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1

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

4

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

5

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Professor in Geology and Geophysics Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

6

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2007- Associate professor in Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana Physical Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

7

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milos From Geophysical Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of geophysical experiments carried out by eight teams on the island of Milos as part of an integrated project under the European Commission's geothermal R & D programme are considered. The combination of these data with earlier studies on the geology and geophysics of Milos allow the compilation of a possible model of the geothermal reservoir and its surroundings in the central eastern part of the island. The reservoir is fed by convection of hot fluids from a depth of several kilometres, but the geophysical data provide no strong support for the earlier hypothesis

8

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

9

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology, 2013, Oxygen isotope composition of meltwater from a Neoproterozoic glaciation in South China. Geology1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

10

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of...

11

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Citation USGS. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey [Internet]. 2013. [updated 2013/01/03;cited 2013/11/22]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/NAWC-surface.html

12

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex Palaeontology & Stratigraphy B. Sc. 1982-1986 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Academia Sinica Calcareous Algae & carbonate sedimentology M.Sc. 1986-1989 Princeton University Stable isotope geochemistry

Bao, Huiming

13

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

14

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (10) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic

15

Regional geology and geophysics of the Jemez Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The western margin of the Rocky Mountain tectonic belt is the initial site for the Los Alamos Geothermal Project. lgneous activity in the area culminated with the formation of a collapsed volcanic caldera and the deposition of thick beds of tuff. Geophysical studies indicate that the region is one of relatively highterrestrial heat flow, low-crustal density, low-crustal seismic velocities, low-crustal magnetoelectric impedance, and thin crust. 34 references. (auth)

West, F.G.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Geophysics. · Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 2003-2007. Posdoc in Isotope geochemistry. Department of GeologicalHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520 Plants: Physiological Role and Isotopic Composition. Adviser: Dan Yakir. Professional experience · Yale

17

Geological and geophysical studies in Grass Valley, Nevada. Preliminary open file report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geologic setting, geochemistry, and heat flow of the Leach Hot Springs area are discussed. Geophysical data is presented under the following section headings: survey lines; presentation of data; gravity survey; magnetic survey; self-potential; bipole-dipole apparent resistivity and apparent conductance; electric field ratio tellurics; dipole-dipole resistivity; magnetotellurics; seismological methods; seismic data and preliminary interpretation. (JGB)

Beyer, H.; Dey, A.; Liaw, A.; Majer, E.; McEvilly, T.V.; Morrison, H.F.; Wollenberg, H.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource: Neal Hot Springs Abstract We present integrated geophysical data to characterize a geothermal system at Neal Hot Springs in eastern Oregon. This system is currently being developed for geothermal energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western Snake River Plain. The intersection of these two fault systems, coupled with high geothermal gradients from thin continental crust produces pathways for surface water and deep geothermal water interactions at Neal Hot Springs.

19

Precambrian basement geology of the Permian basin region of west Texas and Eastern New Mexico: A geophysical perspective  

SciTech Connect

Because most of the Permian basin region of west Texas and southern New Mexico is covered by Phanerozoic rocks, other means must be found to examine the Precambrian upper crustal geology of the region. We have combined geologic information on the Precambrian from outcrops and wells with geophysical information from gravity and magnetic surveys in an integrated analysis of the history and structure of basement rocks in the region. Geophysical anomalies can be related to six Precambrian events: formation of the Early Proterozoic outer tectonic belt, igneous activity in the southern Granite-Rhyolite province, an episode of pre-Grenville extension, the Grenville orogeny, rifting to form the Delaware aulacogen, and Eocambrian rifting to form the early Paleozoic continental margin. Two geophysical features were studied in detail: the Abilene gravity minimum and the Central Basin platform gravity high. The Abilene gravity minimum is shown to extend from the Delaware basin across north-central Texas and is interpreted to be caused by a granitic batholith similar in size to the Sierra Nevada batholith in California and Nevada. This batholith appears to be related to formation of the southern Granite- Rhyolite province, possibly as a continental margin arc batholith. Because of this interpretation, we have located the Grenville tectonic front southward from its commonly quoted position, closer to the Llano uplift. Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions are found to core the Central Basin platform and the Roosevelt uplift. These intrusions formed at about 1.1 Ga and are related in time to both the Mid-Continent rift system and the Grenville orogeny in Texas. Precambrian basement structures and changes in lithology have influenced the structure and stratigraphy in the overlying Permian basin, and thus have potential exploration significance.

Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon An Integrated Model For The Geothermal Field Of Milos From Geophysical Experiments Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Geological and Geophysical Study of the Geothermal Energy Potential of Pilgrim Springs, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pilgrim Springs geothermal area, located about 75 km north of Nome, was the subject of an intensive, reconnaissance-level geophysical and geological study during a 90-day period in the summer of 1979. The thermal springs are located in a northeast-oriented, oval area of thawed ground approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} in size, bordered on the north by the Pilgrim River. A second, much smaller, thermal anomaly was discovered about 3 km northeast of the main thawed area. Continuous permafrost in the surrounding region is on the order of 100 m thick. Present surface thermal spring discharge is {approx} 4.2 x 10{sup -3} m{sup 3} s{sup -1} (67 gallons/minute) of alkali-chloride-type water at a temperature of 81 C. The reason for its high salinity is not yet understood because of conflicting evidence for seawater vs. other possible water sources. Preliminary Na-K-Ca geothermometry suggests deep reservoir temperatures approaching 150 C, but interpretation of these results is difficult because of their dependence on an unknown water mixing history. Based on these estimates, and present surface and drill hole water temperatures, Pilgrim Springs would be classified as an intermediate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system.

Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B. [eds.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

crustal structure. We used results from surface geological mapping, drill hole data from water wells and geothermal exploration wells, KRISP 85 seismic data for a profile across...

27

809New Zealand Journal of Geology & Geophysics, 2004, Vol. 47: 809821 00288306/04/47040809 The Royal Society of New Zealand 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

809New Zealand Journal of Geology & Geophysics, 2004, Vol. 47: 809­821 0028­8306/04/4704­0809 © The Royal Society of New Zealand 2004 Stable isotope values in modern bryozoan carbonate from New Zealand Department of Geology Dickinson College P.O. Box 1773 Carlisle, PA 17013, USA WILLIAM P. PATTERSON Department

Patterson, William P.

28

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a leucogranite which intruded the metamorphic rocks. Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the drillhole itself was strongly influenced by structural zones. Water chemistry indicates that this geothermal resource is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Several geophysical logs were employed to characcterize the drillhole geology. The natural gamma and neutron porosity logs indicate gross rock type and the accoustic logs indicate fractured rock and potentially permeable zones. A series of temperature logs run as a function of time during and after the completion of drilling were most useful in delineating the zones of maximum heat flux. Convective heat flow and temperatures greater than 350/sup 0/F appear to occur only along an open fracture system encountered between depths of 1850 and 2775 feet. Temperature logs indicate a negative thermal gradient below 3000 feet.

Galbraith, R.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Integration of regional to outcrop digital data: 3D visualisation of multi-scale geological models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale geological models contain three-dimensional, spatially referenced data, typically spanning at least six orders of magnitude from outcrop to regional scale. A large number of different geological and geophysical data sources can be combined ... Keywords: Digital geological mapping, Immersive visualisation, Terrestrial laser-scanning, User interaction, Virtual outcrop models

R. R. Jones; K. J. W. McCaffrey; P. Clegg; R. W. Wilson; N. S. Holliman; R. E. Holdsworth; J. Imber; S. Waggott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Applications of Geophysical and Geological Techniques to Identify Areas for Detailed Exploration in Black Mesa Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

A recent report submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (NIPER/BDM-0226) discussed in considerable detail, the geology, structure, tectonics, and history of oil production activities in the Black Mesa basin in Arizona. As part of the final phase of wrapping up research in the Black Mesa basin, the results of a few additional geophysical studies conducted on structure, stratigraphy, petrophysical analysis, and oil and gas occurrences in the basin are presented here. A second objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of relatively inexpensive, noninvasive techniques like gravity or magnetic in obtaining information on structure and tectonics in sufficient detail for hydrocarbon exploration, particularly by using the higher resolution satellite data now becoming available to the industry.

George, S.; Reeves, T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, M.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Preliminary geological and geophysical evaluation of the Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect, Southwestern Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Castle Dome HDR geothermal prospect is located in Yuma County, Arizona, in a region centered about 80 km north of Yuma along US Rte. 95. The area of interest is broadly defined by a negative residual Bouguer gravity anomaly which is about 45 km across, steep-sided in many places, and as much as 30 mgals in magnitude. The geology of this Basin and Range area is poorly known, but the few published reports and current Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) field studies indicate that the Castle Dome Mountains and adjacent ranges are chiefly a thick pile of welded ash-flow tuffs of probable mid-Tertiary age. The tuffs rest unconformably on Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks exposed only outside steep edges of the gravity low. This gravity anomaly may reflect the presence of a large caldera. A regional magnetotelluric study now in progress will define the depths to electrical conductors within the crust and upper mantle and contribute to understanding of crustal structure, the gravity anomaly, and the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area.

Gutmann, J.T.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Ander, M.E.; Laney, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments indicate the presence of crustal thickening within the rift valley area beneath the Kenya dome, an uplift centred on the southern part of the Kenya rift. North of the dome, these interpretations show thinning of the crust and an increase in crustal extension. To the south near the Kenya/Tanzania border, crustal thinning associated with the rift is modest. Our study was aimed at further investigating crustal structure from this dome southwards via a

36

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tule Chek, Bc, Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule Chek, Bc, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A method is described to determine bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are obtained by using Parker's ideal body theory and linear programming algorithms. Such bounds are given in terms of trade-off diagrams, where regions of feasible solutions compatible with the observed data can be assured. Gravity data from the Tule Chek, B.C., Mexico, geothermal area were used to compute such trade-off diagrams. Seismic

37

An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya Rift Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Northern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Kenyan part of the East African rift is among the most studied rift zones in the world. It is characterized by: (1) a classic rift valley, (2) sheer escarpments along the faulted borders of the rift valley, (3) voluminous volcanics that flowed from faults and fissures along the rift, and (4) axial and flank volcanoes where magma flow was most intense. In northern Kenya, the rift faults formed in an area where the lithosphere was weakened and stretched by Cretaceous-Paleogene extension, and in central and southern Kenya, it formed along old zones of weakness at the

38

Integrated Geologic and Geophysical Assessment of the Eileen Gas Hydrate Accumulation, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Using detailed analysis and interpretation of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, along with modeling and correlation of specially processed log data, a viable methodology has been developed for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ) and associated ''sub-hydrate'' free gas prospects in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska (Figure 1). The seismic data, in conjunction with modeling results from a related study, was used to characterize the conditions under which gas hydrate prospects can be delineated using conventional seismic data, and to analyze reservoir fluid properties. Monte Carlo style gas hydrate volumetric estimates using Crystal Ball{trademark} software to estimate expected in-place reserves shows that the identified prospects have considerable potential as gas resources. Future exploratory drilling in the Milne Point area should provide answers about the producibility of these shallow gas hydrates.

Timothy S. Collett; David J. Taylor; Warren F. Agena; Myung W. Lee; John J. Miller; Margarita Zyrianova

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

TECTONIC EVOLUTION OF SYRIA INTERPRETED FROM INTEGRATED GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOLOGICAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 2.6: Examples of correlations between seismic reflection data and two-way incidence reflection of Industry, Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic. Sawaf, T., D. Al-Saad, A. Gebran, M. Barazangi, J.A. Best and T

40

Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

Friedmann, S J

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geological-geophysical evaluation of the Hot Springs area, Bath County, Virginia. Progress report, June 1, 1975--February 29, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the northwestern part of Virginia and adjacent parts of West Virginia there are approximately 100 springs that have temperatures ranging from slightly above the mean air temperature (9 to 12/sup 0/C) to about 41/sup 0/C. A study was made to evaluate the geothermal resource potential of the area in the vicinity of the Warm Springs anticline in Bath and Allegheny Counties, Virginia. Phase I of the study is the compilation of a geologic map based on published maps and supported by reconnaissance and detailed geologic mapping in areas where published maps are not available. Phase II consists of a regional bipole-dipole electrical resistivity survey made in order to detect the presence of resistivity lows that might be associated with a geothermal system at depth. Phase III will include drilling a single hole to a depth of approximately 300 m with the hope of obtaining a heat flow value that is representative of the region. (LBS)

Costain, J.K.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Early lunar geology and geophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite a number of human and robotic missions to the Moon, there are still important unanswered questions about its early evolution, and how it came to be the object we observe today. Here we use observational, experimental, ...

Garrick-Bethell, Ian, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Definition: Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic)

45

Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO2: An Integrated Global Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JAF21006.DOC JAF21006.DOC First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory May 15-17, 2001 Washington, D.C. Natural Analogs for Geologic Storage of CO 2 : An Integrated Global Research Program S. H. Stevens (sstevens@adv-res.com, (703) 528 8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe Road, Suite 600 Arlington, VA USA 22201 703-528-8420 J. M. Pearce (jmpe@bgs.ac.uk, (0)115 9363 222) British Geological Survey Nottingham, NG12 5GG, United Kingdom. A. A. J. Rigg (a.rigg@petroleum.crc.org.au, 61-2-9490 8225) Australian Petroleum Cooperative Research Centre Sydney, NSW Australia ABSTRACT Coordinated research efforts are underway on three continents (North America, Europe,

46

Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Air due to Terrestrial Radionuclides in Southern Brazil: Synthesis by Geological Units and Lithotypes Covered by the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project  

SciTech Connect

The absorbed dose rates in air due to terrestrial radionuclides were estimated from aerial gamma spectrometric data for an area of 48,600 km{sup 2} in Southern Brazil. The source data was the Serra do Mar Sul Aero-Geophysical Project back-calibrated in a cooperative work among the Geological Survey of Brazil, the Geological Survey of Canada, and Paterson, Grant and Watson Ltd. The concentrations of eU (ppm), eTh (ppm) and K (%) were converted to dose rates in air (nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}) by accounting for the contribution of each element's concentration. Regional variation was interpreted according to lithotypes and a synthesis was performed according to the basic geological units present in the area. Higher values of total dose were estimated for felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, with average values varying up to 119{+-}24 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}, obtained by Anitapolis syenite body. Sedimentary, metasedimentary and metamafic rocks presented the lower dose levels, and some beach deposits reached the lowest average total dose, 18.5{+-}8.2 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Thorium gives the main average contribution in all geological units, the highest value being reached by the nebulitic gneisses of Atuba Complex, 71{+-}23 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Potassium presents the lowest average contribution to dose rate in 53 of the 72 units analyzed, the highest contribution being obtained by intrusive alkaline bodies (28{+-}12 nGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}). The general pattern of geographic dose distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory-Department of Physics-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pinese, Jose P. P. [Department of Geosciences-CCE State University of Londrina Campus Universitario-Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001, CEP 86051-990, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reprinted from: Journal of Geoscience Education, v. 46, 1998, p. 30-40. Integrating Computers into the Field Geology Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reprinted from: Journal of Geoscience Education, v. 46, 1998, p. 30-40. Integrating Computers@rci.rutgers.edu ABSTRACT The Field Geology course at Rutgers University incor- porates computers in all projects, including operator and transcription errors. Fur- thermore, ETS data can be downloaded directly to a computer, where

48

Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

GV Last; DG Horton

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geological and Geophysical Investigations of the Hydrogeology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Canol Road Area Daniel E. Lawson, Jeffrey C. Strasser, Jodie D. Strasser, Steven A. Arcone, Allan J of Fort Wainwright, Alaska Part I: Canol Road Area Daniel E. Lawson, Jeffrey C. Strasser, Jodie D

50

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Production Data Integration into High Resolution Geologic Models with Trajectory-based Methods and A Dual Scale Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse problems associated with reservoir characterization are typically underdetermined and often have difficulties associated with stability and convergence of the solution. A common approach to address this issue is through the introduction of prior constraints, regularization or reparameterization to reduce the number of estimated parameters. We propose a dual scale approach to production data integration that relies on a combination of coarse-scale and fine-scale inversions while preserving the essential features of the geologic model. To begin with, we sequentially coarsen the fine-scale geological model by grouping layers in such a way that the heterogeneity measure of an appropriately defined 'static' property is minimized within the layers and maximized between the layers. Our coarsening algorithm results in a non-uniform coarsening of the geologic model with minimal loss of heterogeneity and the ?optimal? number of layers is determined based on a bias-variance trade-off criterion. The coarse-scale model is then updated using production data via a generalized travel time inversion. The coarse-scale inversion proceeds much faster compared to a direct fine-scale inversion because of the significantly reduced parameter space. Furthermore, the iterative minimization is much more effective because at the larger scales there are fewer local minima and those tend to be farther apart. At the end of the coarse-scale inversion, a fine-scale inversion may be carried out, if needed. This constitutes the outer iteration in the overall algorithm. The fine-scale inversion is carried out only if the data misfit is deemed to be unsatisfactory. We propose a fast and robust approach to calibrating geologic models by transient pressure data using a trajectory-based approach that based on a high frequency asymptotic expansion of the diffusivity equation. The trajectory or ray-based methods are routinely used in seismic tomography. In this work, we investigate seismic rays and compare them with streamlines. We then examine the applicability of streamline-based methods for transient pressure data inversion. Specifically, the high frequency asymptotic approach allows us to analytically compute the sensitivity of the pressure responses with respect to reservoir properties such as porosity and permeability. It facilitates a very efficient methodology for the integration of pressure data into geologic models.

