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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

2

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wabash River coal gasification repowering project: Public design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (the Project), conceived in October of 1990 and selected by the US Department of Energy as a Clean Coal IV demonstration project in September 1991, is expected to begin commercial operations in August of 1995. The Participants, Destec Energy, Inc., (Destec) of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc., (PSI) of Plainfield, Indiana, formed the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (the JV) to participate in the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program by demonstrating the coal gasification repowering of an existing 1950`s vintage generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The Participants, acting through the JV, signed the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE in July 1992. The Participants jointly developed, and separately designed, constructed, own, and will operate an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (CGCC) power plant using Destec`s coal gasification technology to repower Unit {number_sign}1 at PSI`s Wabash River Generating Station located in Terre Haute, Indiana. PSI is responsible for the new power generation facilities and modification of the existing unit, while Destec is responsible for the coal gasification plant. The Project demonstrates integration of the pre-existing steam turbine generator, auxiliaries, and coal handling facilities with a new combustion turbine generator/heat recovery steam generator tandem and the coal gasification facilities.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Combined Air Sparge and Bioremediation of an Underground Coal Gasification Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EG&G Technical Services of West Virginia (TSWV) Inc. is successfully remediating a former underground coal gasification (UCG) test site in northeastern Wyoming. EG&G is demonstrating the effectiveness of combined air sparge and biostimulation technology. This project is being conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE ) - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), the lease holder of the site. UCG testing from 1976 through 1979 contaminated three water-bearing units at the site with benzene. Previous pump and treat operations at the site showed the presence of a persistent non-dissolved benzene source material. The Felix I coal seam is the most contaminated unit at the site and was the target unit for the initial demonstration. Air sparging was selected to strip dissolved benzene, volatilize the non- dissolved benzene source material, and to provide oxygen for increasing aerobic bacteria populations. Indigenous bacteria populations were stimulated with ammonium phosphate addition. EG&G designed the remediation system to take advantage of the hydrogeologic environment to produce a cost-effective approach to the groundwater remediation. Groundwater pumping was used to manipulate subsurface air flow, nutrient transport, and biomass management. Demonstration operations began on September 29, 1995, and were suspended on April 30, 1996 to begin demonstration expansion. Initial results of the demonstration show substantial reduction in benzene concentrations across the demonstration area. Benzene concentration reductions greater than 80% were observed two months after demonstration operations were suspended.

Covell, J.R.; Thomas, M.H.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Autothermal coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test data from the Ruhrchemie/Ruhrkohle Texaco coal gasification demonstration plant at Oberhausen are reported. (5 refs.)

Konkol. W.; Ruprecht, P.; Cornils, B.; Duerrfeld, R.; Langhoff, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

NONE

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. Topical report, July 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (WRCGRP, or Wabash Project) is a joint venture of Destec Energy, Inc. of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc. of Plainfield, Indiana, who will jointly repower an existing 1950 vintage coal-fired steam generating plant with coal gasification combined cycle technology. The Project is located in West Terre Haute, Indiana at PSI`s existing Wabash River Generating Station. The Project will process locally-mined Indiana high-sulfur coal to produce 262 megawatts of electricity. PSI and Destec are participating in the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments. As a Clean Coal Round IV selection, the project will demonstrate integration of an existing PSI steam turbine generator and auxiliaries, a new combustion turbine generator, heat recovery steam generator tandem, and a coal gasification facility to achieve improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and reduced installation costs. Upon completion in 1995, the Project will not only represent the largest coal gasification combined cycle power plant in the United States, but will also emit lower emissions than other high sulfur coal-fired power plants and will result in a heat rate improvement of approximately 20% over the existing plant configuration. As of the end of December 1993, construction work is approximately 20% complete for the gasification portion of the Project and 25% complete for the power generation portion.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Autothermal coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents test results of a pilot plant study of coal gasification system based on the process developed by Texaco. This process has been improved by the project partners Ruhrchenie A.G. and Ruhrkohle A.C. in West Germany and tested in a demonstration plant that operated for more than 10,000 hours, converting over 50,000 tons of coal into gas. The aim was to develop a process that would be sufficiently flexible when used at the commercial level to incorporate all of the advantages inherent in the diverse processes of the 'first generation' - fixed bed, fluidized bed and entrained bed processes - but would be free of the disadvantages of these processes. Extensive test results are tabulated and evaluated. Forecast for future development is included. 5 refs.

Konkol, W.; Ruprecht, P.; Cornils, B.; Duerrfeld, R.; Langhoff, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Beluga Coal Gasification - ISER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ISER was requested to conduct an economic analysis of a possible 'Cook Inlet Syngas Pipeline'. The economic analysis was incorporated as section 7.4 of the larger report titled: 'Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study, DOE/NETL-2006/1248, Phase 2 Final Report, October 2006, for Subtask 41817.333.01.01'. The pipeline would carry CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} from a synthetic gas plant on the western side of Cook Inlet to Agrium's facility. The economic analysis determined that the net present value of the total capital and operating lifecycle costs for the pipeline ranges from $318 to $588 million. The greatest contributor to this spread is the cost of electricity, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.10/kWh in this analysis. The financial analysis shows that the delivery cost of gas may range from $0.33 to $0.55/Mcf in the first year depending primarily on the price for electricity.

Steve Colt

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the underground coal gasification field test at the Hoe Creek site No. 2, Wyoming, helium pulses were introduced to develop information to characterize the flow field, and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Quantitative analysis of the tracer response curves shows an increasing departure from a plug flow regime with time because of the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex non-uniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model. 17 refs.

Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Status of health and environmental research relative to coal gasification 1976 to the present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health and environmental research relative to coal gasification conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE sponsorship is summarized. The studies have focused on the chemical and toxicological characterization of materials from a range of process streams in five bench-scale, pilot-plant and industrial gasifiers. They also address ecological effects, industrial hygiene, environmental control technology performance, and risk assessment. Following an overview of coal gasification technology and related environmental concerns, integrated summaries of the studies and results in each area are presented and conclusions are drawn. Needed health and environmental research relative to coal gasification is identified.

Wilzbach, K.E.; Reilly, C.A. Jr. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated Sensing and Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier and Syngas Cooler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the achievements and final results of this program. The objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive systems approach to integrated design of sensing and control systems for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, using advanced model-based techniques. In particular, this program is focused on the model-based sensing and control system design for the core gasification section of an IGCC plant. The overall approach consists of (i) developing a first-principles physics-based dynamic model of the gasification section, (ii) performing model-reduction where needed to derive low-order models suitable for controls analysis and design, (iii) developing a sensing system solution combining online sensors with model-based estimation for important process variables not measured directly, and (iv) optimizing the steady-state and transient operation of the plant for normal operation as well as for startup using model predictive controls (MPC). Initially, available process unit models were implemented in a common platform using Matlab/Simulink{reg_sign}, and appropriate model reduction and model updates were performed to obtain the overall gasification section dynamic model. Also, a set of sensor packages were developed through extensive lab testing and implemented in the Tampa Electric Company IGCC plant at Polk power station in 2009, to measure temperature and strain in the radiant syngas cooler (RSC). Plant operation data was also used to validate the overall gasification section model. The overall dynamic model was then used to develop a sensing solution including a set of online sensors coupled with model-based estimation using nonlinear extended Kalman filter (EKF). Its performance in terms of estimating key unmeasured variables like gasifier temperature, carbon conversion, etc., was studied through extensive simulations in the presence sensing errors (noise and bias) and modeling errors (e.g. unknown gasifier kinetics, RSC fouling). In parallel, an MPC solution was initially developed using ideal sensing to optimize the plant operation during startup pre-heating as well as steady state and transient operation under normal high-pressure conditions, e.g. part-load, base-load, load transition and fuel changes. The MPC simulation studies showed significant improvements both for startup pre-heating and for normal operation. Finally, the EKF and MPC solutions were coupled to achieve the integrated sensing and control solution and its performance was studied through extensive steady state and transient simulations in the presence of sensor and modeling errors. The results of each task in the program and overall conclusions are summarized in this final report.

Aditya Kumar

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Hoe Creek No. 2 (Wyoming) underground-coal-gasification field test, researchers introduced helium pulses to characterize the flow field and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Flow models such as the axial-dispersion and parallel tanks-in-series models allowed interpretation of the in situ combustion flow field from the residence time distribution of the tracer gas. A quantitative analysis of the Hoe Creek tracer response curves revealed an increasing departure from a plug-flow regime with time, which was due to the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex nonuniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery, and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model.

Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet...

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Role of Oxygen in Coal Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Products supplies oxygen to a number of coal gasification and partial oxidation facilities worldwide. At the high operating pressures of these processes, economics favor the use of 90% and higher oxygen purities. The effect of inerts...

Klosek, J.; Smith, A. R.; Solomon, J.

22

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCT) is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering (WRCGR) Project, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Repowering consists of replacing an existing coal-fired boiler with one or more clean coal technologies to achieve significantly improved environmental performance. The desire to demonstrate utility repowering with a two-stage, pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow, integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system prompted Destec Energy, Inc., and PSI Energy, Inc., to form a joint venture and submit a proposal for this project. In July 1992, the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (WRCGRPJV, the Participant) entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. The project was sited at PSI Energy's Wabash River Generating Station, located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate IGCC repowering using a Destec gasifier and to assess long-term reliability, availability, and maintainability of the system at a fully commercial scale. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding (for capital and operating costs during the demonstration period) of $438 million. Construction for the demonstration project was started in July 1993. Pre-operational tests were initiated in August 1995, and construction was completed in November 1995. Commercial operation began in November 1995, and the demonstration period was completed in December 1999. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information provided in Wabash's Final Report (Dowd 2000), as well as other references and bibliographic sources.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Apparatus for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for fixed-bed coal gasification is described in which coal such as caking coal is continuously pyrolyzed with clump formation inhibited, by combining the coal with a combustible gas and an oxidant, and then continually feeding the pyrolyzed coal under pressure and elevated temperature into the gasification region of a pressure vessel. The materials in the pressure vessel are allowed to react with the gasifying agents in order to allow the carbon contents of the pyrolyzed coal to be completely oxidized. The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Simon Shackley #12;The Public Perceptions of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG): A Pilot Study Dr Simon Shackley of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) in the United Kingdom. The objectives were to identify the main dangers

Watson, Andrew

26

Materials performance in coal gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of several materials testing projects which were conducted in operating coal gasification pilot plants in the United States. These projects were designed to test potential materials of construction for commercial plants under actual operating conditions. Pilot plants included in the overall test program included the Hygas, Conoco Coal, Synthane, Bi-Gas, Peatgas (Hygas operating with peat), Battelle, U-Gas, Westinghouse (now KRW), General Electric (Gegas), and Mountain Fuel Resources plants. Test results for a large variety of alloys are discussed and conclusions regarding applicability of these materials in coal gasification environments are presented. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Judkins, R.R.; Bradley, R.A.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed...

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Catalytic coal gasification: use of calcium versus potassium* Ljubisa R on the gasification in air and 3.1 kPa steam of North Dakota lignitic chars prepared under slow and rapid pyrolysis of calcium is related to its sintering via crystallite growth. (Keywords: coal; gasification; catalysis

32

Hydrogen Production: Coal Gasification | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andof Energy EmbrittlementFact Sheet HydrogenCoal Gasification

33

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in an integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high-alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period, we conducted a simulated gasifier test primarily with TiN-coated steel samples. Although the test showed these coatings to offer significant protection against corrosion, they also revealed a lack of uniformity in the coatings. We spent a considerable amount of effort improving our coatings procedure as well as the fluidized bed reactor and its heater. Based on the results collected thus far, we selected 12 samples and sent them to ConocoPhillips for testing in their gasifier at the Wabash River Energy plant.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process analysis and simulation of underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation pertains to the prediction of cavity growth and the prediction of product gas composition in underground coal gasification (ICG) via mathematical model. The large-scale simulation model of the UCG process is comprised of a number of sub-models, each describing definable phenomena in the process. Considerable effort has been required in developing these sub-models, which are described in this work. In the first phase of the investigation, the flow field in field experiments was analyzed using five selected flow models and a combined model was developed based on the Hoe Creek II field experimental observations. The combined model was a modified tanks-in-series mode, and each tank consisted of a void space and a rubble zone. In the second phase of this work, a sub-model for self-gasification of coal was developed and simulated to determine the effect of water influx on the consumption of coal and whether self-gasification of coal alone was shown to be insufficient to explain the observed cavity growth. In the third phase of this work, a new sweep efficiency model was developed and coded to predict the cavity growth and product gas composition. Self-gasification of coal, water influx, and roof collapse and spalling were taken into account in the model. Predictions made by the model showed reasonable agreement with the experimental observations and calculations.

Chang, H.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

39

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this period we tested coated alloy coupons under conditions designed to mimic the conditions in the filter unit after the high-temperature heat recovery unit (HTHRU). The filter unit is another important area where corrosion has caused unscheduled downtime, and the remedy has been the use of sintered metal tubes made of expensive alloys such as inconel. The objective of our test was to determine if those coatings on 400-series steel that were not able to withstand the harsher conditions of the HTHRU, may be sufficiently resistant for use in the filter unit, at the reduced temperatures. Indeed, most of our coatings survived well; the exceptions were the coated porous samples of SS316. We continued making improvements to our coatings apparatus and the procedure began during the last quarter. As a result of these modifications, the coupons we are now producing are uniform. We describe the improved procedure for preparing diffusion coatings. Finally, because porous samples of steel in grades other than SS316 are not readily available, we also decided to procure SS409 powder and fabricate our own sintered porous coupons.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

In-situ coal-gasification data look promising  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to a report given at the 6th Underground Coal Conversion Symposium (Afton, Oklahoma 1980), the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal-gasification experiments Oil Gas J. 77 sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute and directed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory demonstrated the feasibility of in-situ coal conversion and featured the use of a directionally drilled channel to connect the injection and production wells rather than the reverse-burn ordinarily used to produce the connecting channel. In the test, 2816 cu m of coal weighing (APPROX) 4200 tons was consumed, with (APPROX) 18% of the product gas escaping through the overburden or elsewhere. When air injection was used, the average heating value was 217 Btu/std cu ft. The average thermal efficiency of the burn was 65%, and the average gas composition was 35% hydrogen, 5% methane, 11% carbon monoxide, and 44% carbon dioxide. Subsidence occurred after completion of the test. The Uniwell gasification method, scheduled for use in the final experiment in the Deep-1 series of underground coal-gasification tests in Wyoming, seeks to prevent subsidence by use of concentric pipes which are inserted into the vertical well to control the combustion zone. Underground coal-gasification prospects and the mechanics of subsidence are discussed.

