yet meaningful district heating system with two end correspondingly the controllers. In this paper we focus on one of these case studies, a district heating system to the system. Presently district heating systems are designed to meet the needs of a given number of end users

De Persis, Claudio

237

Adaptive nuclear reactor control for integral quadratic cost functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of optimally controlling the power level changes of a nuclear reactor is considered. The model of an existing power plant is used, which is a ninth-order nonlinear system, having time-varying parameters. A closed form solution of the optimal ...

George T. Bereznai; Naresh K. Sinha

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Evaluations of nutrient diffusing substrates and the primary importance of light in controlling periphyton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eutrophication is an increasingly recognized threat to the health of streams and rivers in the United States. This thesis presents two studies aimed at increasing the utility of periphyton analysis as a tool for water resource managers to address eutrophication. In the first study, artificial channels were used to investigate the response of periphyton to different nutrient delivery mechanisms. In two channels, nutrients were delivered via diffusion to periphyton growth surfaces using modified Matlock Periphytometers. In two additional channels, nutrients were delivered by dosing water in the channel. The data showed that nutrient delivery via diffusion elicits a significantly greater periphyton response. The use of diffusing substrates for periphyton studies remains a viable tool for some objectives, but results should be extrapolated to natural conditions with caution. In the second study, modified Matlock Periphytometers and inexpensive light meters were used to investigate the relationship between periphyton growth and light availability in two fourth-order Texas streams. The data indicate that light availability explains 91.9 percent of the variability of observed periphyton growth under control conditions, and 99.7 percent under nutrient-enriched conditions. The strong correlation suggests that efforts to address eutrophication should recognize the importance of riparian shade. Equations to predict chlorophyll-a as a function of relative light intensity are also presented.

Murawski, Matthew Thomas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. IV. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: {alpha}, Fe-PEAK, LIGHT, AND HEAVY ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We present detailed chemical abundances in eight clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We measure abundances of 22 elements for clusters spanning a range in age of 0.05-12 Gyr, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical enrichment and star formation history of the LMC. The abundances were obtained from individual absorption lines using a new method for analysis of high-resolution (R {approx} 25,000), integrated-light (IL) spectra of star clusters. This method was developed and presented in Papers I, II, and III of this series. In this paper, we develop an additional IL {chi}{sup 2}-minimization spectral synthesis technique to facilitate measurement of weak ({approx}15 mA) spectral lines and abundances in low signal-to-noise ratio data (S/N {approx} 30). Additionally, we supplement the IL abundance measurements with detailed abundances that we measure for individual stars in the youngest clusters (age < 2 Gyr) in our sample. In both the IL and stellar abundances we find evolution of [{alpha}/Fe] with [Fe/H] and age. Fe-peak abundance ratios are similar to those in the Milky Way (MW), with the exception of [Cu/Fe] and [Mn/Fe], which are sub-solar at high metallicities. The heavy elements Ba, La, Nd, Sm, and Eu are significantly enhanced in the youngest clusters. Also, the heavy to light s-process ratio is elevated relative to the MW ([Ba/Y] >+0.5) and increases with decreasing age, indicating a strong contribution of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star ejecta to the interstellar medium throughout the later history of the LMC. We also find a correlation of IL Na and Al abundances with cluster mass in the sense that more massive, older clusters are enriched in the light elements Na and Al with respect to Fe, which implies that these clusters harbor star-to-star abundance variations as is common in the MW. Lower mass, intermediate-age, and young clusters have Na and Al abundances that are lower and more consistent with LMC field stars. Our results can be used to constrain both future chemical evolution models for the LMC and theories of globular cluster formation.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cameron, Scott A. [Science Department, 3000 College Heights Blvd., Cerro Coso Community College, Ridgecrest, CA 93555 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org, E-mail: scameron@cerrocoso.edu, E-mail: andy@ociw.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NO{sub x} control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, progress was made on the computational simulation of a full-scale boiler with the purpose of understanding the potential impacts of burner operating conditions on soot and NO{sub x} generation. Sulfation tests on both the titania support and vanadia/titania catalysts were completed using BYU's in situ spectroscopy reactor this quarter. These experiments focus on the extent to which vanadia and titania sulfate in an SO{sub 2}-laden, moist environment. Construction of the CCS reactor system is essentially complete and the control hardware and software are largely in place. A large batch of vanadia/titania catalyst in powder form has been prepared for use in poisoning tests. During this quarter, minor modifications were made to the multi-catalyst slipstream reactor and to the control system. The slipstream reactor was installed at AEP's Rockport plant at the end of November 2002. In this report, we describe the reactor system, particularly the control system, which was created by REI specifically for the reactor, as well as the installation at Rockport.

Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Periodic optimal control for biomass productivity maximization in a photobioreactor using natural light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the question of optimization of the microalgal biomass long term productivity in the framework of production in photobioreactors under the influence of day/night cycles. For that, we propose a simple bioreactor model accounting for light attenuation in the reactor due to biomass density and obtain the control law that optimizes productivity over a single day through the application of Pontryagin's maximum principle, with the dilution rate being the main control. An important constraint on the obtained solution is that the biomass in the reactor should be at the same level at the beginning and at the end of the day so that the same control can be applied everyday and optimizes some form of long term productivity. Several scenarios are possible depending on the microalgae's strain parameters and the maximal admissible value of the dilution rate: bang-bang or bang-singular-bang control or, if the growth rate of the algae is very strong in the presence of light, constant maximal dilution. A bifurcation...

Grognard, Frédéric; Bernard, Olivier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Stabilization of High Efficiency CdTe Photovoltaic Modules in Controlled Indoor Light Soaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance and stabilization of large-area, high-efficiency 9%, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) modules maintained under controlled light-soaking nominally at 800 Watts/m2 irradiance and 65C module temperature are investigated. Degradation of module performance occurs predominantly in the first few hundred hours of exposure under these conditions; these symptoms included losses in fill factor (FF), open-circuit voltage (Voc), and short-circuit current (Isc), which amount to between 7% and 15% total loss in performance. Higher stabilized performance was achieved with lower copper content in the back contact. Transient effects in module Voc and Isc were observed, suggesting partial annealing thereof when stored under low-light levels. Performance changes are analyzed, aided by monitoring the current-voltage characteristics in situ during exposure.

del Cueto, J. A.; Pruett, J.; Cunningham, D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis. [Advanced light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Integrated model-based control and diagnostic monitoring for automotive catalyst systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated model-based automotive catalyst control and diagnostic monitoring system is presented. This system incorporates a simplified dynamic catalyst model that describes oxygen storage and release in the catalyst and predicts the post-catalyst ... Keywords: automotive catalyst, model predictive control, on-board diagnostic monitoring

Kenneth R. Muske; James C. Peyton Jones

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

248

Time-minimal control of dissipative two-level quantum systems: The Integrable case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this article is to apply recent developments in geometric optimal control to analyze the time minimum control problem of dissipative two-level quantum systems whose dynamics is governed by the Lindblad equation. We focus our analysis on the case where the extremal Hamiltonian is integrable.

B. Bonnard; D. Sugny

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

250

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. Using the initial CFD baseline modeling of the Gavin Station and the plant corrosion maps, six boiler locations for the corrosion probes were identified and access ports have been installed. Preliminary corrosion data obtained appear consistent and believable. In situ, spectroscopic experiments at BYU reported in part last quarter were completed. New reactor tubes have been made for BYU's CCR that allow for testing smaller amounts of catalyst and thus increasing space velocity; monolith catalysts have been cut and a small reactor that can accommodate these pieces for testing is in its final stages of construction. A poisoning study on Ca-poisoned catalysts was begun this quarter. A possible site for a biomass co-firing test of the slipstream reactor was visited this quarter. The slipstream reactor at Rockport required repair and refurbishment, and will be re-started in the next quarter. This report describes the final results of an experimental project at Brown University on the fundamentals of ammonia / fly ash interactions with relevance to the operation of advanced NOx control technologies such as selective catalytic reduction. The Brown task focused on the measurement of ammonia adsorption isotherms on commercial fly ash samples subjected to a variety of treatments and on the chemistry of dry and semi-dry ammonia removal processes.

Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding; Robert Hurt

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Differential spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors with a light-emitting-diode-based integrating sphere source  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental realization of differential spectral responsivity measurement by using a light-emitting diode (LED)-based integrating sphere source. The spectral irradiance responsivity is measured by a Lambertian-like radiation field with a diameter of 40mm at the peak wavelengths of the 35 selectable LEDs covering a range from 280 to 1550nm. The systematic errors and uncertainties due to lock-in detection, spatial irradiance distribution, and reflection from the test detector are experimentally corrected or considered. In addition, we implemented a numerical procedure to correct the error due to the broad spectral bandwidth of the LEDs. The overall uncertainty of the DSR measurement is evaluated to be 2.2% (k=2) for Si detectors. To demonstrate its application, we present the measurement results of two Si photovoltaic detectors at different bias irradiance levels up to 120mW/cm{sup 2}.

Zaid, Ghufron; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project was to develop cost-effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low-NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program. This project included research on: (1) In furnace NOx control; (2) Impacts of combustion modifications on boiler operation; (3) Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst testing and (4) Ammonia adsorption/removal on fly ash. Important accomplishments were achieved in all aspects of the project. Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), an in-furnace NOx reduction strategy based on injecting urea or anhydrous ammonia into fuel rich regions in the lower furnace, was evaluated for cyclone-barrel and PC fired utility boilers. Field tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the RRI process to significantly reduce NOx emissions from a staged cyclone-fired furnace operating with overfire air. The field tests also verified the accuracy of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling used to develop the RRI design and highlighted the importance of using CFD modeling to properly locate and configure the reagent injectors within the furnace. Low NOx firing conditions can adversely impact boiler operation due to increased waterwall wastage (corrosion) and increased soot production. A corrosion monitoring system that uses electrochemical noise (ECN) corrosion probes to monitor, on a real-time basis, high temperature corrosion events within the boiler was evaluated. Field tests were successfully conducted at two plants. The Ohio Coal Development Office provided financial assistance to perform the field tests. To investigate soot behavior, an advanced model to predict soot production and destruction was implemented into an existing reacting CFD modeling tool. Comparisons between experimental data collected in a pilot scale furnace and soot behavior predicted by the CFD model showed good agreement. Field and laboratory tests were performed for SCR catalysts used for coal and biomass co-firing applications. Fundamental laboratory studies were performed to better understand mechanisms involved with catalyst deactivation. Field tests with a slip stream reactor were used to create catalyst exposed to boiler flue gas for firing coal and for co-firing coal and biomass. The field data suggests the mechanisms leading to catalyst deactivation are, in order of importance, channel plugging, surface fouling, pore plugging and poisoning. Investigations were performed to better understand the mechanisms involved with catalyst regeneration through mechanical or chemical methods. A computer model was developed to predict NOx reduction across the catalyst in a SCR. Experiments were performed to investigate the fundamentals of ammonia/fly ash interactions with relevance to the operation of advanced NOx control technologies such as selective catalytic reduction. Measurements were performed for ammonia adsorption isotherms on commercial fly ash samples subjected to a variety of treatments and on the chemistry of dry and semi-dry ammonia removal processes. This work resulted in the first fundamental ammonia isotherms on carbon-containing fly ash samples. This work confirms industrial reports that aqueous solution chemistry takes place upon the introduction of even very small amounts of water, while the ash remains in a semi-dry state.

Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Dave Swenson; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a new effort was begun on the development of a corrosion management system for minimizing the impacts of low NOx combustion systems on waterwalls; a kickoff meeting was held at the host site, AEP's Gavin Plant, and work commenced on fabrication of the probes. FTIR experiments for SCR catalyst sulfation were finished at BYU and indicated no vanadium/vanadyl sulfate formation at reactor conditions. Improvements on the mass-spectrometer system at BYU have been made and work on the steady state reactor system shakedown neared completion. The slipstream reactor continued to operate at AEP's Rockport plant; at the end of the quarter, the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 1000 hours. Some operational problems were addressed that enable the reactor to run without excessive downtime by the end of the quarter.

Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Material protection, control and accounting cooperation at the Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP), Novouralsk, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant is one of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy`s nuclear material production sites participating in the US Department of Energy`s Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program. The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant is Russia`s largest uranium enrichment facility and blends tons of high-enriched uranium into low enriched uranium each year as part of the US high-enriched uranium purchase. The Electrochemical Integrated Plant and six participating national laboratories are cooperating to implement a series of enhancements to the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability systems at the site This paper outlines the overall objectives of the MPC&A program at Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant and the work completed as of the date of the presentation.

McAllister, S., LLNL

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. During an unplanned outage, damage occurred to the electrochemical noise corrosion probes installed at the AEP Gavin plant; testing is expected to resume in August. The KEMCOP corrosion coupons were not affected by the unplanned outage; the coupons were removed and sent for analysis. BYU conducted a series of tests before the ISSR lab was relocated. Ammonia adsorption experiments provided clear evidence of the types of acidic sites present on catalyst surfaces. Data collected this quarter indicate that surface sulfation decreases Lewis acid site concentrations for all catalysts thus far studied, confirming that catalytic activity under commercial coal-based SCR conditions occurs primarily on Br{o}nsted acid sites and would be susceptible to basic impurities such as alkali and alkaline earth oxides, chlorides, and sulfates. SCR activity tests based on MS analysis showed that increasing sulfation generally increases NO reduction activity for both 0% and 1% vanadia catalysts. During this quarter, the slipstream reactor at Rockport operated for 720 hours on flue gas. Catalyst exposure time reached 4500 hours since installation. The reactor is out of service at the Rockport plant and plans are being made to move it to the Gadsden Plant. At Gadsden, modifications have begun in preparation for installation of the slipstream reactor next quarter.

Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Field tests for NOx reduction in a cyclone fired utility boiler due to using Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) have been started. CFD modeling studies have been started to evaluate the use of RRI for NOx reduction in a corner fired utility boiler using pulverized coal. Field tests of a corrosion monitor to measure waterwall wastage in a utility boiler have been completed. Computational studies to evaluate a soot model within a boiler simulation program are continuing. Research to evaluate SCR catalyst performance has started. A literature survey was completed. Experiments have been outlined and two flow reactor systems have been designed and are under construction. Commercial catalyst vendors have been contacted about supplying catalyst samples. Several sets of new experiments have been performed to investigate ammonia removal processes and mechanisms for fly ash. Work has focused on a promising class of processes in which ammonia is destroyed by strong oxidizing agents at ambient temperature during semi-dry processing (the use of moisture amounts less than 5 wt-%). Both ozone and an ozone/peroxide combination have been used to treat both basic and acidic ammonia-laden ashes.

Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

A novel fractional order fuzzy PID controller and its optimal time domain tuning based on integral performance indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel fractional order (FO) fuzzy Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller has been proposed in this paper which works on the closed loop error and its fractional derivative as the input and has a fractional integrator in its output. The fractional ... Keywords: FLC tuning, Fractional order controller, Fuzzy PID, Genetic algorithm, Integral performance indices, Optimal PID tuning

Saptarshi Das; Indranil Pan; Shantanu Das; Amitava Gupta

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type, such as wasted light hours and energy costs. However,percent of wasted light hours. Figure 3. Energy Savings for

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

light metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina Refinery Design and Development; Alumina Refinery Safety and Integrity ... Environmental and Plant Improvements; Process Control Developments.

262

Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Integrated Emissions Control Cost Estimating Workbook (IECCOST) Version 3.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IECCOST economic analysis workbook produces rough-order-of-magnitude cost estimates of the installed capital and levelized annual operating costs for standalone and integrated environmental control systems installed on coal-fired power plants. The model allows for the comparison ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated topology control and routing in wireless sensor networks for prolonged network lifetime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study considers an integrated topology control and routing problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which are employed to gather data via use of sensors with limited energy resources. We employ a hierarchical topology and routing structure with ... Keywords: Algorithms, Data gathering, Network design models, Wireless sensor networks

Halit íster; Hui Lin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4E 4E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F. Rubinstein & D. Bolotov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. Levi & K. Powell U.S. General Services Administration P. Schwartz Peter Schwartz, & Associates, LLC August 2008 Presented at the 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, CA, August 17-22, 2008, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

266

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Control Technology Descriptions and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few air pollution control suppliers are developing processes that may reduce several pollutants simultaneously in a configuration that is lower in cost than the total cost of using existing devices for each pollutant. It would benefit the industry if an independent organization that is technically knowledgeable about all the components of such multi-pollutant controls evaluated the opportunities these processes offer.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Energy and lighting design  

SciTech Connect

A detailed examination of the current energy conservation practices for lighting systems is presented. This first part of a two-part presentation covers the following: energy and lighting design; lighting and energy standards; lighting efficiency factors; light control and photometrics; lighting and the architectural interior; luminaire impact on the environment; basic design techniques; the lighting power budget; and conservation through control.

Helms, R.N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Integrated Computing, Communication, and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring of the electricity market has affected all aspects of the power industry from generation to transmission, distribution, and consumption. Transmission circuits, in particular, are stressed often exceeding their stability limits because of the difficulty in building new transmission lines due to environmental concerns and financial risk. Deregulation has resulted in the need for tighter control strategies to maintain reliability even in the event of considerable structural changes, such as loss of a large generating unit or a transmission line, and changes in loading conditions due to the continuously varying power consumption. Our research efforts under the DOE EPSCoR Grant focused on Integrated Computing, Communication and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems. This research is applicable to operating and controlling modern electric energy systems. The controls developed by APERC provide for a more efficient, economical, reliable, and secure operation of these systems. Under this program, we developed distributed control algorithms suitable for large-scale geographically dispersed power systems and also economic tools to evaluate their effectiveness and impact on power markets. Progress was made in the development of distributed intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. The methodologies employed combine information technology, control and communication, agent technology, and power systems engineering in the development of intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. In the event of scheduled load changes or unforeseen disturbances, the power system is expected to minimize the effects and costs of disturbances and to maintain critical infrastructure operational.

Bajura, Richard; Feliachi, Ali

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Integration of Self-Assembled Porous Alumina and Distributed Bragg Reflector for Light Trapping in Si Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light trapping is an important issue for thin film silicon photovoltaic cells due to the limited absorption coefficient for near infrared light. In this letter, we present a photonic structure that combines porous anodic ...

Sheng, Xing

271

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. III. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: Fe AND AGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a {approx}5 Gyr range, the ages of {approx}2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a {approx}200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex); the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of {approx}20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cameron, Scott A. [Astronomy Department, 500 Church Street, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1090 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org, E-mail: sacamero@umich.edu, E-mail: andy@ociw.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ESB Networks Case Study on Distribution Volt-VAR Control Integrated with Wind Turbine Inverter Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key topic addressed in this Smart Grid Demonstration case study is how the decoupled reactive power capability of modern, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) wind farms can be used to actively control voltage at the point of common coupling. This was done within the context of assessing technologies that will allow higher penetration of renewable resources without violating voltage limits on local distribution systems.A trial was conducted, using a section of Ireland’s ESB ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

2011 Quantum Control of Light & Matter Gordon Research Conference (July 31-August 5, 2011, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA)  

SciTech Connect

Quantum control of light and matter is the quest to steer a physical process to a desirable outcome, employing constructive and destructive interference. Three basic questions address feasibility of quantum control: (1) The problem of controllability, does a control field exist for a preset initial and target state; (2) Synthesis, constructively finding the field that leads to the target; and (3) Optimal Control Theory - optimizing the field that carries out this task. These continue to be the fundamental theoretical questions to be addressed in the conference. How to realize control fields in the laboratory is an ongoing challenge. This task is very diverse viewing the emergence of control scenarios ranging from attoseconds to microseconds. How do the experimental observations reflect on the theoretical framework? The typical arena of quantum control is an open environment where much of the control is indirect. How are control scenarios realized in dissipative open systems? Can new control opportunities emerge? Can one null decoherence effects? An ideal setting for control is ultracold matter. The initial and final state can be defined more precisely. Coherent control unifies many fields of physical science. A lesson learned in one field can reflect on another. Currently quantum information processing has emerged as a primary target of control where the key issue is controlling quantum gate operation. Modern nonlinear spectroscopy has emerged as another primary field. The challenge is to unravel the dynamics of molecular systems undergoing strong interactions with the environment. Quantum optics where non-classical fields are to be generated and employed. Finally, coherent control is the basis for quantum engineering. These issues will be under the limelight of the Gordon conference on Quantum Control of Light and Matter.

Thomas Weinacht

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

Urbanczyk, Adam [COBRA Research Institute on Communication Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Noetzel, Richard [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM), ETSI Telecommunication, Technical University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display with Integrated Drivers R.M.A. Dawson, Z. Shen, D.A. Furst, S. Connor, J. Hsu, M.G. Kane, R.G. Stewart, A. Ipri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display with Integrated Drivers R.S.A. Abstract The design of an active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display using a polysilicon. Introduction Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presently of great interest due to their potential

278

DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workstation density, timeouts, standby power, and controlthose that achieve very low standby power will have the mostWS lighting. Third, standby power contributes significantly

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Performance of electronic ballasts and lighting controllers with 34-W fluorescent lamps: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamps are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the system efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extensively in concert lighting and are finding increased usage in dance lighting because refers to the upstage back curtain (is white or a light color), which can be us for lighting or special Mixer #12;Monitor House speaker Lighting System Control Board: Similar to the sound board, the light

Bifano, Thomas

284

Beyond integrated safeguards: performance-based assessments for future nuclear controls.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, iE the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control agendas are to advance, they will likely become increasingly seen as parallel undertakings with the objective of comprehensive cradle-to-grave controls over nuclear materials and possibly even warheads removed from defense programs along with materials in civilian use. This 'back to the future' prospect was envisioned in the Acheson-Lillienthal Report and the Baruch Plan, and more modestly in the Atoms-for-Peace Proposal. Unlike the grand plans of the early nuclear years, today's and tomorrow's undertakings will more likely consist of a series of incremental steps with the goal of expanding nuclear controls. These steps will be undertaken at a time of fundamental change in the IAEA safeguards system, and they will be influenced by those changes in profound ways. This prospective influence needs to be taken into account as the IAEA develops and implements integrated safeguards, including its efforts to establish new safeguards criteria, undertake technological and administrative improvements in safeguards, implement credible capabilities for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities and activities and, perhaps, provide for a more intensive involvement in applying safeguards in new roles such as the verification of a fissile materials cutoff treaty. Performance-based criteria offer one promising way to address the effectiveness of integrated safeguards and to provide a common means of assessing the other key areas of a comprehensive approach to nuclear controls as these develop independently and to the extent that they are coordinated in the future.

Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development of the integrated environmental control model. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this contract is to develop and refine the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The work in this contract is divided into two phases. Phase I deals with further developing the existing version of the IECM and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the model. Phase H deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the updated model. The present report summarizes recent progress on the Phase I effort during the period April 1, 1995 through June 30, 1995. This report presents additional revisions to the new cost models of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology initially reported in our fourth quarterly report. For convenience, the complete description of the revised FGD models are presented here.

Kalagnanam, J.R.; Rubin, E.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Integrated emissions control system for residential CWS furnace. Final report, September 20, 1989--March 20, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to the successful development and commercialization of a coal-fired residential furnace is the need for a reliable, cost-effective emission control system. Tecogen is developing a novel, integrated control system to control NO{sub x}SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. At the heart of this system is a unique emissions control reactor for the control of SO{sub 2}. This reactor provides high sorbent particle residence time within the reactor while doing so in a very compact geometry. Final cleanup of any fine particulates exiting the reactor including respirable-sized particulates, is completed with the use of high efficiency bag filters. Under a previous contract with PETC (Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79650), Tecogen developed a residential-scale Coal Water Slurry (CWS) combustor to control NO{sub x}emission. This combustor makes use of centrifugal forces, set up by a predominantly tangential flow field, to separate and confine larger unburned coal particles in the furnace upper chamber. Various partitions are used to retard the axial, downward flow of these particles, and thus maximize their residence time in the hottest section of the combustor. By operating this combustor under staged conditions, the local stoichiometry in the primary zone can be controlled in such a manner as to minimize NO{sub x} emission.

Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Touch-Dim Network for the Dimming Control of Lighting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DALI is a popular interface of lighting network system with an excellent dimming facility, but it is too complicated when it is applied in family house. Touch-Dim installation of DALI ballast is then developed. The installation and operation are much ... Keywords: DALI, lighting, network, Touch-Dim

Jyh-Ching Juang; Hung-Chi Wang; Chun-Lin Lu; Wen-Ming Chen; Ching-Wen Hsu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Topical viscosity control for light hydrocarbon displacing fluids in petroleum recovery and in fracturing fluids for well stimulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solvent-type flooding fluids comprising light hydrocarbons in the range of ethane to hexane (and mixtures thereof) are used to displace crude oil in formations having temperatures of about 20 degrees to about 150 degrees Centigrade and pressures above about 650 psi, the light hydrocarbons having dissolved therein from about 0.05% to about 3% of an organotin compound of the formula R.sub.3 SnF where each R is independently an alkyl, aryl or alkyaryl group from 3 to 12 carbon atoms. Under the pressures and temperatures described, the organotin compounds become pentacoordinated and linked through the electronegative bridges, forming polymers within the light hydrocarbon flooding media to render them highly viscous. Under ambient conditions, the viscosity control agents will not readily be produced from the formation with either crude oil or water, since they are insoluble in the former and only sparingly soluble in the latter.

Heller, John P. (Socorro, NM); Dandge, Dileep K. (Socorro, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Direct Torque Control Based on Space Vector Modulation with Adaptive Neural Integrator for Stator Flux Estimation in Induction Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct torque control based on space vector modulation (SVM-DTC) preserve DTC transient merits, furthermore, produce better quality steady-state performance in a wide speed range. A new adaptive neural integration algorithm for estimating stator flux ... Keywords: DTC, space vector modulation, adaptive neural integrator, stator flux estimation

Chunhua Zang; Xianqing Cao

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

291

From Design to Production Control Through the Integration of Engineering Data Management and Workflow Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At a time when many companies are under pressure to reduce "times-to-market" the management of product information from the early stages of design through assembly to manufacture and production has become increasingly important. Similarly in the construction of high energy physics devices the collection of (often evolving) engineering data is central to the subsequent physics analysis. Traditionally in industry design engineers have employed Engineering Data Management Systems (also called Product Data Management Systems) to coordinate and control access to documented versions of product designs. However, these systems provide control only at the collaborative design level and are seldom used beyond design. Workflow management systems, on the other hand, are employed in industry to coordinate and support the more complex and repeatable work processes of the production environment. Commercial workflow products cannot support the highly dynamic activities found both in the design stages of product development and in rapidly evolving workflow definitions. The integration of Product Data Management with Workflow Management can provide support for product development from initial CAD/CAM collaborative design through to the support and optimisation of production workflow activities. This paper investigates this integration and proposes a philosophy for the support of product data throughout the full development and production lifecycle and demonstrates its usefulness in the construction of CMS detectors.

J-M. Le Goff; G. Chevenier; A. Bazan; T. Le Flour; S. Lieunard; S. Murray; J-P. Vialle; N. Baker; F. Estrella; Z. Kovacs; R. McClatchey; G. Organtini; S. Bityukov

1998-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion-beam apparatus and method for analyzing and controlling integrated circuits. The ion-beam apparatus comprises a stage for holding one or more integrated circuits (ICs); a source means for producing a focused ion beam; and a beam-directing means for directing the focused ion beam to irradiate a predetermined portion of the IC for sufficient time to provide an ion-beam-generated electrical input signal to a predetermined element of the IC. The apparatus and method have applications to failure analysis and developmental analysis of ICs and permit an alteration, control, or programming of logic states or device parameters within the IC either separate from or in combination with applied electrical stimulus to the IC for analysis thereof. Preferred embodiments of the present invention including a secondary particle detector and an electron floodgun further permit imaging of the IC by secondary ions or electrons, and allow at least a partial removal or erasure of the ion-beam-generated electrical input signal.

Campbell, Ann N. (Albuquerque, NM); Soden, Jerry M. (Placitas, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Model for Staebler-Wronski degradation deduced from long-term, controlled light-soaking experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term light-soaking experiments of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules have now established that stabilization of the degradation occurs at levels that depend significantly on the operating conditions, as well as on the operating history of the modules. The authors suggest that stabilization occurs because of the introduction of degradation mechanisms with different time constants and annealing activation energies, depending on the exposure conditions. Stabilization will occur once a sufficient accumulation of different degradation mechanisms occurs. They find that operating module temperature during light-soaking is the most important parameter for determining stabilized performance. Next in importance is the exposure history of the device. The precise value of the light intensity seems least important in determining the stabilized efficiency, as long as its level is a significant fraction of 1-sun.

Von Roedern, B.; del Cueto, J. A.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Performance of MEMS-based visible-light adaptive optics at Lick Observatory: Closed- and open-loop control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the University of California's Lick Observatory, we have implemented an on-sky testbed for next-generation adaptive optics (AO) technologies. The Visible-Light Laser Guidestar Experiments instrument (ViLLaGEs) includes visible-light AO, a micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, and open-loop control of said MEMS on the 1-meter Nickel telescope at Mt. Hamilton. In this paper we evaluate the performance of ViLLaGEs in open- and closed-loop control, finding that both control methods give equivalent Strehl ratios of up to ~ 7% in I-band and similar rejection of temporal power. Therefore, we find that open-loop control of MEMS on-sky is as effective as closed-loop control. Furthermore, after operating the system for three years, we find MEMS technology to function well in the observatory environment. We construct an error budget for the system, accounting for 130 nm of wavefront error out of 190 nm error in the science-camera PSFs. We find that the dominant known term is internal static error...

Morzinski, Katie; Gavel, Donald T; Grigsby, Bryant; Dillon, Daren; Reinig, Marc; Macintosh, Bruce A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Design and Implementation of Switching Voltage Integrated Circuits Based on Sliding Mode Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for high performance circuits in systems with low-voltage and low-power requirements has exponentially increased during the few last years due to the sophistication and miniaturization of electronic components. Most of these circuits are required to have a very good efficiency behavior in order to extend the battery life of the device. This dissertation addresses two important topics concerning very high efficiency circuits with very high performance specifications. The first topic is the design and implementation of class D audio power amplifiers, keeping their inherent high efficiency characteristic while improving their linearity performance, reducing their quiescent power consumption, and minimizing the silicon area. The second topic is the design and implementation of switching voltage regulators and their controllers, to provide a low-cost, compact, high efficient and reliable power conversion for integrated circuits. The first part of this dissertation includes a short, although deep, analysis on class D amplifiers, their history, principles of operation, architectures, performance metrics, practical design considerations, and their present and future market distribution. Moreover, the harmonic distortion of open-loop class D amplifiers based on pulse-width modulation (PWM) is analyzed by applying the duty cycle variation technique for the most popular carrier waveforms giving an easy and practical analytic method to evaluate the class D amplifier distortion and determine its specifications for a given linearity requirement. Additionally, three class D amplifiers, with an architecture based on sliding mode control, are proposed, designed, fabricated and tested. The amplifiers make use of a hysteretic controller to avoid the need of complex overhead circuitry typically needed in other architectures to compensate non-idealities of practical implementations. The design of the amplifiers based on this technique is compact, small, reliable, and provides a performance comparable to the state-of-the-art class D amplifiers, but consumes only one tenth of quiescent power. This characteristic gives to the proposed amplifiers an advantage for applications with minimal power consumption and very high performance requirements. The second part of this dissertation presents the design, implementation, and testing of switching voltage regulators. It starts with a description and brief analysis on the power converters architectures. It outlines the advantages and drawbacks of the main topologies, discusses practical design considerations, and compares their current and future market distribution. Then, two different buck converters are proposed to overcome the most critical issue in switching voltage regulators: to provide a stable voltage supply for electronic devices, with good regulation voltage, high efficiency performance, and, most important, a minimum number of components. The first buck converter, which has been designed, fabricated and tested, is an integrated dual-output voltage regulator based on sliding mode control that provides a power efficiency comparable to the conventional solutions, but potentially saves silicon area and input filter components. The design is based on the idea of stacking traditional buck converters to provide multiple output voltages with the minimum number of switches. Finally, a fully integrated buck converter based on sliding mode control is proposed. The architecture integrates the external passive components to deliver a complete monolithic solution with minimal silicon area. The buck converter employs a poly-phase structure to minimize the output current ripple and a hysteretic controller to avoid the generation of an additional high frequency carrier waveform needed in conventional solutions. The simulated results are comparable to the state-of-the-art works even with

Rojas Gonzalez, Miguel Angel

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Light-cone path integral approach to the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect and the SLAC data on bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent data of the SLAC E-146 collaboration on the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect for bremsstrahlung from 8 and 25 GeV electrons are analyzed within a rigorous light-cone path integral approach. Numerical calculations have been carried out treating rigorously the Coulomb effects and including the inelastic processes. Comparison with the experimental data is performed taking into account multi-photon emission and photon absorption. For most of the targets the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

B. G. Zakharov

1998-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Light-Duty Vehicle Exhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. D. Jones, "Development Cost Estimates for Fuel Economy ofExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-PricingExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing

Wang, Quanlu; Kling, Catherine; Sperling, Daniel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Virginia Tech Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGHTING Daylight and Electric Careful consideration has been given to the integration of daylight, electric light, and the consequences relative to energy conservation, spatial...

299

The Mobil Integrated C{sup 3} (command control and communications) and Security System  

SciTech Connect

The current political and economic situations suggest that significant reductions of nuclear forces outside the US will continue. This implies that in times of crisis the rapid deployment of nuclear weapons into a theater may be required. This paper describes a proposed Mobile Integrated C{sup 3} and Security System (MICSS). The MICSS, together with associated personnel, could satisfy the command and control and security requirements of a deployed nuclear operation. Rapid deployment poses unique nuclear weapon surety difficulties that must be overcome for the operation to be effective and survivable. The MICSS must be portable, reliable, limited in size, and easily emplaced to facilitate movement, reduce the possibility of detection, and minimize manpower requirements. The MICSS will be based on existing technology. Sandia has designed prototype mobile command centers for the military. These command centers are based on an approach that stresses modularity, standards, and the use of an open architecture. Radio, telephone, satellite communications, communication security, and global positioning system equipment has been successfully integrated into the command centers. Sandia is also supporting the development of portable security systems for the military. These systems are rapidly deployable and mission flexible and are capable of intrusion detection, area and alarm display, night assessment, and wireless sensor communications. This paper is organized as follows: Background information about the prototype mobile command centers will be presented first. Background information about portable security systems concepts will then be given. Next, an integrated communications and security system will be presented, and finally, the design and status of a prototype MICSS will be described.

Eras, A.; Brown, R.D.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls  

SciTech Connect

Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF NOx WITH INTEGRATED ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNERS AND SNCR  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired electric utilities are facing a serious challenge with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} emissions. At issue are the NO{sub x} contributions to the acid rain, ground level ozone, and particulate matter formation. Substantial NO{sub x} control requirements could be imposed under the proposed Ozone Transport Rule, National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and New Source Performance Standards. McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), and Fuel Tech are teaming to provide an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control. The system will be comprised of an ultra low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology plus a urea-based, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system. This system will be capable of meeting a target emission limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu and target ammonia (NH3) slip level targeted below 5 ppmV for commercial units. Our approach combines the best available combustion and post-combustion NO{sub x} control technologies. More specifically, B and W's DRB-4Z TM ultra low-NO{sub x} PC burner technology will be combined with Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT (SNCR) and NO{sub x}OUT Cascade (SNCR/SCR hybrid) systems and jointly evaluated and optimized in a state-of-the-art test facility at MTI. Although the NO{sub x}OUT Cascade (SNCR/SCR hybrid) system will not be tested directly in this program, its potential application for situations that require greater NO{sub x} reductions will be inferred from other measurements (i.e., SNCR NO{sub x} removal efficiency plus projected NO{sub x} reduction by the catalyst based on controlled ammonia slip). Our analysis shows that the integrated ultra low-NO{sub x} burner and SNCR system has the lowest cost when the burner emissions are 0.25 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu or less. At burner NO{sub x} emission level of 0.20 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu, the levelized cost per ton of NO{sub x} removed is 52% lower than the SCR cost.