Kim, Jong Uk

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

55

Opportunities in geophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What are the chances of a physicist finding an agreeable job in geophysics? The apparently poor prospects for jobs in academic physics led me to explore the possibilities in geophysics; this field

H. Richard Crane

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic and geophysics studies were completed at the Raft River valley. References Williams, P.L.; Mabey, D.R.; Pierce, K.L.; Zohdy, A.A.R.; Ackermann, H.; Hoover, D.B. (1 May 1975) Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1975)&oldid=59434

57

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

58

BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BSU Geophysics Field Camp Report 2012 Abstract Neal Hot Springs (NHS) is an active geothermal site and home to a new binary power plant built by U.S. Geothermal and funded through the Department of Energy. Power production is scheduled to begin in late 2012 and is proposed to generate 25 mega-watts of power to its customer Idaho Power. The project has also served Boise State University as an ideal location for geophysical exploration and research. Research began in spring of 2011 during BSU's annual geophysics field camp. Students and faculty conducted various geophysical surveys to gain insight into the controlling geological structure of the area. Studies of the site continued into 2012

59

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geophysical imaging method utilizing backpropagation and zeroth-order phase approximation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining, under field conditions and in near-real time, an image of a geophysical objective under the ground in a geophysical medium, utilizing a zeroth order phase approximation implemented with first signal-to-detector arrival times for a plurality of signal transmitters transmitting signals through the geologic medium and the geologic objective to a plurality of signal receivers, disposed adjacent to the geologic objective in a predetermined manner. 9 figs.

Witten, A.J.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

62

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Methods Geophysical Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geophysical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geophysical Methods: Methods used to measure the physical properties of the earth Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction There are five main types of geophysical methods used for geothermal resource discovery: Seismic Methods (active and passive) Electrical Methods Magnetic Methods Gravity Methods Radiometric Methods Seismic methods dominates oil and gas exploration, and probably accounts

70

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

71

The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, 3D visualisation, Geoscience education, Knowledge capture, Systematic geological surveying

Holger Kessler; Steve Mathers; Hans-Georg Sobisch

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A suction lysimeter and a geophysical access port  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is described for monitoring vadose zones, geologic media or buried waste in sediment and more particularly to such an apparatus which is operable as an access port for geophysical logging and collecting fluid samples to permit analysis of such fluid samples for the presence of toxic substances, having a pipe-like, stainless steel, longitudinally extending, access tube with two ends, where the first end extends above the surface of the sediment and has a removable air tight seal. The subject invention further has a backing in fluid communication with the access tube and a fluid permeable plate contiguous with the backing, wherein the fluid permeable plate is made up of porous stainless steel. A reservoir is integrated into the second closed end of the access tube for containing the collected fluid. A vacuum pump, having a vacuum gauge/transducer attached thereto, is connected to the removable air tight seal for applying a vacuum to the access tube, such that gas and fluid samples may be drawn through the fluid permeable plate. A fluid sample connector coupled to the removable air tight seal, in addition to the vacuum pump with vacuum gauge/transducer, for withdrawing a fluid sample from the access tube.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the TertiaryQuaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic reflection and gravity surveys shows that some faults recognized by minor displacements at the surface...

76

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where...

77

GGHAWKERHAWKER Geology and Geophysics at The University of Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and oil shale. Climate change is not considered a barrier to continued use of fossil fuels. Plan B ­ Clean

Peterson, Blake R.

78

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

79

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO 2 Sequestration Larry R. Myer (LRMyer@lbl.gov; 510/486-6456) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Science Division One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Introduction Geophysical techniques will be used in monitoring of geologic sequestration projects. Seismic and electrical geophysical techniques will be used to map the movement of CO 2 in the subsurface and to establish that the storage volume is being efficiently utilized and the CO 2 is being safely contained within a known region. Rock physics measurements are required for interpretation of the geophysical surveys. Seismic surveys map the subsurface velocities and attenuation while electrical surveys map the conductivity. Laboratory measurements are required to convert field

80

Particle Filtering in Geophysical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of particle filters in geophysical systems is reviewed. Some background on Bayesian filtering is provided, and the existing methods are discussed. The emphasis is on the methodology, and not so much on the applications themselves. ...

Peter Jan van Leeuwen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Available Energy of Geophysical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative derivation of the available energy for a geophysical fluid system is presented. It is shown that determination of the equilibrium temperature of the system by the minimization of an energy availability function is equivalent to that ...

Peter R. Bannon

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Existing geologic data show that the basalt has been broken by complex intersecting fault zones at the hot springs. Natural state hot water flow patterns in the fracture network will be interpreted from temperature gradient wells and then tested with moderate depth core holes. Production and injection well tests of the core holes will be monitored with an innovative combination of Flowing Differential Self-Potential (FDSP) and resistivity tomography surveys. The cointerpretation of all these highly detailed geophysical methods sensitive to fracture permeability patterns and water flow during the well tests will provide unprecedented details on the structures and flow in a shallow geothermal aquifer and support effective development of the low temperature reservoir and identification of deep up flow targets.

84

Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program is designed to provide valuable new subsurface information about one of the Nation's arguably most promising high-temperature geothermal targets. Until now, the Emigrant Geothermal Prospect has been tested by only shallow and relatively shallow thermal-gradient boreholes and a small number of exploration wells, all of which have lacked any detailed 2-D or 3-D structural context. The applicants propose to conduct an innovative integration of detailed 2- D and 3-D structural reconstructions (structural mapping and reflection/refraction source seismology integrated with available data).

85

Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. First annual report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide a more quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective will be accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multidisciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. The intent is to obtain a quantitative reservoir description incorporating outcrop, field, well-to-well, and laboratory core and fluid data of widely varying scales. This interdisciplinary effort will integrate geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. A more accurate reservoir description will allow greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, is available for the field research activities that will be conducted.

Martin, F.D.; Buckley, J.S.; Weiss, W.W.; Ouenes, A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geologic evaluation of the Oasis Valley basin, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a geologic study of the area between the underground-nuclear-explosion testing areas on Pahute Mesa, in the northwesternmost part of the Nevada Test Site, and the springs in Oasis Valley, to the west of the Test Site. The new field data described in this report are also presented in a geologic map that is a companion product(Fridrich and others, 1999) and that covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles centered on Thirsty Canyon SW, the quadrangle in which most of the Oasis Valley springs are located. At the beginning of this study, published detailed maps were available for 3 of the 9 quadrangles of the study area: namely Thirsty Canyon (O'Connor and others, 1966); Beatty (Maldonado and Hausback, 1990); and Thirsty Canyon SE (Lipman and others, 1966). Maps of the last two of these quadrangles, however, required extensive updating owing to recent advances in understanding of the regional structure and stratigraphy. The new map data are integrated in this re port with new geophysical data for the Oasis Valley area, include gravity, aeromagnetic, and paleomagnetic data (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Hudson and others, 1994; Hudson, unpub. data).

Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; and Mankinen, E.A.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994  

SciTech Connect

The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley near Winnemucca, North-Central Nevada Abstract From May 2008 to September 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected data from more than 660 gravity stations, 100 line-km of truck-towed magnetometer traverses, and 260 physical-property sites in the vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley, northern Nevada (fig. 1). Gravity, magnetic, and physical-property data were collected to study regional crustal structures as an aid to understanding the geologic framework of the Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel Valley areas, which in

89

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Drilling to evaluate the geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley began in 1974 and resulted in the discovery of a geothermal reservoir at a depth of approximately 1523 m (500 ft). Several organizations and companies have been involved in the geophysical logging program. There is no comprehensive report on the geophysical logging, nor has there been a complete interpretation. The objectives of this study are to make an integrated interpretation of the available data and compile a case history. Emphasis has been on developing a simple interpretation

90

RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic & Reservoir Data Data Sets Online Data Rooms Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well...

91

Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University at SAGEEP 2008: Geophysical Instruction for Non-Geophysicists  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), a nonprofit professional organization, conducted an educational series of seminars at the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) in Philadelphia in April 2008. The purpose of these seminars, conducted under the name Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University (EEGU) over three days in parallel with the regular SAGEEP technical sessions, was to introduce nontraditional geophysical conference attendees to the appropriate use of geophysics in environmental and engineering projects. Five half-day, classroom-style sessions were led by recognized experts in the application of seismic, electrical, gravity, magnetics, and ground-penetrating radar methods. Classroom sessions were intended to educate regulators, environmental program managers, consultants, and students who are new to near-surface geophysics or are interested in learning how to incorporate appropriate geophysical approaches into characterization or remediation programs or evaluate the suitability of geophysical methods for general classes of environmental or engineering problems.

Jeffrey G. Paine

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, including those pertaining to: (a) Adequate identification of seismic exploration crews operating in this

94

Borehole Geophysical Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Methods Citation Carole D. Johnson. Borehole...

95

Borehole Geophysical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Geophysical Logging Citation Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.....

96

IGPP: Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IGPP Home IGPP Astrophysics IGPP Planetary Sciences IGPP Mini Grant Seminars Phone Book LLNL Home FY09 IGPP Mini Grant The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP)...

97

High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

98

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optimizing the use of aeromagnetic data for predictive geological interpretation: an example from the Grenville Province, Quebec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictive geological mapping relies largely on the empirical and statistical analysis of aeromagnetic data. However, in most applications the analysis remains essentially visual and unconstrained. The lithological and structural diversity of rock units ... Keywords: GIS, Geophysical modeling, Magnetic data, Predictive geological mapping, Spatial modeling

Sharon Parsons; Lopold Nadeau; Pierre Keating; Chang-Jo Chung

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geophysical Techniques page? For detailed information on Geophysical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geophysical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geophysical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. E [+] Electrical Techniques‎ (2 categories) 5 pages G [×] Gravity Techniques‎ 3 pages M [×] Magnetic Techniques‎ 3 pages S [+] Seismic Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Geophysical Techniques" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. D DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) E Electrical Techniques G Gravity Techniques M Magnetic Techniques

103

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center...

105

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geophysics IV. Gravity, Magnetic, and Magnetotelluric Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric methods. Each of the 10 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities » Opportunities » Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures Promoting and supporting high-quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. Contact Director Harald Dogliani (505) 663-5309 Email Deputy and Signatures Jon Schoonover (505) 665-0772 Email Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 663-5291 Email Astophysics and Cosmology Ed Fenimore (505) 667-7371 Email Climate Manvendra K. Dubey (505) 665-3128 Email Geophysics Scott Baldridge (505) 667-4338 Email Space Physics Josef Koller (505) 665-7395 Email Expanding the frontiers of astrophysical, space, earth, and climate sciences and their signatures The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los

110

A geological framework for temporal sedimentary dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical, geochemical and geotechnical methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal aspects of sediment distribution, accumulation, post-depositional alterations, and seafloor response and recovery to major events in a temperate, paraglacial, turbid outwash fjord. The goals of this study are to generate a complete geological model and compare the results to the global distribution of fjords. The over arching theme of this study is that the ratio of the area of the watershed to the area of the receiving basin can provide a first order indicator of many factors including glacial mass; the timing of glacial retreat; sediment input, accumulation, and preservation; and other factors. Temporal observations reveal the change of this fjord from a glaciated basin to and estuarine environment. These observations become important when viewed in the context of global climate change and the continued loss of ice. Preserved strata provide a 2800 yr record of changing modes of sedimentation as the system evolved from a glaciated basin to a non-glaciated fjord revealing a detailed chronology of change between end-member systems which can be used to infer changes as glaciers retreat from other fjords. Short lived radio isotopes were used to investigate post-depositional alteration of modern sediments. Without an understanding of how biological and physical processes work to modify sedimentary fabric during preservation, changes seen in sediment and rock core data cannot be accurately resolved. Physical processes can cause erosion and lateral transport; winnowing and armoring; and instantaneous sedimentation, all of which may be preserved. Biological processes can modulate the preservation of strata by destroying sedimentary fabric and integrating signals. The final fundamental need is to investigate the seafloor response and recovery to these events. Massive earthquakes are frequent in the study area and cause perturbations to sediment input and preservation. By understanding how lakes and deltas modulate sediment discharge after the event; how shorelines are modified after the event; and where sediment is deposited we can determine the influence these changes have on the environment and on humans.

Noll, Christian John

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) Home Publications Collaboration & Links Staff Research Highlights Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Geodynamics & National Security Nonlinear Elasticity Time Reversal Los Alamos Seismic Network Stimulated Porous Fluid Flow Resource Recovery Seismic & Acoustic Imaging Exploration Geophysics Induced Seismicity Volcanoes & Earthquakes Other Research CONTACTS Group Leader Ken Rehfeldt Administrative Contacts Jody Benson Cecilia Gonzales Geophysics (EES-17) The Geophysics Group supports the national security mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory by providing technical expertise to monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. Though our focus is on seismic monitoring, we also apply electric, magnetic, radionuclide, and acoustic technologies to monitor underground explosions, maintain our ability to conduct tests, and develop the Yucca Mountain Project. In addition, we study the nonlinear properties of earth materials, imaging with seismic waves, how seismic waves affect the interaction of porous rocks and fluids, use of seismic waves to characterize underground oil reservoirs, volcanology and volcanic seismicity, advanced computational physics of earth materials, and using drilling technology to study the crust of the earth. These tasks are complemented by our extensive background in both conventional and hot dry rock geothermal energy development and geophysical support of the Nevada Test Site.

