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1

A new paradigm for integrated environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision of an integrated Earth observation system to help protect and sustain the planet and its inhabitants is significant and timely, and thus has been identified recently by many organizations. Clearly, the societal benefits of global integrated ... Keywords: cloud computing, data integration, environmental monitoring, modeling and simulation, sensors, visualization

Kevin Montgomery; Carsten Mundt

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness.

Jaquish, R.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS): Integrated Systems-Based Approaches to Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Michelle H.; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Marble, Justin; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrated environmental control and monitoring in the intelligent workplace. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project involved the design and engineering of the control and monitoring of environmental quality - visual, thermal, air - in the Intelligent Workplace. The research objectives were to study the performance of the individual systems, to study the integration issues related to each system, to develop a control plan, and to implement and test the integrated systems in a real setting. In this project, a control strategy with related algorithms for distributed sensors, actuators, and controllers for negotiating central and individual control of HVAC, lighting, and enclosure was developed in order to maximize user comfort, and energy and environmental effectiveness. The goal of the control system design in the Intelligent Workplace is the integration of building systems for optimization of occupant satisfaction, organizational flexibility, energy efficiency and environmental effectiveness. The task of designing this control system involves not only the research, development and demonstration of state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems, but also their integration. The ABSIC research team developed functional requirements for the environmental systems considering the needs of both facility manager and the user. There are three levels of control for the environmental systems: scheduled control, sensor control, and user control. The challenges are to achieve the highest possible levels of energy effectiveness simultaneously with the highest levels of user satisfaction. The report describes the components of each system, their implementation in the Intelligent Workplace and related control and monitoring issues.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrated mobile GIS and wireless internet map servers for environmental monitoring and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: With the progress of mobile GIS technology there is a great potential for adopting wireless communications and Internet mapping services for regional environmental management programs and natural habitat conservation. This paper provides an overview of a NASA-funded research project that focuses on the development of mobile GIS tools and wireless Internet Map Server (IMS) services to facilitate environmental monitoring and management tasks. By developing and testing wireless web-based map/image servers, mobile GIS applications, and global positional systems (GPS), this research created an integrated software/hardware infrastructure for a prototype mobile GIS application. The mobile GIS prototype allows multiple resource managers and park rangers to access large-size, remotely sensed images and GIS layers from a portable web server mounted in a vehicle. Users can conduct real-time spatial data updates and/or submit changes back to the web server over the wireless local area network (WLAN). This paper discusses in general the major components of mobile GIS, their current technological limitations, and potential problems during implementation. Key research agenda for mobile GIS are identified with suggestions for future research and development.

Ming-hsiang Tsou

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Developing an integrated ecological resource management and monitoring plan as part of an environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in defining the appropriate content of an Environmental Management System (EMS) as specified by ISO 14001 prompted a study to determine how ecological concerns should be integrated into an EMS and subsequently implemented. This paper describes an approach for developing objectives, targets, and processes for ecological resource management at those Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where an ecological resource management approach that goes beyond simple regulatory compliance is warranted. A major goal of this approach is to position DOE facilities so that they can proactively address ecological concerns, rather than being forced to respond retroactively to damage claims, restoration requirements, and/or bad publicity. Although DOE is not requiring ISO 14001 implementation at its facilities, it is recommending ISO 14001 as a voluntary approach to encourage good environmental practices, such as pollution prevention and sustainable development, by adopting an integrated systems approach. The DOE position is that existing DOE orders and policy statements are consistent with, and have elements of, the ISO 14001 EMS approach.

Michael, D.; Hooten, M. [Neptune and Co., Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roy-Harrison, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental monitoring via compressive sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring aims to describe the state of the environment. It identifies environmental issues to show us how well our environmental objectives are being met. Traditional large-scale sensor networks for environmental monitoring suffers from ... Keywords: compressive sensing, environmental monitoring, information management, sensor networks

Shulin Yan; Chao Wu; Wei Dai; Moustafa Ghanem; Yike Guo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

15

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

1984 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

19

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

22

2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MO, June 4-7, 1979 INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTALContract W-7405-ENG-48 INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL0.003 mrem C^ Figure 5 INSTRUMENTATION: Too often analytical

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart A. Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the WIPP DOEWIPP-03-3230 Describes the groundwater...

26

1986 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1986 are summarized in this report. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates and halogens; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the organics, radioactivity, and water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; and the concentrations of organics, radioactivity, and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory. In 1986, the results of the surveillance program demonstrated that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

1982 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1982 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 30 references, 9 figures, 18 tables.

Day, L.E.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

1981 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1981 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 28 references, 9 figures, 20 tables.

Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

1983 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1983 are summarized. The amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactivity of air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. The amounts of radioactivity released in airborne and liquid effluents from laboratory facilities to the environment were within allowable standards as stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1. Other pollutants, such as metals, organic compounds, etc., in the effluents released from the Laboratory were well below federal, state and local standards as applied to site specific conditions. 34 references, 9 figures, 17 tables.

Day, L.E.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ENVIRONMENTAL OVERSIGHT AND MONITORING AGREEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OVERSIGHT AND MONITORING AGREEMENT OVERSIGHT AND MONITORING AGREEMENT (Agreement in Principle) Between the United States Department of Energy and the State of Idaho 1. This Agreement in Principle (Agreement) is voluntarily entered into by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), under the authority of 42 U.S.C. §71 01 et. seq., and the State of Idaho (State) under the authority of Article IV, Section S of the Idaho Constitution and Idaho Code § 39-10S. DOE's designated lead for purposes of this Agreement is the DOE's Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and DOE's Naval Reactors Idaho Branch Office for Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program matters. The State's designated lead for purposes of this Agreement is the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This Agreement replaces the Environmental Oversight and

32

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for Existing Plants The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was developed for the National Energy Technology...

38

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is intended to document the quality assurance of the Environmental Monitoring Program. The Quality Assurance Project Plan has two parts and is written to become a chapter in the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Part A describes the management responsibilities and activities performed to assure the quality of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Part B covers the documentation requirements for changes in the Monitoring Program, and provides details on control of the design and implementation of quality assurance activities.

Holland, R.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP), Environmental Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Chapter 11 - Potable Water Chapter 12 - Groundwater Monitoring Chapter 13 - Landfill Gas and Leachate Monitoring Appendix A - Acronyms and Technical Terms Appendix B...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety...

43

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

Not Available

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 This report documents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) analysis of DOE environmental monitoring, surveillance, and control activities. The analysis is based primarily on DOE Headquarters independent oversight evaluations of environmental monitoring and surveillance activities that were conducted at 14 different sites across the DOE complex during fiscal years 1999 through 2002. Independent oversight evaluations determined that all sites had established

46

Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo (Science Applications International Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement the requirements of this program plan, are also referenced. The DOE regulates its own activities for radiation protection of the public under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011). The effluent and environmental monitoring activities prescribed by DOE Order 5400.5 and the DOE/EH-0173T guidance manual are designed to ensure that DOE facilities implement standards and regulations to protect members of the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation. Effluent and environmental monitoring also provide 1999 Environmental Monitoring Plan DOE/WIPP 99-2194 the data necessary to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental protection regulations. Other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are empowered through specific legislation to regulate certain aspects of DOE activities potentially affecting public health and safety or the environment. Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards (43 FR 47707), requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all necessary actions for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. Beyond statutory requirements, the DOE has established a general environmental protection policy. The Environmental Policy Statement (issued by then Secretary Herrington on January 8, 1986, and extended on January 7, 1987) describes the DOE's commitment to national environmental protection goals in that it conducts operations ''in an environmentally safe and sound manner . . . in compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards'' (DOE, 1986). This Environmental Policy Statement also states the DOE's commitment to ''good environmental management in all of its programs and at all of its facilities in order to correct existing environmental problems, to minimize risks to the environment or public health, and to anticipate and address pote

Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

REMOTE SENSING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINING AND MONITORING D. B. Reister  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and monitor environmental issues. By understanding environmental conditions, capital and remediation projects can be accelerated, saving millions of dollars. By monitoring conditions more closelyREMOTE SENSING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINING AND MONITORING D. B. Reister Oak Ridge National

49

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Medium Volume Air Sampling (HVAS/MVAS). #12;Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Community FSA: Food Standards Agency H2O2: Hydrogen peroxide HPA: Health Protection Agency HVAS/MVAS: High/monitoring type code Terrestrial dose rate monitoring T1 Air passive shades and HVAS/MVAS T2 Wet, dry, total

50

Environmental monitoring plan, July 1--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) under the terms of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA) are providing annual reports: reporting of State`s monitoring and analysis, and findings of DOE`s quality and effectiveness of DOE`s monitoring and surveillance. This report blends some of both of the required annual reports as described in the TOA section A.7.2.2. The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) integrates the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report presents the results of environmental monitoring in Tennessee in the following areas: surface waters; ground water; air; and fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radionuclide emissions from DOE sources at ETTP must be determined for purposes of estimat- ing doseETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs Setting The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly known as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or K-25

Pennycook, Steve

52

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage yards at ETTP remained well below the requirements in DOE orders. Nonradiological emissions were airborne radionuclide emissions from DOE sources at ETTP must be determined for purposes of estimating doseETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs Setting

Pennycook, Steve

53

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km{sup 2} area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site-specific exposure rates. This configuration also allows for remote programming and troubleshooting of sensors. Involvement of stakeholders in the monitoring process provides a number of benefits, including increased public confidence in monitoring results, as well as decreasing costs by more than 50 percent from when the program was managed entirely by U.S. federal employees. Additionally, the CEMP provides an ideal platform for testing new environmental sensors. (authors)

Hartwell, William T. [Division of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Shafer, David S. [Division of Hydrological Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

Stencel, J.R.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Statistical Methods for Environmental Pollution Monitoring  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

f!\Jl~~ If & &0 f!\Jl~~ If & &0 :3 Statistical Methods for Environmental Pollution Monitoring 3 3679 00058 9400 Statistical Methods for Environmental Pollution Monitoring Richard O. Gilbert Pacific Northwest Laboratory Imi5l VAN NOSTRAND REINHOLD COMPANY ~ - - - - - - - New York Dedicated to my parents, Mary Margaret and Donald I. Gilbert Copyright © 1987 by Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 86-26758 ISBN 0-442-23050-8 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC06-76RLOI830. All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means-graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Volume 3. Radiation  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrunnentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory under a grant from the Natioral Science Foundation. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements of Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedical Parameters related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. The survey material is compiled in 5 loose- leaf volumes which can be periodically updated. An update for volume 3 on radiation instrumentation is presented. New pages are included for insertion in the introductory material and also under the headings nuclear reactors, combination instruments, alpha particle instrumentation, beta particle instrumentation, x and gamma radiation monitoring instrumentation, gamma spectrometry, neutron monitoring instrumentation, personnel dosimetry, radionuclides (strontium -89 and -90, iodine -129 and -131, radium, uranium, plutonium, and instrument notes), and infrared. (WHK)

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SensorScope: Out-of-the-Box Environmental Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring constitutes an important field of application for wireless sensor networks. Given the severity of potential climate changes, environmental impact on cities, and pollution, it is a domain where sensor networks can have great impact ... Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, environmental monitoring, deployments

Guillermo Barrenetxea; Franois Ingelrest; Gunnar Schaefer; Martin Vetterli; Olivier Couach; Marc Parlange

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews Draft for Public Review and Comment March 2013 2 Table of Contents: I. Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 3 II. Questions and Answers .................................................................................................................... 5 A. Stage 1: Preliminary Questions ................................................................................................. 5 1. How Does NEPA and CEQA Terminology Differ? .................................................... 5 a. "Action" (NEPA) versus "Project" (CEQA) ................................................ 5

65

Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site, ER-B-98-02 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site,...

66

Fiscal Year 2003 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the Groundwater Monitoring Project. It documents well and constituent lists for the monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders.

Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Lindberg, Jon W.; McDonald, John P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental Monitoring at the Savannah River Plant, Annual Report - 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental monitoring program has been in existence at SRP since 1951. The original preoperational surveys have evolved into an extensive environmental monitoring program in which sample types from approximately 500 locations are analyzed for radiological and/or nonradiological parameters. The results of these analyses for 1981 are presented in this report.

Ashley, C.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy DOE-ID DOE Idaho Operations Office EM Office of Environmental Management ESER Environmental Surveillance, Education and Research HSS Office of Health, Safety...

72

Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

McKinney, S.M.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Integrated environmental modeling: A vision and roadmap for the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) is inspired by modern environmental problems, decisions, and policies and enabled by transdisciplinary science and computer capabilities that allow the environment to be considered in a holistic way. The problems ... Keywords: Community of practice, Integrated environmental modeling, Model integration, Roadmap

Gerard F. Laniak; Gabriel Olchin; Jonathan Goodall; Alexey Voinov; Mary Hill; Pierre Glynn; Gene Whelan; Gary Geller; Nigel Quinn; Michiel Blind; Scott Peckham; Sim Reaney; Noha Gaber; Robert Kennedy; Andrew Hughes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Environmental monitoring and assessment program at potential OTEC sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecologically sound operations of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants can be insured by careful attention to the marine environment during the design phase. This requires quality information from regions of potential OTEC interest, coordinated with required assessment studies to insure legal compliance. Currently, preliminary or actual surveys and laboratory studies are being conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, and Guam for potential moored or seacoast OTEC plants and in the equatorial South Atlantic for proposed plant--ship operations to provide such benchmark and baseline data. These data plus existing archival information can be used to model effects of OTEC operations based on projected design schemes. Four major areas of concerns (1) redistribution of oceanic properties, (2) chemical pollution, (3) structural effects, and (4) socio-legal-economic; and 11 key issues associated with OTEC development and operation have been identified. In general mitigating strategies can be used to alleviate many deleterious environmental effects of operational problems as biostimulation, outgassing, etc. Various assessment research studies on toxicity, biocide releases, etc., are under way or are planned to investigate areas where no clear mitigating strategy is available. Data from the monitoring and assessment programs is being integrated into a series of environmental compliance documents including a comprehensive programmatic environmental impact assessment.

Wilde, P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released September 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Darwin J. Morgan morgan@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 Kelly K. Snyder snyderk@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 The National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has released the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. The report summarizes the results of air and groundwater monitoring during calendar year 2010 on and off of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site. It also reports the estimated radiological dose to the public from releases of radioactive material from the NNSS and summarizes the overall environmental compliance and management performance

76

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Implementation, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.epa.gov/ Program Start 1998 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Philippines, South Korea South America, South America, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia References EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies[1]

77

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies (Redirected from Chile-EPA Integrated Environmental Strategies Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Implementation, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.epa.gov/ Program Start 1998 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Philippines, South Korea South America, South America, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia

78

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies (Redirected from India-EPA Integrated Environmental Strategy) Jump to: navigation, search Name EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Implementation, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.epa.gov/ Program Start 1998 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Philippines, South Korea South America, South America, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia

79

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies (Redirected from Mexico-EPA Integrated Environmental Strategy) Jump to: navigation, search Name EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Implementation, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.epa.gov/ Program Start 1998 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Philippines, South Korea South America, South America, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia

80

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies (Redirected from Philippines-EPA Integrated Environmental Strategy) Jump to: navigation, search Name EPA-Integrated Environmental Strategies Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Implementation, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.epa.gov/ Program Start 1998 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Philippines, South Korea South America, South America, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The integration of process monitoring for safeguards.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model is a reprocessing plant model that has been developed for safeguards analyses of future plant designs. The model has been modified to integrate bulk process monitoring data with traditional plutonium inventory balances to evaluate potential advanced safeguards systems. Taking advantage of the wealth of operator data such as flow rates and mass balances of bulk material, the timeliness of detection of material loss was shown to improve considerably. Four diversion cases were tested including both abrupt and protracted diversions at early and late times in the run. The first three cases indicated alarms before half of a significant quantity of material was removed. The buildup of error over time prevented detection in the case of a protracted diversion late in the run. Some issues related to the alarm conditions and bias correction will need to be addressed in future work. This work both demonstrates the use of the model for performing diversion scenario analyses and for testing advanced safeguards system designs.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders (''surveillance monitoring''); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jon W; Newcomer, Darrell R; Thornton, Edward C

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders ("surveillance monitoring"); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environmental Monitoring Plan for Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEA Baseline Exposure Assessment CPC Condensation Particle Counter CNT Carbon Nanotubes DOE Department of Energy EETD Environmental Energy Technologies Division EHS Environment,...

86

Monitoring Environmental Cleanup at Brookhaven National Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compensation, and Liability Act environmental cleanup activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory comply with the Record of Decision (ROD) for each project. (A ROD...