Hamid Farzan

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responsive to the real-time price of energy, and provideresponsive to the real-time price of energy [5]. Controls

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research focussed on fundamental problems in the conversion of light to stored chemical energy. Specifically, work was completed on the design, synthesis and study of multi-component super- and supramolecular systems for photoinduced charge separation, one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis, and on the use of these and related systems for the photochemical generation of H2 from water. At the center of these systems are chromophores comprised of square planar coordinated Pt(II) ions with arylacetylide and either diimine or terpyridyl ligands. Previous work had shown that the chromophores are photoluminescent in fluid solution with long-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) excited states that are necessarily directional. An advance which set the stage for a number of proposed studies was the light-driven production of hydrogen from water using a Pt(terpyridyl)(arylacetylide)+ chromophore and a sacrificial electron donor. The reaction is catalytic and appears to rival previously reported ruthenium bipyridyl systems in terms of H2 production. Variation of system components and mechanistic studies were conducted to understand better the individual steps in the overall process and how to improve its efficiency. Success with light driven H2 generation was employed as a key probe as new systems were constructed consisting of triads for photoinduced charge separation placed in close proximity to the H2 generating catalyst - a Pt colloid - through direct linkage or supramolecular interactions with the polymer used to stabilize the colloid. In order to prepare new donor-chromophore-acceptor (D-C-A) triads and associated D-C and C-A dyads, new ligands were synthesized having functional groups for different coupling reactions such as simple amide formation and Pd-catalyzed coupling. In these systems, the donor was attached to the arylacetylide ligands and the acceptor was linked to the diimine or terpyridyl chelate. Research under the contract proved successful in the development of synthetic methodologies to make multi-component systems designed so as to maintain electronic communication between components held in a defined spatial arrangement. Systems effective for light driven H2 generation were examined by photophysical methods including transient absorption spectroscopy to observe charge-separated states and chart their dynamics. Quantum yields for hydrogen production were also measured. Additional studies examined the effectiveness of these systems for H2 generation and involved the development of new catalysts and systems based thereon. From these studies, a better understanding of initial steps in the light driven generation of hydrogen were obtained.

Professor Richard Eisenberg

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Control of light saturated photosynthesis: Concentration and activity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Final report, September 1, 1993--February 28, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is one of the most abundant enzymes on the planet and is responsible for catalysing the net fixation of CO{sub 2} into organic matter. It is central, therefore, to primary productivity in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Rubisco is a large enzyme with low substrate affinity and low catalytic efficiency and is considered to limit the rate of light-saturated photosynthesis. This report summarizes research into the molecular basis of the regulation of phytoplankton photosynthesis. It describes experimental and theoretical studies of the role of Rubisco in regulating the photosynthetic rate of phytoplankton. It also describes the integration of a mechanistically based phytoplankton growth model into a description of primary productivity in the sea. This work was conducted as part of the Ocean Margins Program.

Geider, R.J. [Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). College of Marine Studies

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Loss of integrated control system power and overcooling transient at Rancho Seco on December 26, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 26, 1985, Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, located in Clay, California, about 25 miles southeast of Sacramento, experienced a loss of dc power within the integrated control system (ICS) while the plant was operating at 76% power. The plant is owned by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). Following the loss of ICS dc power, the reactor tripped on high reactor coolant system (RCS) pressure followed by a rapid overcooling transient and automatic initiation of the safety features actuation system on low RCS pressure. The overcooling transient continued until ICS dc power was restored 26 minutes after its loss. The fundamental causes for this transient were design weaknesses and vulnerabilities in the ICS and in the equipment controlled by that system. These weaknesses and vulnerabilities were not adequately compensated by other design features, plant procedures or operator training. These weaknesses and vulnerabilities were largely known to SMUD and the NRC staff by virtue of a number of precursor events and through related analyses and studies. Yet, adequate plant modifications were not made so that this event would be improbable, or so that its course or consequences would be altered significantly. The information was available and known which could have prevented this overcooling transient; but in the absence of adequate plant modifications, the incident should have been expected. The report includes findings and conclusions of the NRC Incident Investigation Team sent to Rancho Seco by the NRC Executive Director for Operations in conformance with NRC's recently established Incident Investigation Program. 33 figs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Integrating Small Scale Distributed Generation into a Deregulated Market: Control Strategies and Price Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small scale power generating technologies, such as gas turbines, small hydro turbines, photovoltaics, wind turbines and fuel cells, are gradually replacing conventional generating technologies, for various applications, in the electric power system. The industry restructuring process in the United States is exposing the power sector to market forces, which is creating competitive structures for generation and alternative regulatory structures for the transmission and distribution systems. The potentially conflicting economic and technical demands of the new, independent generators introduce a set of significant uncertainties. What balance between market forces and centralized control will be found to coordinate distribution system operations? How will the siting of numerous small scale generators in distribution feeders impact the technical operations and control of the distribution system? Who will provide ancillary services (such as voltage support and spinning reserves) in the new competitive environment? This project investigates both the engineering and market integration of distributed generators into the distribution system. On the technical side, this project investigates the frequency performance of a distribution system that has multiple small scale generators. Using IEEE sample distribution systems and new dynamic generator models, this project develops general methods for

Judith Cardell; Marija Ili?; Richard D. Tabors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Measurement and control of exciton spin in organic light emitting devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic semiconductors are a promising new material set for electronic and optoelectronic devices. Their properties can be precisely controlled through chemistry, and they are well-suited for large-area, flexible, and ...

Segal, Michael, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated powertrain control to meet future CO2 and Euro-6 emissions targets for a diesel hybrid with SCR-deNOx system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept is introduced to optimize the performance of the entire powertrain: Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC). In this concept, the synergy between engine, driveline and aftertreatment system is exploited by integrated energy and emission management. ...

Frank Willems; Darren Foster

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy ConsumptionEnergy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock. Lawrence Berkeley National

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electrochromic-photovoltaic film for light-sensitive control of optical transmittance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable transmittance optical component includes an electrochromic material and a photovoltaic device-type thin film solar cell deposited in a tandem type, monolithic single coating over the component. A bleed resistor of a predetermined value is connected in series across the electrochromic material and photovoltaic device controlling the activation and deactivation of the electrochromic material. The electrical conductivity between the electrochromic material and the photovoltaic device is enhanced by interposing a transparent electrically conductive layer. 5 figures.

Branz, H.M.; Crandall, R.S.; Tracy, C.E.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electrochromic-photovoltaic film for light-sensitive control of optical transmittance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable transmittance optical component includes an electrochromic material and a photovoltaic device-type thin film solar cell deposited in a tandem type, monolithic single coating over the component. A bleed resistor of a predetermined value is connected in series across the electrochromic material and photovoltaic device controlling the activation and deactivation of the electrochromic material. The electrical conductivity between the electrochromic material and the photovoltaic device is enhanced by interposing a transparent electrically conductive layer.

Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO); Crandall, Richard S. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics and Simulation, Tarragona, July 2005 INTEGRATED REAL-TIME CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics and Simulation, Tarragona, July 2005 INTEGRATED REAL-TIME CONTROL FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE SCENARIOS AND APPLICATIONS TO BURNING PLASMAS EFDA-JET CSU, Culham. Sartori, and many other JET-EFDA Contributors D. Moreau #12;D. Moreau IEA W60 Burning Plasma Physics

315

ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

David Wenzhong Gao

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

317

Decision-Support Software for Grid Operators: Transmission Topology Control for Infrastructure Resilience to the Integration of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect

GENI Project: The CRA team is developing control technology to help grid operators more actively manage power flows and integrate renewables by optimally turning on and off entire power lines in coordination with traditional control of generation and load resources. The control technology being developed would provide grid operators with tools to help manage transmission congestion by identifying the facilities whose on/off status must change to lower generation costs, increase utilization of renewable resources and improve system reliability. The technology is based on fast optimization algorithms for the near to real-time change in the on/off status of transmission facilities and their software implementation.

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

K. Stork; R. Poola

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is developing the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. The program is conducted in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, industry, and international partners. Idaho National Laboratory serves as the Technical Integration Office and coordinates the research and development (R&D) projects in the following pathways: Materials Aging and Degradation Assessment, Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems

320

The potential for control of carbon dioxide emissions from integrated gasification/combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production through efficient fuel used is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy-efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such systems and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an to equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget is 1 kg/kWh CO{sub 2}. The base case for the comparison is a 457-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, preparation, and transportation of the coal and limestone result in a net system electric power production of 454 MW with a 0.835 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output is taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2} and then processed in a glycol-based absorber unit to recover CO{sub 2} Prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then transports the CO{sub 2} for geological sequestering. The net electric power production for the system with CO{sub 2} recovery is 381 MW with a 0.156 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction of Electricity Peak Demand (WWR 33%) 8 DimLights aenergy consumption. 3.4. Peak demand Also of interestis the reduction in peak demand of electricity since peak

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Integrating planning and control for single-bodied wheeled mobile robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to couple path planning and control for mobile robot navigation in a hybrid control framework. We build upon an existing hybrid control approach called sequential composition, in which a set of feedback control ... Keywords: Hybrid controls, Mobile robots, Sequential composition

David C. Conner; Howie Choset; Alfred A. Rizzi

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

MLE+: a tool for integrated design and deployment of energy efficient building controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation engines for buildings can be realistic and accurate, but only provide basic control interfaces. Control engineers have developed robust and complex controls for energy-efficient building operation though such methods are often based on simplistic ...

Willy Bernal, Madhur Behl, Truong Nghiem, Rahul Mangharam

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control System. Energy and Buildings 33(2001): 477-487.control system. Energy and Buildings Lee ES, Yazdanian M ,Daylight Controls. Energy and Buildings 33(2001): 793-803.

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integration of Nevada Test Site (NTS) Work Control Programs and Incorporating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) into Activity Level Work Planning and Control  

SciTech Connect

This session will examine a method developed by Federal and Contractor personnel at the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to improve the planning and execution of work activities utilizing an Activity Level Work Control process in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations. The process was initially developed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2007, and implementation is commencing during the fourth quarter of FY 2008. This process will significantly enhance the flexibility and the appropriate rigor in the performance of work activities.

Mike Kinney and Kevin Breen

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

RF signal inductors in iUHD for voltage controlled oscillators in configurable RF integrated circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The miniaturization of radio frequency wireless communications circuitry has resulted in a need for smaller inductors. This thesis presents designs of spiral inductors to be fabricated in Draper Laboratory's integrated ...

Karpe, Charvak (Charvak P.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integrated model-based run-to-run uniformity control for epitaxial silicon deposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiconductor fabrication facilities require an increasingly expensive and integrated set of processes. The bounds on efficiency and repeatability for each process step continue to tighten under the pressure of economic ...

Gower, Aaron E. (Aaron Elwood)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Conference 5739, SPIE International Symposium Integrated Optoelectronic Devices, 22-27 Jan 2005, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric Ga in green light emitting diodes is one of the big challenges towards all-solid- state lighting. The prime,3], and commercialization [4,5] of high brightness light emitting diodes LEDs has led to a 1.82 Billion-$/year world market

Wetzel, Christian M.

330

Connecticut Light & Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Motors, HVAC Controls Active Incentive No...

331

An Integrated Refrigeration, Humidity Control and HVAC Solution for Supermarkets: Field Demonstration at a Wal-Mart SuperCenter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a systematic approach to developing an energy efficient and cost effective solution for refrigeration, humidity control, indoor air quality, and space heating and cooling for large retail super centers. The report also presents the results of a field demonstration using a newly developed integrated system that achieved significant energy savings and other benefits compared to the state-of-the-art system.

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Experimental Approach of a High Performance Control of Two PermanentMagnet Synchronous Machines in an Integrated Drive for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

The close-loop digital signal processor (DSP) control of an integrated-dual inverter, which is able to drive two permanent magnet (PM) motors independently, is presented and evaluated experimentally. By utilizing the neutral point of the main traction motor, only two inverter poles are needed for the two-phase auxiliary motor. The modified field-oriented control scheme for this integrated inverter was introduced and employed in real-time control. The experimental results show the inverter is able to control two drives independently. An integrated, component count reduced drive is achieved.

Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Su, Gui-Jia [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Demonstration of An Integrated Approach to Mercury Control at Lee Station  

SciTech Connect

General Electric (GE) has developed an approach whereby native mercury reduction on fly ash can be improved by optimizing the combustion system. This approach eliminates carbon-rich areas in the combustion zone, making the combustion process more uniform, and allows increasing carbon content in fly ash without significant increase in CO emissions. Since boiler excess O{sub 2} can be also reduced as a result of optimized combustion, this process reduces NO{sub x} emissions. Because combustion optimization improves native mercury reduction on fly ash, it can reduce requirements for activated carbon injection (ACI) when integrated with sorbent injection for more efficient mercury control. The approach can be tailored to specific unit configurations and coal types for optimal performance. This report describes results of a U.S. DOE sponsored project designed to evaluate the effect of combustion conditions on 'native' mercury capture on fly ash and integrate combustion optimization for improved mercury and NO{sub x} reduction with ACI. The technology evaluation took place in Lee Station Unit 3 located in Goldsboro, NC and operated by Progress Energy. Unit 3 burns a low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal and is a 250 MW opposed-wall fired unit equipped with an ESP with a specific collection area of 249 ft{sup 2}/kacfm. Unit 3 is equipped with SO{sub 3} injection for ESP conditioning. The technical goal of the project was to evaluate the technology's ability to achieve 70% mercury reduction below the baseline emission value of 2.9 lb/TBtu, which was equivalent to 80% mercury reduction relative to the mercury concentration in the coal. The strategy to achieve the 70% incremental improvement in mercury removal in Unit 3 was (1) to enhance 'naturally' occurring fly ash mercury capture by optimizing the combustion process and using duct humidification to reduce flue gas temperatures at the ESP inlet, and (2) to use ACI in front of the ESP to further reduce mercury emissions. The program was comprised of field and pilot-scale tests, engineering studies and consisted of eight tasks. As part of the program, GE conducted pilot-scale evaluation of sorbent effect on mercury reduction, supplied and installed adjustable riffle boxes to assist in combustion optimization, performed combustion optimization, supplied mobile sorbent injection and flue gas humidification systems, conducted CFD modeling of sorbent injection and flue gas humidification, and performed mercury testing including a continuous 30-day sorbent injection trial. Combustion optimization was the first step in reduction of mercury emissions. Goals of combustion optimization activities were to improve 'native' mercury capture on fly ash and reduce NO{sub x}. Combustion optimization included balancing of coal flow through individual burners to eliminate zones of carbon-rich combustion, air flow balancing, and burner adjustments. As part of the project, the original riffle boxes were replaced with Foster-Wheeler's adjustable riffle boxes to allow for biasing the coal flow between the coal pipes. A 10-point CO/O{sub 2}/NO{sub x} grid was installed in the primary superheater region of the back pass to assist in these activities. Testing of mercury emissions before and after combustion optimization demonstrated that mercury emissions were reduced from 2.9 lb/TBtu to 1.8 lb/TBtu due to boiler operation differences in conjunction with combustion optimization, a 38% improvement in 'native' mercury capture on fly ash. Native mercury reduction from coal was {approx}42% at baseline conditions and 64% at optimized combustion conditions. As a result of combustion optimization NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by 18%. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed to study the flow distribution and sorbent injection in the post air heater duct in Lee Station Unit 3. Modeling of the flow pattern exiting the air pre-heater demonstrated that because of the duct transition from a circular opening at the exit of air-pre-heater to a rectangular ESP inlet duct, flow separation occurred at the corners afte

Vitali Lissianski; Pete Maly

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Automated Monitoring and Control Using New Data Integration Paradigm Mladen Kezunovi , Tanja Djoki Tatjana Kosti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2003, Substation Committee of the IEEE Power Engineering Society [3] C.R.Ozansoy, A.Zayegh, A.Kalam, "Communications for Substation Automation and Integration", In Australasian Universities Power Engineering Substation Automation LiPing LU1,2 , GangYan LI1 , YeQiong SONG2 1 ­ School of Mechanical and Electronical

Kezunovic, Mladen

335

Argonne CNM Highlight: Light Scattering by Nanoparticles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Light Scattering by Nanoparticles: Understanding Confinement of Light for Nanophotonics Applications through Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope Schematic of the apertureless near-field optical microscope. The optical scattering from the AFM probe tip provides the subdiffraction-limited optical field information. One of the motivations of nanoscience is to achieve sufficient control over photon propagation in nanostructures so as to effectively replace the electron with the photon in all-optical integrated circuits. The much greater speed and bandwidth of light pulses versus electrons promise new capabilities and size reduction of photon based “electronics.” Arrays of metal nanoparticles are currently considered a leading candidate for photon

336

Technology: Lighting the Way to Tomorrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology: Lighting the Way to Tomorrow Technology: Lighting the Way to Tomorrow Speaker(s): Jeff Quinlan Date: June 28, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Abby Enscoe Over the course of the last decade there have been a series of technological changes that have significantly impacted the lighting industry. This presentation examines a few of these changes. In particular, it will discuss the advent of lighting grade LEDs, the spread of controls from luminaires to the grid, and market factors that are spurring the need for improved systems. Starting with an examination of the macro economic trends, continuing through various elements of luminaire design, and concluding with a vision of better integrated systems, this presentation will show the state of the art in lighting technology and discuss what is

337

Waveguide-integrated electroluminescent carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon based optoelectronic devices promise to revolutionize modern integrated circuits by combining outstanding electrical and optical properties into a unified technology. By coupling nanoelectronic devices to nanophotonic structures functional components such as nanoscale light emitting diodes, narrow-band thermal emitters, cavity controlled detectors and wideband electro optic modulators can be realized for chipscale information processing. These devices not only allow the light-matter interaction of low-dimensional systems to be studied, but also provide fundamental building blocks for high bandwidth on-chip communication. Here we demonstrate how light from an electrically-driven carbon-nanotube can be coupled directly into a photonic waveguide architecture. We realize wafer scale, broadband sources integrated with nanophotonic circuits allowing for propagation of light over centimeter distances. Moreover, we show that the spectral properties of the emitter can be controlled directly on chip with passive...

Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Flavel, Benjamin S; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Krupke, Ralph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hybrid lighting: Illuminating our future  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid lighting is a combination of natural and artificial illumination to be used indoors for all lighting needs. Ideally, hybrid lighting is effectively indistinguishable from standard artificial lighting except in quality and cost, where it will likely be an improvement. Hybrid lighting systems are produced by a combination of four technologies: collecting natural light, generating artificial light, transporting and distributing light to where it is needed, and controlling the amounts of both natural and artificial light continuously during usage. Lighting demands a large fraction of our energy needs. If we can control or decrease this demand, we are able to accommodate societal growth without energy demand growth.

Cates, M.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Clothes Washers, Dehumidifiers, Dishwasher, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Pool Pumps, Programmable Thermostats,...

340

Integrated Emissions Control - Process Review: Multi-Pollutant Process Cost Comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have the potential to reduce the emission rates for multiple pollutants simultaneously with the goal of identifying integrat...

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Flash Lighting with Fluorescent Lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A flash lighting circuit with the fluorescent lamp is designed to produce lighting flicker by means of controlling the operating frequency and the duty-ratio of… (more)

Hsieh, Horng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

343

2012 SG Peer Review - GridLAB-D and Integrated T&D Control - David Chassin, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GridLAB-D Analysis of Smart Grids David P. Chassin, PI Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 7, 2012 !& =;;A & 5 " /'' # !&( &' Objective Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY12 FY12 authorized FY13 requested *Out-year(s) $4,500 $1,425 $1,330 GridLAB-D Base $400 $400/yr NRECA $150 Micro-Grid Controls $240 Camp Smith Modeling $240 Integrated T&D Control $300 *Out-year(s) funding does not include new starts beyond FY13. Technical Scope Use GridLAB-D to quantify the impact of smart grid technologies, such as microgrids, distributed renewables, and new advanced load control strategies. GridLAB-D can simulation these different technologies in an accelerated time-frame to help

344

A Modular Building Controls Virtual Test Bed for the Integrations of Heterogeneous Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control and energy management systems. ” ASHRAE TransactionsSimulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus. ”the EnergyPlus Energy Management System module, cur- rently

Wetter, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

346

Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses (Illinois)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies CustomOthers pending approval, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Exit Signs, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

347

Performance analysis of an integrated eye gaze tracking / electromyogram cursor control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eye Gaze Tracking (EGT) systems allow individuals with motor disabilities to quickly move a screen cursor on a PC. However, there are limitations in the steadiness and the accuracy of cursor control and clicking capabilities they provide. On the other ... Keywords: EGT, EMG, cursor control, motor disabilities

Craig A. Chin; Armando Barreto; Gualberto Cremades; Malek Adjouadi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Data Integration and Information Exchange for Enhanced Control and Protection of Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mladen Kezunovic, IEEE Fellow Texas A&M University, Department of Electrical Engineering, College Station are connected directly to the switchyard via dedicated wiring typically terminated in the substation control) that are wired to the substation switchyard and located in the control house. In today's practice, the local

Kezunovic, Mladen

349

System theoretic framework for assuring safety and dependability of highly integrated aero engine control systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of complex, safety-critical systems for aero-engine control is subject to the, often competing, demands for higher safety and reduced development cost. Although the commercial aerospace industry has a general ...

Atherton, Malvern J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Preliminary Guidelines for Integrated Controls and Monitoring for Fossil Fuel Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern digital distributed control systems offer a large number of advantages to operators of fossil fuel plants, and many utilities will be replacing their existing control systems with them. This report, consisting of the preliminary guidelines developed by the Southern California Edison Company during the first phase of its El Segundo power plant, units 3 and 4, retrofit project, offers advice applicable to other phased upgrades, complete changeouts, or new installations.

1990-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy impacts of controlling carbon dioxide emissions from an integrated gasification/combined-cycle system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from a study of the impacts associated with CO{sub 2} recovery in integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) systems which is being conducted for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center by Argonne National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to compare, on a consistent systems-oriented basis, the energy and economic impacts of adding CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration to an IGCC system. The research reported here has emphasized commercial technologies for capturing CO{sub 2}, but ongoing work is also addressing advanced technologies under development and alternate power-system configurations that may enhance system efficiency.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Kanda, Naohiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Naohiro Kanda

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two. Therefore, there is a lack of both analysis tools and operational strategies for considering them as an integrated system. One drawback of operating the ramp-metering system and the diamond interchange system in isolation is that traffic from the ramp, particularly if it is metered, can spill back into the diamond interchange, causing both congestion and safety concerns at the diamond interchange. While flushing the ramp queues by temporarily suspending ramp metering has been the primary strategy for preventing queue spillback, it can result in freeway system breakdown, which would affect the entire system's efficiency. The aim of this research was to develop operational strategies for managing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering system (IDIRMS). Enhanced modeling methodologies were developed for an IDIRMS. A computer model named DRIVE (Diamond Interchange and Ramp Metering Integration Via Evaluation) was developed, which was characterized as a mesoscopic simulation and analysis model. DRIVE incorporated the enhanced modeling methodologies developed in this study and could be used to perform system analysis for an IDIRMS given a set of system input parameters and variables. DRIVE was validated against a VISSIM microscopic simulation model, and general agreement was found between the two models. System operational characteristics were investigated using DRIVE to gain a better understanding of the system features. Integrated control strategies (ICS) were developed based on the two commonly used diamond interchange phasing schemes, basic three-phase and TTI four-phase. The ICS were evaluated using VISSIM microscopic simulation under three general traffic demand scenarios: low, medium, and high, as characterized by the volume-to-capacity ratios at the metered ramps. The results of the evaluation indicate that the integrated operations through an adaptive signal control system were most effective under the medium traffic demand scenario by preventing or delaying the onset of ramp-metering queue flush, thereby minimizing freeway breakdown and system delays.

Tian, Zongzhong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Monovalve with integrated fuel injector and port control valve, and engine using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine includes an engine casing that defines a hollow piston cavity separated from an exhaust passage and an intake passage by a valve seat. A gas exchange valve member is positioned adjacent the valve seat and is moveable between an open position and a closed position. The gas exchange valve member also defines an opening that opens into the hollow piston cavity. A needle valve member is positioned in the gas exchange valve member adjacent a nozzle outlet and is moveable between an inject position and a blocked position. A port control valve member, which has a hydraulic surface, is mounted around the gas exchange valve member and moveable between an intake position and an exhaust position. A pilot valve is moveable between a first position at which the port control hydraulic surface is exposed to a source of high pressure fluid, and a second position at which the port control hydraulic surface is exposed to a source of low pressure fluid.