Not Available

1980-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

High frequency electromagnetic burn monitoring for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of high frequency electromagnetic waves to monitor an in-situ coal gasification burn process, and presents some recent results obtained with the method. Both the technique, called HFEM (high frequency electromagnetic) probing, the HFEM hardware used are described, and some of the data obtained from the LLNL Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment conducted near Gillette, Wyoming are presented. HFEM was found to be very useful for monitoring the burn activity found in underground coal gasification. The technique, being a remote sensing method which does not require direct physical contact, does not suffer from burnout problems as found with thermocouples, and can continue to function even as the burn progresses on through the region of interest. While HFEM does not replace more conventional instrumentation such as thermocouples, the method does serve to provide data which is unobtainable by other means, and in so doing it complements the other data to help form a picture of what cannot be seen underground.

Deadrick, F.J.; Hill, R.W.; Laine, E.F.

1981-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal-gasification technical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

@ Winter 2005 Precarious energy situation demands strategic Summary: vehicles, wind power, and biomass and coal gasification -- that could fill the gap untilrenewables......

44

Burn cavity growth during the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed history is given of the growth of the burn cavity during the first month of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment near Gillette, Wyoming, in 1979. The changing shape of the cavity with time is inferred from data from three types of instruments installed throughout the experimental zone: (1) thermocouples at various levels in a number of holes, to map temperatures; (2) extensometers at various levels in other holes, to detect motions of the overburden material; and (3) high-frequency electromagnetic (HFEM) scans made between various pairs of holes, to detect cavities and zones of burning coal. Additional data on the final shape of the underground cavity are derived from the results of a core drilling program carried out from the surface after the burn had ended. This study of cavity growth history has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the in situ coal gasification process operates in sites like Hoe Creek. The diagnostic system provided invaluable information on cavity growth and on the interaction between the two coal seams. Some new problems with injection well survival and slag production in oxygen-steam burns were brought out, and the importance of understanding and controlling heat loss mechanisms was amply demonstrated. Although no one system of underground diagnostics can give all of the information needed to fully describe the in situ process, a combination of several diagnostic systems can be used to deduce a self-consistent description.

Hill, R.W.

1981-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Burn cavity growth during the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground-coal-gasification experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed history is given of the growth of the burn cavity during the first month of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment near Gillette, Wyoming, in 1979. The changing shape of the cavity with time is inferred from data from three types of instruments installed throughout the experimental zone: (1) thermocouples at various levels in a number of holes, to map temperatures; (2) extensometers at various levels in other holes, to detect motions of the overburden material; and (3) high-frequency electromagnetic scans made between various pairs of holes, to detect cavities and zones of burning coal. Additional data on the final shape of the underground cavity is derived from the results of a core drilling program carried out from the surface after the burn had ended. This study of cavity growth history has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the in-situ coal gasification process operates in sites like Hoe Creek. The diagnostic system provided invaluable information on cavity growth and on the interaction between the two coal seams. Some new problems with injection well survival and slag production in oxygen-steam burns were brought out, and the importance of understanding and controlling heat loss mechanisms was amply demonstrated. Although no one system of underground diagnostics can give all of the information needed to fully describe the in-situ process, a combination of several diagnostic systems can be used to deduce a self-consistent description.

Hill, R.W.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Steam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental results of coal gasification with and without the addition of calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide as dual-functioning catalyst–capture agents. Using two different coal types and temperatures between 700 and 900 °C, we studied the effect of these catalyst–capture agents on (1) the syngas composition, (2) CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S capture, and (3) the steam–coal gasification kinetic rate. The syngas composition from the gasifier was roughly 20% methane, 70% hydrogen, and 10% other species when a CaO/C molar ratio of 0.5 was added. We demonstrated significantly enhanced steam–coal gasification kinetic rates when adding small amounts of potassium hydroxide to coal when operating a CaO–CaCO{sub 3} chemical looping gasification reactor. For example, the steam–coal gasification kinetic rate increased 250% when dry mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 with a sub-bituminous coal, and the kinetic rate increased 1000% when aqueously mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 along with potassium hydroxide at a K/C molar ratio of 0.06. In addition, we conducted multi-cycle studies in which CaCO{sub 3} was calcined by heating to 900 °C to regenerate the CaO, which was then reused in repeated CaO–CaCO{sub 3} cycles. The increased steam–coal gasification kinetics rates for both CaO and CaO + KOH persisted even when the material was reused in six cycles of gasification and calcination. The ability of CaO to capture carbon dioxide decreased roughly 2–4% per CaO–CaCO{sub 3} cycle. We also discuss an important application of this combined gasifier–calciner to electricity generation and selling the purge stream as a precalcined feedstock to a cement kiln. In this scenario, the amount of purge stream required is fixed not by the degradation in the capture ability but rather by the requirements at the cement kiln on the amount of CaSO{sub 4} and ash in the precalcined feedstock.

Siefert, Nicholas S.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Litster, Shawn; Berry, David, A

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Case-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case-study of a coal gasification-based energy supply system for China Zheng Hongtao Department Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, China ``Syngas city'' (SC) is a concept for a coal clean fuels derived via coal gasification. Emissions of air pollutants in the SC scenario are compared

48

A feasibility study for underground coal gasification at Krabi Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to evaluate the technical, economical, and environmental feasibility of underground coal gasification (UCG) in the Krabi Mine, Thailand, was conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in cooperation with B.C. Technologies (BCT) and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The selected coal resource was found suitable to fuel a UCG facility producing 460,000 MJ/h (436 million Btu/h) of 100--125 Btu/scf gas for 20 years. The raw UCG gas could be produced for a selling price of $1.94/MMBtu. The UCG facility would require a total investment of $13.8 million for installed capital equipment, and annual operating expenses for the facility would be $7.0 million. The UCG gas could be either cofired in a power plant currently under construction or power a 40 MW simple-cycle gas turbine or a 60 MW combined-cycle power plant.

Solc, J.; Steadman, E.N. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Boysen, J.E. [BC Technologies, Laramie, WY (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Process for fixed bed coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

Sadowski, Richard S. (Greenville, SC)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Large-block experiments in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of the nation's energy program is to develop processes for cleanly producing fuels from coal. One of the more promising of these is underground coal gasification (UCG). If successful, UCG would quadruple recoverable U.S. coal reserves. Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performed an early series of UCG field experiments from 1976 through 1979. The Hoe Creek series of tests were designed to develop the basic technology of UCG at low cost. The experiments were conducted in a 7.6-m thick subbituminous coal seam at a relatively shallow depth of 48 m at a site near Gillette, Wyoming. On the basis of the Hoe Creek results, more extensive field experiments were designed to establish the feasibility of UCG for commercial gas production under a variety of gasification conditions. Concepts and practices in UCG are described, and results of the field tests are summarized.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracturing, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY, LLNL applied three different linking methods: explosive fracture, reverse burning, and directional drilling. Air was injected in all three experiments; a steam/oxygen mixture, during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the type of linking method did not influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters but declined from its initial value over a period of time because of heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A sweep efficiency model for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new model to predict sweep efficiency for underground coal gasification (UCG) has been developed. The model is based on flow through rubble in the cavity as well as through the open channel and uses a tanks-in-series model for the flow characteristics. The model can predict cavity growth and product gas composition given the rate of water influx, roof collapse, and spalling. Self-gasification of coal is taken into account in the model, and the coal consumption rate and the location of the flame front are determined by material and energy balances at the char surface. The model has been used to predict the results of the Hoe Creek III field tests (for the air gasification period). Predictions made by the model such as cavity shape, product gas composition, temperature profile, and overall reaction stoichiometry between the injected oxygen and the coal show reasonable agreement with the field test results.

Chang, H.L.; Edgar, T.F.; Himmelblau, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

60

The particulate and vapor phase components of airborne polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal gasification pilot plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE PARTICULATE AND VAPOR PHASE COMPONENTS OF AIRBORNE POLYAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS(PAHs) IN COAL GASIFICATION PILOT PLANTS A Thesis by ERIC JON BRINK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE PARTICULATE AND VAPOR PHASE COMPONENTS OF AIRBORNE POLYAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHs) IN COAL GASIFICATION PILOT PLANTS A Thesis by ERIC JON BRINK...

Brink, Eric Jon

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal gasification research program. Final technical progress report, October 1978-November 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The agreement between the United States Government Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute for the Joint Coal Gasification Research Program provided for one or more technical evaluation contractors. Pullman Kellogg (now the M.W. Kellogg Company) was selected as evaluation contractor to assess, and report to the DOE/GRI Operating Committee on, the relative merits of the active programs covered by the agreement. This report includes the period from 1 October 1978 to 30 November 1982. The objective was to provide engineering support for the DOE/GRI high Btu coal gasification program. This support generally consisted of assistance in developing or advancing each process to its maximum potential. Kellogg monitored and evaluated the startup and operational activities of all pilot plant projects within the combined DOE/GRI program. Kellogg evaluated proposals to determine their technical feasibility as potential processes or as viable processing operations for commercial-scale gasification of coal. Kellogg also recorded observations on the reliability, maintainability, and availability of the equipment used in the pilot plant or PDU facilities. Kellogg performed design reviews, data analyses, and engineering evaluations of proposals, cost estimates and monthly progress reports to provide information considered essential to the overall objectives of the combined DOE/GRI program.

Bostwick, L.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

ENCOAL mild coal gasification project public design and construction report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Public Design Report describes the 1000 ton per day ENCOAL mild coal gasification demonstration plant now in operation at the Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The objective of the project is to demonstrate that the proprietary Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology can reliably and economically convert low Btu PRB coal into a superior, high-Btu solid fuel (PDF), and an environmentally attractive low-sulfur liquid fuel (CDL). The Project`s plans also call for the production of sufficient quantities of PDF and CDL to permit utility companies to carry out full scale burn tests. While some process as well as mechanical design was done in 1988, the continuous design effort was started in July 1990. Civil construction was started in October 1990; mechanical erection began in May 1991. Virtually all of the planned design work was completed by July 1991. Most major construction was complete by April 1992 followed by plant testing and commissioning. Plant operation began in late May 1992. This report covers both the detailed design and initial construction aspects of the Project.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

Natesan, K.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of forward combustion underground coal gasification models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey has been made of forward combustion gasification models that are available in the public domain. The six models obtained for study have been mathematically analyzed to determine their conceptual completeness and computational complexity. The models range in scope of generality from a simple constrained mass balance model to a two-dimensional unsteady-state model. The computer code for each model has been implemented on the University of Wyoming CDC CYBER 730/760 computer system. Computed analyses with each of the programs are compared using data (taken primarily from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) Data Base) corresponding to six representative DOE sponsored field experiments at Hanna, Hoe Creek, Rawlins, and Pricetown. Four of the field tests were air injection experiments and two were oxygen/steam injection experiments. This study provides a direct comparison of input data requirements and computer resource requirements of the six computer codes. It furnishes an indication of the applicability of each model to the various operating conditions in the different field tests. Computational capabilities and limitations of each model are discussed in detail. 20 references, 47 figures, 13 tables.

Fausett, L.K.; Fausett, D.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The commercial feasibility of underground coal gasification in southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is a clean coal technology with the commercial potential to provide low- or medium-Btu gas for the generation of electric power. While the abundance of economic coal and natural gas reserves in the United States of America (USA) has delayed the commercial development of this technology in the USA, potential for commercial development of UCG-fueled electric power generation currently exists in many other nations. Thailand has been experiencing sustained economic growth throughout the past decade. The use of UCG to provide electric power to meet the growing power demand appears to have commercial potential. A project to determine the commercial feasibility of UCG-fueled electric power generation at a site in southern Thailand is in progress. The objective of the project is to determine the commercial feasibility of using UCG for power generation in the Krabi coal mining area located approximately 1,000 kilometers south of Bangkok, Thailand. The project team has developed a detailed methodology to determine the technical feasibility, environmental acceptability, and commercial economic potential of UCG at a selected site. In the methodology, hydrogeologic conditions of the coal seam and surrounding strata are determined first. These results and information describing the local economic conditions are then used to assess the commercial potential of the UCG application. The methodology for evaluating the Krabi UCG site and current project status are discussed in this paper.

Solc, J.; Young, B.C.; Harju, J.A.; Schmit, C.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Boysen, J.E. [B.C. Technologies, Ltd., Laramie, WY (United States); Kuhnel, R.A. [IIASES, Delft (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluating the feasibility of underground coal gasification in Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasification (UCG) is a clean coal technology that converts in situ coal into a low- to medium-grade product gas without the added expense of mining and reclamation. Potential candidates for UCG are those coal resources that are not economically recoverable or that are otherwise unacceptable for conventional coal utilization processes. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), through the sponsorship of the US Trade and Development Agency and in collaboration with the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), is undertaking a feasibility study for the application of UCG in the Krabi coal mining area, 620 miles south of Bangkok in Thailand. The EERC`s objective for this project is to determine the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of demonstrating and commercializing UCG at a selected site in the Krabi coal mining area. This paper addresses the preliminary developments and ongoing strategy for evaluating the selected UCG site. The technical, environmental, and economic factors for successful UCG operation are discussed, as well as the strategic issues pertaining to future energy expansion in southern Thailand.