112

Geophysical study of the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geophysical studies in the Clear Lake region of California, north of San Francisco, have revealed a prominent, nearly circular negative gravity anomaly with an amplitude of more than 25 milligals (mgal) and an areal extent of approximately 250 square miles and, in addition, a number of smaller positive and negative anomalies. The major negative gravity anomaly is closely associated with the Clear Lake volcanic field and with an area characterized by hot springs and geothermal fields. However, the anomaly cannot be explained by mapped surface geologic features of the area. Aeromagnetic data in the Clear Lake region show no apparent correlation with the major negative gravity anomaly; the local magnetic field is affected principally by serpentine. An electrical resistivity low marks the central part of the gravity minimum, and a concentration of earthquake epicenters characterizes the Clear Lake volcanic field area. The primary cause of the major negative gravity anomaly is believed to be a hot intrusive mass, possibly a magma chamber, that may underlie the Clear Lake volcanic field and vicinity. This mass may serve as a source of heat for the geothermal phenomena in the area. Other smaller gravity anomalies in the Clear Lake region are apparently caused by near-surface geologic features, including relatively dense units of the Franciscan Formation and less dense Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rock units.

Chapman, R.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

115

Geophysical LaboratoryGeophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Washington Washington, DCWashington, DC Russell J. HemleyRussell J. Hemley Percy W. BridgmanPercy W. BridgmanGeophysical LaboratoryGeophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of WashingtonCarnegie Institution STATE VIBRATIONAL STATE ELECTRONIC STATE (K-edge, Band Gap) OPTICAL X-RAY · Diamond window opaque above

Hemley, Russell J.

116

Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

Goff, F.; Waters, A.C. (eds.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

GRADUATE STUDY IN GEOLOGY The graduate program involves 26 full-, part-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.G., Summons R.E. and Sweet I.P., 1986. Hydrocarbon shows and petroleum source rocks in sediments as old as 1. Petroleum source rocks of the Amadeus Basin. In: Geological and geophysical studies in the Amadeus Basin.D. and Francis D.A., 1993. Geochemistry of oils and source rocks of the East Coast Basin and implications

Peterson, Blake R.

118

A Hydrologic-geophysical Method for Characterizing Flow and Transport Processes Within The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project was to employ two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar, to image a controlled infiltration of a saline tracer under unsaturated flow conditions. The geophysical techniques have been correlated to other more traditional hydrologic measurements including neutron moisture measurements and induction conductivity logs. Images that resulted during two successive infiltrations indicate the development of what appear to be preferential pathways through the finer grained materials, although the results could also be produced by cationic capture of free ions in clays. In addition the site as well as the developing solute plume exhibits electrical anisotropy which is likely related to flow properties. However the geologic significance of this phenomenon is still under investigation.

David Alumbaugh; Douglas LaBrecque; James Brainard; T.C. (Jim) Yeh

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geophysical survey, Paso Robles geothermal area, California, part of the resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges is included, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. Results for two geophysical methods that have been used in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys, are discussed and interpreted.

Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING IN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRAZIL August/2010 Mônica Mazzini Perrotta Remote Sensing Division Head #12;SUMMARY The Geological Survey of Brazil mission The Remote Sensing Division Main remote, Paleontology, Remote Sensing Director of Hydrology and Land Management But Remote Sensing Division gives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geophysical Exploration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Exploration Technologies Geophysical Exploration Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Geophysical Exploration Technologies Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

122

EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco EETD Researchers at the American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco December 9-13 December 2013 A number of scientists from the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are presenting papers and posters at the American Geophysical Union Meeting next week in San Francisco. Here are brief descriptions of one talk and two posters by EETD scientists and their colleagues. For more information, go to the AGU meeting site at the link below, where you can look up presentations by scientists from EETD and other divisions of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Energy-Water Integrated Assessment of the Sacramento Area and a Demonstration of WEAP-LEAP Capability Poster Monday, December 9, 2013, 8 AM - 12 PM Hall A-C Moscone South Researchers from EETD and partner institutions report on a new basin-scale

123

Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

Reeves, J.J.; Rowland, D.A.; Trentham, R.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and south Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Reeves, J.J.

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

127

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

Daniels, Jeff

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

The KU Geologic Record Volume 1, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the articles. KU has one of the strongest research groups in the world working on car- bonate rocks. GeotimesPhil- lips) was cited as the example of resurgent focus on hydro- thermal oil and gas reser- voirs. These are systems in which hot fluids move though rocks and enhance porosity. Such studies integrate hydro- geology

Peterson, Blake R.

130

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

131

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integrated Geophysical Exploration of a Known Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy production. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the Western...

134

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geophysical Techniques Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Borehole geophysics were completed at the Raft River valley, Idaho. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. (1 February 1977) Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geophysical_Method_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=594349" Category: Exploration Activities

135

Geology of Nevada: The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology plays a central role in Nevadas human history, economy, and future. Cordilleran tectonics have created the Basin and Range landscape and interior drainage of the Great Basin, provided a rain shadow to make Nevada the nations driest state, and generated frequent earthquakes along normal and strike-slip faults. Geology is key to reducing risks from Nevadas natural and anthropogenic hazards (earthquakes, flash floods, drought, land subsidence, erosion after wildland fires, landslides, swelling and collapsing soils, radon, arsenic, and others). Nevadas geologic fortunes make it the leading state in the production of gold, silver, barite, lithium, and mercury and a major producer of geothermal power and gypsum. The metals are primarily related to igneous activity, with major pulses of magma during the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Barite is mined from Paleozoic

Jonathan G. Price

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

JOURNAL OF SEDIMENTARY RESEARCH, VOL. 70, NO. 1, JANUARY, 2000, P. 227239 Copyright 2000, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Society for Sedimentary Geology) 1073-130X/00/070-227/$03.00 ANKERITE CEMENTATION IN DEEPLY BURIED.K. e-mail: j.hendry@qub.ac.uk 2 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland, U.K. 3 Isotope Geosciences Unit, Scottish

Haszeldine, Stuart

138

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

139

A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Mexico, 1978e Geothermal demonstration plant--1975. Hydrologic testing geothermal test hole no. 2. Losof the ~lles Caldera geothermal system, New Mexico. Trans.

Wilt, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales, sandstones, and limestones (this layer is probably a significant storage reservoir and may be a major production

Wilt, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Recent Developments in Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics Applied to Hydrothermal Reservoir Mapping and Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in research and development of four of UURI's projects are reviewed in this paper. First, the development of chemical tracers has evolved to a field test in the Dixie Valley geothermal system in Nevada. Second, the measurement of in situ stress continues to demonstrate changes with location in the orientation of stress within active geothermal systems. Third, we continue to develop hydrologic models of geothermal systems based upon fluid inclusion measurements. Fourth, we are developing equipment that will allow testing of borehole to borehole and borehole to surface electrical resistivity techniques for locating fluid-filled fractures.

Moore, Joseph N.; Nielson, Dennis L.; Wright, Phillip M.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

A geological and geophysical study of the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensional stresses caused Africa and South America to break up about 130 Million Years. When Africa rifted away from South America, a large onshore triple junction began at about 13 S and propagated northward. This triple junction failed and created the Reconcavo-Tucano-Jupato rift (R-T-J), located in northeastern Brazil (north of Salvador). The extensional stress that created this rift was caused by a change in the force acting on the plate during the Aptian. A series of offshore rifts also opened at this time, adjacent to the R-T-J rift; this series of basins are referred to as Jacuipe, Sergipe, and Alagoas (J-S-A). The basins are separated by bathymetric highs to the north and the south of the Sergipe-Alagoas basin. The Sergipe-Alagoas basin has a Bouguer gravity anomalies more negative than -35 mGal, and the other two basins have values more negative than -100 mGal; the total magnetic intensity is also about 60-80 nT higher in the Sergipe-Alagoas basin than the surrounding basins. The gravity and magnetic values in the Sergipe-Alagoas basin, when compared to the Jacuipe and the Sergipe-Alagoas basins, indicate that the depositional history and/or the formation of the Sergipe-Alagoas basin is different from the other two basins. This study was done by analyzing the gravity and magnetic anolamies in the region, and comparing these anomalies to the stratigraphy of the basin. This research has allowed the stratigraphy and structures of the Sergipe-Alagoas basin to be better understood - the location of the Sergipe fracture zone will also be outlined. This study provides a comprehensive view of the Sergipe-Alagoas basin and outlines a method for using Gravity and Magnetics to better understand the stratigraphy and structure of the Sergipe-Alagoas basin.

Melton, Bradley Douglas

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested Reading The electrical resistivity log as an aidare assumed. The electrical resistivity of reservoir rocksdescribe the electrical resistivity of sedimentary rocks as

Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Project Description The project is expected to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data held by the State Geological Surveys available via the NGDS. State Arizona Objectives Expand and enhance the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermalrelevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

146

Recent advances in optimized geophysical survey design Hansruedi Maurer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- time tomography: Geophysics, 74, no.4, Q27­Q40, doi:10.1190/ 1.3141738. Atkinson, A. C., A. N. Donev

147

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

148

Geophysical Study of the Salton Trough of Southern California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1964 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geophysical Study of the Salton Trough of Southern California Citation Shawn...

149

Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance...

150

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

151

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEWS LIBRARY JOBS SITE MAP Emergency Maps Organization Goals Phone Search Science > LANL Institutes > Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics National Security Education...

152

Geological Sciences College of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

postgraduate studies in Engineering Geology. `From going to mines and quarries, looking at what the job entails to his childhood when he would enjoy visiting mines and caves while on holidays around the UK, learning Geological Evolution of NZ and Antarctica GEOL 483 Coal & Petroleum Geology GEOL488 Special Topics

Hickman, Mark

153

Mineral resource potential and geology of the Challis National Forest, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an assessment of the mineral potential of the Challis National Forest based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical data compiled at a 1:250,000 scale and on published information on mineral deposits and occurrences. More than half of the forest has a high to moderate resource potential for one or more of the following commodities: Ag, Au, Ba, Bi, Cu, Mo, Nb, Pb, REE, Ta, Th, Sb, Sn, U, V, W, Zn, fluorspar, geothermal energy, and common variety minerals.

Worl, R.G.; Wilson, A.B.; Smith, C.L.; Kleinkopf, M.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

155

Field implementation of geophysical diffraction tomography  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical diffraction tomography is a new technique that shows promise as a tool for quantitative subsurface (below-ground) imaging. The approach being used is based upon the filtered backpropagation algorithm, which is a mathematical extension of the reconstruction software used in conventional X-ray CAT scanners. The difference between this method and existing methods is that the new algorithm rigorously accounts for diffraction effects through an exact inversion of the wave equation. This refinement is necessary in that it admits the use of acoustic and long-wavelength electromagnetic waves, allowing tomography to be taken from the laboratory to the field. ORNL's effort in geophysical diffraction tomography involves reducing the filtered backpropagation algorithm to practice. This requires the design and construction of field instrumentation as well as the development of an improved algorithm. The original algorithm requires the imaged region to be illuminated by plane waves. This requirement simplifies the algorithm but complicates its field implementation in that plane waves are difficult to generate. Consequently, ORNL has been working to generalize the filtered backpropagation algorithm to allow a broader range of incoming wave fields which can more easily be realized in the field. The instrumentation aspects involve the selection of appropriate sonic sources and receivers along with the development of a state-of-art, portable, computer-controlled, multichannel data acquisition system. 5 references, 6 figures.

Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

157

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Integrated approach towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the progress during the first year of the project on Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. This project is funded under the Department of Energy`s Class I program which is targeted towards improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits. The project involves an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by drilling of horizontal injection wells to improve production performance. The type of data the authors intend to integrate includes cross bore hole seismic surveys, geological interpretation based on logs and cores, and engineering information. This report covers the first phase of the project which includes a detailed reservoir description of the field based on the available information, followed by flow simulation of the Self Unit to compare the simulated result with the historical performance. Based on the simulated results, a vertical test well was drilled to validate this reservoir description. The well will also be used as a source well for a cross bore hole seismic survey. This report discusses the related geophysical, geological and engineering activities leading to the drilling of the vertical test well. The validation phase and the collection of the cross bore hole survey has just begun, and the results will be presented in the next annual report.

Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/tectonics, hydrogeology, stable isotope geochemistry, environmental geology, sedimentology and stratigraphyAssistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics The Department of Geology structural geology with interest in the study of fractured reservoirs and geomechanics. The successful

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.  

SciTech Connect

During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Report of the geophysical measurements in geothermal wells workshop, Airport Marina Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 17--19, 1975  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a Workshop on Geophysical Measurements in Geothermal Wells, hosted in Albuquerque, September 17-19, by Sandia Laboratories and jointly sponsored by the United States Geological Survey and the Energy Research and Development Administration. During the workshop, tutorial papers dealing with the geothermal resource, geothermal logging, and high temperature technology were followed by working panel sessions. Three panels deliberated, respectively, well and reservoir parameters, log interpretation, and high temperature technology. In a final session, the reports of the panels were heard and discussed by the full workshop. A summary of the workshop conclusions and recommendations, as well as the complete panel statements, are presented. (auth)

Baker, L.E.; Baker, R.P.; Hughen, R.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An introduction to electrical resistivity in geophysics Abstract Physicists are finding that the skills they have learned in their training may be applied to areas beyond traditional physics topics. One such field is that of geophysics. This paper presents the electrical resistivity component of an undergraduate geophysics course at Radford University. It is taught from a physics perspective, yet the application of the theory to the real world is the overriding goal. The concepts involved in electrical resistivity studies are first discussed in a general sense, and then they are studied through the application of the relevant electromagnetic theory.

166

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geology and alteration of the Coso geothermal area were mapped in conjunction with geophysical surveys and a deep drill test (CGEH-1) to facilitate selection of a follow-up drill site. The oldest rocks exposed at Coso are intermediate to mafic metamorphic rocks of uncertain age intruded by dikes and pods of quartz latite porphyry and felsite, and by a small

170

Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology  

SciTech Connect

Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

172

Beyond Gaussian Statistical Modeling in Geophysical Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review discusses recent advances in geophysical data assimilation beyond Gaussian statistical modeling, in the fields of meteorology, oceanography, as well as atmospheric chemistry. The non-Gaussian features are stressed rather than the ...

Marc Bocquet; Carlos A. Pires; Lin Wu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Contour Analysis: A New Approach for Melding Geophysical Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new approach, contour analysis, for combining independent estimates of a geophysical field to produce a single realization incorporating data from all sources. Contour analysis divides the field estimates into contours and ...

Arthur J. Mariano

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near-Inertial Oscillations of Geophysical Surface Frontal Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrinsic oscillations of stable geophysical surface frontal currents of the unsteady, nonlinear, reduced-gravity shallow-water equations on an f plane are investigated analytically and numerically. For frictional (Rayleigh) currents ...

Angelo Rubino; Sergey Dotsenko; Peter Brandt

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research geomagnetic ionosphere currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research Keywords geomagnetic ionosphere currents Index Terms Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere Ionosphere: Current systems Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism: Rapid time variations Space Weather: Impacts on technological systems Space Weather: Geomagnetically induced currents

Michigan, University of

176

Geophysical Applications of Partial Wavelet Coherence and Multiple Wavelet Coherence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the application of partial wavelet coherence (PWC) and multiple wavelet coherence (MWC) to geophysics is demonstrated. PWC is a technique similar to partial correlation that helps identify the resulting wavelet coherence (WTC) ...