Milam, David M. (Metamora, IL)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Homeostatic control: economic integration of solar technologies into electric power operations and planning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and technical interfaces between the electrical utility and the distributed, nondispatchable electric generation systems are only minimally understood at the present time. The economic issues associated with the interface of new energy technologies and the electric utility grid are discussed. Then the concept of Homeostatic Control is introduced and the use of such an economic concept applied to the introduction of nondispatchable technologies into the existing utility system is discussed. The transition and potential impact of a Homoeostatic Control system working with the existing electric utility system is discussed.

Tabors, R.D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Integration Of The LHC Cryogenics Control System Data Into The CERN Layout Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider’s Cryogenic Control System makes extensive use of several databases to manage data appertaining to over 34,000 cryogenic instrumentation channels. This data is essential for populating the software of the PLCs which are responsible for maintaining the LHC at the appropriate temperature. In order to reduce the number of data sources and the overall complexity of the system, the databases have been rationalised and the automatic tool, that extracts data for the control software, has been simplified. This paper describes the main improvements that have been made and considers the success of the project.

Fortescue-Beck, E; Gomes, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Light-cone zero modes revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vacuum problem of light-cone quantum field theory is reanalysed from a functional-integral point of view.

Thomas Heinzl

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

THE INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERED AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH WITH LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUSLY CLOSED SITES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental remediation efforts that are underway at hundreds of contaminated sites in the United States will not be able to remediate large portions of those sites to conditions that would permit unrestricted access. Rather, large volumes of waste materials, contaminated soils and cleanup residuals will have to be isolated either in place or in new, often on-site, disposal cells with long term monitoring, maintenance and institutional control needs. The challenge continues to be to provide engineering systems and controls that can ensure the protection of public health and the environment over very long time horizons (hundreds to perhaps thousands of years) with minimal intervention. Effective long term management of legacy hazardous and nuclear waste requires an integrated approach that addresses both the engineered containment and control system itself and the institutional controls and other responsibilities that are needed. Decisions concerning system design, monitoring and maintenance, and the institutional controls that will be employed are best done through a "risk-nformed, performance-based" approach. Such an approach should incorporate an analysis of potential "failure" modes and consequences for all important system features, together with lessons learned from experience with systems already in place. The authors will present the preliminary results of a case study approach that included several sites where contamination isolation systems including institutional controls have been implemented. The results are being used together with failure trees and logic diagrams that have been developed for both the engineered barriers and the institutional controls. The use of these analytical tools to evaluate the potential for different levels of failure and associated consequences will be discussed. Of special interest is the robustness of different approaches to providing long-term protection through redundancy and defense in depth.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century, light-source user facilities have transformedagreement that a new user facility that provides an array ofon which large-scale user facilities in this domain might be

Arenholz, Elke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Lighting Research Group: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Lighting Research Facilities at LBNL gonio-photometer Gonio-photometer We use this device to measure the intensity and direction of the light from a lamp or fixture. integrating sphere Integrating sphere This instrument allows us to get a fast and accurate measurement of the total light output of a lamp. We are not able to determine the direction of the light, only the intensity. power analyzer Power analyzer We use our power analyzer with the lamps in the gonio-photometer to measure input power, harmonic distortion, power factor, and many other signals that tell us how well a lamp is performing. spectro-radiometer Spectro-radiometer This device measures not only the intensity of a light source but also the intensity of the light at each wavelength.

363

From Design to Production Control Through the Integration of Engineering Data Management and Workflow Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At a time when many companies are under pressure to reduce "times-to-market" the management of product information from the early stages of design through assembly to manufacture and production has become increasingly important. Similarly in the construction of high energy physics devices the collection of ( often evolving) engineering data is central to the subsequent physics analysis. Traditionally in industry design engineers have employed Engineering Data Management Systems ( also called Product Data Management Systems) to coordinate and control access to documented versions of product designs. However, these systems provide control only at the collaborative design level and are seldom used beyond design. Workflow management systems, on the other hand, are employed in industry to coordinate and support the more complex and repeatable work processes of the production environment. Commer cial workflow products cannot support the highly dynamic activities found both in the design stages of product developmen...

Le Goff, J M; Bityukov, S; Estrella, F; Kovács, Z; Le Flour, T; Lieunard, S; McClatchey, R; Murray, S; Organtini, G; Vialle, J P; Bazan, A; Chevenier, G

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Parallel Row-Based Algorithm For Standard Cell Placement With Integrated Error Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel approaches to control error in parallel cellplacement algorithms: (1) Heuristic Cell-Coloring; (2) Adaptive Sequence Length Control. 1. INTRODUCTION Simulated annealing is a general-purpose optimization method that has been successfully applied to solve a large variety of combinatorial optimization problems including many in VLSI design. Annealing is computationally very expensive, hence efforts to improve execution time has proceeded along two fronts: (1) accelerating the annealing schedule, and (2) parallelizing the annealing algorithm for execution on multiprocessors. Parallel implementations of annealing as applied to the cell placement application either attempt multiple cell moves in parallel [1-7], or distribute ...

Jeff S. Sargent; Prith Banerjee

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Title: “ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF MARINE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS – CONTROL OF INTEGRATED, AUTONOMOUS POWER SYSTEMS”  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Norpropeller. Electric propulsion will provide better vessel manouverability, system redundancy and higher flexibility with engine room arrangement, Ĺdnanes (2003). On vessels where there is a large variation in load demand reduced fuel consumption and optimal power/energy management may be regarded as advantages that are still not fully utilized. In that respect, the new equipment and modern control systems can provide new possibilities for improving present control strategies, performance, and utilization of the installation. It is also expected that an improved control system should provide overall higher level of safety and reliability. The present state of the art type of tools and methods for analyzing combined power systems does only to a limited extent utilize the possibilities for increased knowledge available in the more advanced models and methods developed and used within each of the machinery and electrical engineering disciplines. To be able to analyze increasingly more complex systems of interest, the ability to easily combine models and methods to develop more fundamental insight into the total systems behavior, its characteristics and limitations will be an advantage in design of new systems. According to that it is first necessary to design the power system simulation model which should include mathematical models of electrical and mechanical machinery components to the required level

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chapter 3, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Commercial and 3: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol Stephen Carlson, DNV KEMA Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 3 - 1 Chapter 3 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol ....................................................................................... 3 3 Savings Calculations .............................................................................................................. 5 3.1 Algorithms ....................................................................................................................... 5

367

Massively parallel solution of the inverse scattering problem for integrated circuit quality control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors developed and implemented a highly parallel computational algorithm for solution of the inverse scattering problem generated when an integrated circuit is illuminated by laser. The method was used as part of a system to measure diffraction grating line widths on specially fabricated test wafers and the results of the computational analysis were compared with more traditional line-width measurement techniques. The authors found they were able to measure the line width of singly periodic and doubly periodic diffraction gratings (i.e. 2D and 3D gratings respectively) with accuracy comparable to the best available experimental techniques. They demonstrated that their parallel code is highly scalable, achieving a scaled parallel efficiency of 90% or more on typical problems running on 1024 processors. They also made substantial improvements to the algorithmics and their original implementation of Rigorous Coupled Waveform Analysis, the underlying computational technique. These resulted in computational speed-ups of two orders of magnitude in some test problems. By combining these algorithmic improvements with parallelism the authors achieve speedups of between a few thousand and hundreds of thousands over the original engineering code. This made the laser diffraction measurement technique practical.

Leland, R.W.; Draper, B.L. [Sandia National Labs., NM (United States); Naqvi, S.; Minhas, B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Dept.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Integrated-circuit control for two-lamp electronic ballast. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Circuitry is described for a solid-state, high-frequency fluorescent ballast designed to operate two F40 T-12 rapid-start lamps. The circuits are designed to be produced by hybrid integrated circuit (IC) technology. The signal components are produced on a single IC chip; the power transistors are attached to an alumina substrate. The initial IC version reduces the component count by about 50%. The cost of each IC in 500K lots is $0.70, replacing discrete parts costing $2.25. Additional savings of more than $1.00 per unit are realized by the decreased assembly time and improved reliability of the ICs. The system performance (two-lamp F40) was compared to the discrete version of the ballast and to an efficient core-coil ballast and found to be 6% less and 20% more efficient, respectively. The decrease in efficiency relative to the discrete version of the ballast is due to retaining some power to the filaments during operation in order to maintain normal lamp life.

Kohler, T.P.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

370

ULTRA LOW NOx INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR NOx EMISSION CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important, enabling step in keeping coal as a viable part of the national energy mix in this century, and beyond. Presently 57% of U.S. electrical generation is coal based, and the Energy Information Agency projects that coal will maintain a lead in U.S. power generation over all other fuel sources for decades (EIA 1998 Energy Forecast). Yet, coal-based power is being strongly challenged by society's ever-increasing desire for an improved environment and the resultant improvement in health and safety. The needs of the electric-utility industry are to improve environmental performance, while simultaneously improving overall plant economics. This means that emissions control technology is needed with very low capital and operating costs. This project has responded to the industry's need for low NOx emissions by evaluating ideas that can be adapted to present pulverized coal fired systems, be they conventional or low NOx firing systems. The TFS 2000{trademark} firing system has been the ALSTOM Power Inc. commercial offering producing the lowest NOx emission levels. In this project, the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system served as a basis for comparison to other low NOx systems evaluated and was the foundation upon which refinements were made to further improve NOx emissions and related combustion performance. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive Powder River Basin coal (PRB) to a moderately reactive Midwestern bituminous coal (HVB) to a less reactive medium volatile Eastern bituminous coal (MVB). Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis.

Galen H. Richards; Charles Q. Maney; Richard W. Borio; Robert D. Lewis

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

High-Performance Control of Two Three-Phase Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machines in an Integrated Drive for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

The closed-loop control of an integrated dual AC drive system is presented to control two three-phase permanent-magnet motors. A five-leg inverter is employed in the drive system; three of the inverter legs are for a main traction motor, but only two are needed for a three-phase auxiliary motor by utilizing the neutral point of the traction motor. An integrated drive with reduced component count is therefore achieved by eliminating one inverter leg and its gate drivers. A modified current control scheme based on the rotor flux orientation principle is presented. Simulation and experimental results are included to verify the independent control capability of the integrated drive.

Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Su, Gui-Jia [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Sustainability Program of Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UEIP has been working on a comprehensive sustainability program that includes establishing a site sustainability working group, information gathering, planning, organizing, developing schedule and estimated costs, trhough joint UEIP-US DOE/NNSA National Laboratory sustainability contracts. Considerable efforts have been necessary in the sustainability planning, monitoring, and control of the scope of work using tools such as Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project and SAP R/3. While information interchanges within the sustainability program provides adequate US assurances that US funds are well spent through its quarterly reporting methodology, proper information security and protection measures are taken throughout the process. Decommissioning of outdated equipment has also become part of determining sustainability requirements and processes. The site’s sustainability program has facilitated the development of a transition plan toward eventual full Russian funding of sustaining nuclear security upgrades.

Vakhonin, Alexander; Yuldashev, Rashid; Dabbs, Richard D.; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Patrick, Scott W.; Ku, Eshter M.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

375

PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith (Opal RT Technologies, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work. However, they are only two of the many, many elements which must be considered; and they, therefore, must be considered, always, in relation to the other elements. The achievement of good lighting depends on a reasonable understanding of three primary factors: one, the visual response to lighting; two, the availability and types of lighting; and three, methods for controlling light. This thesis is intended to supply enough information to provide a working knowledge of each of these facets. The human visual response is discussed in "Goals For Good Lighting." The availability and types of lighting are dealt with in the section on available light. The remainder of the thesis concerns methods for controlling light. The use of scale models for studying the natural lighting characteristics of buildings due to the building geometry, the fenestration details and the interior reflectance has been well established as pointed out in the earlier part of this thesis. With the completion of the work outlined herein, the feasibility of using scale models for studying skylights is also an established fact. The method of analysis by models can be a valuable tool to any designer who is concerned about day-lighting.