87

Concepts for Environmental Radioactive Air Sampling and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radioactive air sampling and monitoring is becoming increasingly important as regulatory agencies promulgate requirements for the measurement and quantification of radioactive contaminants. While researchers add to the growing body of knowledge in this area, events such as earthquakes and tsunamis demonstrate how nuclear systems can be compromised. The result is the need for adequate environmental monitoring to assure the public of their safety and to assist emergency workers in their response. Two forms of radioactive air monitoring include direct effluent measurements and environmental surveillance. This chapter presents basic concepts for direct effluent sampling and environmental surveillance of radioactive air emissions, including information on establishing the basis for sampling and/or monitoring, criteria for sampling media and sample analysis, reporting and compliance, and continual improvement.

Barnett, J. M.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Near Facility Environmental Monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near-facility environmental monitoring directed by Waste Management Technical Services and supersedes HNF-EP-0538-4. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Waste Management Technical Services in implementing near-facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1 (DOE 1990) as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE-RL 1997) and is used to define: Environmental measurement and sampling locations used to monitor environmental contaminants near active and inactive facilities and waste storage and disposal sites; Procedures and equipment needed to perform the measurement and sampling; Frequency and analyses required for each measurement and sampling location; Minimum detection level and accuracy; Quality assurance components; and Investigation levels. Near-facility environmental monitoring for the Hanford Site is conducted in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1990), 5400.5 (DOE 1993), 5484.1 (DOE 1990), and 435.1 (DOE 1999), and DOE/EH-O173T (DOE 1991). It is Waste Management Technical Services' objective to manage and conduct near-facility environmental monitoring activities at the Hanford Site in a cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner that is in compliance with the letter and spirit of these regulations and other environmental regulations, statutes, and standards.

MCKINNEY, S.M.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

Gray, R.H. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Semantic data integration and monitoring in the railway domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information integration is a key for further growth of efficiency in management decisions for the railway domain. In the context of the EU project InteGRail (funded in the 6th Framework Programme) an integration approach leveraged by ontologies known ... Keywords: data and system integration, distributed reasoning, information reuse, monitoring and maintenance, ontology, railway domain, semantic modeling

Jan-Gregor Fischer; Mikhail Roshchin; Gerhard Langer; Michael Pirker

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

SciTech Connect

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Governor's Office of Planning and Research, issued on March 5, 2013, a draft handbook on integrating NEPA and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review processes....

95

The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=P10033EF.PDF Cost: Free References: EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency). 2004. The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook. EPA430-B-04-006. Washington, DC. Office of Air and Radiation.[1] Related Tools Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment

96

Environmental regulation with incomplete information and imperfect monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental protection agencies issue regulations without complete information about the economic cost of pollution abatement. The lack of information limits the ability of environmental protection agencies to restore economic efficiency when regulating firms generating pollution. In the three papers of this dissertation, optimal environmental regulations are derived in the presence of asymmetric information about pollution abatement costs. In the regulatory equilibria analyzed in Chapter 1, firms are induced to reveal the information they possess concerning abatement costs through the judicious use of abatement standard-subsidy combinations. The incentive compatible environmental regulations are superior to uniform standard-subsidy schemes. The maintained assumption is that firms automatically comply with the pollution abatement standards adopted by the regulator. In the models of Chapters 2 and 3, it is recognized that compliance may have to be induced through appropriate monitoring and enforcement measures. In the model of Chapter 2, the regulator precommits to monitoring of compliance with the incentive compatible environmental regulations, and asymmetric information characterizes the interaction between the firm and regulator. The probabilities of monitoring, abatement standards, and corresponding subsides are chosen to ensure firm compliance. Enforcement considerations distort downward the pollution abatement requirements mandated for firms. In the analysis of Chapter 3, the regulator is unable to credibly precommit to a monitoring strategy. In the Nash equilibrium to the enforcement subgame, monitoring must be a best response on the part of the regulator to the level of firm noncompliance and vice versa. Without precommitment to monitoring, the pollution abatement standards supporting a separating equilibrium are independent of monitoring costs. The inability to precommit to monitoring increases the expected level of noncompliance and decrease welfare.

Ellis, G.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.1 SWCX for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring- .1 SWCX for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring Introduction As defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office L'ltegrated l\1anagement System Procedure, .._1\fEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021 Appendices A and B. The cognizant DOE Hanford NCO may issue specific sitewide

99

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING--Radiation--Vol3Pt1  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory originally under a grant from the National Science Foundation and now by the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Department of Energy. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements in Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedicine related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored: their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls.

Authors, Various

1972-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Bill Wilborn, NNSA /NFO; Kathryn Knapp, NNSA /NFO; Irene Farnham, N-I; Sam Marutzky, N-I

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental monitoring and cooperative resource management at the WIPP site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster session by the Environmental Monitoring Section of the US DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is to demonstrate that the DOE is committed to sound environmental management. This WIPP poster session demonstrates radiological as well as nonradiological environmental monitoring activities conducted routinely at the WIPP. And how data collected prior to the WIPP being operational is used to establish a preoperational baseline for environmental studies in which the samples collected during the operational phase will be compared. Cooperative Resource Management is a relatively new concept for governments agencies. It allows two or more agencies the ability to jointly share in funding a program or project and yet both agencies can benefit from the outcome. These programs are usually a biological type study. The WIPP cooperative agreement between the US BLM, DOE and its contractors is to continue the ongoing documentation of the diversity of the Chihuahuan desert.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Plant sentinels and molecular probes that monitor environmental munitions contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants accumulate TNT and similar compounds from soil. Their sessile nature requires that plants adapt to environmental changes by biochemical and molecular means. In principle, it is possible to develop a monitoring capability based on expression of any gene that is activated by specific environmental conditions. The authors have identified plant genes activated upon exposure to TNT. Partial gene sequences allow design of DNA probes that measure TNT-induced gene activity. These will be used to develop sensitive assays that monitor gene expression in plants growing in environments possibly contaminated with explosives.

Jackson, P.J.; DeWitt, J.G.; Hill, K.K.; Kuske, C.R.; Kim, D.Y. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Genomics and Structural Biology Group

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Optical power monitors in Ge monolithically integrated on SOI chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication and operation of optical power monitors monolithically integrated on silicon-on-insulator optical chips. The devices consist of near-infrared waveguide pn heterojunction photodiodes in evaporated germanium. The low temperature ... Keywords: Germanium, Integrated optoelectronics, Photodetectors, Powermonitor, Silicon-on-insulator

L. Colace; V. Sorianello; M. Romagnoli; L. Socci; G. Assanto

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Goodrich, M. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wireless monitoring of a distributed environmental health intervention in Haiti  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, countless children die in underdeveloped countries as a result of water-borne illness. We present a prototype system, currently in pilot testing by a Haiti-based NGO, that supports increased transparency and scalability for data assimilation ... Keywords: Haiti, ICT4D, NFC, RFID, WASH, environmental health, mHealth, mobile phones, program monitoring, sanitation, water

David Holstius; Joseph "Jofish" Kaye; Edmund Seto

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Landscape Environmental Monitoring: Sample Based Versus Complete Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 Landscape Environmental Monitoring: Sample Based Versus Complete Mapping Approaches in Aerial for this purpose. In mapping, homogenous areas are first delineated as polygons. Aerial photo interpretation and Traub, 2003). The argument is that a sample survey takes less time; that it is possible to achieve more

117

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SensorScope: Application-specific sensor network for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SensorScope is a turnkey solution for environmental monitoring systems, based on a wireless sensor network and resulting from a collaboration between environmental and network researchers. Given the interest in climate change, environmental monitoring ... Keywords: Architecture, deployment, environmental monitoring, implementation, wireless sensor network

Franois Ingelrest; Guillermo Barrenetxea; Gunnar Schaefer; Martin Vetterli; Olivier Couach; Marc Parlange

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fuel Integrity Monitoring and Failure Evaluation Handbook, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook documents the current status of light water reactor (LWR) fuel integrity monitoring activities in the U.S. nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on current fuel reliability methods and fuel failure mitigation techniques. The handbook provides information on boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel release activity monitoring techniques, including trending and interpreting the activity data with respect to the condition of the failed rods. It also presents an i...

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Draft)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), incollaboration with the California Governors Office of Planning and Research, issued on March 5, 2013, a draft handbook on integrating NEPA and...

123

1996 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1996 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The NRF is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and contains three naval reactor prototypes and the Expended Core Facility, which examines developmental nuclear fuel material samples, spent naval fuel, and irradiated reactor plant components/materials. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

An integrated approach to algorithmic design and environmental analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the motivation and design of DesignScript, an end-user domain-specific programming language for algorithmic architectural and geometric design. Furthermore, the integration and use of DesignScript within the context of an environmental ... Keywords: design computation, end-user programming, environmental analysis, geometric modelling

Robert Aish; Andrew Marsh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring of Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. DOE maintains the largest cleanup program in the world, currently spanning over a million acres in 13 states. The inventory of contaminated materials includes 90 million gallons of radioactive waste, 6.4 trillion liters of groundwater, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris. It is not feasible to completely restore many sites to predisposal conditions. Any contamination left in place will require monitoring, engineering controls and/or land use restrictions to protect human health and environment. Research and development efforts to date have focused on improving characterization and remediation. Yet, monitoring will result in the largest life-cycle costs and will be critical to improving performance and protection. Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Deeb, Rula A [ARCADIS/Malcolm Pirnie; Hawley, Elisabeth L [ARCADIS/Malcolm Pirnie; Truex, Michael J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Freshley, Mark D [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Mccord, John [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Young, Michael H [University of Texas, Austin; Gilmore, Tyler J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miller, Rick [University of Kansas; Miracle, Ann L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kaback, Dawn [AMEC Geomatrix; Eddy-Dilek, Carol [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Rossabi, Joe [Redox Tech, LLC; Lee, M Hope [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bush, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado (USA); Beam, Paul [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Chamberlain, Grover [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Gerdes, Kurt [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Collazo, Yvette [U.S. Department of Energy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring of Environmental Remediation Sites - (SOMERS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. DOE maintains the largest cleanup program in the world, currently spanning over a million acres in 13 states. The inventory of contaminated materials includes 90 million gallons of radioactive waste, 6.4 trillion liters of groundwater, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris. It is not feasible to completely restore many sites to predisposal conditions. Any contamination left in place will require monitoring, engineering controls and/or land use restrictions to protect human health and environment. Research and development efforts to date have focused on improving characterization and remediation. Yet, monitoring will result in the largest life-cycle costs and will be critical to improving performance and protection. Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Hope; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1975  

SciTech Connect

This is an annual report summarizing the effluent and environmental monitoring program at the Ames Laboratory of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. An inventory of the radioactive materials and certain chemicals released to the environment is included. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. An estimate of the radiation dose to the public resulting from the operations of the Ames Laboratory is stated. (auth)

Voss, M.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

PROCESS MONITORING FOR SAFEGUARDS VIA EVENT GENERATION, INTEGRATION, AND INTERPRETATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a recognized safeguards benefit from using process monitoring (PM) on nuclear facilities to complement nuclear materials accountancy. We introduce a model-based approach for PM in which the assessment regarding the state of the monitored system is conducted at a system-centric level. The proposed architecture integrates both time-driven and event-driven data integration and analysis for decision-making. While the time-driven layers of the proposed architecture encompass more traditional PM methods based on time series data and analysis, the event-driven layers encompass operation monitoring methods based on discrete event data integration and analysis. By integrating process- and operation-related information and methodologies within an unified modeling and monitoring framework that includes not only current but also past plant behaviors, the task of anomaly detection is greatly improved because this decision-making approach can benefit from not only known time-series relationships among measured signals but also from known event sequence relationships among generated events. Building from the proposed system-centric PM architecture, we briefly introduce methods that can be used to implement its different components. The application of the proposed approach is then demonstrated via simulation experiments.

Humberto E. Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Tae-Sic Yoo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP). Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program seeks to deliver needed technologies, timely and cost-effectively, to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The scope of characterizations monitoring, and sensor technology needs that are required by those organizations encompass: (1) initial location and characterization of wastes and waste environments - prior to treatment; (2) monitoring of waste retrieval, remediation and treatment processes; (3) characterization of the co-position of final waste treatment forms to evaluate the performance of waste treatments processes; and (4) site closure and compliance monitoring. Wherever possible, the CMST-IP fosters technology transfer and commercialization of technologies that it sponsors.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A guide to environmental monitoring data, 1945--1972: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a guide to the work accomplished by the Environmental Monitoring Data Task, which is one of the tasks in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the Environmental Monitoring Data Task was to recover, evaluate, process, and/or reconstruct the environmental monitoring data for the period 1945--1972. The period of time for which environmental monitoring data were sought was determined by the start-up and shut-down dates of the Hanford facilities that emitted the majority of radionuclides to the two major pathways: air and the Columbia River. Radionuclide emissions to the air were mainly the result of the operation of the chemical separations plants from 1944--1972 (Heeb 1994). Radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River were mainly the result of the operation of the single-pass production reactors from 1944--1971 (Heeb and Bates 1994). Therefore, the historical environmental monitoring data sought were for the period 1945--1972. Within the period of 1945--1972, specific periods of interest to the HEDR Project vary depending on the pathway. For example, 1945--1951 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the air and hence vegetation uptake of radionuclides, while 1956--1965 was the peak period for radionuclide emissions to the Columbia River and hence fish uptake of radionuclides. However, adequate historical data were not always available for the periods of interest. In the case of vegetation measurements, conversion and correction factors had to be developed to convert the historical measurements to modern standard measurements. Table S.1 lists the reports that explain these conversion and correction factors. In the case of Columbia River fish and waterfowl, bioconcentration factors were developed for use in any year where the river pathway data are insufficient.

Thiede, M.E.; Bates, D.J.; Mart, E.I.; Hanf, R.W.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Multi-Modal Integrated Safety, Security & Environmental Program Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an approach to assessing and protecting the surface transportation infrastructure from a network science viewpoint. We address transportation security from a human behavior-dynamics perspective under both normal and emergency conditions for the purpose of measuring, managing and mitigating risks. The key factor for the planning and design of a robust transportation network solution is to ensure accountability for safety, security and environmental risks. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Multi-Modal Integrated Safety, Security and Environmental Program (M2IS2EP) evolved from a joint US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) Assets Utilization Program and ORNL SensorNet Program initiative named the Identification and Monitoring of Radiation (in commerce) Shipments (IMRicS). In November of 2002 the first of six pilot demonstrations was constructed at the Tennessee I-40/75 Knox County Weigh Station outside of Knoxville. Over the life of the project four more installations were deployed with various levels of ORNL oversight. In October of 2004 the ORNL SensorNet Program commissioned a research team to develop a project plan and to identify/develop a strategic vision in support of the SensorNet Program, keeping in mind the needs of the various governmental constituencies (i.e., DOT/DHS/EPA) for improving the safety/security/environment of the highway transportation system. Ultimately a more comprehensive ORNL SensorNet Program entitled Trusted Corridors was established and presented to ORNL, DOE, DOT, DHS, EPA and State leaders. Several of these entities adopted their own versions of these programs and are at various stages of deployment. All of these initiatives and pilots make up the foundation of the concepts and ideas of M2IS2EP and will be discussed further on in this paper.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ETTP Environmental Monitoring Program 4-1 4. ETTP Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radionuclides from ETTP operations were well within the allowable derived concentration guides published in DOE to the public from uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards at ETTP remained below the requirements in DOE than 99%. 4.1 ETTP RADIONUCLIDE AIRBORNE EFFLUENT MONITORING Inorder to demonstrate compliance withDOE

Pennycook, Steve

139

Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System | Stanford Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System Integrated Safety & Environmental Management System How do you plan for SAFETY in your job? In an effort to provide a formal and organized process to manage all aspects of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) issues at its laboratories, the DOE developed the Integrated Safety and Environmental Management System (ISEMS). In short, it's a process that allows people (such as staff and Users) at all levels to plan, perform, assess and improve their implementation of ES&H at work. The system puts the responsibility for safety on each person. Fundamental to the process are the Guiding Principles that can be viewed as "best management practices" or "how we do business", which are the policies that integrate ISMS at all levels; the Core Functions, which provide the

140

Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

Jannik, G.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980  

SciTech Connect

The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

Voss, M.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

Not Available

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING THROUGH AN IMPROVED AIR MONITORING TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect

Environmental sampling (ES) is a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguarding approaches throughout the world. Performance of ES (e.g. air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) supports the IAEAs mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a State and has been available since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors (1992-1997). A recent step-change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities is an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Utilizing commonly used equipment throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories for particle analysis, researchers are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) silicon substrate has been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. The new collection equipment will allow IAEA nuclear safeguards inspectors to develop enhanced safeguarding approaches for complicated facilities. This paper will explore the use of air monitoring to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility that could be used for comparison of consistencies in declared operations. The implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Technical aspects of the air monitoring device and the analysis of its environmental samples will demonstrate the essential parameters required for successful application of the system.