Young, B.C.; Harju, J.A.; Schmit, C.R.; Solc, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Boysen, J. [B.C. Technologies, Ltd., Laramie, WY (United States); Kuehnel, R.A. [International Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences, Delft (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Steam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looping gasification using a calcium oxide-carbonate cycle, in which a pure stream of CO2 is generatedSteam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture Nicholas S. Siefert operating a CaO-CaCO3 chemical looping gasification reactor. For example, the steam-coal gasification

Litster, Shawn

69

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data delineate a reactor cavity 42.7m (140 ft.) long, 35.1 m (115 ft.) and 21.3 m (70 ft.) high that is partially filled with rubble, char and pyrometamorphic rock. Sedimentographic studies were completed on the overburden. Reflectance data on coal samples within the reactor cavity and cavity wall reveal that the coal was altered by temperatures ranging from 245/sup 0/C to 670/sup 0/C (472/sup 0/-1238/sup 0/F). Overburden rocks found within the cavity contain various pyrometamorphic minerals, indicating that temperatures of at least 1200/sup 0/C (2192/sup 0/F) were reached during the tests. The calcite cemented fine-grained sandstone and siltstone directly above the Hanna No. 1 coal bed formed a strong roof above the cavity, unlike other UCG sites such as Hoe Creek which is not calcite cemented. 30 references, 27 figures, 8 tables.

Youngberg, A.D.; Sinks, D.J.; Craig, G.N. II; Ethridge, F.G.; Burns, L.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

LLNL Underground Coal Gasification Project annual report - fiscal year 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laboratory has been conducting an interdisciplinary underground coal gasification program since 1974 under the sponsorship of DOE and its predecessors. We completed three UCG tests at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming, during the period 1975 to 1979. Five small field experiments, the large-block tests, were completed from 1981 to 1982 at the exposed coal face in the WIDCO coal mine near Centralia, Washington. A larger test at the same location, the partial-seam CRIP test, was completed during fiscal year 1984. In conjunction with the DOE and an industrial group lead by the Gas Research Institute, we have prepared a preliminary design for a large-scale test at the WIDCO site. The planned test features dual injection and production wells, module interaction, and consumption of 20,000 tons of coal during a hundred-day steam-oxygen gasification. During fiscal year 1984, we documented the large-block excavations. The cavities were elongated, the cavity cross sections were elliptical, and the cavities contained ash and slag at the bottom, char and dried coal above that, and a void at the top. The results from the large-block tests provided enough data to allow us to construct a composite model, CAVSM. Preliminary results from the model agree well with the product-gas chemistry and cavity shape observed in the large-block tests. Other models and techniques developed during the year include a transient, moving-front code, a two-dimensional, reactive-flow code using the method of lines, and a wall-recession-rate model. In addition, we measured the rate of methane decomposition in the hot char bed and developed an engineering rate expression to estimate the magnitude of the methane-decomposition reaction. 16 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

Stephens, D.R.; O'Neal, E.M. (eds.)

1985-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

Thorsness, C.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

The suitability of coal gasification in India's energy sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), an advanced coal-based power generation technology, may be an important technology to help India meet its future power needs. It has the potential to provide higher generating ...

Simpson, Lori Allison

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Markets for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification: an analysis of 13 site specific studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978 the US Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Resource Applications, developed a commercialization plan for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. Several initial steps have been taken in that process, including a comprehensive study of industrial markets, issuance of a Notice of Program Interest, and funding of proposals under the Alternate Fuels Legislation (P.L. 96-126). To assist it in the further development and administration of the commercialization plan, the Office of Resource Applications has asked Booz, Allen and Hamilton to assess the market prospects for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. This report covers the detailed findings of the study. Following the introduction which discusses the purpose of the study, approach used for the assignment and current market attitudes on coal gasification, there are three chapters on: systems configurations and applications; economic and finanical attractiveness; and summary of management decisions based on feasibility study results. The final chapter briefly assesses the management decisions. The general consensus seems to be that coal gasification is a technology that will be attractive in the future but is marginal now. 6 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

What should the government do to encourage technical change in the energy sector?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and storage; (4) clean coal technologies, such as the Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle; and (5

Deutch, John

79

LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have continued laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in small blocks of coal (approx. 30 cm on a side). Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition, we have been developing a mathematical model for these experiments in order to further our understanding of the physical and chemical processes governing the burning of the coal and the growth of the cavity within the block. This model will be adapted, later, to larger-scale coal-block experiments, and finally to full-scale field exoperiments. We hope to obtain scaling laws and other insights from the model. The small-block experiments are beginning to provide information relevant to the early-time cavity growth. The natural extension of these experiments to larger blocks, perhaps 10ft or more on a side, is presently being planned. The large-block tests will be conducted at a mine, where blocks of coal will be isolated by the experimenter; the objective will be to quantify early-time cavity growth. We completed planning for the directionally drilled injection well for DOE Experiment No. 1. Assessment of the data obtained during the various underground coal gasification tests is continuing. Results from the four different diagnostic systems have been combined to produce a description of the shape of the burn cavity as a function of time during the Hoe Creek No. 3 experiment. Groundwater samples from wells located at distances of a few feet to several hundred feet from the gasification cavities have been collected before, during, and after each of the Hoe Creek tests. The analysis of the groundwater contamination data pertinent to the Hoe Creek No. 2 test was completed.

Olness, D.U. (ed.)

1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Shaped-charge tests in support of the coal-gasification program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL concept for in-situ coal gasification requires forming horizontal holes in deep coal beds to connect vertical bore shafts. These lateral holes are required to provide a passage for the gases between the vertical shafts. Shaped charges are being considered for producing these horizontal bore holes. This report describes a test method for evaluating new shaped charge designs and presents the results for three designs.

Scheloske, R.F.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimated groundwater restoration costs associated with commercial underground coal gasification operations. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete a preliminary cost estimate for groundwater restoration for the Hoe Creek commercial underground coal gasification (UCG) facility under a set of ground rules based on field data measurements and specific compound removal requirements. Of the three approaches evaluated for disposal of the contaminated groundwater, deep well injection is the least expensive, followed by the alternate treatment approach.

Fischer, D.D.

1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Characterizing a lignite formation before and after an underground coal gasification experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water. To answer questions relating to the amount of lignite gasified, subsidence, ground water pollution problems and to obtain a better understanding of the process itself, work is needed to define the size, shape and orientation of the cavity...CHARACTERIZING A LIGNITE FORMATION BEFORE AND AFTER AN UNDERGROUND COAL GASIFICATION EXPERIMENT A Thesis by USMAN AHMED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Ahmed, Usman

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Results from the third LLL underground coal gasification experiment at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of the US Energy Program is the development of processes to produce clean fuels from coal. Underground coal gasification is one of the most promising of these processes. If successful, underground coal gasification (UCG) would quadruple the proven reserves of the US coal. Cost for products produced from UCG are projected to be 65 to 75% of those from conventional coal conversion. Finally, UCG appears to possess environmental advantages since no mining is involved and there are less solid wastes produced. In this paper we describe results from the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification test. The experiment employed a drilled channel between process wells spaced 130' apart. The drilled channel was enlarged by reverse combustion prior to forward gasification. The first week of forward gasification was carried out using air injection, during which 250 tons of coal were consumed yielding an average dry product gas heating value of 114 Btu/scf. Following this phase, steam and oxygen were injected (generally a 50-50 mixture) for 47 days, during which 3945 tons of coal were consumed at an average rate of 84 tons of coal per day and an average dry gas heating value of 217 Btu/scf. The average gas composition during the steam-oxygen phase was 37% H/sub 2/, 5% CH/sub 4/, 11% CO, and 44% CO/sub 2/. Gas recovery was approximately 82% during the test, and the average thermochemical efficiency was near 65%.

Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Aiman, W.R.; Stephens, D.R.

1980-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of as-generated slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, the authors found that it would be extremely difficult for as-generated slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1,400 and 1,700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications.

None

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for, various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and Phase II, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications.

Unknown

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

Underground coal gasification data base. [Information on 14 US DOE sponsored tests; also available on computer tapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a data base containing results from fourteen DOE-sponsored underground coal gasification (UCG) field tests. These tests include three performed by LLNL near Gillette, Wyoming at the Hoe Creek site, eight performed by LETC at a site near Hanna, Wyoming, two by GULF near Rawlings, Wyoming, and one performed by METC near Princetown, West Virginia. All tests were done in flat lying coal seams except the Rawlings tests, which utilized a steeply dipping seam. The report presents process parameters and the results of material and energy balances for each test in a variety of forms. The raw process data used to construct the data base is first discussed along with material and energy balance conventions. Following this, each test is described with the process geometry and a brief operating chronology given. Differential and integral summary information in tabular and graphic form is provided for each test. Computer tapes of the entire data base may be requested from the authors through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Cena, R.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Ott, L.L.

1982-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advances in the development of wire mesh reactor for coal gasification studies - article no. 084102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to further understand the coal gasification behavior in entrained-flow gasifiers, a high pressure and high temperature wire mesh reactor with new features was recently built. An advanced LABVIEW-based temperature measurement and control system were adapted. Molybdenum wire mesh with aperture smaller than 70 {mu} m and type D thermocouple were used to enable high carbon conversion ({gt}90%) at temperatures {gt}1000 {sup o}C. Gaseous species from wire mesh reactor were quantified using a high sensitivity gas chromatography. The material balance of coal pyrolysis in wire mesh reactor was demonstrated for the first time by improving the volatile's quantification techniques.

Zeng, C.; Chen, L.; Liu, G.; Li, W.H.; Huang, B.M.; Zhu, H.D.; Zhang, B.; Zamansky, V. [GE Global Research Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Changes in major organic contaminants in the groundwater at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of groundwater analysis at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification (UCG) site have indicated that, after gasification, the phenolic compounds and neutral aromatic hydrocarbons decrease more slowly than expected on the basis of our laboratory studies. The field data also fail to confirm the expected inverse relationship between a contaminant's water solubility and the extent to which it is sorbed by surrounding coal. The authors described a mechanism for the deposition of coal pyrolysis products that may help to elucidate the observed behavior of these organic contaminants. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Wang, F.; Mead, W.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Quarterly report, December 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of data for the Hanna IV and Hoe Creek in situ coal gasification tests raised questions concerning the fundamental controlling mechanisms of the process. The two main areas of concern are: (1) the air flow patterns; and (2) the initial cavity growth. Sandia National Laboratories is addressing these concerns by developing models of these processes. Results to date are in qualitative agreement with known phenomena. There have also been developments in data handling capability. These include improved data presentation ability and development of routine storage, access and back up methods.

Glass, R.E. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Techniques and equipment used in contaminant detection at Hoe Creek underground coal gasification experimental site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data obtained from existing monitoring wells at an experimental coal gasification site indicated that local groundwater supplies were under risk from organic contaminants, particularly phenols. A more extensive monitoring system was installed. A drilling and open-hole sampling programme was devised to locate the edge of the contaminated area and indicate where additional monitoring wells were required. Geophysical logging was employed to determine the optimal position of gas-driven groundwater samplers/piezometers. The system successfully delineated the extent of the contaminant plume on 3 sides, but further work is required on the fourth side.

Davidson, S.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mutagenic and toxic activity of environmental effluents from underground coal gasification experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using bacterial bioassays, the authors have screened for the presence of mutagens and toxins in extracts from groundwater, and in tar from product gas, at the Hoe Creek II and III in situ coal gasification sites. The sites exhibited different potential biological hazards, suggesting that different gasification processes may represent different human health concerns. It was found that mutagens are present in groundwater, they persist for at least 2 years after gasification has been terminated, and they show a change in activity with time, possibly in parallel with changes in chemical composition. The tar may represent a disposal problem, since it is mutagenic, but with a low level of activity.

Timourian, H.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Application of geological studies to overburden collapse at underground coal gasification experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed geologic and mineralogic studies were conducted on the Hanna, Wyoming, and Hoe Creek, Wyoming, underground coal gasification sites. These studies demonstrate the importance geologic factors have on controlling overburden collapse into the reactor cavity during and after coal gasification and on subsequent environmental problems. Parameters that control the collapse of overburden material into the reactor cavity include: duration of the burn; maximum span of unsupported roof rock; lateral and vertical homogeneity, permeability and rock strength; and thickness of overburden materials. At the Hoe Creek I experiment, a small reactor cavity and a correspondingly short maximum span of unsupported roof rock consisting of fine-grained, low permeability overbank deposits resulted in minimal collapse. At the Hoe Creek II experiment, a significant amount of collapse occurred due to an increased span of unsupported roof rock comprised of poorly consolidated, more permeable channel sandstones and a limited amount of overburden mudstones and siltstones. Roof rock collapse extended to the surface at the Hoe Creek III experiment where the roof rock consisted of highly permeable, poorly consolidated channel sandstones. The unit comprising the reactor cavity roof rock at the Hanna II experimental site is a laterally continuous lacustrine delta deposit, which primarily consists of sandstones with lesser amounts of interbedded siltstones and claystones. Calcite cement has reduced permeability and interstitial waters which probably kept spalling of the roof rock to a minimum. Consequently, roof rock collapse at the Hanna II experiment was much less extensive than at the Hoe Creek II and III experiments.