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF NOX WITH INTEGRATED ULTRA LOW-NOX BURNERS AND SNCR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an environmentally acceptable and cost-effective NO{sub x} control system that can achieve less than 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu for a wide range of coal-burning commercial boilers. The system will be comprised of an ultra low-NO{sub x} PC burner technology plus a urea-based, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system. In addition to the above stated NO{sub x} limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip levels will be targeted below 5 ppmV for commercial units. Testing will be performed in the 100 million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) in Alliance, Ohio. Finally, by amendment action, a limited mercury measurement campaign was conducted to determine if the partitioning and speciation of mercury in the flue gas from a Powder River Basin coal is affected by the addition of Chlorides to the combustion zone.

Hamid Farzan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lighting Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Renovations Lighting Renovations Lighting Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide focuses on the renewable energy opportunities, energy efficiency may also present amble opportunity for energy and cost savings. Renewable Energy Options for Lighting Renovations Daylighting Photovoltaics Daylighting Daylighting maximizes the use of natural light in a space to reduce the need for artificial lighting. Incorporating daylighting into a lighting strategy should occur during the planning stage of design since it affects all aspects. Ambient light dimming controls are critical in daylighting, since the

379

Subsystem of Data Acquisition Using the ModBus Protocol in Real Time of the Digital Electro-Hydraulic Control and Its Integration with the Integral System of Process Information of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the achieved development is presented of a software module of data acquisition in real time using the ModBus protocol named Subsystem of Data Acquisition of the Digital Electro-Hydraulic Control and its integration with the New Data ... Keywords: Real time, Data acquisition System, Nuclear power plant, Modbus protocol, Linux, C++, TCP/IP

Efren Ruben Coronel Flores, Carlos Chairez Campos

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dry Integrated Emissions Control Technology Options: EMO, DryFining, NeuStream-DR and DSI State-of-the-Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update provides a series of enhanced Level 1 analyses of multiple dry integrated emissions reduction technology options for use at coal-fired, utility-scale generating plants. The report also contains a section covering the current state-of-the-art for Duct Sorbent Injection systems (DSI). This document also includes an updated listing of the Integrated Emissions Control (IEC) technologies that have been proposed in the past for use at ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/or daylighting availability. Advanced Lighting Luminaries and Systems consisted of four projects focused· · · · · · Energy-Related Environmental Research Energy Systems Integration Environmentally Preferred Advanced and costs. Demand Responsive Lighting Systems comprised three projects that developed advanced lighting

382

Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

Plotkin, S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Large-scale controllable synthesis of dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} photocatalysts with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity  

SciTech Connect

The controllable synthesis of novel dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures has been successfully obtained via a simple hydrothermal route. The as-synthesized products were studied by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the nucleation and growth of the nanodumbbells were governed by an oriented aggregation growth mechanism. It is noteworthy that the concentration of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and the volume ratio of H{sub 2}O to CH{sub 3}COOH were crucial to the growth of the final nanoarchitectures. Control experiments were also carried out to investigate the factors which impact on the morphology of the products. Furthermore, the as-prepared BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures demonstrated the superior visible-light-driven photocatalytic efficiency, which is helpful for the separation and recycle considering their promising applications in harmful pollutants disposal. - Graphical Abstract: The controllable synthesis of novel dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures has been successfully obtained via a simple hydrothermal route; the as-prepared BiVO{sub 4} hierarchical nanostructures demonstrated the superior visible-light-driven photocatalytic efficiency. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} structures were synthesized and characterized for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The volume ratios of H{sub 2}O to CH{sub 3}COOH were crucial to the final morphologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their photocatalytic activity was up to 90% under visible-light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dumbbell-like BiVO{sub 4} structures may utilize the pollutant disposal.

Lu Yang [Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China); Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luo Yongsong, E-mail: ysluo@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China); Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kong Dezhi; Zhang Deyang; Jia Yonglei; Zhang Xinwei [Department of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lighting fundamentals handbook: Lighting fundamentals and principles for utility personnel  

SciTech Connect

Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of overall electricity use and demand in commercial buildings. This handbook for utility personnel provides a source of basic information on lighting principles, lighting equipment, and other considerations related to lighting design. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part One, Physics of Light, has chapters on light, vision, optics, and photometry. Part Two, Lighting Equipment and Technology, focuses on lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls. Part Three, Lighting Design Decisions, deals with the manner in which lighting design decisions are made and reviews relevant methods and issues. These include the quantity and quality of light needed for visual tasks, calculation methods for verifying that lighting needs are satisfied, lighting economics and methods for evaluating investments in efficient lighting systems, and miscellaneous design issues including energy codes, power quality, photobiology, and disposal of lighting equipment. The handbook contains a discussion of the role of the utility in promoting the use of energy-efficient lighting. The handbook also includes a lighting glossary and a list of references for additional information. This convenient and comprehensive handbook is designed to enable utility lighting personnel to assist their customers in developing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting systems. The handbook is not intended to be an up-to-date reference on lighting products and equipment.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Lighting Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Lighting is very critical in photography. The specimen should be placed on a background which will not detract from the resolution of the fracture surface. For basic lighting, one spotlight is suggested. The light is then raised or lowered, and

386

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

Zafred, Paolo R. (Murrysville, PA); Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Lighting Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Design Lighting Design July 29, 2012 - 6:28pm Addthis Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. How does it work? Buy ENERGY STAR-rated lighting for the highest quality, energy-efficient lighting. Use timers and other controls to turn lights on and off. Use outdoor solar lighting. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. If you're constructing a new house, consider lighting as part of your whole-house design -- an

389

A language for shading and lighting calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A shading language provides a means to extend the shading and lighting formulae used by a rendering system. This paper discusses the design of a new shading language based on previous work of Cook and Perlin. This language has various types of shaders for light sources and surface reflectances, point and color data types, control flow constructs that support the casting of outgoing and the integration of incident light, a clearly specified interface to the rendering system using global state variables, and a host of useful built-in functions. The design issues and their impact on the implementation are also discussed. CR Categories: 1.3.3 [Computer Graphics] Picture/Image Generation- Display algorithms; 1.3.5 [Computer Graphics

Pat Hanrahan; Jim Lawsont

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Median Light Rail Crossing: Accident Causation And Countermeasures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooperative Research Program. Integration of Light RailRail Grade Crossings. In National Cooperative Highway ResearchLight Rail Safety Issues. In Transportation Research Record

Coifman, Benjamin; Bertini, Robert L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Envelope & Lighting Technologies to Reduce Electric Demand in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of light shelf reflectors. Deploying Integrated Systems Realizing the full energy-saving potential of envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings means...

392

Improvements in dose accuracy delivered with static-MLC IMRT on an integrated linear accelerator control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Dose accuracy has been shown to vary with dose per segment and dose rate when delivered with static multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Varian C-series MLC controllers. The authors investigated the impact of monitor units (MUs) per segment and dose rate on the dose delivery accuracy of SMLC-IMRT fields on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC), which delivers dose and manages motion of all components using a single integrated controller. Methods: An SMLC sequence was created consisting of ten identical 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} segments with identical MUs. Beam holding between segments was achieved by moving one out-of-field MLC leaf pair. Measurements were repeated for various combinations of MU/segment ranging from 1 to 40 and dose rates of 100-600 MU/min for a 6 MV photon beam (6X) and dose rates of 800-2400 MU/min for a 10 MV flattening-filter free photon (10XFFF) beam. All measurements were made with a Farmer (0.6 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber placed at the isocenter in a solid-water phantom at 10 cm depth. The measurements were performed on two Varian LINACs: C-series Trilogy and TrueBeam. Each sequence was delivered three times and the dose readings for the corresponding segments were averaged. The effects of MU/segment, dose rate, and LINAC type on the relative dose variation ({Delta}{sub i}) were compared using F-tests ({alpha} = 0.05). Results: On the Trilogy, large {Delta}{sub i} was observed in small MU segments: at 1 MU/segment, the maximum {Delta}{sub i} was 10.1% and 57.9% at 100 MU/min and 600 MU/min, respectively. Also, the first segment of each sequence consistently overshot ({Delta}{sub i} > 0), while the last segment consistently undershot ({Delta}{sub i} dose rates greater than 100 MU/min. The linear trend of decreasing dose accuracy as a function of increasing dose rate on the Trilogy is no longer apparent on TrueBeam, even for dose rates as high as 2400 MU/min. Dose inaccuracy averaged over all ten segments in each beam delivery sequence was larger for Trilogy than TrueBeam, with the largest discrepancy (0.2% vs 3%) occurring for 1 MU/segment beams at both 300 and 600 MU/min. Conclusions: Earlier generations of Varian LINACs exhibited large dose variations for small MU segments in SMLC-IMRT delivery. Our results confirmed these findings. The dose delivery accuracy for SMLC-IMRT is significantly improved on TrueBeam compared to Trilogy for every combination of low MU/segment (1-10) and high dose rate (200-600 MU/min), in part due to the faster sampling rate (100 vs 20 Hz) and enhanced electronic integration of the MLC controller with the LINAC. SMLC-IMRT can be implemented on TrueBeam with higher dose accuracy per beam ({+-}0.2% vs {+-}3%) than previous generations of Varian C-series LINACs for 1 MU/segment delivered at 600 MU/min).

Li Ji; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Stepaniak, Christopher J.; Farrey, Karl J.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evolution in lighting  

SciTech Connect

Lights consume 20-25% of the nation's electricity, establishing strong incentives to develop more efficient lighting strategies. Attention is turning to where, when, and how we light our environment, and the potential savings add up to half the lighting load nationwide. Some types of lamp are more efficient than others, but characteristics other than energy consumption may dictate where they can be used. Current lighting strategies consider task requirements, light quality, and the potential for daylighting. Energy management systems that control the timing and intensity of light and new types of energy-efficient bulbs and fixtures are increasingly attractive to consumers. The effort will require continued research and the awareness of decision makers. 4 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.; Pertusiello, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shade-screens are widely used in commercial buildings as a way to limit the amount of direct sunlight that can disturb people in the building. The shade screens also reduce the solar heat-gain through glazing the system. Modern energy and daylighting analysis software such as EnergyPlus and Radiance require complete scattering properties of the scattering materials in the system. In this paper a shade screen used in the LBNL daylighting testbed is characterized using a photogoniometer and a normal angle of incidence integrating sphere. The data is used to create a complete bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF) that can be used in simulation programs. The resulting BSDF is compared to a model BADFs, both directly and by calculating the solar heat-gain coefficient for a dual pane system using Window 6.

Jonsson, Jacob; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Lee, Eleanor S.; Rubin, Mike

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Transmission and Distribution Benefits of Direct Load Control: Seattle City Light and Snohomish Public Utility District Pilot Project Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two residential direct load control programs in the Puget Sound region have reduced peak loads at both the system as well as the local transmission and distribution levels. This report presents program load impact results estimated using metered and disaggregated end-use load data. Included is a detailed description of participants' attitudes toward the programs and their experiences with program implementation.

1994-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Baseline vs. Replacement High Bay Lighting Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting has been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. New developments in fluorescent, induction, LED (light-emitting diode), and plasma lighting technologies have spurred various building managers to replace or retrofit existing lighting fixtures. These advances in lighting sources often allow conservation of electricity, better quality of light, and more flexibility in the control of light. However, these new lighting sources still have ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lighting Research Center Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lighting Group: Light Distribution Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Alternatives to Incandescent Downlights Hotel and Institutional Bathroom Lighting Portable Office Lighting Systems Low Glare Outdoor Retrofit Luminaire LED Luminaires...

399

Central Electric Cooperative - Non-Residential Lighting Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government, Tribal Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

400

Outlaw lighting  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management programs by utilities and the federal government`s Green Lights program have made significant inroads in promoting energy-efficient lighting. But the Energy Policy Act now prohibits certain types of lighting. This article provides analysis to help architects determine new lamp performance compared with older lighting products.

Bryan, H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline lamps -- typically used for task lighting such as garages and under cabinet fixtures, and for lighting large areas in commercial buildings. CFLs CFLs combine the energy efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience and popularity of incandescent fixtures. CFLs fit most fixtures

402

Photovoltaic lighting system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of 21 PV-powered low pressure sodium lighting systems on a multi-use has been documented in this paper. Specific areas for evaluation include the vandal resistant PV modules, constant voltage and on/off PV charge controllers, flooded deep-cycle lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VLRA) gel batteries, and low pressure sodium ballasts and lights. The PV lighting system maintenance intervals and lessons learned have been documented over the past 2.5 years. The above performance data has shown that with careful hardware selection, installation, and maintenance intervals the PV lighting systems will operate reliably.