Hanks, D.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program in the 21st Century: The Evolution of a Monitoring Network  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the evolution of the various operational aspects of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) network following the transfer of program administration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education in 1999-2000. The CEMP consists of a network of 29 fixed radiation and weather monitoring stations located in Nevada, Utah, and California. Its mission is to involve stakeholders directly in monitoring for airborne radiological releases to the off site environment as a result of past or ongoing activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and to make data as transparent and accessible to the general public as feasible. At its inception in 1981, the CEMP was a cooperative project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DRI, and EPA. In 1999-2000, technical administration of the CEMP transitioned from EPA to DRI. Concurrent with and subsequent to this transition, station and program operations underwent significant enhancements that furthered the mission of the program. These enhancements included the addition of a full suite of meteorological instrumentation, state-of-the-art electronic data collectors, on-site displays, and communications hardware. A public website was developed. Finally, the DRI developed a mobile monitoring station that can be operated entirely on solar power in conjunction with a deep-cell battery, and includes all meteorological sensors and a pressurized ion chamber for detecting background gamma radiation. Final station configurations have resulted in the creation of a platform that is well suited for use as an in-field multi-environment test-bed for prototype environmental sensors and in interfacing with other scientific and educational programs. Recent and near-future collaborators have included federal, state, and local agencies in both the government and private sectors. The CEMP also serves as a model for other programs wishing to involve stakeholders with a meaningful role in the process of monitoring and data collection.

Hartwell, W.T.; Tappen, J.; Karr, L.

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

148

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE/EA-lOSl ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CARLSBAD ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

j j DOE/EA-lOSl ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CARLSBAD ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & RESEARCH CENTER FACILITY, f l d rz= F L G;: ( J 1L" 1 '&) FzB 2 B j p s Q S T I DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD AREA OFFICE TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables ..................................................... iv ListofFigures .................................................... iv ListofAcronyms ................................................... v Executive Summary ............................................... ES-i 1.1 Background Information ........................................ 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 1.0 General ...................................................... 1 .................................... 1 2.0 Description of the Alternatives

150

Development of autonomous gamma dose logger for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous monitoring and archiving of background radiation levels in and around the nuclear installation is essential and the data would be of immense use during analysis of any untoward incidents. A portable Geiger Muller detector based autonomous gamma dose logger (AGDL) for environmental monitoring is indigenously designed and developed. The system operations are controlled by microcontroller (AT89S52) and the main features of the system are software data acquisition, real time LCD display of radiation level, data archiving at removable compact flash card. The complete system operates on 12 V battery backed up by solar panel and hence the system is totally portable and ideal for field use. The system has been calibrated with Co-60 source (8.1 MBq) at various source-detector distances. The system is field tested and performance evaluation is carried out. This paper covers the design considerations of the hardware, software architecture of the system along with details of the front-end operation of the autonomous gamma dose logger and the data file formats. The data gathered during field testing and inter comparison with GammaTRACER are also presented in the paper. AGDL has shown excellent correlation with energy fluence monitor tuned to identify {sup 41}Ar, proving its utility for real-time plume tracking and source term estimation.

Jisha, N. V.; Krishnakumar, D. N.; Surya Prakash, G.; Kumari, Anju; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

(Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Integrated Omics in Systems Biology: The New Frontier for Environmental Biotechnology  

SciTech Connect

Environmental biotechnology encompasses a wide range of characterization, monitoring and control for bioenergy and bioremediation technologies that are based on biological processes. Recent breakthroughs in our understanding of biogeochemical processes and genomics are leading to exciting new and cost effective ways to monitor and manipulate the environment and potentially produce bioenergy fuels as we also cleanup the environment. Indeed, our ability to sequence an entire microbial genome in just a few hours is leading to similar breakthroughs in characterizing proteomes, metabolomes, phenotypes, and fluxes for organisms, populations, and communities. Understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in subsurface environments has tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of biogeochemistry and the potential for making biofuel breakthroughs. Monitoring techniques that inventory and monitor terminal electron acceptors and electron donors, enzyme probes that measure functional activity in the environment, functional genomic microarrays, phylogenetic microarrays, metabolomics, proteomics, and quantitative PCR are also being rapidly adapted for studies in environmental biotechnology. Integration of all of these new high throughput techniques using the latest advances in bioinformatics and modeling will enable break-through science in environmental biotechnology. A review of these techniques with examples from field studies and lab simulations will be discussed.

Hazen, Terry C.

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 7-1 7.0 SOIL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 7-1 7.0 SOIL MONITORING To Read About Turn........................................................................................................................................................... 7-1 Soil Comparison Levels................................................................................................................................... 7-14 Quality Assurance for the Soil, Foodstuffs, and Biota Monitoring Program

154

Third annual environmental restoration monitoring and assessment report for FY 1994 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring, field investigations, and assessments conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, providing an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. The results presented are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) Project. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The Remedial Investigation Plan (DOE 1992) for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and the major conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. During FY 1992, the remedial investigation activities were integrated with a series of environmental monitoring and SI activities at ORNL that address pathways and processes important for contaminant movement to gain a more integrated perspective of contamination movement at the watershed scale.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.; Guth, M.A.S. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

A green wireless sensor network for environmental monitoring and risk identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensor-based community network for environmental data gathering and predictive analysis has been developed. A mesh network of wireless sensors reports data to a central site for environmental monitoring and risk identification. Data analysis and ...

Patricia Morreale; Feng Qi; Paul Croft

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

EA-1081: Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to continue U.S. Department of Energy funding of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center in the Waste Isolation Pilot...

158

Extending the Battery-Powered Operating Time of a Wireless Environmental Monitoring System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advances in low-power microelectronics and sensor technologies have enabled the creation of sophisticated environmental monitoring systems capable of operating on battery power. Independence from a (more)

Butler, Ross Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Special Section Guest Editorial: Advances in Remote Sensing for Monitoring Global Environmental Changes  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on advances in remote sensing for monitoring global environmental changes, and discussed10 papers selected from a number of areas of expertise.

Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Chang, Ni-Bin

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

Holland, Robert C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, May 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Abbreviations i Executive Summary iii 1 Introduction 1 2 Positive Attributes 3 3 Program Enhancements 5 4 INL Site Environmental Monitoring Program 7 4.1 Overall Assessment 7 4.2 Crosscutting Concerns and Recommendations 7 4.3 Media-Specific Perspectives and Recommendations 11 4.3.1 Air Monitoring 11 4.3.2 Liquid Effluent Monitoring 12 4.3.3 Soil Monitoring 12 4.3.4 Agricultural Products and Game Animals Monitoring 13

162

Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C. [and others

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pollution control and environmental monitoring efforts at DOE's Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale demonstration of such technology is currently being carried out at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in Tullahoma, Tennessee and at the Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The CFFF is dedicated to the evaluation of downstream (steam cycle) components and technology that may be considered for a full-scale MHD system. The objectives of the CFFF testing include the demonstration of various pollution control devices and techniques at a scale sufficient for future scale-up. The CFFF offers a unique test environment in which emissions control techniques can be developed and evaluated through emissions and environmental monitoring. Results thus far have demonstrated the ability of sulfur oxide (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and particulate emissions well below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Regeneration of the potassium sulfate to produce sulfur-free compounds also has been demonstrated. The experimental program at the CFFF is now aimed at determining the optimum conditions for future commercial scale designs. Because of increased interests in Air Toxics, measurements of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potential greenhouse gas, priority pollutants (inorganic as well as organics), and chlorine-containing species (Cl{sub 2} and HCl) are also included in our ongoing efforts. Environmental monitoring activities are being pursued to develop an environmental impact assessment data base. These include the use of three ambient air sites to determine the impacts of gaseous and particulate emissions, five lake water sites to determine impacts due to process water discharges and seven sites to collect terrestrial data on possible soil contamination and tree growth. In this paper, we will summarize the status of our ongoing environmental program. 16 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Attig, R.C.; Crawford, L.W.; Lynch, T.P.; Sheth, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: environmental assessment and monitoring plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental monitoring and reporting plan is based on requirements set by the State of California, Water Quality Control Board, and the Division of Oil and Gas as well as special requirements by the County of Imperial, Air Pollution Control Board and other county offices. This plan addresses all of the applicable environmental impacts identified in the Final Environmental Report. Each item of the environmental monitoring and reporting requirements is addressed in terms of (a) impact; (b) mitigation measures and/or engineering practices; and (c) monitoring and reporting requirements. An overall summary of all of the reporting requirements is contained.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The NOAA Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS)A New Surface Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new radiation monitoring program, the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS), that builds upon and takes over from earlier NOAA networks monitoring components of solar radiation [both the visible component (SOLRAD) and ...

B. B. Hicks; J. J. DeLuisi; D. R. Matt

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A high-frequency sampling monitoring system for environmental and structural applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-frequency sampling is not only a prerogative of high-energy physics or machinery diagnostic monitoring: critical environmental and structural health monitoring applications also have such a challenging constraint. Moreover, such unique design constraints ... Keywords: Monitoring system, high-frequency sampling, rock collapse forecasting, wireless sensor network

Cesare Alippi; Romolo Camplani; Cristian Galperti; Antonio Marullo; Manuel Roveri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Environmental radiation real-time monitoring system permanently installed near Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

An environmental radiation real-time monitoring system with high pressure ionization chamber was developed. It has been installed permanently in the vicinity of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first built in mainland China. The system consists of four basic components: environmental radiation monitors; data communication network; a data processing center; and a remote terminal computer situated in Hangzhou. It has provided five million readings of environmental radiation levels as of January 1993. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Minde Ding; Peiru Sheng; Zhangji Zhi [Suzhou Nuclear Research Institute, Jiangsu (China)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hanford Site Integrated EN Based Corrosion Monitoring System Initial Design Report  

SciTech Connect

Design of integrated corrosion monitoring station. This document meets the requirements of TTP RLO-9-WT-41 Milestone A.3-1.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

United States Environmental Monitoring EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPAJ60014-901016 EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062 Agency P.O. Box 93478 May 1990 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development - Offsite Environmental lcrgw Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring d ,& Around United States Nuclear Test Areas Calendar Year 1989 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90/016 DOEIDP100539-062 May 1990 Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1989 contributors: C. F. Costa, N. R. Sunderland, S. C. Black, M. W. Chilton, B. B. Dicey, W. G. Phillips, C. A. Fontana, R. W. Holloway, C. K. Liu, A. A. Mullen, V. E. Niemann, C. J. Rizzardi, D. D. Smith, D. J. Thome, E. A. Thompson, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division

171

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administrations Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

William T. Hartwell

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 3, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Generic integration of environmental decision support systems - state-of-the-art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Information Systems (EIS) and Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) are major building blocks in environmental management and science today. They are used at all levels of public bodies (community, state, national and international ... Keywords: EU FP5, Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS), Environmental Information Systems (EIS), GIMMI, Generic integration, I-MARQ

Ralf Denzer

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

NONE

1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Monitoring environmental efficiency: An application to Italian provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With growing environmental legislation and mounting popular concern for the environment and the quality of life, there has been an increasing recognition in developed nations of the importance of good environmental performance, to assure the reduction ... Keywords: Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), Decision Making Units (DMUs), Environmental efficiency, Sustainable development, Undesirable outputs

Mauro Coli; Eugenia Nissi; Agnese Rapposelli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy Performance Analysis Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance U. S. Department of Energy OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................. 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND EVALUATION APPROACH ........................4 2.0 DOE REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAMS..........................4 3.0 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS .................................................7 3.1 Groundwater Monitoring and Protection...........................7 3.2 Environmental Radiological Program Management ........ 11 3.3 Environmental Radiological Monitoring and Surveillance ...............................................................15 3.4 Radiological Air Emissions

177

Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual environmental monitoring report, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress made in the monitoring and inspection program for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during 1983 is reported. The following sites were monitored: Bayou Choctau, Bryan Mound, St. James Terminal, Sulfur Mines, Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Discussion is presented under the headings: air quality monitoring; oil spills and NPDES compliance; and water quality monitoring. The discussion on water quality monitoring is by far the most extensive. Surface waters from the sites previously mentioned were sampled and monitored for general water quality (except for St. James Terminal where there is a lack of potentially impacted surface waters). The following parameters were measured: pH value; salinity; total suspended particulates; temperature; dissolved oxygen; biochemical oxygen demand; oil and grease; and general observations. 12 references, 6 figures. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

1989 environmental monitoring report, Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Company (REECo) for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) operated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Other environmental compliance programs such as National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), environmental permits, environmental restoration, and waste management programs are also included. The maximum offsite dose impact from 1989 operations was 8.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem as a result of an unusual occurrence. The population received a collective dose of 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} person-rem from this incidence, while the same populations received 4.94 person-rem from natural background radiation. The 1989 SNL, TTR operations had no adverse impact on the general public or the environment. 18 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Phelan, J.; Wolff, T.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; West, G.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water monitoring procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring is the primary method used to protect our ground-water resources. The primary objectives of monitoring programs are to detect, to attribute, and to mitigate any changes in-water quality or quantity. Previous monitoring programs have had numerous problems including the failure to produce usable information and the failure to balance the competing factors of cost-effectiveness and environmental protection. A cost-effective, environmentally-responsive ground-water procedure was designed which consists of eight steps and two feedback loops. The reason for monitoring must first be determined before clear monitoring goals can be set. Characterization of the site allows proper design of the monitoring network. Data is then collected and analyzed creating usable information. Applying this new information to the information expansion loop permits a better understanding of the initial site characterization. Finally evaluating the entire routine to determine the effectiveness of the program allows the optimization loop to modify the system for greater efficiency. The value of this procedure was tested at selected sites in the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas. The mine, which is currently in compliance with state regulations, is not operating an efficient monitoring program. The problems included over-monitoring of metals in and around reclaimed mine blocks, over-monitoring by monitoring wells in the same aquifer, and the failure to attribute changes in a monitoring well near a dewatering well. The feedback loops helped to optimize the entire program by recognizing problems in the stratigraphic column and modifying the monitoring program to lower monitoring costs. Three major benefits are gained by using this procedure: the ground-water monitoring routine can be made more cost-effective, environmental protection will be increased, and environmental liability will be decreased.

Doucette, Richard Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Miniaturized Redox Potential Probe for In Situ Environmental Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43026 The need for accurate, robust in situ microscale monitoring of oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP-contained microelectrodes that can be used in the environment, such as at Superfund sites, to monitor ORP in contaminated for ORP measurements. The electrochemical performance of these ORP electrodes was fully characterized

Papautsky, Ian

182

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of new and conventional thermoluminescent phosphors for environmental monitoring using automated thermoluminescent dosimeter readers  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, there has been considerable interest in a new generation of super-sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) phosphors for potential use in routine personnel and environmental monitoring. Two of these phosphors, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and LiF:Mg,Cu,P, are evaluated in this paper for selected characteristics relevant to environmental monitoring, along with two conventional phosphors widely used in environmental monitoring, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF{sub 2}:Dy. The characteristics evaluated are light-induced fading, light-induced background, linearity and variability at low dose, and the minimum measurable dose. These characteristics were determined using an automated commercial dosimetry system (Harshaw System 8800) and routine processing protocols. Annealing and readout protocols for each phosphor were optimized for use in a large-scale environmental monitoring program.

Rathbone, B.A.; Endres, A.W.; Antonio, E.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the activities of monitoring environmental aspects at designated geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana during the second quarter of 1990 by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University under contract with US DOE. 1 fig. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST S I T E  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST S ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST S I T E AND OTIIER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DnONATIONS ' , '. L , January-December 1 9 7 2 This work performed under a Memorandum o f / : : - ' : L Understanding N o . A T ( 2 6 - 1 ) - 5 3 9 . for the U. S . ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION I ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January-December 1972 by the National Environmental Research Center U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada This Published May 1973 work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U. S . ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION PREFACE The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has used t h e Nevada Test S i t e (NTS) s i n c e January 1951 a s an a r

186

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

F F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE ' i A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 Nuclear Radiation Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 October 1979 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 for t h e U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 by R. F. Grossman Nuclear Radi a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539

187

Environmental application of stable xenon and radioxenon monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CTBT Monitoring. PNNL-11424, (1996) Pacific Northwestv. 2.0 Theory Guide. PNNL-12030. (2000) Pacific Northwestv. 3.1 Users Guide. PNNL-14478. (2004) Pacific Northwest

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wireless sensor networks for structural and environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article discusses various applications of Wireless Sensor Networks (WNS) in environment and civil engineering constructions monitoring with a particular emphasis on the evaluation of the influence of individual node failures on the operation of the ...