Eric K. W. Ng; Johnny C. L. Chan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-10343, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innocent (), Emmanuelle Petelet-Giraud (3), and Pierre Durst (4) (1) BRGM, Regional Geological Survey, Regional Geological Survey Service Bordeaux, France, p.durst@brgm.fr In the south-west of France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

A three-dimensional gravity model of the geologic structure of Long Valley caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several attempts to define and interpret this anomaly have been made in the past using 2-D and 3-D models. None of the previous interpretations have yielded definitive results, but in fairness, the interpretation here has benefited from a larger gravity data base and more subsurface control than available to previous workers. All published 3-D models simplistically assumed constant density of fill. All 2-D models suffered from the inherent three-dimensionality of the complicated density structure of Long Valley caldera. In addition, previous interpreters have lacked access to geological data, such as well lithologies and density logs, seismic refraction interpretations, suface geology, and structural geology interpretations. The purpose of this study is to use all available gravity data and geological information to constrain a multi-unit, 3-D density model based on the geology of Long Valley caldera and its vicinity. Insights on the geologic structure of the caldera fill can help other geophysical interpretations in determining near-surface effects so that deeper structure may be resolved. With adequate control on the structure of the caldera fill, we are able to examine the gravity data for the presence of deeper density anomalies in the crust. 20 refs., 7 figs.

Carle, S.F.; Goldstein, N.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

2000-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1997-1998.

Robinson, William C.; Trentham, Robert C.; Widner, Kevin; Wienbrandt, Richard

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Recovery Act: Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to provide training opportunities for two graduate students in order to improve the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. The graduate student effort will be geared towards the formulation and implementation of an integrated simulation-optimization framework to provide a rigorous scientific support to the design CCS systems that, for any given site: (a) maximize the amount of carbon storage; (b) minimize the total cost associated with the CCS project; (c) minimize the risk of CO2 upward leakage from injected formations. The framework will stem from a combination of data obtained from geophysical investigations, a multiphase flow model, and a stochastic multi-objective optimization algorithm. The methodology will rely on a geostatistical approach to generate ensembles of scenarios of the parameters that are expected to have large sensitivities and uncertainties on the model response and thus on the risk assessment, in particular the permeability properties of the injected formation and its cap rock. The safety theme will be addressed quantitatively by including the risk of CO2 upward leakage from the injected formations as one the objectives that should be minimized in the optimization problem. The research performed under this grant is significant to academic researchers and professionals weighing the benefits, costs, and risks of CO2 sequestration. Project managers in initial planning stages of CCS projects will be able to generate optimal tradeoff surfaces and with corresponding injection plans for potential sequestration sites leading to cost efficient preliminary project planning. In addition, uncertainties concerning CCS have been researched. Uncertainty topics included Uncertainty Analysis of Continuity of Geological Confining Units using Categorical Indicator Kriging (CIK) and the Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to Overlying Formations. Reductions in uncertainty will lead to safer CCS projects.

Bau, Domenico

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

185

Shale caprock integrity under carbon sequestration conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration technology requires injection and storage of large volumes of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) in subsurface geological formations. Shale caprock which constitutes more than 60% of effective seals for geologic hydrocarbon bearing formations are therefore of considerable interest in underground CO 2 storage into depleted oil and gas formations. This study investigated experimentally shale caprocks geophysical and geochemical behavior when in contact with aqueous CO 2 over a long period of time. The primary concern is a potential increase in hydraulic conductivity of clay-rich rocks as a result of acidic brine-rock minerals geochemical interactions. Both

Abiola Olabode; Lauren Bentley; Mileva Radonjic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Prototype Geologic Database and Users Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described here is aimed at assembling a prototype database of raw geologic data typically used to identify and differentiate hydrologically significant lithostratigraphic units. The domain of the prototype database was focused on the T, TX, TY Tank farm area and the 216-Z-9 Trench area in 200 West Area and focused on ''orphan'' data that was not already captured in existing databases, as well as new data coming from core projects. A total of 86 boreholed-wells (78 in the T, TX, TY Tank Farm Area, and 8 in the immediate vicinity of 216-Z-9) are included in the initial prototype database. The prototype database currently consists as a series of Excel workbooks, one for each borehole/well, with multiple worksheets representing the different data tables. The number and complexity of the worksheets is dependent on the type and complexity of the data available for a given borehole. By far the most available data sets for these boreholes were as built drawings (pdf files), geophysical log data (internet links and/or depth specific numerical array), and/or ROCSAN data (particle-size, calcium-carbonate, and Folk/Wentworth Classification). Note that secondary data tables that required manual entry of data were completed only for the eight 216-Z-9 Trench boreholes. Note also, that data tables dealing with the sample, laboratory, and/or analytical information needed to qualify the data also have also not yet been completed, as this requires a greater level of effort than originally planned for this initial exercise.

FOGWELL, T.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii geologic map data Citation Hawaii geologic map data Internet. 2013....

188

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

189

Offshore Extension of Deccan Traps in Kachchh, Central Western India: Implications for Geological Sequestration Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deccan basalts in central western India are believed to occupy large onshore-offshore area. Using geophysical and geological observations, onshore sub-surface structural information has been widely reported. On the contrary, information about offshore structural variations has been inadequate due to scarcity of marine geophysical data and lack of onshore-offshore lithological correlations. Till date, merely a few geophysical studies are reported that gauge about the offshore extent of Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments (pre-Deccan). To fill this gap in knowledge, in this article, we present new geophysical evidences to demonstrate offshore continuation of the Deccan volcanics and the Mesozoic sediments. The offshore multi-channel seismic and onshore-offshore lithological correlations presented here confirm that the Mesozoic sedimentary column in this region is overlain by 0.2-1.2-km-thick basaltic cover. Two separate phases of Mesozoic sedimentation, having very distinctive physical and lithological characteristics, are observed between overlying basaltic rocks and underlying Precambrian basement. Using onshore-offshore seismic and borehole data this study provides new insight into the extent of the Deccan basalts and the sub-basalt structures. This study brings out a much clearer picture than that was hitherto available about the offshore continuation of the Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments of Kachchh. Further, its implications in identifying long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} within sub-basalt targets are discussed. The carbon sequestration potential has been explored through the geological assessment in terms of the thickness of the strata as well as lithology.

Pandey, D. K., E-mail: pandey@ncaor.org [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India); Pandey, A. [IITM, Centre for Climate Change Research (India); Rajan, S. [National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geophysical background and as-built target characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) has provided a facility for DOE, other Government agencies, and the private sector to evaluate and document the utility of specific geophysical measurement techniques for detecting and defining cultural and environmental targets. This facility is the Rabbit Valley Geophysics Performance Evaluation Range (GPER). Geophysical surveys prior to the fiscal year (FY) 1994 construction of new test cells showed the primary test area to be relatively homogeneous and free from natural or man-made artifacts, which would generate spurious responses in performance evaluation data. Construction of nine new cell areas in Rabbit Valley was completed in June 1994 and resulted in the emplacement of approximately 150 discrete targets selected for their physical and electrical properties. These targets and their geophysical environment provide a broad range of performance evaluation parameters from ``very easy to detect`` to ``challenging to the most advanced systems.`` Use of nonintrusive investigative techniques represents a significant improvement over intrusive characterization methods, such as drilling or excavation, because there is no danger of exposing personnel to possible hazardous materials and no risk of releasing or spreading contamination through the characterization activity. Nonintrusive geophysical techniques provide the ability to infer near-surface structure and waste characteristics from measurements of physical properties associated with those targets.

Allen, J.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Geologic investigation of Playa Lakes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada : data report.  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface geological investigations have been conducted at two large playa lakes at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada. These characterization activities were intended to provide basic stratigraphic-framework information regarding the lateral distribution of ''hard'' and ''soft'' sedimentary materials for use in defining suitable target regions for penetration testing. Both downhole geophysical measurements and macroscopic lithilogic descriptions were used as a surrogate for quantitative mechanical-strength properties, although some quantitative laboratory strength measurements were obtained as well. Both rotary (71) and core (19) holes on a systematic grid were drilled in the southern half of the Main Lake; drill hole spacings are 300 ft north-south and 500-ft east-west. The drilled region overlaps a previous cone-penetrometer survey that also addressed the distribution of hard and soft material. Holes were drilled to a depth of 40 ft and logged using both geologic examination and down-hole geophysical surveying. The data identify a large complex of very coarse-grained sediment (clasts up to 8 mm) with interbedded finer-grained sands, silts and clays, underlying a fairly uniform layer of silty clay 6 to 12 ft thick. Geophysical densities of the course-grained materials exceed 2.0 g/cm{sup 2}, and this petrophysical value appears to be a valid discriminator of hard vs. soft sediments in the subsurface. Thirty-four holes, including both core and rotary drilling, were drilled on a portion of the much larger Antelope Lake. A set of pre-drilling geophysical surveys, including time-domain electromagnetic methods, galvanic resistivity soundings, and terrain-conductivity surveying, was used to identify the gross distribution of conductive and resistive facies with respect to the present lake outline. Conductive areas were postulated to represent softer, clay-rich sediments with larger amounts of contained conductive ground water. Initial drilling, consisting of cored drill holes to 100-ft (33-m) depth, confirmed both the specific surface geophysical measurements and the more general geophysical model of the subsurface lake facies. Good agreement of conductive regions with drill holes containing little to no coarse-grained sediments was observed, and vice-versa. A second phase of grid drilling on approximately 300-ft (100-m) centers was targeted a delineating a region of sufficient size containing essentially no coarse-grained ''hard'' material. Such a region was identified in the southwestern portion of Antelope Lake.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geologic map of the Oasis Valley basin and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This map and accompanying cross sections present an updated synthesis of the geologic framework of the Oasis Valley area, a major groundwater discharge site located about 15 km west of the Nevada Test Site. Most of the data presented in this compilation is new geologic map data, as discussed below. In addition, the cross sections incorporate new geophysical data that have become available in the last three years (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999). Geophysical data are used to estimate the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks on the cross sections, and to identify major concealed structures. Large contiguous parts of the map area are covered either by alluvium or by volcanic units deposited after development of the major structures present at the depth of the water table and below. Hence, geophysical data provide critical constraints on our geologic interpretations. A companion paper by Fridrich and others (1999) and the above-cited reports by Hildenbrand and others (1999) and Mankinen and others (1999) provide explanations of the interpretations that are presented graphically on this map. This map covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles in Nye County, Nevada, centered on the Thirsty Canyon SW quadrangle, and is a compilation of one published quadrangle map (O'Connor and others, 1966) and eight new quadrangle maps, two of which have been previously released (Minor and others, 1997; 1998). The cross sections that accompany this map were drawn to a depth of about 5 km below land surface at the request of hydrologists who are modeling the Death Valley groundwater system.

Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; Ryder, P.L.; Slate, J.L.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical Technology |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using New Geophysical Technology Using New Geophysical Technology Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical Technology Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a geothermal case history using a relatively new but proven technology that can accurately map groundwater at significant depths (up to 1,000 meters) over large areas (square kilometers) in short periods of time (weeks). Understanding the location and extent of groundwater resources is very important to the geothermal industry for obvious reasons. It is crucial to have a cost-effective method of understanding where concentrations of geothermal water are located as well as the preferential flow paths of the water in the subsurface. Such

196

Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in southern Raft River Valley, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gravity, aeromagnetic, and telluric current surveys in the southern Raft River have been used to infer the structure and the general lithology underlying the valley. The gravity data indicate the approximate thickness of the Cenozoic rocks and location of the larger normal faults, and the aeromagnetic data indicate the extent of the major Cenozoic volcanic units. The relative ellipse area contour map compiled from the telluric current survey generally conforms to the gravity map except for

198

Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Helicopter Geophysics Applied to Upstream Oil and Gas Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Systems Monitoring Applications Towards Engineered-Natural Systems Geothermal Systems Geologic CO 2 Storage Offshore Systems Conventional and Unconventional Oil...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geophysical investigation of the Warm Springs, Montana area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The location, geology, and previous work in the area are described briefly. The gravity and resistivity survey methods are presented and the results are discussed. (MHR)

Halvorson, J.W.; Wideman, C.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geologic Repository at a Geologic Repository Operations Area at Yucca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted its license application (LA) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a construction authorization for a geologic repository pursuant to Section 114 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended

Mountain Nevada; William J. Boyle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The Soda Lake geothermal field is an ideal setting to test the applicability of the 3D-3C reflection seismic method because: it is a producing field with a great deal of geologic and drilling data already available; it is in an alluvial valley where the subsurface structures that carry the geothermal fluids have no surface manifestations; and, there are downhole geophysical logs of fractures and permeable zones that can be used to ground-truth the new data.

204

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

205

Wavelet denoising techniques with applications to experimental geophysical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare Fourier-based and wavelet-based denoising techniques applied to both synthetic and real experimental geophysical data. The Fourier-based technique used for comparison is the classical Wiener estimator, and the wavelet-based ... Keywords: Denoising, Empirical Bayes, Wavelet, Wavelet thresholding, Wiener filter

Albert C. To; Jeffrey R. Moore; Steven D. Glaser

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION The redox evolution of the oceans through Earth history shaped; Erbacher et al., 2005). In this study we use variations in the isotope composition of U, a trace element and Palmer, 1991). As recently observed, the burial of U into sediments is associated with isotope fraction

Pross, Jörg

207

Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geologic setting and geochemistry of thermal water and geothermal assessment, Trans-Pecos Texas. Final report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs and wells in West Texas and adjacent Mexico are manifestations of active convective geothermal systems, concentrated in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Maximum temperatures are 47/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/C for hot springs and wells in Texas and 90/sup 0/C for hot springs in Mexico within 5 km of the border. Existing information is summarized and the results of a 1-year intensive study of the area are presented. The study includes several overlapping phases: (1) compilation of existing geologic information, both regional studies of geology, structure and geophysics, and more detailed local studies of individual hot spring areas; (2) detailed geologic mapping of hot spring areas to understand the origin and geologic controls of hot springs; (3) field measurement and sampling of hot spring or well waters for geochemical analysis; and (4) synthesis and interpretation of the data.

Henry, C.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

212

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tFavorability and Evidence Data 7 WinRAR ZIP files and links to detailed metadata. Includes data from regression models, gravity and temperature gradients, dilational strain data, and weighted earthquake epicenter data.