Ethridge, F.G.; Alexander, W.G.; Craig, G.N. II; Burns, L.K.; Youngberg, A.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hoe Creek experiments: LLNL's underground coal-gasification project in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and predecessor organizations, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carried out a laboratory program and three field, underground coal gasification tests near Gillette, Wyoming. This report summarizes that work. Three methods of linking or connecting injection and production wells were used for the UCG field tests: Hoe Creek No. 1 employed explosive fracturing, Hoe Creek No. 2 featured use of reverse combustion, and directional drilling was used for the Hoe Creek No. 3. The Gas Research Institute cosponsored the latter test. Laboratory experiments and modeling, together with a laboratory and field environment program, are necessary adjuncts to the field program. Explosive fracturing in coal was simulated using computer models and laboratory tests. We developed a relationship of total inelastic strains to permeability, which we used to design and interpret a coal outcrop, explosive fracturing experiment at Kemmerer, Wyoming. Coal gasification was also simulated in laboratory experiments and with computer models. The primary aim has been to predict and correlate reaction, thermal-front propagation rates, and product gas composition as a function of bed properties and process operating conditions. Energy recovery in the form of produced gas and liquids amounted to 73% of the energy in the consumed coal. There were essentially no losses to the subsurface formation. The greatest energy loss was in steam production.

Stephens, D.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Groundwater restoration field test at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground coal gasification burns were conducted at the Hoe Creek Site in the Powder River Basin. Some contaminants were released in the groundwater. The Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the water from a network of wells. Two million gallons of groundwater were pumped from wells adjacent to the Hoe Creek II underground coal gasification cavity, passed through filters and carbon adsorbers, and reinjected into the cavity. Phenol was the target compound of the water treatment system. The phenol concentration pumped from well WS-10 decreased from 974 parts per billion (ppB) when treatment began on July 2, 1987, to about 200 ppB when treatment ceased on August 29, 1987. Phenol concentrations pumped from well WS-22 fluctuated during the tests, but they decreased to the 150 to 200 ppB range by the time treatment was terminated. The phenol concentration of treated water reinjected into the Hoe Creek II cavity was below detectable limits (less than 20 ppB). Pumping rates were about 18 gallons per minute (gpm) from well WS-10 and 6 to 8 gpm from well WS-22. Hoe Creek is located approximately 20 miles southwest of Gillette, Wyoming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Nordin, J.S.; Barrash, W.; Nolan, B.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well-Stirred Reactor: Effects of Devolatilization and Moisture Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Coal Gasification Processes in a Well- Stirred Reactor: Effects in coal and biomass play an important role on the gasification performance of these fuels to simulate the gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor. This model is a first

Qiao, Li

96

Research on chemical factors in underground coal gasification. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research has been to acquire experimental data and develop mathematical models in order to analyze results from laboratory-scale and field-scale experiments on underground coal gasification (UCG), especially for low-rank coals such as Texas lignite. Experimental data for water injection in a combustion tube, coal core combustion, and coal block gasification are reported; in parallel, a mathematical model for the combustion tube temperature profile and gas composition was developed which compared favorably with experimental data. A mathematical model for predicting gas composition and coal recovery in the Hoe Creek field experiment has been completed and verified with field data. Two experiments have been constructed to obtain data on reactions of interest to UCG; these include an apparatus for determining the kinetics of tar cracking and a microreactor for analyzing the process dynamics of the water gas shift reaction carried out in a fixed bed catalytic system. 44 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

Edgar, T.F.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Hanna and Hoe Creek underground coal gasification test sites: Status report, (June 1986-June 1987)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To comply with a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Western Research Institute (WRI) is required to submit an annual report summarizing the status of environmentally related work performed by WRI at the Hanna and Hoe Creek underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. The following is a summary of work performed at these two sites from June 1986 to June 1987. Several tasks for restoring the water quailty at Hoe Creek were: (1) groundwater treatment demonstration (1986); (2) bench-scale carbon adsorption experiments (1987); (3) design of the scaled-up treatment system (1987); (4) well-pumping test (1987). A summary of the results of each task is presented. 6 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Berdan, G.L.; Nolan, B.T.; Barteaux, W.L.; Barrash, W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi Coal Mine site, Thailand. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the U.S Trade and Development Agency. The report summarizes the accomplishments of field, analytical data evaluation and modeling activities focused on assessment of underground coal gasification (UCG) feasibility at Krabi over a two year period. The overall objective of the project was to determine the technical issues, environmental impact, and economic of developing and commercializing UCG at the site in Krabi. The report contains an Executive Summary followed by these chapters: (1) Project Overview; (2) Project Site Characterization; (3) Inorganic and Thermal Materials Characterization; (4) Technical and Economic Feasibility of UCG At the Krabi Site; (5) Conclusions and Recommendations; (6) Acknowledgments; (7) References.

Boysen, J.; Sole, J.; Schmit, C.R.; Harju, J.A.; Young, B.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

02139, USA Abstract Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants withpre Plus and combined with GTPRO, mass and energy balances were computed. Two gasification technologies quality, efficiency Introduction Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) has emerged

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101

Phase-equilibria for design of coal-gasification processes: dew points of hot gases containing condensible tars. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is concerned with the fundamental physical chemistry and thermodynamics of condensation of tars (dew points) from the vapor phase at advanced temperatures and pressures. Fundamental quantitative understanding of dew points is important for rational design of heat exchangers to recover sensible heat from hot, tar-containing gases that are produced in coal gasification. This report includes essentially six contributions toward establishing the desired understanding: (1) Characterization of Coal Tars for Dew-Point Calculations; (2) Fugacity Coefficients for Dew-Point Calculations in Coal-Gasification Process Design; (3) Vapor Pressures of High-Molecular-Weight Hydrocarbons; (4) Estimation of Vapor Pressures of High-Boiling Fractions in Liquefied Fossil Fuels Containing Heteroatoms Nitrogen or Sulfur; and (5) Vapor Pressures of Heavy Liquid Hydrocarbons by a Group-Contribution Method.

Prausnitz, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Preburn versus postburn mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of overburden and coal at the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hundreds of mineralogic and geochemical tests were done under US Department of Energy contracts on core samples taken from the Hanna underground coal gasification site. These tests included x-ray diffraction studies of minerals in coal ash, overburden rocks, and heat-altered rocks; x-ray fluorescence analyses of oxides in coal ash and heat-altered rocks; semi-quantitative spectrographic analyses of elements in coal, overburden, and heat-altered rocks; chemical analyses of elements and compounds in coal, overburden, and heat-altered rocks and ASTM proximate and ultimate analyses of coal and heat-altered coal. These data sets were grouped, averaged, and analyzed to provide preburn and postburn mineralogic and geochemical characteristics of rock units at the site. Where possible, the changes in characteristics from the preburn to the postburn state are related to underground coal gasification processes. 11 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney [Research & Development Solutions, LLC (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

SPINEL-BASED REFRACTORIES FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE IN COAL GASIFICATION ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology and refractory end users have developed novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels. The objective of this U.S. DOE funded project was to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al 2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Materials have been developed specifically for coal gasification environments and work has been performed to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the service environment and to develop a light-weight back-up refractory system to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the systematic development of these materials, laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials, and relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Refractory Materials based on Magnesia-Alumina Spinel for Improved Performance in Coal Gasification Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a larger project to develop novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels, a team composed of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., and academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed new refractory materials and coating systems specifically for application in coal gasification environments. Materials were developed under this U.S. DOE funded project to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Work was conducted to develop and deploy these new materials and to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the serviced environment. Additionally, a light-weight back-up refractory system was developed to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the efforts involved in the development of these materials, along with the laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials leading to relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the method for bulk separation of multi-component gases generated in a coal gasification process wherein coal is gasified in a gasifier to produce gasification products including a mixture of gases comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gas components carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. It consists of the steps of conveying a stream comprising the mixture of gases into one end of an elongated column containing a solid adsorbent for each of the gases forming the mixture of gases and pressurizing the charge of gases within the column to a pressure within a range sufficient to effect the adsorption by the adsorbent of the conveyed gases including the hydrogen defining the least absorbable gas in the mixture of gases. Then, decreasing the partial pressure of the charge of gases in the column to effect the sequential desorption of the gases hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane from the adsorbent in the column, and conveying the adsorbed gases from the column upon desorption thereof from the adsorbent.

Ghate, M.H.; Yang, R.T.

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modeling of the coal gasification processes in a hybrid plasma torch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major advantages of plasma treatment systems are cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. A new efficient electrodeless 1-MW hybrid plasma torch for waste disposal and coal gasification is proposed. This product merges several solutions such as the known inductive-type plasma torch, innovative reverse-vortex (RV) reactor and the recently developed nonequilibrium plasma pilot and plasma chemical reactor. With the use of the computational-fluid-dynamics-computational method, preliminary 3-D calculations of heat exchange in a 1-MW plasma generator operating with direct vortex and RV have been conducted at the air flow rate of 100 g/s. For the investigated mode and designed parameters, reduction of the total wall heat transfer for the reverse scheme is about 65 kW, which corresponds to an increase of the plasma generator efficiency by approximately 6.5%. This new hybrid plasma torch operates as a multimode, high power plasma system with a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turn down ratio, and offers convenient and simultaneous feeding of several additional reagents into the discharge zone.

Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

LLNL Underground-Coal-Gasification Project. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have continued our laboratory studies of forward gasification in small blocks of coal mounted in 55-gal drums. A steam/oxygen mixture is fed into a small hole drilled longitudinally through the center of the block, the coal is ignited near the inlet and burns toward the outlet, and the product gases come off at the outlet. Various diagnostic measurements are made during the course of the burn, and afterward the coal block is split open so that the cavity can be examined. Development work continues on our mathematical model for the small coal block experiments. Preparations for the large block experiments at a coal outcrop in the Tono Basin of Washington State have required steadily increasing effort with the approach of the scheduled starting time for the experiments (Fall 1981). Also in preparation is the deep gasification experiment, Tono 1, planned for another site in the Tono Basin after the large block experiments have been completed. Wrap-up work continues on our previous gasification experiments in Wyoming. Results of the postburn core-drilling program Hoe Creek 3 are presented here. Since 1976 the Soviets have been granted four US patents on various aspects of the underground coal gasification process. These patents are described here, and techniques of special interest are noted. Finally, we include ten abstracts of pertinent LLNL reports and papers completed during the quarter.

Stephens, D.R.; Clements, W. (eds.) [eds.

1981-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bituminous coal resources of the United States, identifies those resources which are potentially amenable to Underground Coal Gasification (UCG), identifies products and markets in the vicinity of selected target areas, identifies UCG concepts, describes the state of the art of UCG in bituminous coal, and presents three R and D programs for development of the technology to the point of commercial viability. Of the 670 billion tons of bituminous coal remaining in-place as identified by the National Coal Data System, 32.2 billion tons or 4.8% of the total are potentially amenable to UCG technology. The identified amenable resource was located in ten states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia. The principal criteria which eliminated 87.3% of the resource was the minimum thickness (42 inches). Three R and D programs were developed using three different concepts at two different sites. Open Borehole, Hydraulic Fracture, and Electrolinking concepts were developed. The total program costs for each concept were not significantly different. The study concludes that much of the historical information based on UCG in bituminous coals is not usable due to the poor siting of the early field tests and a lack of adequate diagnostic equipment. This information gap requires that much of the early work be redone in view of the much improved understanding of the role of geology and hydrology in the process and the recent development of analytical tools and methods.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Environmental evaluation and restoration plan of the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site, Wyoming: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments were conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Hoe Creek Site, Wyoming; the Hoe Creek I experiment was conducted in 1976, the Hoe Creek II experiment in 1977, and the Hoe Creek III experiment in 1979. These experiments have had an impact on the land and groundwater quality at the site, and the Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that Western Research Institute (WRI) develop and implement a site restoration plan. The purpose of the plan is to restore the site to conditions being negotiated with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ). To prepare for developing a plan, WRI compiled background information on the site. The geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the site were determined, and the water quality data were analyzed. Modelling the site was considered and possible restoration methods were examined. Samples were collected and laboratory tests were conducted. WRI then developed and began implementing a field-scale restoration test. 41 refs, 46 figs., 13 tabs.

Barteaux, W.L.; Berdan, G.L.; Lawrence, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

LLNL underground-coal-gasification project. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity mapping has been completed for the large block experiments, which were done near Centralia, Washington, in the winter of 1981-1982. Postburn excavations into the experimental sites show all the cavities to be largely filled with rubble consisting of dried coal, char, ash, and slag. None of the five injection holes remained completely open through its associated cavity. Temperature histories for all the in situ thermocouples in the large block experiments have been analyzed. The interpretation of most of this temperature data is straightforward and consistent with other observations. As a further refinement in our underground coal gasification (UCG) modeling effort, transient temperature profiles have been calculated for open borehole gasification in wet coal by the isotherm migration method, using the LSODE computer code developed at LLNL. The next logical step in this calculation would be to make the rate of combustion surface movement a function of the rate of steam generation at the vaporization interface. Follow-up observations have continued at the Hoe Creek UCG experiment sites in Wyoming. Phenols have been detected at very low but significant levels in groundwater 400 ft from the Hoe Creek 2 experiment, which was done in 1977. It appears important to continue this investigation of phenol transport at Hoe Creek, and to extend it by drilling and sampling additional wells. The controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technique, which was devised for UCG application, may also have applications in enhanced recovery of crude oil.

Not Available

1982-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1/4 of Section 29 and the E1/2SE1/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in southeast Wyoming. The structure of the site is characterized by beds dipping gently to the northeast. An east-west fault graben complex interrupts this basic trend in the center of the area. The target coal bed of the UCG experiments was the Hanna No. 1 coal in the Hanna Formation. Sedimentary rocks comprising the Hanna Formation consist of a sequence of nonmarine shales, sandstones, coals and conglomerates. The overburden of the Hanna No. 1 coal bed at the Hanna UCG site was divided into four broad local stratigraphic units. Analytical studies were made on overburden and coal samples taken from cores to determine their mineralogical composition. Textural and mineralogical characteristics of sandstones from local stratigraphic units A, B, and C were analyzed and compared. Petrographic analyses were done on the coal including oxides, forms of sulfur, pyrite types, maceral composition, and coal rank. Semi-quantitative spectrographic and analytic geochemical analyses were done on the overburden and coal and relative element concentrations were compared. Trends within each stratigraphic unit were also presented and related to depositional environments. The spectrographic analysis was also done by lithotype. 34 references, 60 figures, 18 tables.

Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Monthly technical progress report, 22 August - 25 September, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to provide engineering support services to the Department of Energy/Gas Research Institute in the high Btu coal gasification research program. The gasification research program is to determine the specific process and/or combination of component processing steps that offer the greatest economic potential for commercial application. During September, Kellogg continued active monitoring of operations at Westinghouse, IGT, Peatgas, and BI-GAS. Efforts relative to Hygas, Rockwell, Exxon and Bell were minimal. Test runs monitored and reported here are BI-GAS tests 17E and 17F, Westinghouse PDU test TP-028-3, and IGT Peatgas test 3. Kellog attended meetings on 1 and 22 September to discuss the review of the Hygas final report. Comments on Kellogg's draft report on the Hygas data base evaluation were received. Kellogg's evaluations of PDU operating data from Westinghouse and Exxon continues. The Kellogg report on Peatgas PDU data base evaluation was issued in draft form. At DOE's request, Kellogg began work on an evaluation of the existing data base (by IGT) for single-stage gasification of peat. Work on the descriptive brochure continued, aimed toward issue of a draft in the near future. Kellogg also provided input regarding Westinghouse test runs to a DOE consultant.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Starr, D.W.; Hubbard, D.A.; Koneru, P.B.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.; Wong, E.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

LLNL in situ coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have continued our laboratory work on forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal. These tests have produced some insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production in Wyodak coal. The results will be presented at the Sixth Underground Coal Conversion Symposium in July. The data from the Hanna 4B experiment have been incorporated into the UCC Data Base and have been analyzed in the same way as the Hoe Creek data. Eventually, all of the Department of Energy (DOE) test data will be included in this continuing program. Site-restoration work has been started at the Hoe Creek site. This work includes the sealing of abandoned wells, some grading and reseeding of the ground surface, and general cleanup. A search for a site for underground coal-gasification (UCG) testing and possible commercial development has been carried out in Washington. The Tono basin was chosen as a tentative UCG test site, and a preliminary investigation of the site has been accomplished. Although the Tono basin appears suitable for UCG testing, additional geohydrologic investigation is needed. Our effort to survey the Soviet literature is continuing; in particular, experiments that yielded results similar to those obtained at Hoe Creek have been analyzed carefully. The Soviets conducted a series of directed-flow experiments in 1955 and 1956. In each experiment, both those in which the roof subsided and those in which it did not, the product-gas heating value was quite stable throughout the gasification period and there was no general decline in heating value, as is customarily observed.

Olness, D.U. (ed.)

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Availability analysis of an integrated gasification-combined cycle: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) contracted with ARINC Research Corporation to perform availability assessments of an integrated coal gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) design. The objective of the study was to quantify the availability impact associated with several design and operating options specified by EPRI. In addition, several scheduled maintenance options for the IGCC plant were evaluated. The IGCC plant addressed in this analysis employs many modular design features that give the plant high equivalent availability through redundancy. The study focused on evaluating and quantifying the expected changes in unit capability, equivalent availability, and heat rate associated with various design alternatives. The findings of the baseline case studies are as follows: (1) The Baseline IGCC design using four gasifiers with 11.2% spare gasification capacity and three combustion turbine/HRSGs sets will have an expected equivalent availability of 86.18% and an average heat rate of 9002 Btu/kWh. (2) The Baseline with Supplemental Firing design using four gasifiers with the 11.2% spare gasification capacity being used to produce supplemental steam and with three combustion turbine HRSG sets will have an expected equivalent availability of 85.64% and an average heat rate of 9147 Btu/kWh. (3) The Baseline with Natural Gas Backup design using four gasifiers and three combustion turbine/HRSG sets with supplemental natural gas backup will have an expected equivalent availability of 91.53% with an average heat rate of 8981 Btu/kWh and a coal-to-natural gas fuel mixture of 23:1. 49 figs., 66 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Methodology for technology evaluation under uncertainty and its application in advanced coal gasification processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has attracted interest as a cleaner alternative to conventional coal-fired power generation processes. While a number of pilot projects have been launched to ...

Gong, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hoe Creek No. 3: first long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are compelling reasons for pursuing underground coal gasification. The resource that could be exploited is huge - enough to quadruple present proved coal reserves - if the process is successful. Cost estimates indicate that substitute natural gas or gasoline may be producible at reasonable prices by the technique. In the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment linkage paths were established between the injection and production wells by drilling a horizontal borehole between them near the bottom of the coal seam. The drilled linkage hole was enlarged by reverse burning, then the forward gasification process began - first with air injection for one week, then with oxygen-steam injection for the remainder of the experiment. During the oxygen-steam injection period, approximately 3900 tons of coal was gasified in 47 days, at an average rate of 83 tons/day. The heating value of the dry product gas averaged 218 Btu/SCF (194 kj/mol), suitable for input to a processing plant for upgrading to pipeline quality, which is approximately 900 Btu/SCF (800 kj/mol).

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Identification and separation of the organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate waters. [5,5 dimethyl hydantoin, dihydroxy benzenes, acetonitrile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A substantial fraction of the organic solutes in condensate waters from low-temperature coal-gasification processes are not identified by commonly employed analytical techniques, have low distriution coefficients (K/sub C/) into diisopropyl ether (DIPE) or methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and are resistant to biological oxidation. These compounds represent an important wastewater-treatment problem. Analytical techniques were developed to detect these polar compounds, and the liquid-liquid phase equilibria were measured with several solvents. A high-performance liquid - chromatography (HPLC) technique was employed to analyze four condensate-water samples from a slagging fixed-bed gasifier. A novel sample-preparation technique, consisting of an azeotropic distillation with isopropanol, allowed identification of compounds in the HPLC eluant by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin and related compounds were identified in condensate waters for the first time, and they account for 1 to 6% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Dimethyl hydatoin has a K/sub D/ of 2.6 into tributyl phosphate (TBP) and much lower K/sub D/ values into six other solvents. It is also resistant to biological oxidation. Phenols (59 to 76% of the COD), dihydroxy benzenes (0.02 to 9.5% of the COD), and methanol, acetonitrile, and acetone (15% of the COD in one sample) were also detected. Extraction with MIBK removed about 90% of the COD. MIBK has much higher K/sub D/ values than DIPE for dihydroxy benzenes. Chemical reactions occurred during storage of condensate-water samples. The reaction products had low K/sub D/ values into MIBK. About 10% of the COD had a K/sub D/ of nearly zero into MIBK. These compounds were not extracted by MIBK over a wide range of pH. 73 references, 6 figures, 35 tables.

Mohr, D.H. Jr.; King, C.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemistry and mechanism of molten-salt catalysts in coal-gasification processes. Final report, January 1984-January 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alkali metal salts have been recognized as effective catalysts in coal gasification. However, the presence of reducing gases, in particular carbon monoxide, has recently been shown to have serious inhibitory effects on the catalyst performance. This program has addressed the question of the chemical interactions between carbon monoxide gas containing mixtures and the salt catalysts in liquid form by probing the solution chemistry by dynamic electrochemical techniques. The results of this study show that oxalate ions are formed by the reaction between carbonate ions and carbon monoxide gas. At temperatures above 700/sup 0/C, sulfate ions are directly attacked by carbon monoxide. The oxalate ions are electroactive and their electrochemistry has been studied and found to involve adsorption of oxalate and formation of reactive intermediates. The pathway likely involves an ECE sequence. The formation of active adsorbed species such as oxalate or sulfides at high temperature may be the means by which catalytic function of the salts is inhibited.

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification. [STEALTH Codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

Langland, R.T.; Trent, B.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two computer codes compare surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite-difference code are shown to match equivalent, implicit finite-element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite-difference continuum rigid-block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. Numerical techniques agree qualitatively with empirical studies but, so far, underpredict ground surface displacement. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together. It is recommended that the thermal characteristics of coal measure rock be investigated and that additional calculations be carried out to longer times so that cooling influences can be modeled.

Trent, B.C.; Langland, R.T.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hoe Creek No. 3 - First long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the first long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection. In the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground experiment, linkage paths were established between the injection and production wells by drilling a horizontal borehole between them near the bottom of the coal seam. The drilled linkage hole was enlarged by reverse burning, and then the forward gasification process was started - first with air injection for one week, then with oxygen-steam injection for the remainder of the experiment. During the oxygen-steam injection period, about 3900 tons of coal were gasified in 47 days, at an average rate of 83 tons per day. The heating value of the dry product gas averaged 218 Btu/scf, suitable for input to a processing plant for upgrading to pipeline quality, which is about 900 Btu/scf.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laboratory studies on evaluation of in situ biodegradation at the Hoe Creek UCG (underground coal gasification) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential for in situ biodegradation in the contaminated groundwater aquifer at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site. Experiments were performed in electrolytic respirometric cells under simulated environmental conditions. An orthogonal, fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the following factors on phenol degradation: nutrient dose, amount of bacterial inoculum, temperature, light conditions, and substrate concentration. Microorganisms native to the environment were used as the inoculum, and phosphorus was used as the nutrient. The amount of inoculum introduced and the nutrient dose were found to have a positive effect on phenol degradation. Temperature changes from 15{degree}C (59{degree}F) to 25{degree}C (77{degree}F) had no significant effect. The light conditions (fluorescent or dark) also had no significant effect on phenol degradation. Higher concentrations of substrate required increased amounts of oxygen for biodegradation. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Nolan, B.T.; Suthersan, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Review of underground coal-gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek. [Hoe Creek 1, 2, and 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracture, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Assessment of advanced coal-gasification processes. [AVCO high throughput gasification in process; Bell High Mass Flux process; CS-R process; and Exxon Gasification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents a technical assessment of the following advanced coal gasification processes: AVCO High Throughput Gasification (HTG) Process, Bell Single - Stage High Mass Flux (HMF) Process, Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Hydrogasification Process, and the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) Process. Each process is evaluated for its potential to produce SNG from a bituminous coal. In addition to identifying the new technology these processes represent, key similarities/differences, strengths/weaknesses, and potential improvements to each process are identified. The AVCO HTG and the Bell HMF gasifiers share similarities with respect to: short residence time (SRT), high throughput rate, slagging and syngas as the initial raw product gas. The CS/R Hydrogasifier is also SRT but is non-slagging and produces a raw gas high in methane content. The Exxon CCG gasifier is a long residence time, catalytic fluidbed reactor producing all of the raw product methane in the gasifier.

McCarthy, J.; Ferrall, J.; Charng, T.; Houseman, J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Feasibility study for underground coal gasification at the Krabi coal mine site, Thailand: Volume 1. Progress report, December 1--31, 1995; Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report, conducted by Energy and Environmental Research Center, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The objective of this report was to determine the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of developing, demonstrating, and commercializing underground coal gasification (UCG) at the Krabi coal mine site in Southern Thailand. This is Volume 1, the Progress Report for the period December 1, 1995, through December 31, 1995.

Young, B.C.; Schmit, C.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit. Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This represents the second quarterly progress report on Phase 2 of the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) Program. Phase 1 of this program started in March 1976 and included the design, construction, and initial operation of the PDU. On June 25, 1980, Phase 2 of the program was initiated. It covers a 1-year operations program utilizing the existing PDU and is planned to include five runs with a targeted total operating time of 9 weeks. During this report period, Run 6, the initial run of the Phase 2 program was completed. The gasification system was operated for a total of 95 h at pressures up to 10 atm. Average product gas HHV values of 100 Btu/scf were recorded during 10-atm operation, while gasifying coal at a rate of 1100 lb/h. The run was terminated when the melt overflow system plugged after 60 continuous hours of overflow. Following this run, melt withdrawal system revisions were made, basically by changing the orifice materials from Monofrax to an 80 Cobalt-20 Chromium alloy. By the end of the report period, the PDU was being prepared for Run 7.

Not Available

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal gasification research program. Safety audits of pilot plants and PDU's  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M.W. Kellogg (formerly Pullmann Kellogg) was requested by DOE to investigate and to evaluate normal and emergency operating procedures and the drawing record systems of the coal gasification pilot plants and process development units (PDU). The purpose of this Safety Audit was to identify deficiencies in operating policies or procedures which could lead to potential hazards. The evaluation of safety-related documentation at the pilot plants and PDU's was also included in the audit. The safety audit visits and meetings were conducted at the following research sites: Bell Aerosopace, BCR BI-GAS, Exxon, IGT Hygas/Peatgas, Rockwell International, and Westinghouse. Kellogg conducted the safety audits requested by DOE. These reviews show the developers as possessing very sincere, positive attitudes toward safety and as being committed to ongoing safety programs. Kellogg found that (in general) all of the developers: use written statements of objectives, operating procedures and check lists; have some form of formal safety training for operators; review equipment and procedural revisions with operators; and maintain timely and accurate drawing records.

Bostwick, L.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Lee, M.D.; Miller, G.R.; Bernard, D.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Materials testing at the Hanna-IV and Hoe Creek-III in situ coal-gasification sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Candidate structural alloys were exposed to the direct product gas stream during three different in situ coal gasification experiments at two sites. Physical appearance and chemical analysis indicate that the coating on the specimens following exposure is typical of condensed hydrocarbons, coal char, coal ash, and mineral particles from the overburden. Deposits on specimens from one test had a fairly high concentration of sulfur (about 8 w/o) while the others had very low sulfur concentrations (0.313 w/o and 0.014 w/o, respectively). Energy-dispersive x-ray spectra indicate that corrosion occurred principally by oxidation, with some sulfidation. Mean penetration rates expressed in millimetres/year were calculated from weight loss data. No material evaluated showed a truly unacceptable degradation. There was no consistent difference in the amount of material removed from specimens with or without welds. Specimens from one test experienced no consistent difference in material removal between different exposure angles; a consistent difference in material loss and dents from particle impact indicated that erosion may have occurred in the other two tests. There was no indication of carburization, decarburization, or severe localized attack in the form of pitting or intergranular corrosion on any of the specimens examined. Results obtained for the flame-sprayed 316 SS specimens and one of the Alonized specimens indicated that use of these processes may be questionable in this environment.