Igor Dunajewski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Geosensor Data Abstraction for Environmental Monitoring Application1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensor data types and for providing derived and often integrated information. To effectively handle integrated grid layers. Within each cell, a slope vector is used to represents the trend of the observed. To handle dynamic sensor data, the proposed abstraction model also supports rapid data update by using

Nittel, Silvia

190

Summary and results of the comprehensive environmental monitoring program at the INEL's Raft River geothermal site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Program was designed to demonstrate that moderate temperature (approx. 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids could be used to generate electricity and provide an alternate energy source for direct-use applications. The environmental program was initiated soon after drilling began. The major elements of the monitoring program were continued during the construction and experimental testing of the 5-MW(e) power plant. The monitoring studies established pre-development baseline conditions of and assessed changes in the physical, biological, and human environment. The Physical Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on geology, subsidence, seismicity, meteorology and air quality. The Biological Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on the flora and fauna of the terrestrial ecosystem, studied raptor disturbances, and surveyed the aquatic communities of the Raft River. The Human Environmental Monitoring Program surveyed historic and archaeological sites, considered the socioeconomic environment, and documented incidences of fluorosis in the Raft River Valley. In addition to the environmental monitoring programs, research on biological direct applications using geothermal water was conducted at Raft River. Areas of research included biomass production of wetland and tree species, aquaculture, agricultural irrigation, and the use of wetlands as a treatment or pretreatment system for geothermal effluents.

Mayes, R.A.; Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

193

Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1985  

SciTech Connect

A general description of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the site's climate, geology, facility water usage, land use, and demography of the area is given. The environmental status for 1985 is reported with respect to non-radioactive and radioactive discharge. (LEW)

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Transparency demonstration of underground radiation and environmental monitoring  

SciTech Connect

One of the legacies of the nuclear weapon and nuclear power cycles has been the generation of large quantities of nuclear waste and fissile materials. As citizens of this planet, it is everyone's responsibility to provide for safe, secure, transparent, disposal of these waste nuclear materials. The Sandia Cooperative Monitoring Center sponsored a Transparency Monitoring Workshop where the use of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was identified as a possible transparency demonstration test bed. Three experiments were conceived as jumpstart activities to showcase the effective use of the WIPP infrastructure as a Transparency Demonstration Test Bed. The three experiments were successfully completed and demonstrated at the International Atomic Energy Association sponsored International Conference on Geological Repositories held in Denver Colorado November 1999. The design and coordination of these efforts is the subject of this paper.

SCHOENEMAN,BARRY D.; HOFER,DENNIS

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Integrated model-based control and diagnostic monitoring for automotive catalyst systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated model-based automotive catalyst control and diagnostic monitoring system is presented. This system incorporates a simplified dynamic catalyst model that describes oxygen storage and release in the catalyst and predicts the post-catalyst ... Keywords: automotive catalyst, model predictive control, on-board diagnostic monitoring

Kenneth R. Muske; James C. Peyton Jones

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated system for control and monitoring in real time of efficient electrical and thermal energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated monitoring and driving system is made of main distributed components: - first level:_one or two computers placed in the control room which monitors the thermal and electrical processes based on the datas provided by the second level via ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, distribution management system, electric power systems, optimization, process control, real time systems, simulation

Ion Miciu; Florin Hartescu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mobility in environmental planning: an integrated multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobility infrastructure planning is an increasingly crucial aspect of environmental planning, essential to boost regional economies and social relations, as well as critical for environmental impacts involved. Structuring inherently complex issues and ...

D. Borri; D. Camarda; A. De Liddo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SITE CHARACfERlZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SITE CHARACfERlZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed ActioD: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct site characterization and environmental monitoring activities. LocadoD of AcdoD: The proposed action would occur on and near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and at other sites in the State of Washington. DeserlpdoD 01 the Proposed AedoD: The proposed action would include a variety of non-intrusive and intrusive characteri2ation and monitoring activities conducted in support of purposes such as environmental surveillance, remediation. research, construction. and sampling.

200

Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainy STAR Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2-TAC 2-TAC GJO-PIN 11.6.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January through March 2003 Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center April 2003 Grand Junction Office Grand Junction Office Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N0060700 GJO-2003-432-TAC GJO-PIN 11.6.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center January through March 2003 April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental M o n i t o r i n g Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P r o t e c t i o n Agency Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 A p r i l 1980 T h i s work performed under Memorandum o f ' Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 f o r t h e U.S. Department o f Energy This page intentionally left blank OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 G. D. P o t t e r , R. F. Grossman, W. A. B l i s s , D. J . Tlom6 Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P

203

Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques  

SciTech Connect

Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF{sub 6} gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques.

Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of the uranium double spike technique for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a uranium double spike in analysis of environmental samples showed that a {sup 235}U enrichment of 1% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.00732) can be distinguished from natural ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.00725). Experiments performed jointly at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) used a carefully calibrated double spike of {sup 233}U and {sup 236}U to obtain much better precision than is possible using conventional analytical techniques. A variety of different sampling media (vegetation and swipes) showed that, provided sufficient care is exercised in choice of sample type, relative standard deviations of less than {+-} 0.5% can be routinely obtained. This ability, unavailable without use of the double spike, has enormous potential significance in the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities.

Hemberger, P.H.; Rokop, D.J.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, D.H.; Turner, M.L.; Barshick, C.M.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA-600/4-81-047 EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043 Agency P.O. Box 15027 June 1981 Las Vegas NV 891 14 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1980 prepared for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank EPA-60014-81-047 DOE/DP/00539-043 June 1981 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radiation moni t o r i ng around U n i t e d States nuclear t e s t areas, calendar y e a r 1980 D. D. Smith, R. F. Grossman, W. D. Corkern, D. J. Thorn6 and R. G. Patzer Envi ronmental Moni t o r i ng Systems Laboratory Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 and J. L. Hopper Reynol ds E l e c t r i c a l & Engineering Company, Inc.

206

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fiscal Year 2005 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various purposes, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users. DOE manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project integrates monitoring for various objectives into a single sampling schedule to avoid redundancy of effort and to improve efficiency of sample collection.This report documents the purposes and objectives of groundwater monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

Rieger, JoAnne T.; Hartman, Mary J.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

208

Annual environmental monitoring summary, July 1974--June 1975  

SciTech Connect

Monsanto Research Corporation operates Mound Laboratory, a government-owned facility of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, at Miamisburg, Ohio. Mound Laboratory is an integrated research, development, and production facility performing work in support of ERDA weapon and non-weapon programs with emphasis on explosive and nuclear technology. Mound Laboratory originated as a technical organization in 1943 when Monsanto Chemical Company was requested to accept responsibility for determining the chemical and metallurgical properties of polonium as a project of the Manhattan Engineering District. Work was carried on at Monsanto`s Central Research Department and several satellite units in the Dayton, Ohio area. Late in 1945, the Manhattan Engineering District determined that the research, development and production organization established by Monsanto at Dayton should become a permanent facility. A search for a suitable location in early 1946 led to the selection of a 180-acre tract adjacent to Miamisburg, about ten miles (16 km) south of Dayton.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Integrating environmental considerations in technology selections under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition requires companies to make decisions that satisfy multiple criteria. Considering profitability alone is no longer sufficient. Ignoring environmental considerations will not only expose a company to potential ...

Chen, Yue (Yue Nina)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental monitoring and compliance at eight UMTRA sites where remedial action was underway during 1992 and at the ten sites that were complete at the end of 1992. Volume I contains information for Ambrosia Lake, NM; Cannonsburg/Burrell, PA; Durango, CO; Falls City, TX; Grand Junction, CO; Green River, UT; and Gunnison, CO. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

212

Annual environmental monitoring summary, July 1975--June 1976  

SciTech Connect

Monsanto Research Corporation operates Mound Laboratory, a government-owned facility of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, at Miamisburg, Ohio. Mound Laboratory is an integrated, research, development, and production facility performing work in support of ERDA weapon and nonweapon programs with emphasis on explosive and nuclear technology. Mound Laboratory originated as a technical organization in 1943 when Monsanto Chemical Company was requested to accept responsibility for determining the chemical and metallurgical properties of polonium as a project of the Manhattan Engineering District. Work was carried on at Monsanto`s Central Research Department and several satellite units in the Dayton, Ohio area. Late in 1945, the Manhattan Engineering District determined that the research, development and production organization established by Monsanto at Dayton should become a permanent facility. A search for a suitable location in early 1946 led to the selection of a 180-acre tract adjacent to Miamisburg, about ten miles (16 km) south of Dayton. Construction of Mound Laboratory, which was named after the Miamisburg Indian Mound adjacent to the site, began in February 1947 and was completed in 1948. The new laboratory was the first permanent facility of the Atomic Energy Commission which had succeeded the Manhattan Engineering District.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Solar-powered WirelessMesh Networksfor Environmental Monitoring Torsten Braun, Thomas Staub, Benjamin Nyffenegger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-powered WirelessMesh Networksfor Environmental Monitoring Torsten Braun, Thomas Staub the development and experiencesof a solar-power driven wirelessmesh network for connectingsensorsin rural is available. II. SOLAR-POWER DRIVEN WIRELESS MESH NETWORK DEPLYOMENT AND OPERATION In a technology project

Braun, Torsten

214

SADmote: a robust and cost-effective device for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time to deployment for wireless sensor networks could be reduced by using commercial sensor nodes. However, this may lead to suboptimal flexibility, power consumption and cost of the system. Our pilot deployment for precision agriculture and fruit growing ... Keywords: environmental monitoring, hardware design, precision agriculture, sensor networks

Atis Elsts; Rihards Balass; Janis Judvaitis; Reinholds Zviedris; Girts Strazdins; Artis Mednis; Leo Selavo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sensorcam: an energy-efficient smart wireless camera for environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing energy cost is crucial for energy-constrained smart wireless cameras. Existing platforms impose two main challenges: First, most commercial smart phones have a closed platform, which makes it impossible to manage low-level circuits. Since the ... Keywords: energy profile, environmental monitoring, smart wireless camera, video coding

Zichong Chen; Paolo Prandoni; Guillermo Barrenetxea; Martin Vetterli

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue  

SciTech Connect

The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Ham, Kenneth [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL; Morris, Gail Wright [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Synthesis and Environmental Management Implications  

SciTech Connect

The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Real Time Quantitative Radiological Monitoring Equipment for Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, analyze, and characterize radiological contamination in soil. These systems have been successfully deployed at several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and Cold War Legacy closure sites. Traditionally, these systems have been used during the characterization and remediation of radiologically contaminated soils and surfaces; however, subsequent to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the applications of these systems have expanded to include homeland security operations for first response, continuing assessment and verification of cleanup activities in the event of the detonation of a radiological dispersal device. The core system components are a detector, a spectral analyzer, and a global positioning system (GPS). The system is computer controlled by menu-driven, user-friendly custom software designed for a technician-level operator. A wide variety of detectors have been used including several configurations of sodium iodide (NaI) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and a large area proportional counter designed for the detection of x-rays from actinides such as Am-241 and Pu-238. Systems have been deployed from several platforms including a small all-terrain vehicle (ATV), hand-pushed carts, a backpack mounted unit, and an excavator mounted unit used where personnel safety considerations are paramount. The INL has advanced this concept, and expanded the system functionality to create an integrated, field-deployed analytical system through the use of tailored analysis and operations software. Customized, site specific software is assembled from a supporting toolbox of algorithms that streamline the data acquisition, analysis and reporting process. These algorithms include region specific spectral stripping, automated energy calibration, background subtraction, activity calculations based on measured detector efficiencies, and on-line data quality checks and measures. These analyses are combined to provide real-time areal activity and coverage maps that are displayed to the operator as the survey progresses. The flexible functionality of the INL systems are well suited to multiple roles supporting homeland security needs.

John R. Giles; Lyle G. Roybal; Michael V. Carpenter

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Zeb: Software for Integration, Display and Management of Diverse Environmental Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Zeb software for integration, display, and management of diverse environmental datasets. Zeb's primary use is for the superpositioning of observational datasets (such as those collected by satellite, radar, mesonet, and ...

Jonathan Corbet; Cynthia Mueller; Chris Burghart; Kristine Gould; Gary Granger

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER  

SciTech Connect

This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1977 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 July 1978 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY O F F - S I T E ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA T E S T S I T E AND OTHER T E S T AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS J a n u a r y through December 1977 by R, F . G r o s s m a n M o n i t o r i n g O p e r a t i o n s D i v i s i o n E n v i r o n m e n t a l M o n i t o r i n g and Support Laboratory U, S . ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las V e g a s , N e v a d a 89114 J u l y 1978 T h i s w o r k p e r f o r m e d under a M e m o r a n d u m of U n d e r

222

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring provides a means to measure the impacts of operations, waste management, and remediation activities on the environment adjacent to facilities and ensure compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Specifically, near-facility environmental monitoring monitors new and existing sites, processes, and facilities for potential impacts and releases; fugitive emissions and diffuse sources associated with contaminated areas, facilities (both active and those undergoing surveillance and maintenance), and environmental restoration activities. External radiation, ambient air particulates, ground and surface water, soil, sediment, and biota (plants and animals) are sampled or monitored. Parameters include, as appropriate, radionuclides; radiation fields; chemical or physical constituents, such as nitrates; pH; and water temperature. All ambient air results were below the US Department of Energy (DOE) Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs). Groundwater concentrations at the two wells at the 107-N Facility were below both the DOE DCG and US Environmental Protection Agency Interim Drinking Water Standards for gamma emitting radionuclides. Soil and vegetation results were generally within historic ranges and mostly below the Accessible Soil Concentration limits (included in HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites) with the exception of one soil sampling location at 1 00 N Area. External radiation fields continued an overall downward trend. Surface water disposal unit samples (water, sediment, and aquatic vegetation) showed radionuclide concentrations below their respective DCG and Accessible Soil Concentration limits. The 100 N Area Columbia river shoreline springs results were below DCGs with the exception of one Sr concentration. More than 4,600 ha (11,300 acres) of radiologically controlled areas were surveyed in 1997, approximately the same as in 1996.

Perkins, C.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

On-line Structural Integrity Monitoring and Defect Diagnosis of Steam Generators Using Analysis of Guided Acoustic Waves.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research using guided acoustic signals. The primary objective was to (more)

Lu, Baofu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A Final Environmental Assessment March 2003 Department of Energy, Sandia Site Office Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque New Mexico Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Environmental Assessment March 2003 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose and Need for Agency Action.......................................................................................1 2.0 No Action and Proposed Action Alternatives............................................................................3 2.1 No Action Alternative .................................................................................................3

225

The In Situ Vitrification Integrated Program: Focusing an innovative solution on environmental restoration needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Integrated Program is to ensure that ISV is a viable alternative for DOE environmental restoration applications. The program focuses ISV development activities upon DOE-wide environmental remediation needs and resolves issues inhibiting timely implementation on DOE sites. currently the ISV Integrated Program is focused on contaminated soil sites but is also resolving some key issues that are common to soils and to potential future applications such as buried waste and underground structures. This paper describes the status and current focus of the ISV Integrated Program.

Buelt, J.L.; Thompson, L.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fading in CaF/sub 2/(Tm/Dy) TL phosphors used in environmental radiation monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoluminescence dosimetry technique is currently used for occupational dosimetry and monitoring of supervised areas in the medical and industrial use of ionizing radiation. Recently, the problems about the potential effects of low dose levels, as those due to natural radiation or in the proximity of nuclear facilities, has produced a continuing interest in the study of thermoluminescent dosemeters for the measurement of environmental exposure. Undoubtedly, TLDs offer a number of advantages over other devices available for these purposes: they are small, relatively inexpensive, stable integrating detectors, which can be used in large number, placed everywhere, and assembled in a variety of arrangements. The aim of this paper is to report the fading observed for two different kind of calcium fluoride submitted to different climate conditions over storage time. CaF/sub 2/ (Dy/Tm) have been chosen because of their high sensitivity which makes them very useful in environmental dosimetry. On the other hand, the lower limit of the absorbed dose for CaF/sub 2/ is about 10/sup -6/Gy while for LiF is about 5x10/sup -5/Gy. Because the environmental absorbed dose in Italy is about 7x10/sup -5/Gy/month it is evident the usefulness of CaF/sub 2/ with respect to LiF.