214

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

215

Geophysical Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Oregon, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical Characterization of a Geothermal System Neal Hot Springs, Oregon, USA Abstract Neal Hot Springs is an active geothermal area that is also the proposed location of a binary power plant, which is being developed by US Geothermal Inc. To date, two production wells have been drilled and an injection well is in the process of being completed. The primary goal of this field camp was to provide a learning experience for students studying geophysics, but a secondary goal was to characterize the Neal Hot Springs area to provide valuable information on the flow of geothermal fluids through the subsurface. This characterization was completed using a variety of

216

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysics Geophysics Focus Leader: Scott Baldridge sbaldridge@lanl.gov This focus supports a breadth of basic research concerning planetary surfaces and interiors, including numerical, experimental, and field studies of the structure, properties, processes, and dynamics of terrestrial and giant planets. It is strongly recommended that proposals exploit unique LANL resources (e.g., LANL high-performance computing resources; the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE); geochemical analyses facilities resident in EES and C divisions; and/or sensor technology capabilities resident in C, EES, ISR, and N divisions). We are particularly interested in innovative research projects in areas of current, strong international scientific interest such as the following: New techniques in passive (imaging) or active (e.g., lidar, radar)

217

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) Application Form A complete application includes: An on-line application Letter of Interest two (2) references (download reference form in PDF or Word format). Referee must submit by email to georgia@lanl.gov or fax to: 505-663-5225 proof of health insurance complete transcripts (unofficial is acceptable) Foreign students, please contact Georgia Sanchez at georgia@lanl.gov regarding your application. Cost is $500, $100.00 is due with the application. Please mail deposit with a copy of your application to: SAGE IGPPS, MS-T001 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA Email: georgia@lanl.gov Voice: 505-663-5291 Note: Course credit may be possible by prior arrangement with your university (please check with your advisor) but cannot be awarded directly

218

Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue Mountain and Pumpernickel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to September 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected data from more than 660 gravity stations, 100 line-km of truck-towed magnetometer traverses, and 260...

219

Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal Dataset Summary Description Output and documentation from a set of multi-century experiments performed using NOAA/GFDL's climate models. Users can download files, display data file attributes, and graphically display the data. Data sets include those from CM2.X experiments associated with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report (IPCC) and the US Climate Change Science Program (US CCSP). Tags {climate,IPCC,CCSP,pressure,SLP," sea ice","upper-level winds",ozone,"meridional winds","zonal winds",u-wind,v-wind," carbon dioxide"," volcanic",aerosol,grids,"soil moisture"," IPCC",flux,"radiation flux",thickness,radiation,emissivity,longwave,sensible,"latent heat",downwelling,upwelling,temperature,convective,runoff,"water vapor",humidity,cloudiness,transport,"geopotential height",assimilation,salinity,evaporation,freshwater}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA); geological related analytical tools; methods to interpret geophysical models; well completion and integrity for long-term CO2...

224

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

verification, and accounting (MVA); geological related analytical tools;methods to interpret geophysical models; well completion and integrity for long- term CO2...

225

Performance Assessment Strategy Plan for the Geologic Repository Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations to assess compliance with the performance requirements in the regulations for a geologic repository and to support the development of the repository. The strategy for these evaluations has been documented in the Performance Assessment Strategy Plan (DOE, 1989). The implementation of the performance assessment strategy is defined in this document. This paper discusses the scope and objectives of the implementation plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans, summarizes the performance assessment areas and the integrated strategy of the performance assessment program. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect

Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Localization of shallow gas deposits and uncontrolled gas flows in young and unconsolidated sediments by geophysical methods  

SciTech Connect

The great mass of Neogene sediments in the Hungarian basin, where several hydrocarbon accumulations are known, is affected by Pliocene strike-slip movements, resulting in many [open quotes]flower structures.[close quotes] The gas may migrate from the reservoirs upward to the surface along the faults. Thus, shallow gas deposits can be located in the young, unconsolidated sands. There are also several shallow gas deposits derived from uncontrolled gas flows. In Hungary, the shallow gas reservoirs, which are small but increasingly important, have not yet been explored properly. However, the depleting gas may pollute the water in the soil as well as cause explosions. Our purpose is to develop inexpensive, complete, and highly sophisticated field- and data-processing techniques and an integrated complex of geophysical methods in order to define the limits of shallow gas deposits. To avoid anomalous behavior on seismic sections of the depleting gas, we started from uncontrolled gas flows which require special velocity and amplitude vs. offset analyses. In addition, natural and controlled source electromagnetic/electric surveys with various parameters were applied. An industrial-scale seismic section over an uncontrolled gas flow, special sections over flower structures and geoelectric sections, and a magnetic map are presented. The integrated complex of geophysical methods outlined above is being developed in order to establish the conditions for the exploration of gas reservoirs which have been used close to their locality and which could be recovered inexpensively.

Csoergei, J.; Kummer, I.; Papa, A.; Sipos, J.; Solyom, I.; Takacs, E.; Timar, Z. (Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Budapest (Hungary)); Keresztes, T. (MOL RT, Budapest (Hungary))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

At quadrennial geophysics fest, earth scientists think globally  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on two areas of current research interest from the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics meeting in July 1995. The first is the possible long and unlikely seeming change of connections. Linked are the warm surface of the tropical Pacific Ocean, the atmosphere at the midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere and the icy stratosphere over Antarctica where the warming of the sea surface 15 years ago may have set the stage for the Antarctic ozone hole. The second major research research reviewed concerned increases in ultraviolet light. Surface radiation in the DNA-damaging region of the spectrum is increasing by as much as 12% per decade at high latitudes.

Kerr, R.A.

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gable named Geological Society of America Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

member of a large team that received a Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award for the Yucca Mountain Project. About the Geological Society of America Established in 1888, The...

230

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geologic flow characterization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

231

NETL: Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

232

Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics 1993 annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief papers on the research being conducted at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics in 1993 in Geosciences, High-Pressure sciences, and Astrophysics.

Ryerson, F.J.; Budwine, C.M. [eds.

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

234

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

235

Computerized coal-quality prediction from digital geophysical logs  

SciTech Connect

A digital suite of geophysical logs, including gamma-ray, resistivity and gamma-gamma density, were used to develop and test a method for predicting coal quality parameters for the Wyodak coal in the Powder River basin of Wyoming. The method was developed by plotting the average of various log response increments (obtained from the contractor's 9-track digital tapes) versus the analytically determined ash, moisture, and Btu/lb for the same intervals of the coal seam. Standard curve-fitting techniques were then employed to determine which log response parameter most accurately predicted the various quality parameters. A computer program was written that reads 9-track, digital, log tapes and determines the coal quality parameters based on the relationships between log response and analytical values. The computer program was written in Fortran 77 for a VAX 11/780 minicomputer. The program was designed to run interactively with user-determined options depending on which geophysical logs were available. Preliminary results have been very encouraging to date with predicted versus analytically determined parameters being estimated to an accuracy of +/-300 Btu/lb (with the average being +/-150 Btu/lb), +/-2% ash and +/-3% moisture. This compares to ASTM lab-to-lab analytical standards of +/-100 Btu/lb, +/-0.7% ash, and +/-0.5% moisture. This prediction methods is applicable to coals from other basins and offers promise as a cost saving tool for exploration and production uses.

Nations, D.L.; Tabet, D.E.; Gerould, C.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

FERNANDO GILBES-SANTAELLA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus Faculty of Arts and Sciences Department of Geology + Spectral Analyses and Sedimentation of the West Coast Beaches of Puerto Rico Undergraduate Research Final, and mineralogy along the west coast of Puerto Rico. These sand sediments were sampled at different geologic

Gilbes, Fernando

237

Christopher U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christopher Magirl U.S. Geological Survey 934 Broadway Suite 300 Tacoma, Washington 98402 Phone; Hydraulic modeling; Computer programming (C/C++, Fortran, Perl), Field survey; Geographic information Research Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. September 2009 ­ present · Analyzing

238

Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A heuristic algorithm for pattern identification in large multivariate analysis of geophysical data sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a heuristic algorithm with factor analysis and a local search optimization system for pattern identification problems as applied to large and multivariate aero-geophysical data. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB code using ... Keywords: Aero-geophysical data, Factor analysis, Local search system, MATLAB program, Patterns identification

Joo Eduardo da Silva Pereira; Adelir Jos Strieder; Janete Pereira Amador; Jos Luiz Silvrio da Silva; Lenidas Luiz Volcato Descovi Filho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral data fusion products for geological outcrop analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Close-range hyperspectral imaging is an emerging technique for remotely mapping mineral content and distributions in inaccessible geological outcrop surfaces, allowing subtle chemical variations to be identified with high resolution and accuracy. Terrestrial ... Keywords: Ground-based, Integration, Surface modelling, Terrestrial laser scanning, Virtual outcrop models, Visualisation

Simon J. Buckley, Tobias H. Kurz, John A. Howell, Danilo Schneider

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The present study completes a study by Thanassoulas et al. (1986) Geophys. Prosp.34, 83-97 and deals with geophysical exploration for geothermal resources in Nea Kessani area, NE Greece. The results of some deep electrical soundings (AB = 6000 m) with the interpretation of a gravity profile crossing the investigated area are considered together with thermal investigations. All subsequent information, along with the conclusions of an earlier paper dealing with a reconnaissance geophysical

243

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

LANL Institutes - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanding the Frontiers of Astrophysical, Space, Earth, & Climate Sciences & Their Signatures The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. These subject areas are selected based on their breadth of scientific challenges facing the international scientific community, as well as relevance to the strategic objective to extend Laboratory scientific excellence. IGPPS/LANL makes a special effort to promote and support new research ideas, which can be further developed through seed funding into major programs supported by federal or other funding sources. IGPPS also supports

246

Geophysical investigation: New Production Reactor Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic crosshole and downhole velocity measurements were performed for two borehole arrays approximately 300 feet deep in conjunction with verticality measurements and geophysical logging of borehole WO-2 (to a depth of 4,960 feet) at the NPR site of the INEL. Past studies show that the site area is covered by a thin layer of soil which overlies numerous basalt flows interrupted by sandy and clayey interbeds. Compressional and shear wave velocities computed for these arrays revealed low velocity zones at the following elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 1: 4,893 feet to 4,873 feet (basalt rubble zone) and 4,705 feet to 4,686 feet (sediment interbed). Corresponding elevation ranges for crosshole array No. 2 include: 4,830 feet to 4,815 feet (sediment interbed), 4,785 feet to 4,765 feet (highly vesicular and fractured basalt), 4,715 feet to 4,705 feet (basalt rubble zone), and 4,672 feet to 4,667 feet (sediment interbed). In general, crosshole velocity data correlated between arrays with velocity differences possibly explained by localized lithologic changes. Due to scatter in the downhole velocity data, only velocity averages were computed. However, these downhole velocities correlated to the approximate mean crosshole velocity values and therefore independent confirmed the crosshole data. Geophysical logging of well WO-2 included natural gamma, neutron, and compensated density logs to a depth of 4,960 feet at which a viscous borehole fluid inhibited further investigation. Second runs of small sections of these logs were repeated satisfactorily for confirmation of certain anomalous areas.

Filipkowski, F.; Blackey, M.; Davies, D.; Levine, E.N.; Murphy, V. [Weston Geophysical Corp., Westboro, MA (US)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NON-PARAMETRIC GEOPHYSICAL DATA INTEGRATION FOR REDUCING UNCERTAINTIES IN MULTIPLE POINT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but when X-ray transmission information is obtained from a multitude of radiographic images, scanned-traditional porous media variables such as interfacial areas and common lines, the latter being the contact points techniques capable of resolving these variables. The ability to quantify phase interfaces and common lines

248

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 ft of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5-million-year-old Elephant Mountain Member, was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5 million year old Elephant Mountain Member was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program...

251

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production Data The Florida Geological Survey is where data related to oil, gas, and geothermal resources for the state of...

253

Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search What links...

254

Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search This is a...

255

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND...

256

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

258

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

259

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, capabilities, and operations in response to a natural or man-made disaster1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Information Response Team (GIRT) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) contains the GIRT

Fleskes, Joe

260

Geological Assessment of the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the ...

Thomas J. Crowley

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION DEVELOPING NONINVASIVE TOOLS TO MONITOR PAST LEAKS AROUND HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect

A characterization program has been developed at Hanford to image past leaks in and around the underground storage tank facilities. The program is based on electrical resistivity, a geophysical technique that maps the distribution of electrical properties of the subsurface. The method was shown to be immediately successful in open areas devoid of underground metallic infrastructure, due to the large contrast in material properties between the highly saline waste and the dry sandy host environment. The results in these areas, confirmed by a limited number of boreholes, demonstrate a tendency for the lateral extent of the underground waste plume to remain within the approximate footprint of the disposal facility. In infrastructure-rich areas, such as tank farms, the conventional application of electrical resistivity using small point-source surface electrodes initially presented a challenge for the resistivity method. The method was then adapted to directly use the buried infrastructure as electrodes for both transmission of electrical current and measurements of voltage. For example, steel-cased wells that surround the tanks were used as long electrodes, which helped to avoid much of the infrastructure problems. Overcoming the drawbacks of the long electrode method has been the focus of our work over the past seven years. The drawbacks include low vertical resolution and limited lateral coverage. The lateral coverage issue has been improved by supplementing the long electrodes with surface electrodes in areas devoid of infrastructure. The vertical resolution has been increased by developing borehole electrode arrays that can fit within the small-diameter drive casing of a direct push rig. The evolution of the program has led to some exceptional advances in the application of geophysical methods, including logistical deployment of the technology in hazardous areas, development of parallel processing resistivity inversion algorithms, and adapting the processing tools to accommodate electrodes of all shapes and locations. The program is accompanied by a full set of quality assurance procedures that cover the layout of sensors, measurement strategies, and software enhancements while insuring the integrity of stored data. The data have been shown to be useful in identifying previously unknown contaminant sources and defining the footprint of precipitation recharge barriers to retard the movement of existing contamination.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT; CUBBAGE B; NOONAN GE; MCNEILL M; HENDERSON C

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

263

CO2-Water-Rock Interactions and the Integrity of Hydrodynamic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InteraCtIOns and the IntegrIty Of hydrOdynamIC seals Background Developing confidence in methods of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geological formations requires an...

264

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

"Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage,"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide (CO of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). DE-FOA-0000652, titled, "Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage," addresses key geologic storage challenges and uncertainties that include improving and validating containment, improving injection operations, increasing reservoir storage efficiency, and mitigating potential releases of CO 2 from the engineered containment system. The following four technical areas of interest are addressed: Area of Interest 1 - Studies of Existing Wellbores Exposed to CO 2 ; Area of Interest 2 - Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies; Area of Interest 3 - Field Methods to Optimize Capacity and Ensure Storage Containment; and Area of Interest 4 - Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and

266

Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50[degree]C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110[degree]C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

Hill, B.E. (ed.)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories: Annual report, fiscal year 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multidisciplinary project was initiated in fiscal year 1986. It comprises 11 reports in two major interrelated tasks: The technical assistance part of the project includes reviewing the progress of the major projects in the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive waste Management (OCRWM) Program and advising the Engineering and Geotechnology Division on significant technical issues facing each project; analyzing geotechnical data, reports, tests, surveys and plans for the different projects; reviewing and commenting on major technical reports and other program documents such as Site Characterization Plans (SCP) and Study Plans; and providing scientific and technical input at technical meetings. The topical studies activity comprises studies on scientific and technical ions and issues of significance to in-situ testing, test analysis methods, and site characterization of nuclear waste geologic repositories. The subjects of study were selected based on discussions with DOE staff. One minor topic is a preliminary consideration and planning exercise for postclosure monitoring studies. The major task, with subtasks involving various geoscience disciplines, is a study of the mechanical, hydraulic, geophysical and geochemical properties of fractures in geologic rock masses.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Imaging algorithms for geophysical applications of impedance tomography  

SciTech Connect

The methods of impedance tomography may be employed to obtain images of subsurface electrical and conductivity variations. For practical reasons, voltages and currents are usually applied at locations on the ground surface or down a limited number of boreholes, but almost never over the entire surface of the region being investigated. The geophysical inversion process can be facilitated by constructing algorithms adopted to these particular geometries and to the lack of complete surface data. In this paper we assume that the fluctuations in conductivity are small compared to the background value. The imaging of these fluctuations is carried out exactly within the constraints imposed by the problem geometry. Several possible arrangements of injection and monitoring electrodes are considered. In two dimensions include: Cross-line geometry, current input along one line (borehole) and measurements along a separate parallel line. Single-line geometry, injection and monitoring using the same borehole. Surface reflection geometry, all input and measurement along the ground surface. Theoretical and practical limitations on the image quality produced by the algorithms are discussed. They are applied to several sets of simulated data, and the images produced are displayed and analyzed.