Loop, R.B.; LaRue, D.M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Study of the treatability of wastewater from a coal-gasification plant. Final report, July 15, 1978-July 14, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focused on the coal gasification facility serving the Holston Army Ammunition Plant in Kingsport, Tennessee. Objectives were to characterize the wastewater produced by the gasification facility, and to evaluate technology for treating the waste in preparation for dischage to the environment. Most wastewater was recycled for scrubbing and cooling the product gas, with the excess requiring disposal found to be an average of only 1170 gallons per day (53 gallons per ton of coal, as received, and 366 gallons per million cubic feet of product gas). Analysis indicated that the waste was warm, high in alkaline material, especially ammonia, high in organic material, especially phenols, and also contaminated with other substances. Sulfides and thiocyanates were especially high in concentration. It was found that pretreatment could be accomplished by stripping (air injection) at high pH, removal of grease and oil (by pH suppression and light aeration) and neutralizatin. Equations were developed to describe the first two steps. Biological treatment through activated sludge was found to be successful, but effected only a moderate degree of treatment, and was troubled with frequent process upset. Attempts to improve treatment efficiency and stability are described. The data indicated the need to study aerated waste stabilization ponds as an alternative to activated sludge. Biological reaction kinetics were studied for activated sludge. Evaluation of the application of granular activated carbon suggested that this could be an effective practical tertiary treatment.

Iglar, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electricity Market Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Advanced Coal - Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Advanced Coal with carbon sequestration OilGas Steam - OilGas Steam Turbine Combined Cycle - Conventional...

139

LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, July-Sep 1980. [Hoe Creek and Gorgas, Alabama tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal have continued. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition to obtaining a qualitative comparison of the forward burn characteristics of two coals, we obtained information on the influence of bedding plane/cleat structure orientation on the early-time shape of the burn cavity in the Roland coal. We have improved our model of the coal drying rate during underground coal gasification (UCG) by adding refinements to the model. To aid in analyzing and predicting the performance of UCG tests, we have developed a simple gas-compositional model. When the model was tested against experimental data from the three Hoe Creek experiments, it was able to match very closely the observed gas compositions, energy fractions, and water influxes. This model can be used to make performance predictions consistent with the material and energy balance constraints of the underground system. A postburn coring and wireline-logging study is under way at the Hoe Creek No. 3 site to investigate the overall effect of the directionally-drilled, horizontal linking hole to better estimate the amount of coal gasified and the shape of the combustion front, and to provide additional information on subsurface deformation and thermal effects. The site reclamation work was completed, including the dismantling of all surface equipment and piping and the plugging and sealing of process and diagnostics wells. Final grading of the reclaimed land has been completed, and the area is ready for disk-seeding. Our survey of the UCG literature has continued with a review of the extensive tests at Gorgas, Alabama, carried on by the US Bureau of Mines from 1947 to 1959.

Olness, D.U. (ed.)

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBTL plants, and integrated coal gasification and combined cycle (IGCC) plants without carbon capture and storage (CCS)-is increased by 3 percentage points to reflect the...

142

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in the IGCC system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high-temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy will improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The Fe- and Ni-based high-temperature alloys are susceptible to sulfidation attack unless they are fortified with high levels of Cr, Al, and Si. To impart corrosion resistance, these elements need not be in the bulk of the alloy and need only be present at the surface layers. In this study, the use of corrosion-resistant coatings on low alloy steels was investigated for use as high-temperature components in IGCC systems. The coatings were deposited using SRI's fluidized-bed reactor chemical vapor deposition technique. Diffusion coatings of Cr and Al were deposited by this method on to dense and porous, low alloy stainless steel substrates. Bench-scale exposure tests at 900 C with a simulated coal gas stream containing 1.7% H{sub 2}S showed that the low alloy steels such SS405 and SS409 coated with {approx}20%Cr and Al each can be resistant to sulfidation attack for 500 h. However, exposure to an actual coal gasifier gas stream at the Wabash River gasifier facility for 1000 h in the temperature range 900 to 950 C indicated that Cr and Al present in the coating diffused further into the substrate decreasing the protective ability of these elements against attack by H{sub 2}S. Similarly, adherent multilayer coatings containing Si, Ti, Al, and Nb were also deposited with subsequent nitridation of these elements to increase the corrosion resistance. Both dense and porous SS409 or SS 410 alloy substrates were coated by using this method. Multilayer coatings containing Ti-Al-Si nitrides along with a diffusion barrier of Nb were deposited on SS410 and they were found also to be resistant to sulfidation attack in the bench scale tests at 900 C. However, they were corroded during exposure to the actual coal gasifier stream at the Wabash River gasifier facility for 1000 h. The Cr/Al coatings deposited inside a porous substrate was found to be resistant to sulfidation attack in the bench-scale simulated tests at 370 C. The long-term exposure test at the Wabash River gasifier facility at 370 C for 2100 h showed that only a minor sulfidation attack occurred inside the porous SS 409 alloy coupons that contained Cr and Al diffusion coatings. This attack can be prevented by improving the coating process to deposit uniform coatings at the interior of the porous structure. It is recommended that additional studies be initiated to optimize the FBR-CVD process to deposit diffusion coatings of the corrosion resistant elements such as Cr, Al, and Ti inside porous metal filters to increase their corrosion resistance. Long-term exposure tests using an actual gas stream from an operating gasifier need to be conducted to determine the suitability of the coatings for use in the gasifier environment.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Jordi Perez; Marc Hornbostel; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coal gasification system with a modulated on/off control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modulated control system is provided for improving regulation of the bed level in a fixed-bed coal gasifier into which coal is fed from a rotary coal feeder. A nuclear bed level gauge using a cobalt source and an ion chamber detector is used to detect the coal bed level in the gasifier. The detector signal is compared to a bed level set point signal in a primary controller which operates in proportional/integral modes to produce an error signal. The error signal is modulated by the injection of a triangular wave signal of a frequency of about 0.0004 Hz and an amplitude of about 80% of the primary deadband. The modulated error signal is fed to a triple-deadband secondary controller which jogs the coal feeder speed up or down by on/off control of a feeder speed change driver such that the gasifier bed level is driven toward the set point while preventing excessive cycling (oscillation) common in on/off mode automatic controllers of this type. Regulation of the bed level is achieved without excessive feeder speed control jogging.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan Project...

147

Coal gasification apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

Nagy, Charles K. (Monaca, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

149

NETL: Coal Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSCJeffreyKey Actions for

150

Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth quarterly reports, December 1978 through August 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the Hanna IV In Situ Coal Gasification Test, Hanna IV-B, was initiated on April 20, 1979. The reverse combustion linking process was completed July 13, 1979, and gasification began July 28, 1979. Sandia Laboratories is providing support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. All techniques are supported by a minicomputer-based, field data acquisition system developed for this application which provides on-site, real-time reduction, analysis and display of the experimental data. Results to date show the development of at least three links, and the progress of the gasification front is being monitored. There have also been developments in hardware for use in the planned Hoe Creek III experiment, notably an inverted thermocouple string with a lateral transmission device. To support all field activities an in-house computing system with complete data base storage capability has been assembled.

Glass, R.E. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: 4th Annual Combined Heat and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

prime movers * Fossil - Coal gasification - Natural Gas - Diesel * Renewable - Biogas - Solar Identify market opportunities driven by...

152

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Providing Clean, Low-Cost,...

153

An Integrated Assessment of the Impacts of Hydrogen Economy on Transportation, Energy Use, and Air Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Outlook coal gasification compressed natural gastechnologies, including gasification and water electrolysis.of natural gas, coal gasification was the preferred method

Yeh, Sonia; Loughlin, Daniel H.; Shay, Carol; Gage, Cynthia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of silicon and titanium on the corrosion of low-alloy steels in a simulated coal gasification environment at 600 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of corrosion tests carried out on a series of Fe-12% Cr alloys in coal gasification environments t 600 C were studied. Effects of Si and Ti on corrosion resistance were assessed using data obtained from a commercial 12% Cr alloy, type 410 (UNS S41000), three specially cast model 12% Cr alloys containing 2.7% Si with Ti levels of 0%, 0.4% and 0.7%, respectively, and a higher alloy (type 28 [UNS N08028]) heat exchanger steel. Corrosion tests were carried out using simulated dry-feed entrained slagging gasifier gas The gas (64% carbon monoxide [CO], 3.8% carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], 0.8% hydrogen sulfide [H{sub 2}S], and balance H{sub 2} [in vol%]) was premixed and passed over the test pieces at a rate high enough to prevent thermodynamic equilibrium achievement. Results showed that Si had a strongly beneficial influence on corrosion resistance. Ti, depending upon the amount added, exerted a positive or negative influence on corrosion resistance and reduced problems associated with workability. The kinetics of corrosion were presented in terms of weight-change and metal-loss measurements, the synergistic influences of Si and Ti were discussed, and corrosion resistance was compared with that exhibited by a commercial 12% Cr steel and type 28, the higher alloy material.

Soler, J.L.J.; Baxter, D.J.; Norton, J.F.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI Coal-Gasification Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities included contained monitoring of test operations at the Hygas, BI-GAS, Westinghoue, Exxon and Bell plant sites. Peat gasification laboratory tests were also monitored; Rockwell testing ended during June. Pilot Plant/PDU test runs monitored and reported were: Hygas Test 87 (the last of the pilot plant series), BI-GAS Tests G-13 and G-14, Westinghouse test runs TP-027, TP-027-4 and TP-027-5, Exxon test periods 19 through 21 and Bell Tests 2174 through 3195. Kellogg continued its work on the Hygas data base evaluation and began an evaluation of the scaleup risks of the Westinghouse oxygen-blown gasifier. Work under new task orders was initiated. The topics included are: Technical/Economic Assessments of Westinghouse, Exxon and Peatgas, Gasifier Vessel Design, Technical/Economic Comparisons of Westinghouse and U-Gas, Peat Harvesting and Dewatering, and Carbonyl Formation in Coal Gasification processes. Economics are essentially complete for the Screening Evaluations of Westinghouse, Exxon and Rockwell and report preparation has begun. Work on the Pilot/Plant PDU Safety Evaluation Task continued.

Bostwick, L.E.; Brancheau, R.J.; Castiglioni, B.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

Raber, E.; Stone, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock and to determine and evaluate the mineralogical and textural changes that were imposed by the experiment. Within the burn cavity the various sedimentary units have been brecciated and thermally altered to form several pyrometamorphic rock types of paralava rock, paralava breccia, buchite, buchite breccia and hornfels. High temperature minerals of mullite, cordierite, oligo-clase-andesine, tridymite, cristobalite, clinopyroxenes, and magnetite are common in the pyrometamorphic rocks. The habit of these minerals indicates that they crystallized from a melt. These minerals and textures suggest that the rocks were formed at temperatures between 1200/sup 0/ and 1400/sup 0/C. A comparison of geologic and geological-technological factors between the Hoe Creek III site, which experienced substantial roof collapse, and the Hanna II site, which had only moderate roof collapse, indicates that overburden thickness relative to coal seam thickness, degree of induration of overburden rock, injection-production well spacing, and ultimate cavity size are important controls of roof collapse in the structural setting of the two sites.

Ethridge, F.C.; Burns, L.K.; Alexander, W.G.; Craig, G.N. II; Youngberg, A.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Twentieth quarterly report: September-November 1979. [Hanna IV and Hoe Creek III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification test, Hanna IV-B, which was initiated on April 20, 1979, was completed on October 4, 1979. Sandia National Laboratories provided support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. During the final gasification stage, 765 tons of coal were reacted involving 17,000 cubic feet. The Hoe Creek III experiment conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratories began on August 15, 1979, and was terminated on October 10, 1979. The purpose of the experiment was to test the drilled borehole linking concept. Sandia National Laboratories' involvement consisted of fielding and monitoring both an inverted thermocouple and a surface electrical resistivity network. The inverted thermocouple was successfully tested and provided thermal data from beneath the burn zone. A real time analysis procedure for the electrical resistivity technique was implemented at Hoe Creek III. Unfortunately, there was insufficient change in the data for this to have been a useful diagnostic. Efforts are continuing to identify the reason for this lack of response.

Glass, R.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced development of a pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized-bed coal gasification system. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Westinghouse coal gasification program is to demonstrate the viability of the Westinghouse pressurized, fluidized bed, gasification system for the production of medium-Btu fuel gas for syngas, electrical power generation, chemical feedstocks, or industrial fuels and to obtain performance and scaleup data for the process and hardware. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) operation and maintenance of the process development unit (PDU); (2) process analysis; (3) cold flow scaleup facility; (4) process and component engineering and design; and (5) laboratory support studies. Some of the highlights for this period are: TP-032-1, a single stage, oxygen-steam blown gasifier test was conducted in three operational phases from March 30, 1982 through May 2, 1982; TP-032-2 was conducted in two operational phases from May 20, 1982 through May 27, 1982; TP-032-1 and TP-032-2 successfully served as shakedown and demonstrations of the full cyclone cold wall; no visible deposits were found on the cold wall after processing highly fouling coals; samples of product gas produced during TP-032-1, were passed through four different scrubbing solutions and analyzed for 78 EPA primary organic pollutants, all of which were found to be below detection limits; TP-M004, a CO/sub 2/ tracer gas test, was initiated and completed; data analysis of test TP-M002-2 was completed and conclusions are summarized in this report; design, procurement and fabrication of the solids injection device were completed; laboratory studies involved gas-solids flow modeling and coal/ash behavior. 2 references, 11 figures, 39 tables.