Bacci, C.; Draghi, V.; Furetta, C.; Rispoli, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

228

Structural Deformation during a Typhoon as Monitored by an Integrated Multi-Sensor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring structural response induced by severe loadings such as typhoon is an efficient way to mitigate or prevent damage. Because the measured signal can be used to activate an alarm system to evacuate people from an endangered building, or to drive a control system to suppress typhoon excited vibrations so as to protect the integrity of the structure. A 108m tall tower in Tokyo has been monitored by an integrated system combining RTK-GPS and accelerometers. Data collected by the multi-sensor system have been analysed and compared to the original finite element modelling (FEM) result for structural deformation monitoring studies. Especially, the short time Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis results have shown that the time-frequency relation does give us almost instantaneous frequency response during a typhoon event. In this paper the feasibility of integrating advanced sensing technologies such as RTK-GPS with traditional accelerometer sensors, for structural vibration response and deformation monitoring under severe loading conditions, is discussed. The redundancy within the integrated system has shown robust quality assurance.

Xiaojing Li

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

2001 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2001 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues is much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

NONE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

2003 Environmental Monitoring Report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2003 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2003 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues in much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Extended Community: An Oral History of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), 1989 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

Studying the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) provides a unique opportunity to trace a concept created by two nuclear industry originators from inception, as it transitioned through several stewardship agencies, to management by a non-profit organization. This transition is informed not only by changes over two decades in the views of the general populace toward nuclear testing but also by changing political climates and public policies. Several parallel histories accompanied the development of the CEMP: an administrative history, an environmental history, and a history of changing public perception of not only nuclear testing, but other activities involving radiation such as waste transportation, as well. Although vital, those histories will be provided only as background to the subject of this study, the oral histories gathered in this project. The oral histories collected open a window into the nuclear testing history of Nevada and Utah that has not heretofore been opened. The nuclear industry has generated a great deal of positive and negative reaction since its inception. The CEMP emerged with specific objectives. It was designed to provide information to potential downwind communities and counter negative perceptions by creating more community involvement and education about the testing. The current objectives of the program are to: (1) Manage and maintain the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) offsite monitoring program including 26 radiation and environmental monitoring stations with associated equipment. Provide air sample collection and analysis, radiological and meteorological data collection, interpretation and reporting. (2) Facilitate independent operation of radiological monitoring stations and data verification by private citizens living in communities in proximity to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). (3) Hire and initiate training of local citizens to serve as Community Environmental Monitors (CEMs) in designated communities. (4) Provide relevant training by qualified instructors to the CEMs as necessary. (5) Assist and manage CEMs in accomplishing their duties, and ensure that contracts and paychecks are issued on schedule. (6) Provide CEMs and Emeriti monthly materials to facilitate public awareness. This project explores how those objectives evolved over time with changes in the nuclear testing program. How similar are today's objectives to those originally established for the program? Do those objectives reflect a changing political landscape as well as changes in testing needs? Those questions and more will be addressed as we follow the program from its inception, through earlier versions administered first by the Public Health Service (PHS), then by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the current administrator, the Desert Research Institute (DRI).

Susan DeSilva

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Extended Community: An Oral History of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), 1989 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

Studying the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) provides a unique opportunity to trace a concept created by two nuclear industry originators from inception, as it transitioned through several stewardship agencies, to management by a non-profit organization. This transition is informed not only by changes over two decades in the views of the general populace toward nuclear testing but also by changing political climates and public policies. Several parallel histories accompanied the development of the CEMP: an administrative history, an environmental history, and a history of changing public perception of not only nuclear testing, but other activities involving radiation such as waste transportation, as well. Although vital, those histories will be provided only as background to the subject of this study, the oral histories gathered in this project. The oral histories collected open a window into the nuclear testing history of Nevada and Utah that has not heretofore been opened. The nuclear industry has generated a great deal of positive and negative reaction since its inception. The CEMP emerged with specific objectives. It was designed to provide information to potential downwind communities and counter negative perceptions by creating more community involvement and education about the testing. The current objectives of the program are to: (1) Manage and maintain the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) offsite monitoring program including 26 radiation and environmental monitoring stations with associated equipment. Provide air sample collection and analysis, radiological and meteorological data collection, interpretation and reporting. (2) Facilitate independent operation of radiological monitoring stations and data verification by private citizens living in communities in proximity to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). (3) Hire and initiate training of local citizens to serve as Community Environmental Monitors (CEMs) in designated communities. (4) Provide relevant training by qualified instructors to the CEMs as necessary. (5) Assist and manage CEMs in accomplishing their duties, and ensure that contracts and paychecks are issued on schedule. (6) Provide CEMs and Emeriti monthly materials to facilitate public awareness. This project explores how those objectives evolved over time with changes in the nuclear testing program. How similar are today's objectives to those originally established for the program? Do those objectives reflect a changing political landscape as well as changes in testing needs? Those questions and more will be addressed as we follow the program from its inception, through earlier versions administered first by the Public Health Service (PHS), then by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the current administrator, the Desert Research Institute (DRI).

Susan DeSilva

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Long-Term Environmental Monitoring of an Operating Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present energy dilemma in which we find ourselves, the magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. Nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution. One often-cited strategic hurdle to the commercial production of nuclear energy is the apparent lack of an acceptable nuclear waste repository. This issue has been quietly addressed at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP; see http://www.wipp.energy.gov), the closest population center of significant size being Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP has been operating for about nine years, disposing of over 250,000 drum-equivalents of nuclear waste. From the standpoint of addressing operational and environmental risk, as well as public fear, WIPP has had extensive human health and environmental monitoring. The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center is in the Institute for Energy and the Environment, in the College of Engineering at New Mexico State University. Located in Carlsbad, NM, CEMRC has been the independent monitoring facility for the area around WIPP from 1993 to the present, i.e., from six years before disposal operations began to nine years of waste disposal operations (www.cemcr.org). Based on the radiological analyses of monitoring samples completed to date for area residents and site workers, and for selected aerosols, soils, sediments, drinking water and surface waters, there is no evidence of increases in radiological contaminants in the region of WIPP that could be attributed to releases from WIPP. Levels of radiological and non-radiological analytes measured since operations began in 1999 have been within the range of baseline levels measured previously, and are within the ranges measured by other entities at the State and local levels since well before disposal phase operations began in 1999. (authors)

Conca, J.; Kirchner, Th.; Monk, J.; Sage, S. [Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, IEE NMSU, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) currently supports an effort to understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. Geologists, hydrologists, physicists and computer scientists are working together to create models of existing contaminated sites and to simulate their behavior. Simulation results are verified based on historical data and extrapolated into the future. Visualization is used for model setup verification, visual analysis of high-performance computing simulation results, and uncertainty quantification. This article describes the challenges and solutions for visual data analysis, which impacts the decision-making process for each of the contaminated sites. Lessons learned from these simulations will also have an impact on deciding on treatment measures for other, similarly contaminated areas, including those affected by more recent events, such as Chernobyl and Fukushima.

Meyer, Joerg; Bethel, E. Wes; Horsman, Jennifer L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Krishnan, Hari; Romosan, Alex; Keating, Elizabeth; Monroe, Laura M.; Strelitz, Richard; Moore, Philip; Taylor, Glenn; Torkian, Ben; Johnson, Timothy C.; Gorton, Ian

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F. (EDITED BY BOND,P.D.)

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ETV Joint Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: Continuous Emission Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations; with stakeholder groups that consist of buyers, vendor organizations, and permitters; and with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center, one of six technology centers under ETV, is operated by Battelle in cooperation with EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory. The AMS Center has recently evaluated the performance of continuous emission monitors used to measure mercury in flue gases. This

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ETV Joint Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: Continuous Emission Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations; with stakeholder groups that consist of buyers, vendor organizations, and permitters; and with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center, one of six technology centers under ETV, is operated by Battelle in cooperation with EPAs National Exposure Research Laboratory. The AMS Center has recently evaluated the performance of continuous emission monitors used to measure mercury in flue gases. This verification

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. These data were collected by implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension, dated August 1988. This document is the fifth EMP status report to be published and presents the data generated during November and December 1990, and January 1991. These reports review a three or four month period and have been published since the project's start in October 1989. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). 5 figs., 12 tabs.

White, T.; Contos, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

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241

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report - calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1995 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water,groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems  

SciTech Connect

Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

Robert Paul Breckenridge

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Position paper: Selecting among five common modelling approaches for integrated environmental assessment and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation of effective environmental policies need to be informed by a holistic understanding of the system processes (biophysical, social and economic), their complex interactions, and how they respond to various changes. Models, ... Keywords: Agent-based model, Bayesian network, Coupled component model, Integrated assessment, Knowledge-based model, System dynamics

Rebecca A. Kelly (Letcher), Anthony J. Jakeman, Olivier Barreteau, Mark E. Borsuk, Sondoss Elsawah, Serena H. Hamilton, Hans JRgen Henriksen, Sakari Kuikka, Holger R. Maier, Andrea Emilio Rizzoli, Hedwig Van Delden, Alexey A. Voinov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Integration of GPS, accelerometer and optical fiber sensors for structural deformation monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Telecommunications. Her current research interests are the integration of RTK-GPS, accelerometer, and optical fiber sensors, and digital signal processing. Monitoring the response of structures, especially tall buildings, under severe loading conditions is an important requirement for the validation of their design and construction, as well as being a maintenance concern. Traditionally such response has been measured using accelerometers. However it is impossible to measure the static or quasi-static components of movement with such sensors. An integrated system comprising RTK-GPS, accelerometer, and optical fiber sensors has been proposed for monitoring structural deformation, with the objective being to assess the integrity of structures. The GPS and accelerometer sensors have been installed on a 108m tall steel tower in Tokyo, together with other sensors such as anemometer and strain gauge. In this paper the seismic and wind-induced responses of the tower are analysed using Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the GPS and accelerometer measurements. Then the correlated signals are extracted by a digital filtering technique. The filtered data sets are also converted to displacement (in the case of accelerometer) and acceleration (in the case of GPS) through double integration and double differentiation respectively, for the purpose of direct comparison. The results agree with each other very well, except that the static component is missing from the accelerometer derived results. Meanwhile, extensive indoor experiments have been conducted to test optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the measurement of distributed strain.

Xiaojing Li

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Strategy and Case Study Example for Designing and Implementing Environmental Long-Term Monitoring at Legacy Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring objectives of site owners, regulators, consultants, and scientists typically share the common elements of (1) cost management, (2) risk management, and (3) information management (Figure 1). Many site owners focus on minimizing monitoring costs while regulators typically focus on risk and regulatory compliance. Scientists and consultants typically provide information management in the form of spreadsheets with extracted information provided in reports to other users. This common piecemeal approach upon individual focus on elements of the monitoring objectives, rather than the common objective of minimizing cost and risk using site information, results in missed opportunities for cost savings, environmental protection, and improved understanding of site performance.

Earl D. Mattson; Roelof J. Versteeg; Mark Ankeny; Gail Heath; Alex Richardson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institutes Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

253

Environmental monitoring for the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this environmental monitoring report are to provide a brief conceptual and historical summary of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project, a brief overview of the environmental monitoring responsibilities and activities of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, and descriptions of the studies, problems, and results obtained from the various monitoring programs. Included are descriptions of the work that has been done in three major monitoring areas: (1) water quality, both surface and subsurface; (2) seismicity, with a discussion of the monitoring strategy of regional, local, and close-in detection networks; and (3) climatology. The purpose of these programs is to record baseline data, define potential effects from the project activities, and determine and record any impacts that may occur.

Pettitt, R.A. (comp.)

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Perkins, C.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Issues and methods in incorporating environmental externalities into the integrated resource planning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a review of current practices and policies in considering environmental externalities in the integrated resource planning and performance based regulation (IRP/PBR) process. The following issues are presented and examined: What are the pros and cons of treating environmental externalities in the IRP process? How are potential future environmental regulations being treated? Are externalities being qualitatively or quantitatively considered, or monetized? Are offsets being allowed? How are externality policies being coordinated among different levels and branches of governments? Should environmental externalities be considered in dispatching a utility`s existing resources? What are the procedures for addressing uncertainty in incorporating environmental externalities into IRP? How are externalities valued? What are other approaches to addressing environmental externalities. This report describes seven major approaches for addressing environmental externalities in the IRP process: qualitative treatment, weighting and ranking, cost of control, damage function, percentage adders, monetization by emission, and multiattribute trade-off analysis. The discussion includes a taxonomy of the full range of alternative methods for addressing environmental externalities, a summary of state PUC actions, the role of state laws, the debate on environmental adders, and the choice of methodologies. In addition, this report characterizes the interests of stakeholders such as the electric industry, fuel suppliers, energy consumers, governmental agencies, public interest groups, consultants, and others. It appears that the views, positions, and interests of these stakeholders are affected by their perceptions of the potential impacts on their economic interests or the viability of their position on environmental policy, by the societal perspective they take, and by the orientation of the analysts toward market competition and their respective accumulated expertise.

Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Tool life monitoring using coefficient of integrated Kurtosis-based algorithm for Z-filter (I-kaz) technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new statistical-based method of tool life monitoring for turning process, called Integrated Kurtosis-based Algorithm for Z-filter Technique, I-kaz, which was based on statistical analysis. The I-kaz method calculates the related ... Keywords: I-kaz, flank wear, machining condition monitoring, tool life, turning, ultrasonic

M. Z. Nuawi; M. J. M. Nor; F. Lamin; S. Abdullah; C. K. E. Nizwan

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Screw Trap, 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2006 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 37,938 fish from 15 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 15% of fish enumerated followed by rainbow trout (10%) and mountain whitefish (7%). Day surveys were conducted during the summer period 2007 (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2007 (October) surveys. The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) program from August through November of 2007. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 999 wild Oncorhynchus mykiss and 5,107 wild run O. tshawytscha were PIT tagged during the study period. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 22.3% for juvenile O. tshawytscha and 9.0% for juvenile O. mykiss. Rotary screw traps operated 7 days a week and remote capture operations were conducted when flow and temperature regimes permitted. This is third annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

Nelle, R.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

Terraqua, Inc. (Wauconda, WA)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Environmental Justice | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Selected documents on the topic of Environmental Justice under NEPA. May 1, 2008 Environmental Justice Strategy In response to Executive Order 12898, DOE prepared and issued its Environmental Justice Strategy in 1995. Since then, the agency has conducted a series of activities to implement the Strategy. Both the Executive Order and the Strategy require that DOE establish and maintain an integrated approach for identifying, tracking, and monitoring environmental justice across the Department. July 1, 1999 Final Guidance for Consideration of Environmental Justice in Clean Air Act 309 Reviews This Environmental Protection Agency document provides guidance on reviewing and commenting on other federal agencies NEPA documents to help

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary S-1 Summary S-1 Summary In this Summary: * Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary covers the major points of the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project includes constructing a new double-circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in northern Sherman County, Oregon. The new line would connect the Klondike III Wind Project and the Biglow Canyon Wind Farm to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. The project would also require expansion of BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation and a new 230-kV substation to integrate the two wind projects. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act

262

Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test wells in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles. 2 figs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test well in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles.

Groat, C.; Stevenson, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of changing global markets for natural gas liquids (NGL) with the simultaneous increase in global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has stimulated an interest in the integration of NGL recovery technology with LNG liquefaction technologies. Historically, the removal of heavy or high-freezing-point hydrocarbons from the feed to LNG plants has been characterized as gas conditioning and achieved using one or more distillation columns. While some attempts to provide reflux to the distillation columns marginally enhanced NGL recovery, little emphasis was placed on maximizing NGL recovery as a product from the LNG process. As such, the integration of the two processes was not a priority. Integrating state-of-the art NGL recovery technology within the CoP LNGSM Process1, formerly the Phillips Optimized Cascade LNG Process, results in a significant reduction in the specific power required to produce LNG, while maximizing NGL recovery. This corresponds to a production increase in both LNG and NGL for comparable compression schemes as compared to stand-alone LNG liquefaction and NGL extraction facilities. In addition, there are potential enhancements to the overall facility availability and project economics and environmental impacts using the integrated concept. This integrated concept has been applied to three ongoing international NGL/LNG projects using the CoP LNG Process in Iran LNG project. In this respect, simulation has been performed in THERMOFLEX software. Moreover, thermo economic analysis has been applied for economic and thermodynamic analysis of base and integrated cases through computer code has been provided here. Finally, the base and integrated case have been evaluated and comprised in view of thermodynamics, economics and environmental impacts.

Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys, 2006-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 11 sites during the summer 2006 survey period and at 15 sites during fall 2006 and winter 2007 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 39,898 fish from 14 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 19% of fish enumerated followed by mountain whitefish (18%) and rainbow trout (14%). Day and night surveys were conducted during the summer 2006 period (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2006 (October) and winter 2007 (February/March) surveys. This is second annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

Nelle, R.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental surveillance and natural resource monitoring at the DOE Pantex plant  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pantex plant is located on the Southern High Plains of the Texas Panhandle. Principal plant activities include the assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons; surveillance, storage, maintenance, repair, and nonexplosive testing of nuclear weapons components; manufacturing of chemical explosive components; and environmental restoration. Environmental monitoring has been conducted for more than 25 yr to assess potential impacts of facility operations on air, surface and ground waters, soils, vegetation, and wildlife. Measured concentrations of airborne radionuclides and nonradiological constituents around the plant perimeter are in compliance with applicable regulations. Concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from both on-site and off-site locations are typical of those attributable to naturally occurring radioactivity and to worldwide fallout. The calculated dose potentially received by a maximally exposed individual in 1997 was 0.000034 mSv (0.0034 mrem). No contamination directly attributable to Pantex operations has been found in the Ogallala aquifer beneath the plant nor downgradient in the well field operated by the city of Amarillo. Some nonradiological contaminants have been found in the perched aquifer beneath the plant and off-site to the southeast. The extent of contamination is being investigated and the problem remediated.

Gray, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States); McGrath, D.A. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and detection of leakage and seepage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the near-surface environment is needed to ensure the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration. Large leakage fluxes, e.g., through leaking wells, will be easier to detect and monitor than slow and diffuse leakage and seepage. The challenge of detecting slow leakage and seepage is discerning a leakage or seepage signal from within the natural background variations in CO{sub 2} concentration and flux that are controlled by a variety of coupled processes in soil. Although there are no direct examples of leaking geologic carbon sequestration sites on which to base a proposed verification approach, we have been guided by our prior simulation studies of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage, which showed that large CO{sub 2} concentrations can develop in the shallow subsurface even for relatively small CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. A variety of monitoring technologies exists for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration and flux, but there is a gap between instrument performance and the detection of a leakage or seepage signal from within large natural background variability. We propose an integrated approach to monitoring and verification. The first part of our proposed approach is to characterize and understand the natural ecosystem before CO{sub 2} injection occurs so that future anomalies can be recognized. Measurements of natural CO{sub 2} fluxes using accumulation chamber (AC) and eddy correlation (EC) approaches, soil CO{sub 2} concentration profiles with depth, and carbon isotope compositions of CO{sub 2} are needed to characterize the natural state of the system prior to CO{sub 2} injection. From this information, modeling needs to be carried out to enhance understanding of carbon sources and sinks so that anomalies can be recognized and subject to closer scrutiny as potential leakage or seepage signals. Long-term monitoring using AC, EC, and soil-gas analyses along with ecosystem and flow and transport modeling should continue after CO{sub 2} injection. The integrated use of multiple measurements and modeling offers a promising approach to discerning and quantifying a small CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal from within the expected background variability.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Environmental monitoring for detection of uranium enrichment operations: Comparison of LEU and HEU facilities  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an ambitious program of worldwide field trials to evaluate the utility of environmental monitoring for safeguards. Part of this program involved two extensive United States field trials conducted at the large uranium enrichment facilities. The Paducah operation involves a large low-enriched uranium (LEU) gaseous diffusion plant while the Portsmouth facilities include a large gaseous diffusion plant that has produced both LEU and high-enriched uranium (HEU) as well as an LEU centrifuge facility. As a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, management of the uranium enrichment operations was assumed by the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The facilities are operated under contract by Martin Marietta Utility Services. Martin Marietta Energy Systems manages the environmental restoration and waste management programs at Portsmouth and Paducah for DOE. These field trials were conducted. Samples included swipes from inside and outside process buildings, vegetation and soil samples taken from locations up to 8 km from main sites, and hydrologic samples taken on the sites and at varying distances from the sites. Analytical results from bulk analysis were obtained using high abundance sensitivity thermal ionization mm spectrometers (TIMS). Uranium isotopics altered from the normal background percentages were found for all the sample types listed above, even on vegetation 5 km from one of the enrichment facilities. The results from these field trials demonstrate that dilution by natural background uranium does not remove from environmental samples the distinctive signatures that are characteristic of enrichment operations. Data from swipe samples taken within the enrichment facilities were particularly revealing. Particulate analysis of these swipes provided a detailed ``history`` of both facilities, including the assays of the end product and tails for both facilities.

Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Carter, J.A.; Ross, H.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies. Finally, the CEMP provides training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs, which help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

T. Hartwell

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Integrated ground-based and remotely sensed data to support global studies of environmental change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data centers routinely archive and distribute large databases of high quality and with rigorous documentation but, to meet the needs of global studies effectively and efficiently, data centers must go beyond these traditional roles. Global studies of environmental change require integrated databases of multiple data types that are accurately coordinated in terms of spatial, temporal and thematic properties. Such datasets must be designed and developed jointly by scientific researchers, computer specialists, and policy analysts. The presentation focuses on our approach for organizing data from ground-based research programs so that the data can be linked with remotely sensed data and other map data into integrated databases with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to global studies. The development of an integrated database for Net Primary Productivity is described to illustrate the process.

Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Garten, C.T.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young-Rainey STAR Center, October through December 2002  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7500 7500 GJO-2003-409-TAC GJO-PIN 11.6.2 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057500 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January 2003 Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ..........................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

274

Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The abundance of coal in the United States makes it one of our Nation's most important strategic resources in building a secure energy future. With today's prices and technology, recoverable reserves located in the United States could supply the Nation's coal consumption for approximately 250 years at current usage rates. However, if coal is to reach its full potential as an environmentally acceptable source of energy, an expanded menu of advanced clean coal technologies must be developed to provide substantially improved options both for the consumer and private industry. Before any technology can be seriously considered for commercialization, it must be demonstrated at a sufficiently large-scale to develop industry confidence in its technical and economic feasibility. The implementation of a federal technology demonstration program is the established means of accelerating the development of technology to meet national energy strategy and environmental policy goals, to reduce the risk to human health and the environment to an acceptable level, to accelerate commercialization, and to provide the incentives required for continued activity in research and development directed at providing solutions to long-range energy problems. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

N /A

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Proceedings of the 24th Seismic Research Review: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Innovation and Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 24th Seismic Research Review: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Innovation and Integration, held 17-19 September, 2002 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Warren, N. Jill [Editor

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] 01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] COVER SHEET Title: Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0150 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Reclamation Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Written comments on this environmental impact statement (EIS) should be addressed to: For general information on the U.S. Department of Energy EIS process, contact: Mr. David Sabo Western Area Power Administration Colorado River Storage Project Customer Service Office P.O. Box 11606 Salt Lake City, Utah 84147-0606 Telephone: (801) 524-5392 Ms. Carol Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42)

278

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of the environmental management integrated baseline at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is one of many Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories that has been performing environmental cleanup and stabilization, which was accelerated upon the end of the cold war. In fact, the INEL currently receives two-thirds of its scope to perform these functions. However, the cleanup is a highly interactive system that creates an opportunity for systems engineering methodology to be employed. At the INEL, a group called EM (Environmental Management) Integration has been given this charter along with a small core of systems engineers. This paper discusses the progress to date of converting the INEL legacy system into one that uses the systems engineering discipline as the method to ensure that external requirements are met.

Murphy, J.A.; Caliva, R.M.; Wixson, J.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1, Introduction  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program at Martin Marietta, IEM (Information Engineering Methodology) was developed as part of a complete and integrated approach to the progressive development and subsequent maintenance of automated data sharing systems. This approach is centered around the organization`s objectives, inherent data relationships and business practices. IEM provides the Information Systems community with a tool kit of disciplined techniques supported by automated tools. It includes seven stages: Information Strategy Planning; Business Area Analysis; Business System Design; Technical Design; Construction; Transition; Production.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Integration report for SRC-I post-baseline environmental R and D  

SciTech Connect

The Baseline Design for the wastewater treatment/reuse and solid-waste handling and disposal systems for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was completed in 1982. Because of the ambitious construction schedule contemplated at that time, the design was not based on comprehensive design data. Consequently, since submission of the Baseline, ICRC has been generating experimental data to confirm and/or refine the Baseline Design. This report integrates all the environmental research and development (R and D) data generated during that period by many different R and D programs. 41 references, 29 figures, 32 tables.

Yen, A.F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT CENTER FOR INTEGRATED NANOTECHNOLOGIES AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES/NEW MEXICO The United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office, has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to construct and operate a CINT Core Facility and establish a Gateway to Sandia Facility. The CINT Core Facility would be constructed on a 20-acre DOE-owned parcel of land on the west side of Eubank Boulevard, north of the entrance to Kirtland Air Force Base. The Gateway to Sandia Facility would be established in existing space within the existing

284

Environmental continuous air monitor inlet with combined preseparator and virtual impactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inlet for an environmental air monitor is described wherein a pre-separator interfaces with ambient environment air and removes debris and insects commonly associated with high wind outdoors and a deflector plate in communication with incoming air from the pre-separator stage, that directs the air radially and downward uniformly into a plurality of accelerator jets located in a manifold of a virtual impactor, the manifold being cylindrical and having a top, a base, and a wall, with the plurality of accelerator jets being located in the top of the manifold and receiving the directed air and accelerating directed air, thereby creating jets of air penetrating into the manifold, where a major flow is deflected to the walls of the manifold and extracted through ports in the walls. A plurality of receiver nozzles are located in the base of the manifold coaxial with the accelerator jets, and a plurality of matching flow restrictor elements are located in the plurality of receiver nozzles for balancing and equalizing the total minor flow among all the plurality of receiver nozzles, through which a lower, fractional flow extracts large particle constituents of the air for collection on a sample filter after passing through the plurality of receiver nozzles and the plurality of matching flow restrictor elements.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Linking science with environmental decision making: Experiences from an integrated modeling approach to supporting sustainable water resources management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The call for more effective integration of science and decision making is ubiquitous in environmental management. While scientists often complain that their input is ignored by decision makers, the latter have also expressed dissatisfaction that critical ... Keywords: Decision support, Integrated modeling, Scenario analysis, Sustainability, Water resources management

Yuqiong Liu; Hoshin Gupta; Everett Springer; Thorsten Wagener

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Summary of the environmental monitoring at the Rock Springs, Wyoming Site No. 9, true in situ oil shale retorting experiment  

SciTech Connect

The environmental effects and needed control technology associated with the potential in-situ retorting of oil shale in the Green River Basin (near Rock Springs, Wyoming) has been studied for over four years. This environmental monitoring program has included previous and existing in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiments and baseline data collection for potential future retorting experiments. The most extensive environmetal monitoring effort is at Rock Springs Site No. 9, a true in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiment which was ignited April 5, 1976. The purpose of this monitoring program was to identify any significant changes in the hydrology, air quality, and soils. Data have been collected during the pre-operational (baseline) and operational phases and continues to be collected during the post-operational phase. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring conducted in support of the LETC Rock Springs No. 9 field experiment and the entire DOE oil shale program. 18 figures, 8 tables.

Virgona, J.E.; Poulson, R.E.; Spedding, T.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN AND GEOSTATISTICAL MODELING TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF CS-137 AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Cs-137 concentrations above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk-based threshold of 0.23 pCi/g may increase the risk of human mortality due to cancer. As a leader in nuclear research, the INL has been conducting nuclear activities for decades. Elevated anthropogenic radionuclide levels including Cs-137 are a result of atmospheric weapons testing, the Chernobyl accident, and nuclear activities occurring at the INL site. Therefore environmental monitoring and long-term surveillance of Cs-137 is required to evaluate risk. However, due to the large land area involved, frequent and comprehensive monitoring is limited. Developing a spatial model that predicts Cs-137 concentrations at unsampled locations will enhance the spatial characterization of Cs-137 in surface soils, provide guidance for an efficient monitoring program, and pinpoint areas requiring mitigation strategies. The predictive model presented herein is based on applied geostatistics using a Bayesian analysis of environmental characteristics across the INL site, which provides kriging spatial maps of both Cs-137 estimates and prediction errors. Comparisons are presented of two different kriging methods, showing that the use of secondary information (i.e., environmental characteristics) can provide improved prediction performance in some areas of the INL site.

Kara G. Eby

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of the integrated environmental control model. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this contract is to develop and refine the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The work in this contract is divided into two phases. Phase I deals with further developing the existing version of the IECM and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the model. Phase H deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the updated model. The present report summarizes recent progress on the Phase I effort during the period April 1, 1995 through June 30, 1995. This report presents additional revisions to the new cost models of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology initially reported in our fourth quarterly report. For convenience, the complete description of the revised FGD models are presented here.

Kalagnanam, J.R.; Rubin, E.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Department of Energy Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of software architecture for environmental monitoring using wireless sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I describe the development of the software architecture for temperature monitoring using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). The goal of the software is to provide a means to remotely monitor and analyze ...

Hari, Piyush

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

03E 03E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *Now with the California Energy Commission PIER Program, Sacramento CA. This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041.

294

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Underground reconnaissance and environmental monitoring related to geologic CO2 sequestration studies at the DUSEL Facility, Homestake Mine, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Underground field reconnaissance was carried out in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to identify potential locations for the planned geologic carbon sequestration experimental facility known as DUSEL CO{sub 2}. In addition, instrumentation for continuous environmental monitoring of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity was installed at various locations within the Homestake mine. The motivation for this work is the need to locate and design the DUSEL CO{sub 2} facility currently being planned to host CO{sub 2} and water flow and reaction experiments in long column pressure vessels over large vertical length scales. Review of existing geologic data and reconnaissance underground revealed numerous potential locations for vertical experimental flow columns, with limitations of existing vertical boreholes arising from limited vertical extent, poor continuity between drifts, and small diameter. Results from environmental monitoring over 46 days reveal spatial and temporal variations related to ventilation, weather, and ongoing dewatering of the mine.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salve, Rohit

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

OpenIR [Open Infrared] : enhancing environmental monitoring through accessible remote sensing, in Indonesia and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the human landscape changes ever more rapidly, environmental change accelerates. Much environmental information is publicly available as infrared satellite data. However, for the general user, this information is difficult ...

Ducao, Arlene (Arlene Brigoli)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In December of 2003 a large amount of water from the Santa Rosa wastewater project began being pumped to The Geysers for injection. Millions of dollars are being spent on this injection project in the anticipation that the additional fluid will not only extend the life of The Geysers but also greatly increase the net amount of energy extracted. Optimal use of the injected water, however, will require that the water be injected at the right place, in the right amount and at the proper rate. It has been shown that Microearthquake (MEQ) generation is a direct indicator of the effect of fluid injection at The Geysers (Majer and McEvilly 1979; Eberhart-Phillips and Oppenheimer 1984; Enedy et al. 1992; Stark 1992; Kirkpatrick et al. 1999; Smith et al. 2000). It is one of the few, if not only methods, practical to monitor the volumetric effect of water injection at The Geysers. At the beginning of this project there was not a detailed MEQ response, Geysers-wide, to a large influx of water such as will be the case from the Santa Rosa injection project. New technology in MEQ acquisition and analysis, while used in parts of The Geysers for short periods of time had not been applied reservoir-wide to obtain an integrated analysis of the reservoir. Also needed was a detailed correlation with the production and injection data on a site wide basis. Last but not least, needed was an assurance to the community that the induced seismicity is documented and understood such that if necessary, mitigation actions can be undertaken in a timely manner. This project was necessary not only for optimizing the heat recovery from the resource, but for assuring the community that there is no hazard associated with the increased injection activities. Therefore, the primary purpose of this project was to develop and apply high-resolution micro earthquake methodology for the entire Geysers geothermal field such that at the end of this project a monitoring and process definition methodology will be available to: (1) Optimize the economic development of The Geysers (as well as other areas) by providing improved information on fluid flow and reservoir dynamics. (2) Aid in the mitigation of environmental impacts of increased fluid injection by improving the understanding between fluid injection and seismicity. (3) Provide a cost-effective blueprint such that the technology can be applied on a routine basis in the future.