Harrington, S.R.; Hund, T.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Light and Bread Mold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light and Bread Mold Light and Bread Mold Name: CHASE Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: HOW CAN I EFICTIVELY TEST THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON BREAD MOLD? Replies: Hello Chase, In order to test the effects of light on bread mould you need to set up an experiment. There are two things you need to have in your experiment to make it a good experiment: 1. A 'control'. 2. Replicates 1. The 'control' Obviously in order to test the effects of light on bread mold you will need to actually shine some light on some bread mold and see what happens. This is your 'treatment'. However, it is vitally important that you know what would have happened without the treatment (in this case added light). Let's pretend that you do a test a you find that the bread mold under the light actually dies. How do you know if your bread mold died because light was added or because at that time of year all bread mold would die naturally or because by adding light you caused the temperature to rise and that killed the bread mold? The answer is that you do not know unless you have taken the trouble to find out with anouther test called the 'control'. The 'control' is a piece of bread mold, identical to the 'treatment' bread mold, which is placed in identical conditions to the 'treatment' piece of bread mold except that light is removed. Your 'control' piece of bread mold will need to be (to the best of your abillity) at the same temperature, in the same area, at similar humidity, etc. Part of the skill of designing a scientific experiment is being able think of all the possible things which might be affecting the bread mold and keeping them the same in both the 'treatment' and the 'control' (except, of course, for the presence of light) so that when you find a difference between the 'treatment' and the 'control' you are sure that it is the result of the light rather than something else.

404

Energy-efficient lighting system for television  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light control system for a television camera comprises an artificial light control system which is cooperative with an iris control system. This artificial light control system adjusts the power to lamps illuminating the camera viewing area to provide only sufficient artificial illumination necessary to provide a sufficient video signal when the camera iris is substantially open.

Cawthorne, Duane C. (Amarillo, TX)

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stability effects of frequency controllers and transmission line configurations on power systems with integration of wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the stability effects of the integration of wind power on multi-machine power systems. First, the small-signal stability effects of turbine governors connected to synchronous generators in the ...

Abdelhalim, Hussein Mohamed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Description of a 1260-Year Control Integration with the Coupled ECHAM1/LSG General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1260-yr integration generated by the ECHAM1/LSG (Large Scale Geostrophic) coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model is analyzed in this paper. The analysis focuses on the climate drift and on the variations of the coupled atmosphere–...

Jin-Song von Storch; Viatcheslav V. Kharin; Ulrich Cubasch; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Dierk Schriever; Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced “F”-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus® is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics® simulation and integrated with MATLAB® for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB®. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Practical image based lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present a user-friendly and practical method for seamless integration of computer-generated images (CG) with real photographs and video. In general such seamless integration is extremely hard and requires recovery of real world information to simulate the same environment for both CG and real objects. This real world information includes camera positions and parameters, and shapes, material properties, and motion of real objects. Among these one of the most important real world information is lighting. Image based lighting that is developed to recover illumination information of the real world from photographs has recently been popular in computer graphics. In this thesis we present a practical image based lighting method. Our method is based on a simple and easily constructible device: a square plate with a cylindrical stick. We have developed a user-guided system to approximately recover illumination information (i.e. orientations, colors, and intensities of light sources) from a photograph of this device. Our approach also helps to recover surface colors of real objects based on reconstructed lighting information. In addition, we will address our observation on shadows with multi-color lights in a compositing aspect and will present a solution to handle the addressed issue.

Lee, Jaemin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: HID Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Systems Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and Related Controls for HID Lighting Systems Objective HID ballast The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential of electronic ballasts and related controls for HID lighting systems to improve the efficiency of current technology. The specific objectives of this project are to: Test, analyze and determine the potential of electronic ballasts for HID lighting systems in cooperation with manufacturers as an emerging energy efficient technology to reduce lighting loads in commercial, industrial and municipal applications. Identify control strategies to further improve the energy efficiency of these systems with a municipal partner. Provide appropriate recommendations for incorporating these technologies into current state codes and regulations.

410

Control of degradation of spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Modeling and Control System Design for an Integrated Solar Generation and Energy Storage System with a Ride-Through Capability: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a generic approach for PV panel modeling. Data for this modeling can be easily obtained from manufacturer datasheet, which provides a convenient way for the researchers and engineers to investigate the PV integration issues. A two-stage power conversion system (PCS) is adopted in this paper for the PV generation system and a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) can be connected to the dc-link through a bi-directional dc/dc converter. In this way, the BESS can provide some ancillary services which may be required in the high penetration PV generation scenario. In this paper, the fault ride-through (FRT) capability is specifically focused. The integrated BESS and PV generation system together with the associated control systems is modeled in PSCAD and Matlab platforms and the effectiveness of the controller is validated by the simulation results.

Wang, X.; Yue, M.; Muljadi, E.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conditioners, Chillers, Clothes Washers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors,...

413

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting Controls...

414

An Integrated Modeling Framework for Exploring Network Reconfiguration of Distributed Controlled Homogenous Power Inverter Network using Composite Lyapunov Function Based Reachability Bound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe an integrated modeling framework for an interactive power network (IPN) consisting of a power network (PN) and a wireless communication network (WCN). The PN is modeled using a set of piecewise linear (PWL) equations. The WCN is modeled using ... Keywords: Lyapunov stability, Markov-chain model, communication network, distributed control systems, electric power network, joint optimization, linear matrix inequality, optimization, piecewise linear systems, reaching conditions, stability, switching power converters, wireless

Sudip K. Mazumder; Muhammad Tahir; Kaustuva Acharya

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Shape the light, light the shape - lighting installation in performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the lighting design theory Light Inside Out, which is the technique of shaping light toward a creation of lighting installation in performance… (more)

Yu, Lih-Hwa, 1972-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Integrated dynamic and simulation model on coupled closed-loop workstation capacity controls in a multi-workstation production system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a dynamic model coupled with a simulation model is introduced to control a multi-workstation production system such that a given performance measure is achieved. In particular, we consider closed loop capacity controls for regulating WIP ...

Tao Wu; Leyuan Shi; Benjamin Quirt; N. A. Duffie

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

ICTs and the limits of integration: Converging professional routines and ICT support in colocated emergency response control rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we have tried to establish how the nature of professional routines affects the ICT supported standardization and scripting of work performed by operators in Dutch colocated emergency response control rooms. In this type of multidisciplinary ... Keywords: Emergency response control room, ICTs, colocated control room, emergency response services, inter-organizational collaboration, professional routines

Stefan Soeparman; Hein van Duivenboden; Pieter Wagenaar; Peter Groenewegen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Total Light Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

419

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

420

Energy Systems Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Integration Systems Integration Ben Kroposki, PhD, PE Director, Energy Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Reducing investment risk and optimizing systems in a rapidly changing energy world * Increasing penetration of variable RE in grid * Increasing ultra high energy efficiency buildings and controllable loads * New data, information, communications and controls * Electrification of transportation and alternative fuels * Integrating energy storage (stationary and mobile) and thermal storage * Interactions between electricity/thermal/fuels/data pathways * Increasing system flexibility and intelligence Current Energy Systems Future Energy Systems Why Energy Systems Integration? 3 Energy Systems Integration Continuum Scale Appliance (Plug)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated lighting controls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

423

Integrating Newer Technology Software Systems into the SLAC Legacy Control System - Two Case Histories and New CMLOG Developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been the goal of SLAC Controls Software to offload processing from the aging Alpha/VMS based control system onto machines that are more widely accepted and used. An additional goal has been to provide more modern software tools to our user community. This paper presents two software products which satisfy those goals.

J. Chen; M. Laznovsky; R. MacKenzie

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

BEYOND INTEGRATED SYSTEM VALIDATION: USE OF A CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATOR FOR PROOF-OF-CONCEPT INTERFACE DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plants in the US. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald Boring; Vivek Agarwal

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Annual report, October 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of Oil Recovery Improvement by Coupling and Interfacial Tension Agent and a Mobility Control Agent in Light Oil Reservoirs will study two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent. The first area defines the interactions of alkaline agent, surfactants, and polymers on a fluid-fluid and fluid-rock basis. The second area concerns the economic improvement of the combined technology. This report examines the interactions of different alkaline agents, surfactants, and polymer combinations on a fluid-fluid basis. Alkali and surfactant combine to reduce the interfacial tension between a low acid number, 42 API gravity crude oil and the aqueous solution to values lower than either agent alone. Surfactant structure can vary from linear chain sulfonates to alkyl aryl sulfonates to produce low interfacial tension values when combined with alkali. However as a class, the alkyl aryl sulfonates were the most effective surfactants. Surfactant olefinic character appears to be critical in developing low interfacial tensions. For the 42 API gravity crude oil, surfactants with molecular weights ranging from 370 to 450 amu are more effective in lowering interfacial tension. Ultra low interfacial tensions were achieved with all of the alkaline agents evaluated when combined with appropriate surfactants. Different interfacial tension reduction characteristics with the various alkali types indicates alkali interacts synergistically with the surfactants to develop interfacial tension reduction. The solution pH is not a determining factor in lowering interfacial tension. Surfactant is the dominant agent for interfacial tension reduction.

Pitts, M.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Second annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Investigation of Oil Recovery Improvement by Coupling an Interfacial Tension Agent and a Mobility Control Agent in Light Oil Reservoirs{close_quotes} is studying two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent. The first area defines the interactions of alkaline agents, surfactants, and polymers on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second area concerns the economic improvement of the combined technology. This report continues the fluid-fluid interaction evaluations and begins the fluid-rock studies. Fluid-fluid interfacial tension work determined that replacing sodium ion with either potassium or ammonium ion in solutions with interfacial tension reduction up to 19,600 fold was detrimental and had little or no effect on alkali-surfactant solutions with interfacial tension reduction of 100 to 200 fold. Reservoir brine increases interfacial tension between crude oil and alkaline-surfactant solutions. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-surfactant solutions maintained ultra low and low interfacial tension values better than NaOH-surfactant solutions. The initial phase of the fluid-rock investigations was adsorption studies. Surfactant adsorption is reduced when co-dissolved with alkali. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} are more efficient at reducing surfactant adsorption than NaOH. When polymer is added to the surfactant solution, surfactant adsorption is reduced as well. When both polymer and alkali are added, polymer is the dominate component, reducing the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NaOH effect on adsorption. Substituting sodium ion with potassium or ammonium ion increased or decreased surfactant adsorption depending on surfactant structure with alkali having a less significant effect. No consistent change of surfactant adsorption with increasing salinity was observed in the presence or absence of alkali or polymer.

Pitts, M.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

429

Northern Lights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Lights Northern Lights Nature Bulletin No. 178-A February 6, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NORTHERN LIGHTS To a person seeing the Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" for the first time, it is an uncanny awe-inspiring spectacle. Sometimes it begins as a glow of red on the northern horizon, ominously suggesting a great fire, gradually changing to a curtain of violet-white, or greenish-yellow light extending from east to west. Some times this may be transformed to appear as fold upon fold of luminous draperies that march majestically across the sky; sometimes as a vast multitude of gigantic flaming swords furiously slashing at the heavens; sometimes as a flowing crown with long undulating colored streamers fanning downward and outward.

430

Design, Control and Evaluation of a Prototype Three Phase Inverter in a BLDC Drive System for an Ultra-Light Electric Vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With an evolving vehicle industry there has been an increase in the demand for light electric vehicles. This thesis was conducted in order to gain… (more)

Larsson, Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonization of Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on

432

Light Organizing/Organizing Light [Light in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a street through alter­ nating areas of dark and light, welandscapes, streets and squares. Light summons our spiritfor changing light, both outside rooms (such as streets and

Schwartz, Martin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device  

SciTech Connect

A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

436

Pupillary efficient lighting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination. 5 figs.

Berman, S.M.; Jewett, D.L.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pupillary efficient lighting system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Management Review Photon Sciences Directorate 2012 Integrated Management Review Presentation 2011 Integrated Management Review Presentation 2010 Integrated Management...

439

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

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Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general