None

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INTEGRATION OVERVIEW Start - Oct 2008 Finish - Oct 2012 37% complete Barriers addressed Heavy truck thermal efficiency Aftertreatment cost Combined NOx and PM emissions * Total...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

LLL in situ coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979. [Hoe Creek No. 3 and planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major effort this quarter has been postexperiment analysis of Hoe Creek No. 3 and planning for future gasification experiments. Hoe Creek No. 3: Thermal data have been analyzed to determine the performance of the drilled horizontal channel during forward gasification. Thermal and material balance data are combined to determine late-time burn boundaries for the experiment. Surface subsidence after the experiment was completed is described. Process wells were inspected to determine failure characteristics and pinpoint late-time injection location. Ground-water quality before and after Hoe Creek No. 3 and the effects of aquifer interconnection on hydraulic measurements at the Hoe Creek No. 2 and No. 3 sites are discussed. Future experiments: Potential UCG sites are being characterized for future tests. Two sites in the Powder River Basin near Gillette, Wyoming are discussed. Preliminary plans for a deep site gasification experiment and a new method for in situ gasification of thick seams are presented.

Cena, R.J.; Strack, B.S. (eds.)

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities during the third quarter of 1979 included the continued monitoring of test operations at the Hygas, BI-GAS, Westinghouse, Exxon and Rockwell plant sites. Test runs monitored and reported were: Hygas 80, 81 and 82, BI-GAS G-8, G-8A and G-8B, Westinghouse TP-022-2, TP-023-1, Exxon startup activities and Rockwell 318-011 through 318-023. Kellogg continued to monitor design and construction of the Bell Aerospace PDU and the bench-scale and non-integrated PDU activities on peat at the IGT laboratories. Kellogg participated in discussion with DOE and GRI concerning the proposed extension of Kellogg's contract to 31 March 1981. Kellog personnel attended program review meetings at IGT in July, at Rockwell and C.F. Braun in August and at Westinghouse in September. Kellogg continued participation in Metals Properties Council activities. At the request of MPC members, Kellogg prepared a series of recommendations for obtaining data useful for future design of gasification plants. Kellogg personnel attended the semi-annual meeting of MPC Subcommittee 9. Work on the draft report on DOE Task No. 3, Consultation on Westinghouse PDU, has been completed. Work on DOE Task No. 4, PDU Screening Analysis continued with final definitions of process flowsheets and operating conditions. Kellogg continued work on DOE Task No. 5, Safety Assurance Study. Information and data are being gathered on the safety-related aspects of the several processes. Work on DOE Task No. 6, Westinghouse Risk Analysis, has been started.

Cover, A.E.; Bostwick, L.E.; Gunderson, J.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Apparatus for solar coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for using focused solar radiation to gasify coal and other carbonaceous materials is described. Incident solar radiation is focused from an array of heliostats through a window onto the surface of a moving bed of coal, contained within a gasification reactor. The reactor is designed to minimize contact between the window and solids in the reactor. Steam introduced into the gasification reactor reacts with the heated coal to produce gas consisting mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, commonly called synthesis gas, which can be converted to methane, methanol, gasoline, and other useful products. One of the novel features of the invention is the generation of process steam in one embodiment at the rear surface of a secondary mirror used to redirect the focused sunlight. Another novel feature of the invention is the location and arrangement of the array of mirrors on an inclined surface (e.g., a hillside) to provide for direct optical communication of said mirrors and the carbonaceous feed without a secondary redirecting mirror.

Gregg, D.W.

1980-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

165

Coal Gasification | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

concentrated CO2 stream can subsequently be captured and sequestered. Learn more about carbon capture and sequestration. Why Is This Technology Being Considered? The United...

166

future energy resources irtually every energy study recommends that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production, transmission, and storage; (4) clean coal technologies, such as the Integrated Coal Gasification

167

Combined Field Integral Equation Based Theory of Characteristic Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional electric field integral equation based theory is susceptible to the spurious internal resonance problem when the characteristic modes of closed perfectly conducting objects are computed iteratively. In this paper, we present a combined field integral equation based theory to remove the difficulty of internal resonances in characteristic mode analysis. The electric and magnetic field integral operators are shown to share a common set of non-trivial characteristic pairs (values and modes), leading to a generalized eigenvalue problem which is immune to the internal resonance corruption. Numerical results are presented to validate the proposed formulation. This work may offer efficient solutions to characteristic mode analysis which involves electrically large closed surfaces.

Qi I. Dai; Qin S. Liu; Hui Gan; Weng Cho Chew

2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

169

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop and evaluate novel sorbents for the Siemens Westinghouse Power Company's (SWPC's) ''Ultra-Clean Gas Cleaning Process'' for reducing to near-zero levels the sulfur- and chlorine-containing gas emissions and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) caused by fuel bound constituents found in carbonaceous materials, which are processed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technologies.

Javad Abbasian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected six integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.; Reuther, R.B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Air-blown Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Power Cogeneration, Inc. (CPC) has requested financial assistance from DOE for the design construction, and operation of a normal 1270 ton-per-day (120-MWe), air-blown integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) demonstration plant. The demonstration plant would produce both power for the utility grid and steam for a nearby industrial user. The objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate air-blown, fixed-bed Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology. The integrated performance to be demonstrated will involve all the subsystems in the air-blown IGCC system to include coal feeding; a pressurized air-blown, fixed-bed gasifier capable of utilizing caking coal; a hot gas conditioning systems for removing sulfur compounds, particulates, and other contaminants as necessary to meet environmental and combustion turbine fuel requirements; a conventional combustion turbine appropriately modified to utilize low-Btu coal gas as fuel; a briquetting system for improved coal feed performance; the heat recovery steam generation system appropriately modified to accept a NO{sub x} reduction system such as the selective catalytic reduction process; the steam cycle; the IGCC control systems; and the balance of plant. The base feed stock for the project is an Illinois Basin bituminous high-sulfur coal, which is a moderately caking coal. 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its application Copersucar, CP 162, Piracicaba, SP ­ Brazil ­ 13400-970 Biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined-from-sugarcane program. 1. Introduction The biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cy- cle (BIG

174

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Evaluation of the IGT Peatgas PDU data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As requested by DOE, Kellogg has reviewed the data base generated by IGT for the Peatgas process during laboratory and PDU testing. Kellogg's central finding, from the review reported here, is that the existing data base contains sufficient evidence to warrant further evaluation of the Peatgas process at pilot plant scale. The existing data base relates to testing with peats from (primarily) Minnesota, North Carolina and Maine. Thermobalance studies were employed to define a few kinetic parameters, i.e., the rate of base carbon conversion. Numerous tests using a small coiled-tube reactor and the lift-line PDU were conducted to investigate hydrogasification, where hydrogen or a steam/hydrogen mixture was the reactive gas. A fluidized bed PDU was employed to investigate steam-oxygen gasification and fluidization relationships were studied. The primary advantages to be gained by Peatgas pilot plant testing are, in Kellogg's opinion, the demonstration and evaluation of the three process stages (drying, hydrogasification and steam-oxygen gasification) in an integrated mode. The lack of integrated operation is a significant shortcoming of the existing data base and as such Kellogg would not recommend use of the data base for purposes other than pilot plant design and preliminary engineering studies. Other more specific comments regarding the data base are given.

Bostwick, L.E.; Chen, R.G.; Hubbard, D.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development and application of optimal design capability for coal gasification systems - Task 1 (Volume 1, 2 and 3). Topical report, July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a process for the post-combustion removal of NO{sub x} from the flue gas of fossil-fuel-fired power plants. SCR is capable of NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of up to 80 or 90 percent. SCR technology has been applied for treatment of flue gases from a variety of emission sources, including natural gas- and oil-fired gas turbines, process steam boilers in refineries, and coal-fired power plants. SCR applications to coal-fired power plants have occurred in Japan and Germany. Full-scale SCR systems have not been applied to coal-fired power plants in the U.S., although there have been small-scale demonstration projects. SCR has become increasingly widely applied in the U.S. to natural-gas fired gas turbine combined cycle systems. In the remainder of this section, we review the applicability of SCR, as well as the need for post-combustion NO{sub x} control, for several power generation systems.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heat exchanger for coal gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

Blasiole, George A. (Greensburg, PA)

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fluidized bed catalytic coal gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents (16) are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 volume percent and 21 volume percent oxygen at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 250.degree. C. in an oxidation zone (24) and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone (44) at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, Jr., Charles A. (15163 Dianna La., Houston, TX 77062); Wesselhoft, Robert D. (120 Caldwell, Baytown, TX 77520); Dunkleman, John J. (3704 Autumn La., Baytown, TX 77520); Aquino, Dolores C. (15142 McConn, Webster, TX 77598); Gouker, Toby R. (5413 Rocksprings Dr., LaPorte, TX 77571)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Apparatus and method for solar coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for using focused solar radiation to gasify coal and other carbonaceous materials. Incident solar radiation is focused from an array of heliostats onto a tower-mounted secondary mirror which redirects the focused solar radiation down through a window onto the surface of a vertically-moving bed of coal, or a fluidized bed of coal, contained within a gasification reactor. The reactor is designed to minimize contact between the window and solids in the reactor. Steam introduced into the gasification reactor reacts with the heated coal to produce gas consisting mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, commonly called "synthesis gas", which can be converted to methane, methanol, gasoline, and other useful products. One of the novel features of the invention is the generation of process steam at the rear surface of the secondary mirror.

Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic Feedstock - EnergyCoal Fly Ash as

182

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the feasibility of integrating SCR and DPF technologies for the next generation of emission control systems for on-road heavy-truck application deer11rappe.pdf More Documents &...

183

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules Reyyan Koc, Nikolaos K. Kazantzis, William J. Nuttall and Yi Hua Ma May 2012 CWPE 1226... & EPRG 1211 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EP RG W OR KI NG P AP ER Abstract Economic Rationale for Safety Investment in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Gas Turbine Membrane Reactor Modules EPRG Working Paper 1211 Cambridge...

Koc, Reyyan; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Nuttall, William J.; Ma, Yi Hua

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development efforts have been underway for decades to replace dry-gas cleaning technology with humid-gas cleaning technology that would maintain the water vapor content in the raw gas by conducting cleaning at sufficiently high temperature to avoid water vapor condensation and would thus significantly simplify the plant and improve its thermal efficiency. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. conducted a program with the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to develop a Novel Gas Cleaning process that uses a new type of gas-sorbent contactor, the ''filter-reactor''. The Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process described and evaluated here is in its early stages of development and this evaluation is classified as conceptual. The commercial evaluations have been coupled with integrated Process Development Unit testing performed at a GTI coal gasifier test facility to demonstrate, at sub-scale the process performance capabilities. The commercial evaluations and Process Development Unit test results are presented in Volumes 1 and 2 of this report, respectively. Two gas cleaning applications with significantly differing gas cleaning requirements were considered in the evaluation: IGCC power generation, and Methanol Synthesis with electric power co-production. For the IGCC power generation application, two sets of gas cleaning requirements were applied, one representing the most stringent ''current'' gas cleaning requirements, and a second set representing possible, very stringent ''future'' gas cleaning requirements. Current gas cleaning requirements were used for Methanol Synthesis in the evaluation because these cleaning requirements represent the most stringent of cleaning requirements and the most challenging for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process. The scope of the evaluation for each application was: (1) Select the configuration for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning Process, the arrangement of the individual gas cleaning stages, and the probable operating conditions of the gas cleaning stages to conceptually satisfy the gas cleaning requirements; (2) Estimate process material & energy balances for the major plant sections and for each gas cleaning stage; (3) Conceptually size and specify the major gas cleaning process equipment; (4) Determine the resulting overall performance of the application; and (5) Estimate the investment cost and operating cost for each application. Analogous evaluation steps were applied for each application using conventional gas cleaning technology, and comparison was made to extract the potential benefits, issues, and development needs of the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology. The gas cleaning process and related gas conditioning steps were also required to meet specifications that address plant environmental emissions, the protection of the gas turbine and other Power Island components, and the protection of the methanol synthesis reactor. Detailed material & energy balances for the gas cleaning applications, coupled with preliminary thermodynamic modeling and laboratory testing of candidate sorbents, identified the probable sorbent types that should be used, their needed operating conditions in each stage, and their required levels of performance. The study showed that Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology can be configured to address and conceptually meet all of the gas cleaning requirements for IGCC, and that it can potentially overcome several of the conventional IGCC power plant availability issues, resulting in improved power plant thermal efficiency and cost. For IGCC application, Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning yields 6% greater generating capacity and 2.3 percentage-points greater efficiency under the Current Standards case, and more than 9% generating capacity increase and 3.6 percentage-points higher efficiency in the Future Standards case. While the conceptual equipment costs are estimated to be only slightly lower for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning processes than for the conventional processes, the improved power plant capacity results in the potentia

Dennis A. Horazak; Richard A. Newby; Eugene E. Smeltzer; Rachid B. Slimane; P. Vann Bush; James L. Aderhold Jr; Bruce G. Bryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. LFEE 2005-002 Report #12;#12;i ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologiesCarbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005 environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal (PC), integrated coal gasification combined cycle

189

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

Rugh, J. P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE)`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the commercialization of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems. This overview briefly describes the supporting RD&D activities and the IGCC projects selected for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program.

Ness, H.M.; Brdar, R.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D)program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, No 593 Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

California's Energy Future - The View to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCS with combustion or gasification of fossil fuels, each ofHigh-efficiency coal gasification, high-efficiency Injectionefficiency, integrated gasification injection systems with

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCS with combustion or gasification of fossil fuels, each ofHigh-efficiency coal gasification, high-efficiency Injectionefficiency, integrated gasification injection systems with

Yang, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water-splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, Marvin W. (Fairview, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine | netl.doe...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International...