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Final Report Environmental Footprints and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, over 50 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from coal. Given that coal reserves in the U.S. are estimated to meet our energy needs over the next 250 years, coal is expected to continue to play a major role in the generation of electricity in this country. With dwindling supplies and high prices of natural gas and oil, a large proportion of the new power generation facilities built in the U.S. can be expected to use coal as the main fuel. The environmental impact of these facilities can only be minimized by innovations in technology that allow for efficient burning of coal, along with an increased capture of the air pollutants that are an inherent part of coal combustion. EPA considers integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the most promising technologies in reducing environmental consequences of generating electricity from coal. EPA has undertaken several initiatives to facilitate and incentivize development and deployment of this technology. This report is the result of one of these initiatives and it represents the combined efforts of a joint EPA/DOE team formed to advance the IGCC technology. The various offices within DOE that participated in the development/review of this report were the Office of Fossil Energy, including the Clean Coal Office and the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Pulverized Coal; Technologies Foreword

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Online Monitoring And Determination Of Environmental Dose Rate, Using Radiological Network In Albania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From May 2004, in the Institute of Nuclear Physics is installed Albanian Radiological Monitoring Network, in the framework of emergency monitoring in the territory of Albania. In this network, this is unique monitoring on-line system in our country. are included 5(five) monitoring stations, respectively in Tirane, Shkoder, Kukes, Korce and Vlore. The last four stations are near Albanian borders The network performs measures of ambient dose rate in a range from 5 nSv/h up to 10 Sv/h. For measurements are used detector of type VACUTEC 70045 A, which are calibrated in the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, University of Tirana, using standard radiation source Cs-137. This monitoring help to warn in real time the relative authorities, in case of radiological accidents of 5th degree (for example accidents in nuclear power plants, near Albanian territory).

Telhaj, Ervis [Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania); Deda, Antoneta [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Monitoring Tropical-Cyclone Intensity Using Environmental Wind Fields Derived from Short-Interval Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid-scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 have been used to derive high-resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic ...

Edward Rodgers; R. Cecil Gentry

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Final report, May--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program of ``emerging clean coal technologies`` under the categories of ``in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen`` as well as ``post-combustion clean-up.`` The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. [Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report. Second calendar quarter--1997  

SciTech Connect

The moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. This report consists of a summary of the radiological and non-radiological data collected and analyzed during the second quarter of 1997.

Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 and 2 Verification for the Environmental Restoration Contractor Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

DOE Policy 450.4 mandates that safety be integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. The goal of an institutionalized Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and the federal property over the life cycle of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The purpose of this Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) ISMS Phase MI Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes were institutionalized within the ER Project, whether these programs and processes were implemented, and whether the system had promoted the development of a safety conscious work culture.

CARTER, R.P.

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development of an Integrated Monitoring System for a New Tritium Facility at Mound  

SciTech Connect

A stand-alone system was developed for monitoring process support services and tritium levels in gloveboxes, room air, room exhaust ducts, and stack exhaust. Sixty tritium monitors were built and interfaced to a Health Physics control room where all tritiuim levels are displayed and abnormal conditions appear as alarms on large display boards. The control room was designed for full remote control of all monitors, with the exception of those for gloveboxes, as well as for control and alarm display of many other functions, including the purge rate for glovebox atmosphere and the selection of room air discharge to stack or to a tritium cleanup system. The monitoring system is interfaced to a data gathering computer and an automatic dialing alarm syhstem.

Rhinehammer, T. B.; Burgess, T. E.; Spyrou, E. L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hammons, EPA Loretta Lehrman, EPA Region 5 Dennis Mikel, EPA Will Ollison, American Petroleum Institute Blue-Green Algae for Microcystins in Freshwater Sources Monitoring Technologies for Measuring Stored) Devices at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants These are infrared cameras that allow simultaneous

317

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps,Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseiller, Tom; Cotter, Michael (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps, Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008-2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseillier, Tom; Cotter, Michael [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

An examination of extended community an oral history of the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (Cemp), 1981 - 2003  

SciTech Connect

From 2002 until 2004, on behalf of the Desert Research Institute (DRI), I conducted an oral history project that focused on the participants in the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP). In the late 1970's, Nevada scientists who participated in the response to the Three Mile Island event returned to Nevada with the idea for a program similar to one being implemented in Pennsylvania. That program directly involved local stakeholders in an independent monitoring effort. As a result, the CEMP was established in 1981, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) providing the funding and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) providing technical and scientific direction, maintaining instrumentation and sampling equipment, analyzing the collected samples, and interpreting and reporting the data. Initially, DRI was largely responsible for identifying and hiring community participants and organizing annual training workshops, later assuming complete responsibility for technical operation of the monitoring network from EPA. The goal was to establish fixed monitoring stations around Nevada, Utah and California, and directly involve stakeholders in the monitoring process. Local teachers would be recruited to receive training and maintain the stations while reporting back to their communities on the monitoring activities and any risks they, or their citizens, perceived. This active stakeholder involvement was intended to provide communities with an immediate resource for any questions or concerns related to testing. It also created a vehicle through which to educate the public about radiation and testing. In the early years of nuclear weapons testing, interactions between local residents and the government were often defined by a lack of communication and understanding. The distrust that existed between government agencies and Nevada, Utah, and California residents, was a perspective that persisted for years after the testing moratorium and continues to endure, to a lesser extent, today. It was this distrust that the Community Environmental Monitoring Program was designed to ameliorate, providing communities and ranches with impartial scientific evidence to address their many concerns. A goal of the oral history project was to gain a better understanding of the CEMP by exploring and documenting its origins and allowing the people who continue to make it a part of their lives tell their stories. Within those stories, we wanted to discover if the program established trust in Nevada, Utah and California communities and ranches; what the program meant and continues to mean to the government, state institutions and local people who participate, and why the program is unique. In order to achieve these goals, DOE funded a two year oral history project. I interviewed the program founders, DOE, EPA and DRI participants, local station managers, and many people with an interest in testing and the government response to downwind communities. This paper includes the purpose, process, and development of the oral history project; why oral history was chosen as the appropriate methodology; who was chosen for an interview and why; some of the pitfalls encountered; what lessons were learned and what value the project has to DOE and the stakeholders in local communities. (authors)

Silva, S. de [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integration plan required by performance agreement SM 7.2.1  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. and its major subcontractors are in agreement that environmental monitoring performed under the Project Hanford Management Contract is to be done in accordance with a single, integrated program. The purpose of this Integration Plan for Environmental Monitoring is to document the policies, systems, and processes being put in place to meet one key objective: manage and integrate a technically competent, multi-media ambient environmental monitoring program, in an efficient, cost effective manner. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. and its major subcontractors also commit to conducting business in a manner consistent with the International Standards Organization 14000 Environmental Management System concepts. Because the integration of sitewide groundwater monitoring activities is managed by the Environmental Restoration Contractor, groundwater monitoring it is outside the scope of this document. Therefore, for the purpose of this Integration Plan for Environmental Monitoring, the Integrated Environmental Monitoring Program is defined as applicable to all environmental media except groundwater. This document provides recommendations on future activities to better integrate the overall environmental monitoring program, with emphasis on the near-field program. In addition, included is the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. team review of the environmental monitoring activities on the Hanford Site, with concurrence of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (The narrative provided later in the Discussion Section describes the review and consideration given to each topic.) This document was developed to meet the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract performance agreement (SM7.2) and the tenets of the U.S. Department of Energy's Effluent and Environmental Monitoring Planning Process. This Plan is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Assurance, Permits, and Policy Division to complete the requirements specified in the Performance Expectation 7.2.1, within the SM7 Environmental, Safety, and Health section of the Project Hanford Management Contract.

Diediker, L.P.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

An Integrated Approach Towards Environmental Impact Assessment Of Projects And Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetary valuation of environmental impacts consist a highly complex matter. Several approaches and techniques have been employed over the last three decades in order to assess effectively environmental projects or policies, within the context of cost benefit analysis. The current paper demonstrates a concise description of the existing environmental impact appraisal methods and, simultaneously, a new combination of monetary valuation techniques applied in each potential receptor which intends to provide an innovative multiperspective assessment concerning future environmental projects. Key words: Environmental assessment, monetary valuation techniques, cost benefit analysis

Aravossis Konstantinos; Vassilios Karydis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An Integrated Development Of A Dynamic Software-Fault Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problems being solved by today's software systems are becoming more complex and are requiring the integration of knowledge from multiple domains. As a result, traditional verification and validation techniques may not be sufficient to identify the ...

A. Q. Gates; P. J. Teller

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) Joint Environmental Management System (EMS) The environmental management system (EMS) has two areas of focus: environmental compliance and environmental sustainability. The environmental compliance aspect of the EMS consists of regulatory compliance and monitoring programs that implement federal, state, local, and tribal requirements; agreements; and permits under the Legacy Management contract. The environmental sustainability aspect promotes and integrates sustainability initiatives such as energy and natural resource conservation, waste minimization, green construction, and use of eco-friendly products and services into all phases of work. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) EMS was

325

Business activity monitoring system design framework integrated with process-based performance measurement model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, strong interests in the real-time performance management are increasing to gain competitive advantages in the rapidly changing business environment. For better business performance or continuous process improvement of an enterprise, real-time ... Keywords: business activity monitoring (BAM), business performance, business process management (BPM), key performance indicator (KPI)

Kwan Hee Han; Sang Hyun Choi; Jin Gu Kang; Geon Lee

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office environmental monitoring program summary data report, first calendar quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

The continuing moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. The onsite radiological surveillance program is shown in a table, and this report gives the first quarter results for that program. During the first calendar quarter of 1997, air samples were collected and analyzed from 45 air particulate sampling stations, 3 noble gas sampling stations, and 12 tritiated water (HTO) vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from one wastewater containment pond and nine sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from ten potable supply wells, one non-potable supply well, and seven drinking water distribution end points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 168 locations.

Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Spectral imaging applications: Remote sensing, environmental monitoring, medicine, military operations, factory automation and manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the activities at OKSI related to imaging spectroscopy presenting current and future applications of the technology. The authors discuss the development of several systems including hardware, signal processing, data classification algorithms and benchmarking techniques to determine algorithm performance. Signal processing for each application is tailored by incorporating the phenomenology appropriate to the process, into the algorithms. Pixel signatures are classified using techniques such as principal component analyses, generalized eigenvalue analysis and novel very fast neural network methods. The major hyperspectral imaging systems developed at OKSI include the Intelligent Missile Seeker (IMS) demonstration project for real-time target/decoy discrimination, and the Thermal InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (TIRIS) for detection and tracking of toxic plumes and gases. In addition, systems for applications in medical photodiagnosis, manufacturing technology, and for crop monitoring are also under development.

Gat, N.; Subramanian, S. [Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (United States); Barhen, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toomarian, N. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Application of fuzzy logic for the integration of environmental criteria in ecodesign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ecodesign of a product implies that different potential environmental problems of diverse nature must be considered, apart from the general design criteria (i.e., technical, functional, ergonomic, aesthetic or economical). In this sense, an ecodesign ... Keywords: Ecodesign tool, Ecological Footprint, Environmental Risk Assessment, Fuzzy logic, Life Cycle Assessment

Marta Herva; Amaya Franco-Ura; Eugenio F. Carrasco; Enrique Roca

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Automated Monitoring and Control Using New Data Integration Paradigm Mladen Kezunovi , Tanja Djoki Tatjana Kosti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2003, Substation Committee of the IEEE Power Engineering Society [3] C.R.Ozansoy, A.Zayegh, A.Kalam, "Communications for Substation Automation and Integration", In Australasian Universities Power Engineering Substation Automation LiPing LU1,2 , GangYan LI1 , YeQiong SONG2 1 ­ School of Mechanical and Electronical

Kezunovic, Mladen

333

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A-1 A-1 APPENDIX A CONSULTATION LETTERS This appendix includes consultation/approval letters between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding threatened and endangered species, and between other state and Federal agencies as needed. Consultation Letters A-2 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-3 Consultation Letters A-4 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-5 Consultation Letters A-6 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-7 Consultation Letters A-8 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement B-1 APPENDIX B NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE

334

Genetic learning of fuzzy integrals accumulating human-reported environmental stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop models based on fuzzy integrals (both of the Choquet and Sugeno type) for accumulating annoyance by noise, odor or light caused by particular sources or activities. As underlying fuzzy measures, we have opted for k-maxitive ... Keywords: Annoyance models, Fuzzy integrals, Genetic optimization, Maxitive fuzzy measure

A. Verkeyn; D. Botteldooren; B. De Baets

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ENVIRONMENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

797 797 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR THE AGUA CALIENTE SOLAR PROJECT IN YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 November 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Executive Summary .................................................................................................................ES-1 Introduction ..........................................................................................................................ES-1 Purpose and Need ...............................................................................................................ES-1 Proposed Action and Alternatives........................................................................................ES-2

336

Environmental Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Systems Technical Assistance Tools Technical Assistance Tool: Integrating Sustainable Practices into Environmental Management Systems , November 2009...

337

Method and Apparatus for Monitoring the Integrity of a Geomembrane Liner using time Domain Reflectometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morris, John L.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method and apparatus for monitoring the integrity of a geomembrane liner using time domain reflectometry  

SciTech Connect

Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

Morrison, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

340

Integrated Omics in Systems Biology: The New Frontier for Environmental Biotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

community. Molecular Systems Biology 3:92 250M H 2 O 2 0pipelines for systems biology ? Integrated data capture,devices, chassis for synthetic biology Comparative Genomics

Hazen, Terry C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1992. Results of continuing basic environmental monitoring, January through December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents changes in the populations of plants and animals on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1992. It is part of a Department of Energy (DOE) program (Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program -- BECAMP) that also includes monitoring DOE compliance with the Endangered Species Act, the Historic Preservation Act, and the American Indian Freedom of Religion Act. Ecological studies were to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act and DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` These studies focused on the following: status of ephemeral plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of reptile and amphibian populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; trends in small mammal populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of large mammals and birds at Nevada Test Site, 1992; and status of perennial plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992.

Hunter, R.B. [comp.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Integration of project management and systems engineering: Tools for a total-cycle environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

An expedited environmental management process has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This process is one result of the Lockheed Martin commitment to the US Department of Energy to incorporate proven systems engineering practices with project management and program controls practices at the INEEL. Lockheed Martin uses a graded approach of its management, operations, and systems activities to tailor the level of control to the needs of the individual projects. The Lockheed Martin definition of systems engineering is: ``Systems Engineering is a proven discipline that defines and manages program requirements, controls risk, ensures program efficiency, supports informed decision making, and verifies that products and services meet customer needs.`` This paper discusses: the need for an expedited environmental management process; how the system was developed; what the system is; what the system does; and an overview of key components of the process.

Blacker, P.B.; Winston, R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation for Transparency in HEU Blenddown at the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) was deployed at the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) highly enriched uranium (HEU) blending facility in January and February 1999 at Novouralsk in Russia for the DOE HEU Transparency Program. The FMFM provides unattended monitoring of the fissile mass flow of the uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas in the process lines of HEU, the low enriched uranium (LEU) blend stock, and the product LEU (P-LEU) of the blending tee non-intrusively. To do this, uranium-235 (U-235) fissions are induced in the UF{sub 6} by a thermalized and modulated californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron source placed on each process line. A set of detectors, located downstream of source, measure delayed gamma rays emitted by the resulting fission fragments. The observed delay in the time correlated measurement between the source and the detector signal provides the velocity of UF{sub 6} and its amplitude is related to the U- 235 content in UF{sub 6}. An on-line computer controls the source modulator, processes the collected detector data, and displays the results. The UEIP Main and the Reserved process lines were implemented with minor modifications. The FMFM monitors the HEU blending operation by measuring UF{sub 6} flows in the process blending lines, and the traceability of the HEU flow from the blend point to the P-LEU. The detail operational characteristics of the FMFM software (FM2) and the measurement methodology used are presented.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, B.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 2, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The EMP consists of a Compliance Monitoring Sampling Program and a Supplemental monitoring Sampling Program. The Compliance Monitoring Sampling Program will be conducted during a summer and a winter Baseline periods during the Pre-Construction/Construction phases of the Project and during a summer and a winter period following the successful Startup and Operational phase of the completed Project. compliance monitoring consist of conducting all the sampling and observation programs associated with existing required Federal, State, and Local Regulations, Permits and Orders. These include air, water, and waste monitoring and OSHA and NESHAP monitoring. The Supplemental Monitoring Program will also be conducted during a summer and a winter Baseline periods during the Pre-Construction/Construction phases of the Demonstration Facility and during a summer and a winter period following the successful startup and Operational phase of the completed Facility. Supplemental Monitoring includes sampling of 27 additional streams that are important to measure operational or environmental performance and impacts of the installation of the new COG treatment facilities.