Witten, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Molyneux, J.E. (Widener Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chester, PA (United States))

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

269

Turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in geophysics and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion associated with turbulent transport of aerosols in the atmosphere and in laboratory experiments. The essence of this phenomenon is the appearance of a nondiffusive mean flux of particles in the direction of the mean heat flux, which results in the formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of aerosols that accumulate in regions of minimum mean temperature of the surrounding fluid. This effect of turbulent thermal diffusion was detected experimentally. In experiments turbulence was generated by two oscillating grids in two directions of the imposed vertical mean temperature gradient. We used Particle Image Velocimetry to determine the turbulent velocity field, and an Image Processing Technique based on an analysis of the intensity of Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of aerosols. Analysis of the intensity of laser light Mie scattering by aerosols showed that aerosols accumulate in the vicinity of the minimum mean temperature due to the effect of turbulent thermal diffusion. Geophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; A. Krein; I. Rogachevskii; J. Buchholz; G. Gruenefeld

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electromagnetic geophysics: Notes from the past and the road ahead Abstract During the last century, electrical geophysics has been transformed from a simple resistivity method to a modern technology that uses complex data-acquisition systems and high-performance computers for enhanced data modeling and interpretation. Not only the methods and equipment have changed but also our ideas about the geoelectrical models used for interpretation have been modified tremendously. This paper describes the evolution of the conceptual and technical foundations of EM methods. Author Michael S. Zhdanov Published Journal

271

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Role of borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Numerous geophysical logs have been made in three deep wells and in several intermediate depth core holes in the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho. Laboratory analyses of cores from the intermediate depth holes were used to provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for a detailed interpretation of logs from the shallow part of the reservoir. A less detailed interpretation of logs from the deeper part of the reservoir

272

Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

Parker, Beatrice Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mining geophysical parameters through decision-tree analysis to determine correlation with tropical cyclone development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between geophysical parameters and tropical cyclones are essential in understanding and predicting the formation of tropical cyclones. Previous studies show that sea surface temperature and vertical wind shear significantly influence the ... Keywords: Data mining, Hurricane, Natural disaster, Prediction

Wenwen Li; Chaowei Yang; Donglian Sun

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Geophysical applications of nuclear resonant spectroscopy Wolfgang Sturhahn and Jennifer M. Jackson*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical applications of nuclear resonant spectroscopy Wolfgang Sturhahn and Jennifer M. Jackson summarize recent developments of nuclear resonant spectroscopy methods like nuclear resonant inelastic x important information on valence, spin state, and magnetic ordering. Both methods use a nuclear resonant

Jackson, Jennifer M.

275

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

Georgen, Jennifer E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

On the Use of Emulators with Extreme and Highly Nonlinear Geophysical Simulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian process emulators are a powerful tool for understanding complex geophysical simulators, including oceanic and atmospheric general circulation models. Concern has been raised about their ability to emulate complex nonlinear systems. For ...

Robin Tokmakian; Peter Challenor; Yiannis Andrianakis

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Toward Optimal Choices of Control Space Representation for Geophysical Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In geophysical data assimilation, observations shed light on a control parameter space through a model, a statistical prior, and an optimal combination of these sources of information. This control space can be a set of discrete parameters, or, ...

Marc Bocquet

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

GRR/Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A Geophysical Exploration Permit is necessary for conducting seismic

280

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

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281

Geological assessment of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the sensitivity of the system to greenhouse gas changes cannot yet be constrained by paleoclimate data below its present large range. Geologic records do not support one of the major predictions of greenhouse models-namely, that tropical sea surface temperatures will increase. Geologic data also suggest that winter cooling in high-latitude land areas is less than predicted by models. As the above-mentioned predictions appear to be systemic features of the present generation of climate models, some significant changes in model design may be required to reconcile models and geologic data. However, full acceptance of this conclusion requires more measurements and more systematic compilations of existing geologic data. Since progress in data collection in this area has been quite slow, uncertainties associated with these conclusions may persist for some time. 106 refs., 6 figs.

Crowley, T.J. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Bureau of Economic Geology. 1978 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bureau research programs and projects are designed to address many of the State's major concerns in the areas of geologic, energy, mineral, land, and environmental resouces. Research programs incorporate geologic concepts that will build toward an understanding of a specific resource and its impact on human activities. In addition to resource assessments in uranium, lignite, and geopressured geothermal energy, the Bureau continued research into analysis of governmental policy related to energy. Systemic geologic mapping, coastal studies, basin analysis projects, and investigations in other areas of economic geology further indicate the range of research programs carried forward in 1978. Specifically, research on mineral resources and land resources, coastal studies, hydrogeology, basin studies, geologic mapping, and other research (tektites and meteorites, carboniferous of Texas, depositional environments of the Marble Falls Formation, Central Texas) are reported. The establishment of the Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute is followed. Contracts and grant support and contract reports are listed. The publications eminating from the Bureau are listed. Services rendered by the Bureau and personnel information are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

284

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County Texas  

SciTech Connect

For a part of the Foster and South Cowden (Grayburg-San Andres) oil fields, improvement in oil production has been accomplished, in part, by using ?pipeline fracturing? technology in the most recent completion to improve fluid flow rates, and filtration of waterflood injection water to preserve reservoir permeability. The 3D seismic survey acquired in conjunction with this DOE project has been used to calculate a 3D seismic inversion model, which has been analyzed to provide detailed maps of porosity within the productive upper 250 feet of the Grayburg Formation. Geologic data, particularly from logs and cores, have been combined with the geophysical interpretation and production history information to develop a model of the reservoir that defines estimations of remaining producible oil. The integrated result is greater than the sum of its parts, since no single data form adequately describes the reservoir. Each discipline relies upon computer software that runs on PC-type computers, allowing virtually any size company to affordably access the technology required to achieve similar results.

Richard Weinbrandt; Robert C. Trentham; William Robinson

1997-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geophysical survey, Paso Robles Geothermal area, California: Part of the Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resource Areas in California; Part of the Second year Report, 1979-80 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of new geophysical work for the Paso Robles geothermal area, California performed under terms of the second year contract, 1979-80 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG). The report contains two sections. The first section is to provide background for the reader and consists of a reprint from CDMG's first year report (1979-80) to DOE. It describes only the Paso Robles studies performed by CDMG in its first year effort. The second section provides new information developed by CDMG in its 1979-80 studies concerning the geophysical survey of the Paso Robles geothermal area. Included in the first section is some general background information concerning the geology and geothermal occurrences in the Southern Coast Ranges, as well as the more detailed information dealing with the Paso Robles area proper. The second section is concerned only with discussion and interpretation of results for two geophysical methods that have so far been used by CDMG in the area: the ground magnetic and gravity surveys. The CDMG studies of the Paso Robles area are not yet complete and additional studies using newly acquired resistivity equipment are planned for the near future, as are more complete surveys of existing wells and new studies of the geothermal aquifers present in the area. A final report to DOE on the Paso Robles area is planned following completion of those studies.

Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Youngs, Les G.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

GEOLOGY FIELD TRIPS IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- Exploration for Petroleum and Natural Gas (optional laboratory) 87 -- The Obelisk: Revisited 96 -- References recording past events. Rather than letters and words, rock characteristics such as shape, color, composition of answers to questions about the nature of geological data gathered through the field trips and laboratory

Engelder, Terry

289

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ro s e m ur phy an d m a r k jac c a rd Carbon dioxide capture and storage (ccs) offers the promise that humanity can continue

290

Geology of magma systems: background and review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of basic concepts and current models of igneous geology is presented. Emphasis is centered on studies of magma generation, ascent, emplacement, evolution, and surface or near-surface activity. An indexed reference list is also provided to facilitate future investigations.

Peterfreund, A.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

292

Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis integrated geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization models for three gas pay sands in the Grand Isle 33 & 43 fields, offshore Louisiana. The reservoirs are Late Miocene in age and include the upper (PM), middle (QH), and lower (RD) sands. The reservoir models address the stratigraphy of the upper (PM) sand and help delineate the lower (RD) reservoir. In addition, this research addresses the partially depleted QH-2 reservoir compartment. The detailed models were constructed by integrating seismic, well log, and production data. These detailed models can help locate recoverable oil and gas that has been left behind. The upper PM model further delineated that the PM sand has several areas that are shaled-out effectively creating a flow barrier within reservoir compartments. Due to the barrier in the PM-1 reservoir compartment, an area of potentially recoverable hydrocarbons remains. In Grand Isle 33, the middle QH sand was partially depleted in the QH-2 reservoir compartment by a series of development wells. Bottom hole pressure data from wells in Grand Isle 32 & 33 reveal that the two QH fault compartments are in communication across a leaking fault. Production wells in the QH-1 compartment produced reserves from the QH-2 compartment. The lower RD sand model helped further delineate the reservoir in the RD-2 compartment and show that this compartment has been depleted. The RD model also shows the possible presence of remaining recoverable hydrocarbons in the RD-1 compartment. It is estimated that about 6.7 billion cubic feet of gas might remain within this reservoir waiting to be recovered. A seismic amplitude anomaly response from the QH and RD sands is interpreted to be a lithologic indicator rather than the presence of hydrocarbons. Amplitude response from the PM level appears to be below the resolution of the seismic data. A synthetic seismogram model was generated to represent the PM and surrounding sands. This model shows that by increasing the frequency of the seismic data from 20 Hz to a dominant frequency of 30 Hz that the PM and surrounding sands could be seismically resolvable. Also the PM-1 compartment has possible recoverable hydrocarbons of 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas remaining.

Casey, Michael Chase

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO2 migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO2. During the course of the project, properties of 19 samples provided by partners on companion projects supported by NETL were measured, covering a range of permeabilities from 0.28 ndarcy to 81 mdarcy. Reservoir simulations were performed for injection of 530,000 tonnes of CO2 through a single well into the Middle Donovan formation in Citronelle Dome, in southwest Alabama, over 40 years, followed by migration and trapping for 10,000 years, using the TOUGH2 and TOUGHREACT software packages from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was estimated that 50 kg CO2/m3 of formation would be converted to mineral phases within the CO2 plume during that time. None of the sand units considered for CO2 storage in Citronelle Dome have thickness exceeding the estimated critical CO2 column height (Berg, 1975) at which seepage might begin, through their confining shale layers. A model for leakage through caprock, based on work by Hildenbrand et al. (2004), including a functional relationship between capillary pressure and the effective permeability to gas in the presence of a wetting phase, demonstrated the sensitivity of long-term storage to caprock permeability and thickness. A traditional course on coal combustion was augmented with material on climate change, coal gasification, and carbon sequestration. A total of 49 students completed the course during two offerings, in Fall 2010 and Fall 2012. It has become a popular advanced elective course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Survey of Department of Energy-Sponsored Geophysical Research for Shallow Waste Site Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface contamination plagues many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and threatens groundwater supplies. This survey discusses research sponsored by the DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) for geophysical characterization of the vadose zone at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and other contaminated sites. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques are used to characterize the shallow subsurfaceelectromagnetic, ground-penetrating radar, electrical, seismic, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Three common themes appear in the research surveyed in this article: (1) the development of high-resolution imaging capabilities to capture important details of the heterogeneous nature of subsurface properties and processes, (2) the coupling of non-intrusive survey geophysical measurements (e.g., electrical surveys) with detailed quantitative precise point-sensor measurements (e.g., lysimeters and vapor-port systems) or borehole (e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance, neutron-based moisture, and geochemical tools) measurements to extend high-precision knowledge away from the borehole, and finally (3) the application of multiple geophysical methods to constrain the uncertainty in determining critical subsurface physical properties. Laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of the manner in which contaminants travel through the vadose zone. Applications of geophysical methods to various contaminated areas at the INEEL are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the...

297

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologic carbon sequestration. Geophys Res Lett 2005;from geologic carbon sequestration sites: Unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration Jennifer L.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Probability Estimation of CO2 Leakage Through Faults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on EffectiveFaults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Yingqi Zhang*,faults at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites is a

Zhang, Yingqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

303

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Landfill disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these studies was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-kilometer (km) (40-mile) radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps. Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data. Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area. Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs. Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Attachment 2, Geology report. Revised final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Bodo Canyon disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these investigations was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65 kilometer radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps; Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data; Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area; Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs; and, Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Geological & Env. Sciences) ­ Stanford University · Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry, Laboratory Methods., Chamberlain, C.P. (In Prep for Geology) Compound- specific stable isotope records of Cenozoic climateMICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN · DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 2534 C.C. LITTLE

Hren, Michael

306

Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

CRC handbook of geophysical exploration at sea, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents some of the most advanced research and operational information currently available about hard minerals and hydrocarbons. Information is provided in an integrated, interdisciplinary manner, stressing case histories and review chapters. Illustrations, graphs, tables, and color satellite images are used to graphically present the results of gravity, geodetic and seismic surveys, and 3-D sea floor sub-bottom visualizations. Data has been obtained from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea using satellites, aircraft, and ships.

Geuer, R.A. (Offshore Technology Research Center, Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of electrical geophysical research at UURI has been to provide reliable exploration and reservoir assessment tools for the shallowest to the deepest levels of interest in geothermal fields. Three diverse methods are being considered currently: magnetotellurics (MT, and CSAMT), self-potential, and borehole resistivity. Primary shortcomings in the methods addressed have included a lack of proper interpretation tools to treat the effects of the inhomogeneous structures often encountered in geothermal systems, a lack of field data of sufficient accuracy and quantity to provide well-focused models of subsurface resistivity structure, and a poor understanding of the relation of resistivity to geothermal systems and physicochemical conditions in the earth generally. In MT, for example, interpretation research has focused successfully on the applicability of 2-D models in 3-D areas which show a preferred structural grain. Leading computer algorithms for 2-D and 3-D simulation have resulted and are combined with modern methods of regularized inversion. However, 3-D data coverage and interpretation is seen as a high priority. High data quality in our own research surveys has been assured by implementing a fully remote reference with digital FM telemetry and real-time processing with data coherence sorting. A detailed MT profile across Long Valley has mapped a caldera-wide altered tuff unit serving as the primary hydrothermal aquifer, and identified a low-resistivity body in the middle crust under the west moat which corresponds closely with teleseismic delay and low density models. In the CSAMT method, our extensive tensor survey over the Sulphur Springs geothermal system provides valuable structural information on this important thermal regime and allows a fundamental analysis of the CSAMT method in heterogeneous areas. The self-potential (SP) method is promoted as an early-stage, cost-effective, exploration technique for covered hydrothermal resources, of low to high temperature, which has little or no adverse environmental impact and yields specific targets for temperature gradient and fluid chemistry testing. Substantial progress has been made in characterizing SP responses for several known, covered geothermal systems in the Basin and Range and southern Rio Grande Rift, and at identifying likely, causative source areas of thermal fluids. (Quantifying buried SP sources requires detailed knowledge of the resistivity structure, obtainable through DC or CSAMT surveys with 2-D or 3-D modeling.) Borehole resistivity (BHR) methods may help define hot and permeable zones in geothermal systems, trace the flow of cooler injected fluids and determine the degree of-water saturation in vapor dominated systems. At UURI, we develop methods to perform field surveys and to model and interpret various borehole-to-borehole, borehole-to-surface and surface-to-borehole arrays. The status of our BHR research may be summarized as follows: (1) forward modeling algorithms have been developed and published to evaluate numerous resistivity methods and to examine the effects of well-casing and noise; (2) two inverse two-dimensional algorithms have been devised and successfully applied to simulated field data; (3) a patented, multi-array resistivity system has been designed and is under construction; and (4) we are seeking appropriate wells in geothermal and other areas in which to test the methods.