Not Available

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

Friedmann, S J

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Efficiency Projects for Office and Education Buildings Integrating Indoor Environmental Quality with Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose and Scope of this Report Many building owners and managers are under increased pressure from many circles to provide good indoor environmental quality (IEQ). There are many opportunities to advance IEQ during the course of energy projects without sacrificing energy efficiency. These opportunities

Integrating Indoor; Environmental Quality; Office Of Radiation; Indoor Air

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

348

Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1994: Results of continuing Basic Environmental Monitoring January through December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final progress report of a Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada operations Office (NV), program to monitor the ecology of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The eight-year Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program (BECAMP) included meeting goals of understanding the spatial and temporal changes of plants and animals on the NTS, and determining the effects of DOE operations on those plants and animals. Determination of the changes was addressed through monitoring the most common plant and animal species at undisturbed (baseline) plots located in the major NTS valleys and mesas. One plot in Yucca Flat, the site of most nuclear weapons tests, was monitored annually, while other baseline plots were censused on a three- or four-year cycle. Effects of DOE operations were examined at sites of major disturbances, related to both DOE operations and natural disturbance mechanisms, censused on a three-year cycle. This report concentrates on work completed in 1994.

Hunter, R.B. [comp.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

They provide a way to monitor the current energy usage.addition to monitoring the energy usage, companies provideenable summarizing the energy usage in quarterly or seasonal

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An integrated approach for techno-economic and environmental analysis of energy from biomass and fossil fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass conversion into forms of energy is receiving current attention because of environmental, energy and agricultural concerns. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the environmental, energy, economic, and technological aspects of using a form of biomass, switchgrass (panicum virgatum), as a partial or complete replacement for coal in power generation and cogeneration systems. To examine the effects of such a substitution, an environmental biocomplexity approach is used, wherein the agricultural, technological, economic, and environmental factors are addressed. In particular, lifecycle analysis (LCA) and a three-dimensional integrated economic, energy and environmental analysis is employed. The effectiveness of alternate technologies for switchgrass preparation, harvest and use in terms of greenhouse gas impact, cost and environmental implications is examined. Also, different scenarios of cofiring and biomass preparation pathways are investigated. Optimization of the total biomass power generation cost with minimum greenhouse gas effect is undertaken using mathematical programming for various alternate competitive biomass processing pathways. As a byproduct of this work a generic tool to optimize the cost and greenhouse gas emissions for allocation of fuel sources to the power generating sinks is developed. Further, this work discusses the sensitivity of the findings to varied cofiring ratios, coal prices, hauling distances, per acre yields, etc. Besides electricity generation in power plants, another viable alternative for reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) is the utilization of biomass in conjunction with combined heat and power (CHP) in the process industries. This work addresses the utilization of biowaste or biomass source in a processing facility for CHP. A systematic algebraic procedure for targeting cogeneration potential ahead of detailed power generation network design is presented. The approach presented here effectively utilizes the biomass and biowaste sources as external fuel, and matches it with the use and dispatch of fuel sources within the process, heating and non-heating steam demands, and power generation. The concept of extractable energy coupled with flow balance via cascade diagram has been used as a basis to construct this approach. The work also discusses important economic factors and environmental policies required for the cost-effective utilization of biomass for electricity generation and CHP.

Mohan, Tanya

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments Comments Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Clark County Public Library Winchester, KY Page 1 of 5 D-1 Comment No. 1 Issue Code: 11 Gasification is different from incineration. It is a better, more environmentally responsible approach to generating energy from the use of fossil fuels and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Incineration produces criteria pollutants, semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds and dioxin/furan compounds. Ash from hazardous waste incinerators is considered a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In contrast, gasification, which occurs at high temperatures and pressures, produces no air emissions, only small amounts of wastewater containing salts. Synthesis gas (syngas)

352

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on-line monitoring of small structural flaws by the use of transient and nonlinear acoustic signal analysis, and its implementation by the proper design of a piezo-electric transducer suite.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

Ruggieri, M.

2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

359

The Effect of Government Actions on Environmental Technology Innovation: Applications to the Integrated Assessment of Carbon Sequestration Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to improve the ability of integrated assessment models (IA) to incorporate changes in technology, especially environmental technologies, cost and performance over time. In this report, we present results of research that examines past experience in controlling other major power plant emissions that might serve as a reasonable guide to future rates of technological progress in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) systems. In particular, we focus on U.S. and worldwide experience with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technologies over the past 30 years, and derive empirical learning rates for these technologies. The patterns of technology innovation are captured by our analysis of patent activities and trends of cost reduction over time. Overall, we found learning rates of 11% for the capital costs of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system for SO{sub 2} control, and 13% for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO{sub x} control. We explore the key factors responsible for the observed trends, especially the development of regulatory policies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control, and their implications for environmental control technology innovation.

Rubin, E. S.; Hounshell, D. A.; Yeh, S.; Taylor, M.; Schrattenholzer, L.; Riahi, K.; Barreto, L.; Rao, S.

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] SUMMARY S.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to establish the level of its commitment (sales) of long- term firm electrical capacity and energy from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydroelectric power plants. Power generated by the SLCA/IP facilities or purchased by Western from other sources is provided to Western's customers under contracts that establish the terms for how capacity (generation capacity) and energy (quantity of electrical energy) are to be sold. The contracts also specify amounts of capacity and energy that Western agrees to offer for long-term (greater than 12 months) sale to its customers. These amounts constitute Western's

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361

Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be comprised of a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasifier to produce synthesis gas from a co-feed of coal and refuse-derived fuel pellets and a high temperature molten carbonate fuel cell. The facility would be powered by the synthesis gas feed. The proposed project would consist of the following major components: (1) refuse-derived fuel pellets and coal receipt and storage facilities; (2) a gasification plant; (3) sulfur removal and recovery facilities; (4) an air separation plant; (5) a high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell; and (6) two combined cycle generation units. The IGCC facility would be built to provide needed power capacity to central and eastern Kentucky. At a minimum, 50 percent of the high sulfur coal used would be from the Kentucky region. Two No Action Alternatives are analyzed in the DEIS. Under the No Action Alternative 1, DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of the proposed facility and no new facility would be built. Under the No Action Alternative 2, DOE would not provide any funding and, instead of the proposed demonstration project, Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Global Energy, Inc., would construct and operate, a 540 megawatt natural gas-fired power station. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

N /A

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

A contractor report to the Department of Energy on environmental management baseline programs and integration opportunities (discussion draft)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) chartered a government contractor led effort to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives which meet the EM mission. The contractor team was challenged to ``think outside-the-box`` for solutions that cross traditional site boundaries and enable the programs to get the job done at an earlier date and at a lower cost. This report documents baseline programs current plans for material disposition and presents the opportunities for additional acceleration of cleanup and cost savings. A graphical depiction of the disposition of EM-owned waste and material from current state to final disposition is shown as disposition maps in Attachments 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. These disposition maps detail the material disposition at eleven major DOE sites as planned in the current discussion draft plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Maps reflecting material disposition at additional sites will be added in the future. Opportunities to further accelerate the cleanup of DOE-EM sites and reduce the overall cost of cleanup are depicted in the alternative disposition maps shown in Attachments 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. These integration opportunities bring nation-wide resources to bear on common problems facing the DOE sites.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Integrating removal actions and remedial actions: Soil and debris management at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

Since 1991, excess soil and debris generated at the Fernald Environmental management Project (FEMP) have been managed in accordance with the principles contained in a programmatic Removal Action (RvA) Work Plan (WP). This plan provides a sitewide management concept and implementation strategy for improved storage and management of excess soil and debris over the period required to design and construct improved storage facilities. These management principles, however, are no longer consistent with the directions in approved and draft Records of Decision (RODs) and anticipated in draft RODs other decision documents. A new approach has been taken to foster improved management techniques for soil and debris that can be readily incorporated into remedial design/remedial action plans. Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This paper describes the methods that were applied to address the issues associated with keeping the components of the new work plan field implementable and flexible; this is especially important as remedial design is either in its initial stages or has not been started and final remediation options could not be precluded.

Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Strimbu, M.J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Taylor, A.C.; Weese, T.E. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yerace, P.J. [USDOE Fernald Area Office, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral for the {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er reaction by using a {sup 55}Mn monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal neutron cross section and the resonance integral of the reaction {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er were measured by the Cd-ratio method using a {sup 55}Mn monitor as single comparator. Analytical grade MnO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples with and without a cylindrical 1 mm Cd shield box were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field obtained from three {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The induced activities in the samples were measured with a 120.8% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector. The correction factors for gamma-ray attenuation (F{sub g}), thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), and resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ({alpha}) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross section for the (n,{gamma}) reaction in {sup 170}Er has been determined to be 8.00 {+-} 0.56 b, relative to that of the {sup 55}Mn monitor. However, some previously reported experimental results compared to the present result show a large discrepancy ranging from 8.3 to 86%. The present result is, in general, in good agreement with the recently measured values by 9%. According to the definition of Cd cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the resonance integral obtained is 44.5 {+-} 4.0 b, which is determined relative to the reference integral value of the {sup 55}Mn monitor by using cadmium ratios. The existing experimental data for the resonance integral are distributed between 18 and 43 b. The present resonance integral value agrees only with the measurement of 43 {+-} 5 b by Gillette [Thermal Cross Section and Resonance Integral Studies, ORNL-4155, 15 (1967)] within uncertainty limits.

Yuecel, Haluk [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK), Besevler Campus, 06100 Tandogan-Ankara (Turkey); Budak, M. Gueray; Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar-Ankara (Turkey)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

368

Integrated High Resolution Microearthquake Analysis and Monitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induced seismicity at The Geysers steam reservoir, NorthernMonitoring for Optimizing Steam Production at The Geysersgas concentrations in steam produced from The Geysers,

Majer, Ernest; Peterson, John; Stark, Mitch; Smith, Bill; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kennedy, Mack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Rock Creek Reserve Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) with the assistance and cooperation of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service, prepared an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan)(DOE/EA-1371) for the Rock Creek Reserve at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) located north of Golden, Colorado. The Rock Creek Reserve was established in May 1999 in recognition of the area's biological significance. Although still under the ownership of the DOE, the Rock Creek Reserve will be co- managed with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of an interagency agreement signed by these two

370

Environmental Management Education Program: Building Environmental Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

The BES program enhanced the capability to integrate environmental sustainability concepts and social justice into multi-dimensional curricula.

Chulock, Hilary N.

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Guide for monitoring equipment environments during nuclear plant operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide is intended to assist utilities in formulating and implementing improved monitoring programs by providing guidance on why, where and how to track environmental conditions such as temperature, radiation, and humidity for equipment in nuclear power plants during operation. The guide describes steps for implementing programs. It also gives advantages, disadvantages and costs for a variety of monitoring methods and devices such as sensors with recording devices, thermographic surveys, and passive thermal and radiation integrating devices. The guide also contains twenty technical papers presented at an environmental monitoring workshop covering the subjects of plant experience with elevated temperatures, plant environmental monitoring programs, and techniques for monitoring temperature and radiation. These individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Danahy, J.W.; Evans, R.W. (Grove Engineering, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EPD Home Staff List (pdf) Org Chart (pdf) Compliance / Permits Programs Other Information Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Site Environmental Reports Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Spill Response BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Developing Environmental Products and Services for Brookhaven Stakeholders The Environmental Protection Division (EPD) develops and delivers environmental products and services for all Brookhaven stakeholders. We manage environmental programs such as pollution prevention, groundwater protection, and natural resource management; provide technical assistance on environmental requirements; maintain the Laboratory's IS0 14001-registered Environmental Management System; prepare environmental permit applications; conduct environmental monitoring; manage data

377

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Micro-power EEG acquisition SoC with integrated seizure detection processor for continuous patient monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous on-scalp EEG monitoring provides a non-invasive means to detect the onset of seizures in epilepsy patients, but cables from the scalp pose a severe strangulation hazard during convulsions. Since the power of ...

Verma, Naveen

379

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment (2006) 116: 513528 DOI: 10.1007/s10661-006-7668-4 c Springer 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the toxicity of heavy metals upon their chemical forms had led to an increasing interest in the qualitative characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) developed by US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) was usually used changewhichisestimatedbyTCLPinthebatchexperimentandthecolumntest.The #12;522 G.L. GUO ET AL. progressive of TCLP

Ma, Lena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated environmental monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program, Entiat River Status and Trend Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Smolt Trap Operations in Nason Creek, March 2007 through March 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP-BPA project No.2003-0017) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance; and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captured i

Collins, Matthew; Jorgensen, John; Murdock, Keely

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Fine Sediment in Spawning Gravel within the Entiat River Subbasin : July 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance; and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Expansion of Existing Smolt Trapping Program and Steelhead Spawner Surveys : March 1st, 2008 - February 28th, 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-0017) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and; (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g., Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Miller, Todd; Tonseth, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

The integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : U.S. Forest Service Fish Abundance and Steelhead Redd Surveys Annual Report : January 1 - December 31, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract report is one of a series of reports that document implementation components of the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) funded project: Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00, Chris Jordan, NOAA-NWFSC project sponsor). Other components of the project are separately reported, as explained below. The ISEMP project has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical data management, communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonids populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, ISEMP has adopted an approach to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot areas, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ES

Call, Justin

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of battery power and solar power, and the solar panelThe production of the solar power is quickly disrupted whenthe irradiance. If the solar power were to be an integral

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electronic-nose for detecting environmental pollutants: signal processing and analog front-end design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring relies on compact, portable sensor systems capable of detecting pollutants in real-time. An integrated chemical sensor array system is developed for detection and identification of environmental pollutants in diesel and gasoline ... Keywords: ADC, Analog front end, Chopper stabilization, Electronic nose, Feature extraction, Gas sensors

Hyuntae Kim; Bharatan Konnanath; Prasanna Sattigeri; Joseph Wang; Ashok Mulchandani; Nosang Myung; Marc A. Deshusses; Andreas Spanias; Bertan Bakkaloglu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Parameters used in the environmental pathways and radiological dose modules (DESCARTES, CIDER, and CRD codes) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site during the period of 1944 to 1992. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

NONE

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Turmoil in U.S. Coal Markets: Integrating Pressures from Environmental Regulations, Renewables, Natural Gas and Globalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. coal markets are changing due to intensifying domestic and international forces. This report reviews the extent of these changes, examines recent trends in supply and demand for coals from each major U.S. coal-producing region, and delineates the principal forces of change and their impacts now and in the future. The report quantifies changes due to environmental regulations, coal plant retirements, and power plant installation environmental controls that reduce the need for the lowest sulfur coals....

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Monitoring the Long-Term Effectiveness of Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Implementation Through Use of a Performance Dashboard Process  

SciTech Connect

This session will examine a method developed by Federal and Contractor personnel at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) to examine long-term maintenance of DOE Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) criteria, including safety culture attributes, as well as identification of process improvement opportunities. This process was initially developed in the summer of 2000 and has since been expanded to recognize the importance of safety culture attributes, and associated safety culture elements, as defined in DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual. This process has proven to significantly enhance collective awareness of the importance of long-term ISMS implementation as well as support commitments by NNSA/NSO personnel to examine the continued effectiveness of ISMS processes.

Michael D. Kinney and William D. Barrick

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integrated sensing platform and method for improved quantitative and selective monitoring of chemical analytes in both liquid and gas phase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By measuring two or more physical parameters of a thin sensing film which are altered when exposed to chemicals, more effective discrimination between chemicals can be achieved. In using more than one sensor, the sensors are preferably integrated on the same substrate so that they may measure the same thin film. Even more preferably, the sensors are provided orthogonal to one another so that they may measure the same portion of the thin film. These provisions reduce problems in discrimination arising from variations in thin films.

Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management program for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics discussed include: site background, climate, and operations; environmental compliance strategies; effluent monitoring; environmental management program including environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, technology development, and public involvement; effluent monitoring of airborne discharges, liquid discharges, toxicity control and monitoring, biological monitoring and abatement; environmental surveillance which encompasses meteorological monitoring, ambient air monitoring, surface water monitoring, soils monitoring, sediment monitoring, and contamination of food stuffs monitoring; radiation doses; chemical exposures; ground water monitoring; and quality assurance.

Koncinski, W.S. [ed.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

INEL Geothermal Environmental Program. Final environmental report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of environmental monitoring programs and research during development of a moderate temperature geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley is presented.