Wannamaker, Philip E.; Wright, Phillip M.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

310

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Carr, B.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mapping groundwater contamination using dc resistivity and VLF geophysical methods -- A case study  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical methods can be helpful in mapping areas of contaminated soil and groundwater. Electrical resistivity and very low-frequency electromagnetic induction (VLF) surveys were carried out at a site of shallow hydrocarbon contamination in Utah County, Utah. Previously installed monitoring wells facilitated analysis of water chemistry to enhance interpretation of the geophysical data. The electrical resistivity and VLF data correlate well, and vertical cross-sections and contour maps generated from these data helped map the contaminant plume, which was delineated as an area of high interpreted resistivities.

Benson, A.K.; Payne, K.L.; Stubben, M.A. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

322

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first two years of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The developed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using effective-medium theory and advanced methods of 3-D modeling and inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. In this project, we have developed a rigorous physical/mathematical model of heterogeneous conductive media based on the effective-medium approach. The new generalized effective-medium theory of IP effect (GEMTIP) provides a unified mathematical method to study heterogeneity, multi-phase structure, and polarizability of rocks. The geoelectrical parameters of a new composite conductivity model are determined by the intrinsic petrophysical and geometrical characteristics of composite media: mineralization and/or fluid content of rocks, matrix composition, porosity, anisotropy, and polarizability of formations. The new GEMTIP model of multi-phase conductive media provides a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, and the volume content of different minerals using electromagnetic data. We have developed a 3-D EM-IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IE) method. Our IE forward modeling software is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have demonstrated that the generalized effective-medium theory of induced polarization (GEMTIP) in combination with the IE forward modeling method can be used for rock-scale forward modeling from grain-scale parameters. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology introduced in this project can be used for the discrimination between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first year of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The proposed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using modern distributed acquisition systems and advanced methods of 3-D inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. One of the most popular is the Cole-Cole relaxation model. In this progress report we have constructed and analyzed a different physical and mathematical model of the IP effect based on the effective-medium theory. We have developed a rigorous mathematical model of multi-phase conductive media, which can provide a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, using the conductivity relaxation model parameters. The parameters of the new conductivity relaxation model can be used for discrimination of the different types of rock formations, which is an important goal in mineral exploration. The solution of this problem requires development of an effective numerical method for EM forward modeling in 3-D inhomogeneous media. During the first year of the project we have developed a prototype 3-D IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IP) method. Our IE forward modeling code INTEM3DIP is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have tested the working version of the INTEM3DIP code for computer simulation of the IP data for several models including a southwest US porphyry model and a Kambalda-style nickel sulfide deposit. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology envisioned in this proposal, will be used for the discrimination of different rocks, and in this way will provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

Price, P.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geology of the Breitenbush River Area, Linn and Marion Counties, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a geologic map and accompanying descriptive text highlighting structural geology, mineralization, and geothermal resources. (ACR)

Priest, G.R.; Woller, N.M.; Ferns, M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

INEL cold test pit demonstration of improvements in information derived from non-intrusive geophysical methods over buried waste sites. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research project were to lay the foundation for further improvement in the use of geophysical methods for detection of buried wastes, and to increase the information content derived from surveys. Also, an important goal was to move from mere detection to characterization of buried wastes. The technical approach to achieve these objectives consisted of: (1) Collect a data set of high spatial density; (2) Acquire data with multiple sensors and integrate the interpretations inferred from the various sensors; (3) Test a simplified time domain electromagnetic system; and (4) Develop imaging and display formats of geophysical data readily understood by environmental scientists and engineers. The breadth of application of this work is far reaching. Not only are uncontrolled waste pits and trenches, abandoned underground storage tanks, and pipelines found throughout most US DOE facilities, but also at military installations and industrial facilities. Moreover, controlled land disposal sites may contain ``hot spots`` where drums and hazardous material may have been buried. The technologies addressed by the R&D will benefit all of these activities.

Not Available

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan, document for the ®rst time in the deep water (up to 650 m Caspian Sea. The Absheron block, named after the nearby Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan, is situated

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

328

Assessment of surface geophysical methods in geothermal exploration and recommendations for future research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The four classes of geophysical methods considered are: passive seismic methods; active seismic methods; natural field electrical and electromagnetic methods; and, controlled-source electrical and electromagnetic methods. Areas of rsearch for improvement of the various techniques for geothermal exploration are identified. (JGB)

Goldstein, N.E.; Norris, R.A.; Wilt, M.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1999); P. 13471348 Computers and creativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 5 (SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1999); P. 1347­1348 Computers and creativity John A. Scales and Roel Snieder "The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers."--Sydney J. Harris "Technical skill is mastery of complexity while

Scales, John

330

Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

Priest, G.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50{degree}C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110{degree}C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

Hill, B.E. [ed.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Analytical Performance Models for Geologic Repositories  

SciTech Connect

This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in the present report are: (a) Solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (Chapter 2); (b) Transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (Chapter 3); (c) Advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (Chapter 4); (d) Radionuclide.transport in fractured media (Chapter 5); (e) A mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (Chapter 6); and (f) Dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (Chapter 7).

Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi,A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Savoshy, S.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Grid Integration  

SciTech Connect

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geologic and hydrologic research on the Moana geothermal system, Washoe County, Nevada. Final report October 1, 1982-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and drilling exploration surveys were used to assess the Moana geothermal resource in Washoe County, Nevada, and to determine its relationship with nearby Steamboat Hot Springs. Moana is the largest single moderate-temperature resource in Nevada that supports geothermal space heating applications. Results show that the general geology and structure for the two systems is similar, but important differences exist with respect to reservoir rocks. Gravity data delineated the contact between important volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Moana, but contour trends did not correlate well with mapped faults. Fluid geochemistry data show major differences in bulk chemical composition, stable-light isotope ratios, and radiocarbon ages for Moana and Steamboat geothermal waters. Water level measurements in observation wells in Moana show simultaneous increasing and decreasing values in different sections of the geothermal area. Temperature-depth profiles changed little during the six-month monitoring period. Direct use of the resource is increasing and longer-lasting, more efficient down-hole heat exchangers are replacing previous equipment that was prone to scaling and corrosion. A computer program that calculates heat output for state-of-the-art heat exchangers is described. Recommendations for continued monitoring, heat exchanger design, and fluid reinjection studies are included. Data are available to government agencies responsible for regulation as well as local residents and potential developers to ensure prudent resource utilization.

Flynn, T.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

339

Geophysical study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the central Rio Grande rift and adjacent Great Plains and Colorado Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the national hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a regional deep magnetotelluric (MT) survey of Arizona and New Mexico was performed. The main objective of the MT project was to produce a regional geoelectric contour map of the pervasive deep electrical conductor within the crust and/or upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau, Basin and Range Province, and Rio Grande rift. Three MT profiles cross the Jemez lineament. Preliminary one-dimensional analysis of the data suggest the lineament is associated with anomalously high electrical conductivity very shallow in the crust. An MT/audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) study of a 161 km/sup 2/ HDR prospect was performed on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Two-dimensional gravity modeling of a 700-km gravity profile at 34/sup 0/30'N latitude was used to study the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. Several models of each of three consecutive layers were produced using all available geologic and geophysical constraints. Two short-wavelength anomalies along the gravity profile were analyzed using linear optimization techniques.

Ander, M.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Relations between tectonic zones of the Albanides on the basis of results of geophysical studies  

SciTech Connect

The Ablanides are located between the Dinarides of Yugoslavia and the Hellenides of Greece, which together form the southern branch of the Mediterranean Alpine Belt. Our analysis of the Albanides and their extension into the Adriatic Sea integrates surface geological observations, well data, and results of seismological, reflection-seismic, gravity, magnetic, and geoelectric surveys. Evolution of the Albandies began with the Triassic subsidence of their Hercynian substratum under a tensional regime, culminating in crustal separation and opening of the Hellenic-Dinaride oceanic basin. The internal Albanides (IA) formed part of the oceanic Hellenic-Dinaride Basin, whereas the external Albanides (EA) developed out of the westward adjacent passive margin and continental shelf of the Adriatic plate. This was accompanied by the development of a synorogenic foredeep basin. During the tectonic, tarditectonic, and neotectonic phases, progressive westward shift of the foredeep basin axis to its present location in the Adriatic. The EA evolved out of a shelf and continental margin sedimentary prism and a superimposed foredeep wedge, which together form the Alpine-deformed hydrocarbon-bearing Albanian Sedimentary Basin. Reflection-seismic and gravity surveys done in the EA and the Adriatic Sea define distinct structural belts related to different tectonic zones of the Albanian Sedimentary Basin. The most important oil and gas accumulations are found in the Jonian zone and in the Periadriatic depression. The carbonate-dominated Late Triassic to Late Cretaceous series of the lonian, Kruja, and Krasta-Cukali zones contains several rich source rock intervals. In the lonian zone, Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene carbonates and oligocene-Miocene flysch-type sandstones form the reservoirs of the main oil and gas accumulations. The Tortonian-Pliocene Molasse-type clastics of the Periadriatic depression also contain source rocks and stratigraphically trapped gas accumulations.

Frasheri, A. (Polytechnic Univ., Tirana (Albania))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Nutrient Enrichment Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During most summers over the past 30 years, bottom dissolved oxygen across a large area of the Louisiana and upper Texas continental shelf declined to concentrations too low (hypoxia) for most fish and large invertebrate animals to survive. This area is one of the best known dead zones proliferating around the world [Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008]. During July 2008, hypoxic bottom waters extended across 20,720 square kilometers (Figure 1), but they were probably even more extensive because winds from Hurricane Dolly mixed the waters off Texas before the survey could be completed. Increased inputs of nutrients (principally nitrogen and phosphorus) from the U.S. agricultural heartland within the Mississippi- Atchafalaya River Basin ( MARB) are implicated in the development and spread of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently, the causes of, and solutions for, hypoxia have been subjects of extensive debate and analysis. An integrated scientific assessment led to a 2001 Action Plan [Mississippi River / Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, 2001] with a goal of reducing the area of the hypoxic zone to less than 5000 square kilometers by reducing nitrogen loading [Rabalais et al., 2007]. are primarily related to nutrient fluxes from the MARB [SAB, 2008, p. 2]. The reconfirmed consensus is that anthropogenic nutrients stimulate the production of planktonic organic matter, the decomposition of which depletes dissolved oxygen in bottom waters on the seasonally stratified inner shelf. Despite these two major scientific assessments supporting this consensus, skeptics [Dagg et al., 2007; Bianchi et al., 2008] have suggested alternative causes of hypoxia, including (1) oxidation of organic matter not derived from phytoplankton production, (2) physical processes affecting water column stability, and (3) coastal wetland loss and river controls. This article addresses these criticisms and demonstrates why they do not challenge the consensus on nutrient enrichment. Organic Matter Sources Seasonally recurring hypoxia developed on the shelf from the 1970s through the 1990s, coinciding with a tripling of nitrate

Gulf Of Mexico Hypoxia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

April 7, 2008 Dr. Mark Myers, Director US Geological Survey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US Geological Survey 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Mail ... The Central and Eastern United States hazard ... coastal California and the Basin and Range ...

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Reactive transport modeling for CO2 geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.geological storage of carbon dioxide. Int. J. Greenhouse GasIPCC special report on carbon dioxide capture and storage.

Xu, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geological occurrence of gas...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geological occurrence of gas hydrates at the Blake Outer Ridge, western North Atlantic Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

348

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

350

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Citation...

351

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,...

352

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...

353

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the...

354

Modeling wetland loss in coastal Louisiana: Geology, geography ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Habitat change in coastal Louisiana from 1955/6 to 1978 was analyzed to determine the influence of geological and man-made changes on landscape ...

355

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -...

356

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

357

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy ...  

Researchers at ORNL developed a down-well heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract ...

358

COMPUTER MODELING OF NUCLIDE ADSORPTION ON GEOLOGIC MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aqueous transport of radionuclides through geologic media,lead J the exchange of radionuclide mass between the aqueousdistribution of a given radionuclide between the solid and

Silva, R.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO2 Storage Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Development Office of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority; Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky Geological Surveys; Western Michigan University; and Battelle's Pacific Northwest...

360

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009 Although proved reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, and natural gas have historically been

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the electricity generated by the power reactors that have produced the waste. Of course, the current international situation is that no nation is currently willing to take any radioactive waste from another nation for deep disposal. This means that every nation will ultimately need to develop its own deep repository. This makes no sense, however--many nations have only a modest amount of waste, or do not have appropriate geological settings for a repository, or both. Ultimately, the need for one or more multi-national or international repositories will emerge, although so far this has not happened.

Budnitz, R J

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Florida Name Florida Geological Survey Address 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard M.S. 49 City, State Tallahassee, Florida Zip 32399 Website http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geo Coordinates 30.47491°, -84.357967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.47491,"lon":-84.357967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Insolation integrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

Dougherty, John J. (Norristown, PA); Rudge, George T. (Lansdale, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geology of the Tambaredjo oil field, Suriname  

SciTech Connect

After the initial discovery in the sixties of oil below the coastal plain of Suriname (S. America), the State Oil Company of Suriname started production of the unique Tambaredjo field in 1982. The heavy, biodegraded oil (14-16[degrees] API) is produced under compaction drive, from the Paleocene T-sand (average thickness 5 m) at a depth of about 300 m. More than 300 wells have been drilled in an area of about 200 km[sup 2]. High resolution seismics makes it possible to correlate units down to 2 m thick. This dense network of bore holes is very suitable for geological correlations and 3D modeling. The T-sand reservoir consists of angular, medium to coarse grained unconsolidated sands with interfingering clays and lignites. The sands are deposited on a well cemented erosional Cretaceous basement. The reservoir is sealed by locally continuous clays. The oil is trapped in structural highs created by syn-sedimentary rejuvenated basement faults. The depositional environment of the T-sand ranges from fluviatile to deltaic. Frequent avulsion and synsedimentary faulting created a highly compartmented reservoir. Although interconnectedness of the sand bodies is high, clay smears and silting out of the edges confine reservoir compartments. The best genetic sand units such as channel fills or mouth bar deposits hardly correlate over more than a few hundred meters. The Tambaredjo oil field offers an unique opportunity to study the detailed sedimentology and petroleum geology of a fluvio-deltaic transitional realm on the passive margin along the Guiana coast.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Wong, T.E. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

Barnhart, Kevin Scott

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hydrologic and geophysical studies at Midnite Mine, Wellpinit, WA: Summary of 1995 field season. Report of investigations/1996  

SciTech Connect

The Midnite Mine is an inactive, hard-rock uranium mine on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State. Long-term changes in water quality and the results of slug tests and two geophysical surveys are described. Of the locations monitored, only two exhibited water quality degradation over time. Hydraulic conductivity measurements from slug tests are reported for five additional locations in the bedrock. Relative values of hydraulic conductivity from slug tests agreed well with ranked specific capacity data. A geophysical survey identified buried constructed features that channel subsurface water to a contaminated seep. Historic aerial photos corroborated the results of the geophysical study. A new geophysical technique was successfully used to monitor hydraulic and geochemical responses to a pumping test in saturated waste rock.

Williams, B.C.; Riley, J.A.; Montgomery, J.R.; Robinson, J.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geological investigation of the Socorro geothermal area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a comprehensive geological and geochemical study of the Socorro geothermal area are presented. The following are discussed: geologic setting, structural controls, stratigraphic controls, an ancient geothermal system, modern magma bodies, geothermal potential of the Socorro area, and the Socorro transverse shear zone. (MHR)

Chapin, C.E.; Sanford, A.R.; White, D.W.; Chamberlin, R.M.; Osburn, G.R.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the United States regulations and project experiences associated with permitting injection wells used for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This report is an update of a previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study on this subject published in December 2008 when the draft regulations governing geologic sequestration were first published.BackgroundSeparating ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Automatic Building of Structured Geological Models Sylvain Brandel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological models used for oil and gas exploration. We present a prototype of a "geological pilot" which Modeling for oil and gas exploration Hydrocarbon reservoir models are a major tool currently used involved in oil and gas exploration have acquired a huge amount of seismic data, which are neither

Brandel, Sylvain

375

GS3: A Knowledge Management Architecture for Collaborative Geologic Sequestration Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern scientific enterprises are inherently knowledge-intensive. In general, scientific studies in domains such as groundwater, climate, and other environmental modeling as well as fundamental research in chemistry, physics, and biology require the acquisition and manipulation of large amounts of experimental and field data in order to create inputs for large-scale computational simulations. The results of these simulations must then be analyzed, leading to refinements of inputs and models and further simulations. In this paper we describe our efforts in creating a knowledge management platform to support collaborative, wide-scale studies in the area of geologic sequestration. The platform, known as GS3 (Geologic Sequestration Software Suite), exploits and integrates off-the-shelf software components including semantic wikis, content management systems and open source middleware to create the core architecture. We then extend the wiki environment to support the capture of provenance, the ability to incorporate various analysis tools, and the ability to launch simulations on supercomputers. The paper describes the key components of GS3 and demonstrates its use through illustrative examples. We conclude by assessing the suitability of our approach for geologic sequestration modeling and generalization to other scientific problem domains

Gorton, Ian; Black, Gary D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Wurstner, Signe K.; Hui, Peter SY

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

377

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

378

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

379

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

380

doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology Kendra J. Williams Gregory D. Hoke, Carmala isotope altimeter: Do Quaternary pedogenic carbonates predict Email alerting services articles cite Geological Society of America on December 18, 2009geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, November

Garzione, Carmala N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A multi-physics, integrated approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOCAD, CAD, CADD) bcc blind courtesy copy ACT [logging] neutron porosity (Cf source) BCOM [JOK and epithermal neutron porosity (Am/Be source) logging tool (Schlumberger version G) CORELOG [ODP] database International Association of Drilling Contractors IAPSO International Association for the Physical Sciences

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

383

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lietzke, D.A. (Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)); McMaster, W.M. (McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

Hatcher, Robert D

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

390

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

391

Geologic mapping of tunnels using photogrammetry: Camera and target positioning  

SciTech Connect

A photogrammetric method has been developed by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Reclamation for the use in geologic mapping of tunnels (drifts). The method requires photographing the tunnel walls and roof with a calibrated small-format camera to obtain stereo pairs of photos which are then oriented in an analytical stereo plotter for measurement of geologic features. The method was tested in G-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site. Calculations necessary to determine camera and target positions and problems encountered during testing were used to develop a set of generic formulas that can be applied to any tunnel. 7 figs.

Coe, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dueholm, K.S. [Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Surveying and Photogrammetry

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

393

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of geologic carbon sequestration Catherine A. Petersleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Env EarthDOE) Conference on Carbon Sequestration, 2005. Alexandria,

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

395

Geological characterization report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical information is presented relevant to the WIPP site in the Delaware Basin in SE New Mexico. This volume covers regional geology, site geology, and seismology. (DLC)

Powers, D.W.; Lambert, S.J.; Shaffer, S.E.; Hill, L.R.; Weart, W.D. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED Platinum View the NREL Press Release. NREL's multistory Energy Systems Integration...

397

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Integrated Deployment Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Deployment Workshop Integrated Deployment Workshop The Energy Systems Integration Facility workshop, Integrated Deployment, was held August 21 - 23, 2012 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Each day of the workshop, which included a tour of the Energy Systems Integration Facility, focused on a different topic: Day 1: Utility-Scale Renewable Integration Day 2: Distribution-Level Integration Day 3: Isolated and Islanded Grid Systems The agenda and presentations from the workshop are below. Agenda Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview ESIF Technology Partnerships Integrated Deployment Model Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility: Workshop Proceedings Printable Version Energy Systems Integration Home Research & Development

398

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

399

Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 2 Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Mission * Mission - Project mission is to provide treatment of approximately 900,000 gallons of tank farm waste - referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) - stored at the Idaho Tank Farm Facility to a stable waste form suitable for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). - Per the Idaho Cleanup Project contract, the resident Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) facility, shall have the capability for future packaging and shipping of the existing high level waste (HLW) calcine to the geologic

400

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for magma: hydrothermal systems - geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a comparative assessment for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program, geophysical data were used, to characterize and evaluate potential magma-hydrothermal targets at five drill sites in the western United States. The sites include Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico, and The Geysers-Clear Lake, Long Valley, and Salton Trough areas, California. This summary discusses the size, depth, temperature, and setting of each potential target, as well as relvant scientific questions about their natures and the certainty of their existence.

Kasameyer, P.

1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated geologic geophysical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

402

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

403

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

404

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

405

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

406

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

407

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

408

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

409

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

410

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

411

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

412

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

413

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

414

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

415

Geologic interpretation of space shuttle radar images of Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space shuttle mission in November 1981 acquired images of parts of the earth with a synthetic aperture radar system at a wavelength of 23.5 cm (9.3 in.) and spatial resolution of 38 m (125 ft). This report describes the geologic interpretation of 1:250,000-scale images of Irian Jaya and eastern Kalimantan, Indonesia, where the all-weather capability of radar penetrates the persistent cloud cover. The inclined look direction of radar enhances subtle topographic features that may be the expression of geologic structures. On the Indonesian images, the following terrain categories are recognizable for geologic mapping: carbonate, clastic, volcanic, alluvial and coastal, melange, and metamorphic, as well as undifferentiated bedrock. Regional and local geologic structures are well expressed on the images.

Sabing, F.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Multiblock grid generation for simulations in geological formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating fluid flow in geological formations requires mesh generation, lithology mapping to the cells, and computing geometric properties such as normal vectors and volume of cells. The purpose of this research work is to compute and process the geometrical ...

Sanjay Kumar Khattri

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

419

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NETL: News Release - DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test CO2 Injection Begins in Existing Production Well to Evaluate CO2 Storage Potential, Oil Recovery Washington, D.C. - A U.S. Department...

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421

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

integr~1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 AUDIT REPORT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY' S MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INTEGRATION MARCH 1998 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Principal Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "Audit of the Department of Energy's Management of Research and Development Integration" BACKGROUND The Congress, independent task forces, and advisory groups have pointed out the need for the Department to improve its integration of research and development (R&D) projects. In the past, R&D management was carried out by different program offices with the research being

423

Large Scale Computing Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Modeling and Imaging G. A. Newman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 9 - 10 , 2010 Talk Outline * SEAM Geophysical Modeling Project - Its Really Big! * Geophysical Imaging (Seismic & EM) - Its 10 to 100x Bigger! - Reverse Time Migration - Full Waveform Inversion - 3D Imaging & Large Scale Considerations - Offshore Brazil Imaging Example (EM Data Set) * Computational Bottlenecks * Computing Alternatives - GPU's & FPGA's - Issues Why ? So that the resource industry can tackle grand geophysical challenges (Subsalt imaging, land acquisition, 4-D, CO2, carbonates ......) SEAM Mission Advance the science and technology of applied

424

The US Agency for International Development--Los Alamos National Laboratory--US Geological Survey Central American Geothermal Resources Program  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary field teams for this energy assistance program consisted of staff from Los Alamos, the US Geological Survey, the country of the study, and consultants; this provided the wide range of expertise necessary for geothermal resource evaluation. The program was successful largely because of the field teams dedication to their goals of verifying new geothermal resources and of sharing exploration techniques with in-country collaborators. Training programs included the geochemical, geophysical, and geological techniques needed for geothermal exploration. However, the most important aspect was long-term field work with in-country collaborators. Four geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled, three in Honduras and one in Guatemala. One of the coreholes was co-financed with Honduras, and showed their commitment to the project. Three of the exploration holes encountered high-temperature fluids, which provided information on the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoirs at promising sites in both countries. A geothermal well logging system was built and is shared between four Central American countries. For the evaluation of geothermal fluids, a geochemistry laboratory was established in Tegucigalpa, Honduras; it is now self-sufficient, and is part of Honduras' energy program. Through the teaching process and by working with counterparts in the field, the team expanded its own experience with a wide variety of geothermal systems, an experience that will be beneficial in the future for both the US investigators and in-country collaborators. At the working-scientists level, new contacts were developed that may flourish and professional ties were strengthened between scientists from a variety of US agencies. Rather than competing for research and field budgets, they worked together toward a common goal.

Heiken, G.; Goff, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Janik, K. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Branch of Igneous and Geothermal Processes)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Integrated System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Window System Our research activities in the field of high performance windows have led us to conclude that even by using high performance insulating glass units, low conductivity frames, and warm edge spacers, there are still untapped sources for improving energy efficiency in the design and use of residential windows. While such high performance windows are a dramatic improvement over conventional units, they do not reduce conductive losses through wall framing around the window, offer guarantees against excessive wall/window infiltration nor do they adapt to the daily and seasonal potentials for night insulation and summer shading. To meet this need, we have been working on the design, development, and prototyping of Integrated Window Systems (IWS) since 1993. Integrated Window Systems are a form of panelized construction where the wall panel includes an operable or fixed window sash, recessed night insulation, integral solar shading, and is built in a factory setting in order to minimize thermal short circuits and infiltration at joints. IWSs can be built in modular lengths to facilitate their installation with conventional wood frame stick construction or other forms of panelized construction.

426

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

J. Marvin Herndon

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Radioactive Waste Isolation in Salt: Peer review of documents dealing with geophysical investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Repository Project, a US Department of Energy program to develop a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste, is governed by a complex and sometimes inconsistent array of laws, administrative regulations, guidelines, and position papers. In conducting multidisciplinary peer reviews of contractor documents in support of this project, Argonne National Laboratory has needed to inform its expert reviewers of these governmental mandates, with particular emphasis on the relationship between issues and the technical work undertaken. This report acquaints peer review panelists with the regulatory framework as it affects their reviews of site characterization plans and related documents, including surface-based and underground test plans. Panelists will be asked to consider repository performance objectives and issues as they judge the adequacy of proposed geophysical testing. All site-specific discussions relate to the Deaf Smith County site in Texas, which was approved for site characterization by the President in May 1986. Natural processes active at the Deaf Smith County site and the status of geophysical testing near the site are reviewed briefly. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

McGinnis, L.D.; Bowen, R.H.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers 487 Near Surface Geophysics, 2009, 487-498  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extend a short distance from the shore. Discontinuities in these patches of transmissive sediments can is useful as a rapid reconnaissance tool for mapping geologic heterogeneity. The results can be used can guide the placement of seepage meters. a fine grid is to make rapid reconnaissance measurements

Toran, Laura

432

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

433

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository. The report describes progress in development of an integrated modeling framework that can be used for systematically analyzing the performance of a natural barrier system and identifying key factors that control the performance. This framework is designed as an integrated tool for prioritization and programmatic decisions. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report More Documents & Publications Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development FY11 Progress Report

434

Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and RDH for conodont alteration index determination to better define regional P-T conditions. Efforts are being made to calibrate and standardize geophysical log correlation, seismic reflection data, and Ordovician lithologic signatures to better resolve subsurface stratigraphy and structure beneath the poorly explored Plateau in Tennessee and southern Kentucky. We held a successful workshop on Ordovician rocks geophysical log correlation August 7, 2003 that was cosponsored by the Appalachian PTTC, the Kentucky and Tennessee geological surveys, the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association, and small independents. Detailed field structural and stratigraphic mapping of a transect across part of the Ordovician clastic wedge in Tennessee was begun in January 2003 to assist in 3-D reconstruction of part of the southern Appalachian basin and better assess the nature of a major potential source rock assemblage. (3) Laying the groundwork through (1) and (2) to understand reservoir architecture, the petroleum systems, ancient fluid migration, and conduct 3-D analysis of the southern Appalachian basin.

Robert D. Hatcher

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Vision and framework for technical and management support to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia  

SciTech Connect

This ''Technical and Management Support'' program would facilitate the transfer of spent fuel from commercial power plants in Taiwan to a storage and geologic repository site near Krasnoyarsk, Russia. This program resolves issues of disposition of Taiwan spent fuel (including US origin fuel) and provides revenue for Russia to develop an integrated spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management system including a geologic repository. LLNL has ongoing contracts and collaborations with all the principal parties and is uniquely positioned to facilitate the development of such a program. A three-phase approach over 20 years is proposed: namely, an initial feasibility investigation followed by an engineering development phase, and then implementation.

Halsey, W G; Jardine, L J; Smith, C F

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the first stage of planning field development, the simulation model is calibrated to dynamic data (history matching). One of the aims of the research is to extend the streamline based generalized travel time inversion method for full field models with multimillion cells through the use of grid coarsening. This makes the streamline based inversion suitable for high resolution simulation models with decades long production history and numerous wells by significantly reducing the computational effort. In addition, a novel workflow is proposed to integrate well bottom-hole pressure data during model calibration and the approach is illustrated via application to the CO2 sequestration. In the second stage, field development strategies are optimized. The strategies are primarily focused on rate optimization followed by infill well drilling. A method is proposed to modify the streamline-based rate optimization approach which previously focused on maximizing sweep efficiency by equalizing arrival time of the waterfront to producers, to account for accelerated production for improving the net present value (NPV). Optimum compromise between maximizing sweep efficiency and maximizing NPV can be selected based on a 'trade-off curve.' The proposed method is demonstrated on field scale application considering geological uncertainty. Finally, a novel method for well placement optimization is proposed that relies on streamlines and time of flight to first locate the potential regions of poorly swept and drained oil. Specifically, the proposed approach utilizes a dynamic measure based on the total streamline time of flight combined with static and dynamic parameters to identify "Sweet-Spots" for infill drilling. The "Sweet-Spots" can be either used directly as potential well-placement locations or as starting points during application of a formal optimization technique. The main advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency in calculating dynamic measure map. The complete workflow was also demonstrated on a multimillion cell reservoir model of a mature carbonate field with notable success. The infill locations based on dynamic measure map have been verified by subsequent drilling.

Taware, Satyajit Vijay

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4+ production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env