203

Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method for increasing steam decomposition in a coal gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gasification of coal in the presence of steam and oxygen is significantly enhanced by introducing a thermochemical water- splitting agent such as sulfuric acid, into the gasifier for decomposing the steam to provide additional oxygen and hydrogen usable in the gasification process for the combustion of the coal and enrichment of the gaseous gasification products. The addition of the water-splitting agent into the gasifier also allows for the operation of the reactor at a lower temperature.

Wilson, M.W.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

In-situ coal gasification: a new technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the technology for underground gasification of Western US subbituminous coals is advancing through efforts at the Hanna and Hoe Creek test sites, the development of an Eastern bituminous coal technology has only begun. The Pricetown 1 field test proved the feasibility of gasifying the thin-seam, swelling bituminous coal resources. Key issues remaining to be demonstrated include an effective linkage method, means of controlling gas production and composition, and scale-up. A major field-test program could entail three phases: (1) resolving the linkage and process control problems in the Appalachian basin, (2) assessing the technology in the untested Illinois basin, and (3) testing a multimodule commercial-scale prototype.

Agarwal, A.K.; Zielinski, R.E.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Liberatore, A.J.; Martin, J.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistory History On7, 2008Science &

208

Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Kevin Galbreath

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the rod mill and weigh belt feeder undergo most expected maintenance requirements. All tanks, drums, and other areas of potential atmospheric exposure of the product slurry or...

210

Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic Feedstock - EnergyCoal Fly Ash asCoal

211

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing, an National Carbon Capture Center at ,iMA-110662Wabash River

212

Hydrogen separation by ceramic membranes in coal gasification. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general objective of this project was to develop hydrogen permselective membranes for hydrogen production from coal gas. The project consisted of the following tasks: (i) membrane preparation and characterization, (ii) membrane stability testing, and (iii) analysis and economic evaluation of a membrane-assisted ammonia from coal process. Several oxides (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in dense (or nonporous) form were identified to be permselective to hydrogen at elevated temperatures. To obtain reasonable permeance it is necessary that the membrane consists of a thin selective layer of the dense oxide supported on or within the pores of a porous support tube (or plate). Early in the project we chose porous Vycor tubes (5mm ID, 7 mm OD, 40 {Angstrom} mean pore diameter) supplied by Corning Inc. as the membrane support. To form the permselective layer (SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) we employed chemical vapor deposition using the reaction of the chloride (SiCl{sub 4}, etc.) vapor and water vapor at high temperatures. Deposition of the selective layer was carried out in a simple concentric tube reactor comprising the porous support tube surrounded by a wider concentric quartz tube and placed in an electrically heated split tube furnace. In one deposition geometry (the opposing reactants or two-sided geometry) the chloride vapor in nitrogen carrier was passed through the inner tube while the water vapor also in nitrogen carrier was passed in the same direction through the annulus between the two tubes. In the other (two-sided) geometry the chloride-containing stream and the water-containing stream were both passed through the inner tube or both through the annulus.

Gavalas, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An Integrated Assessment of the Impacts of Hydrogen Economy on Transportation, Energy Use, and Air Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. [36] EIA, Annual energy outlook 2005 with projectionsAdministration, Annual energy outlook 2006 with projectionsMC NRC O&M SMR WTW Annual Energy Outlook coal gasification

Yeh, Sonia; Loughlin, Daniel H.; Shay, Carol; Gage, Cynthia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heat release rate markers for premixed combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

–1075. [21] Report: Hydrogen from Coal Program: Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan for the period 2008 through 2016. U.S. Department of Energy, 2008. [22] Report: Wabash River Coal Gasification re-powering Project: A DOE Assesment. U.S. Department... of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2002. [23] O. Maustard, Report: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, An Overview of Coal based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology, 2005. [24] R...

Nikolaou, Zacharias M.; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

EIS-0382: Mesaba Energy Project Itasca County, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NOTE: All DOE funding has been expended. This EIS evalutes the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and demonstrate a commercial utility-scale next-generation Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generating facility having a capacity of 606 MWe (net). It will incorporate over 1,600 design and operational lessons learned from the successful but smaller-scale 262 MWe (net) Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project, located in Terre Haute, Indiana.

216

Worldwide construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper lists major construction projects in worldwide processing and pipelining, showing capacities, contractors, estimated costs, and time of construction. The lists are divided into refineries, petrochemical plants, sulfur recovery units, gas processing plants, pipelines, and related fuel facilities. This last classification includes cogeneration plants, coal liquefaction and gasification plants, biomass power plants, geothermal power plants, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plants, and a coal briquetting plant.

Williamson, M.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FORSuperiorThe Office ofScience| Department of3Combined|

219

Methods and Issues for the Combined Use of Integral Experiments and Covariance Data: Results of a NEA International Collaborative Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the Nuclear Science Committee under the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) established a Subgroup (called “Subgroup 33”) in 2009 on “Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data.” The first stage was devoted to producing the description of different adjustment methodologies and assessing their merits. A detailed document related to this first stage has been issued. Nine leading organizations (often with a long and recognized expertise in the field) have contributed: ANL, CEA, INL, IPPE, JAEA, JSI, NRG, IRSN and ORNL. In the second stage a practical benchmark exercise was defined in order to test the reliability of the nuclear data adjustment methodology. A comparison of the results obtained by the participants and major lessons learned in the exercise are discussed in the present paper that summarizes individual contributions which often include several original developments not reported separately. The paper provides the analysis of the most important results of the adjustment of the main nuclear data of 11 major isotopes in a 33-group energy structure. This benchmark exercise was based on a set of 20 well defined integral parameters from 7 fast assembly experiments. The exercise showed that using a common shared set of integral experiments but different starting evaluated libraries and/or different covariance matrices, there is a good convergence of trends for adjustments. Moreover, a significant reduction of the original uncertainties is often observed. Using the a–posteriori covariance data, there is a strong reduction of the uncertainties of integral parameters for reference reactor designs, mainly due to the new correlations in the a–posteriori covariance matrix. Furthermore, criteria have been proposed and applied to verify the consistency of differential and integral data used in the adjustment. Finally, recommendations are given for an appropriate use of sensitivity analysis methods and indications for future work are provided.

Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A modeling software linking approach for the analysis of an integrated reforming combined cycle with hot potassium carbonate CO[subscript 2] capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this study is the analysis of an integrated reforming combined cycle (IRCC) with natural gas as fuel input. This IRCC consisted of a hydrogen-fired gas turbine (GT) with a single-pressure steam bottoming cycle ...

Nord, Lars Olof

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CPC air-blown integrated gasification combined cycle project. Quarterly report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project cost and schedule. The combustion turbine commercial operation date is scheduled for 7/1/95 with the combined cycle commercial operation date of 7/1/96. A two year demonstration period will commence after IGCC commercial operation. Details of costs on a total project and DOE Envelope basis along with detailed schedule components were covered. Major cost variances to date were discussed. The major variances this year relate to contracts which were anticipated to be finalized mid 1992 but which are not executed. These include GEESI, the ASU and key vessels. Some of these contracts are almost in place and others are scheduled for the first quarter 1993. Numerous project specifications, process flow diagrams, piping and instrument diagrams and other drawings have been reviewed and approved as part of the preliminary engineering process.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITY ON STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OF Ni-YSZ ANODE OF SOFCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity production through the integration of coal gasification with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may potentially be an efficient technique for clean energy generation. However, multiple minor and trace components are naturally present in coals. These impurities in coal gas not only degrade the electrochemical performance of Ni-YSZ anode used in SOFCs, but also severely endanger the structural integrity of the Ni-YSZ anode. In this paper, effect of the trace impurity of the coal syngases on the mechanical degradation of Ni-YSZ anode was studied by using an integrated experimental/modeling approach. Phosphorus is taken as an example of impurity. Anode-support button cell was used to experimentally explore the migration of phosphorous impurity in the Ni-YSZ anode of SOFCs. X-ray mapping was used to show elemental distributions and new phase formation. The subsequent finite element stress analyses were conducted using the actual microstructure of the anode to illustrate the degradation mechanism. It was found that volume expansion induced by the Ni phase change produces high stress level such that local failure of the Ni-YSZ anode is possible under the operating conditions

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The U.S. Department of Energy`s integrated gasification combined cycle research, development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, coal has played a major role as a fuel source for power generation both domestically and abroad. Despite increasingly stringent environmental constraints and affordable natural gas, coal will remain one of the primary fuels for producing electricity. This is due to its abundance throughout the world, low price, ease of transport an export, decreasing capital cost for coal-based systems, and the need to maintain fuel diversity. Recognizing the role coal will continue to play, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working in partnership with industry to develop ways to use this abundant fuel resource in a manner that is more economical, more efficient and environmentally superior to conventional means to burn coal. The most promising of these technologies is integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Although IGCC systems offer many advantages, there are still several hurdles that must be overcome before the technology achieves widespread commercial acceptance. The major hurdles to commercialization include reducing capital and operating costs, reducing technical risk, demonstrating environmental and technical performance at commercial scale, and demonstrating system reliability and operability. Overcoming these hurdles, as well as continued progress in improving system efficiency, are the goals of the DOE IGCC research, development and demonstrate (RD and D) program. This paper provides an overview of this integrated RD and D program and describes fundamental areas of technology development, key research projects and their related demonstration scale activities.

Brdar, R.D.; Cicero, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water gas shift reaction (WGSR) plays a major role in increasing the hydrogen production from fossil fuels. However, the enhanced hydrogen production is limited by thermodynamic constrains posed by equilibrium limitations of WGSR. This project aims at using a mesoporous, tailored, highly reactive calcium based sorbent system for incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} product which drives the equilibrium limited WGSR forward. In addition, a pure sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced simultaneously. A detailed project vision with the description of integration of this concept with an existing coal gasification process for hydrogen production is presented. Conceptual reactor designs for investigating the simultaneous water gas shift and the CaO carbonation reactions are presented. In addition, the options for conducting in-situ sorbent regeneration under vacuum or steam are also reported. Preliminary, water gas shift reactions using high temperature shift catalyst and without any sorbent confirmed the equilibrium limitation beyond 600 C demonstrating a carbon monoxide conversion of about 80%. From detailed thermodynamic analyses performed for fuel gas streams from typical gasifiers the optimal operating temperature range to prevent CaO hydration and to effect its carbonation is between 575-830 C.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, or cogeneration systems, generated electrical/mechanical and thermal energy simultaneously, recovering much of the energy normally lost in separate generation. This recovered energy can be used for heating or cooling purposes, eliminating the need for a separate boiler. Significant reductions in energy, criteria pollutants, and carbon emissions can be achieved from the improved efficiency of fuel use. Generating electricity on or near the point of use also avoids transmission and distribution losses and defers expansion of the electricity transmission grid. Several recent developments make dramatic expansion of CHP a cost-effective possibility over the next decade. First, advances in technologies such as combustion turbines, steam turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells. and heat-recovery equipment have decreased the cost and improved the performance of CHP systems. Second, a significant portion of the nation's boiler stock will need to be replaced in the next decade, creating an opportunity to upgrade this equipment with clean and efficient CHP systems. Third, environmental policies, including addressing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, have created pressures to find cleaner and more efficient means of using energy. Finally, electric power market restructuring is creating new opportunities for innovations in power generation and smaller-scale distributed systems such as CHP. The integrated analysis suggests that there is enormous potential for the installation of cost-effective CHP in the industrial, district energy, and buildings sectors. The projected additional capacity by 2010 is 73 GW with corresponding energy savings of 2.6 quadrillion Btus, carbon emissions reductions of 74 million metric tons, 1.4 million tons of avoided SO{sub 2} emissions, and 0.6 million tons of avoided NO{sub x} emissions. The authors estimate that this new CHP would require cumulative capital investments of roughly $47 billion over ten years.

Kaarsberg, T.M.; Elliott, R.N.; Spurr, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Asymptotic Analysis II (1995) 31-54 31 North-Holland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposits, oil and gas reserves, assessing the integrity of chemical and nuclear waste repositories, and even in mineral extraction processes such as in situ coal gasification, enhanced oil recovery

Peirce, Anthony

227

Topping of a combined gas- and steam-turbine powerplant using a TAM combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to evaluate the engineering and economic feasibility of a thermionic array module (TAM) topped combustor for a gas turbine. A combined gas- and steam-turbine system was chosen for this study. The nominal output of the gas and steam turbines were 70 MW and 30 MW, respectively. The gas-turbine fuel was a coal-derived medium-Btu gas assumed to be from an oxygen blown Texaco coal-gasification process which produces pressurized gas with an approximate composition of 52% CO and 36% H/sub 2/. Thermionic converters are assumed to line the walls of the gas-turbine combustor, so that the high-temperature gases heat the thermionic converter emitter. The thermionic converters produce electricity while the rejected heat is used to preheat the combustion air. To maximize the production of power from the thermionic converter, the highest practical flame temperature is obtained by preheating the combustor air with the thermionic collectors and rich combustion. A portion of the air, which bypassed the combustor, is reintroduced to complete the combustion at a lower temperature and the mixed gases flow to the turbine. The exhaust gases from the turbine flow to the heat recovery boilers to the bottoming steam cycle. The gas and steam turbine system performance calculation was based on data from Brown Boveri Turbomachinery, Inc. The performance of the thermionic converters (TAM) for the reference case was based on actual measurements of converters fired with a natural gas flame. These converters have been operated in a test furnace for approximately 15,000 device hours.

Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lovell, B.T.; McCrank, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Integrated Combined Heat and Power/Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Landfill Gas to Power Applications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIan Kalin About32C:\Documents andINTEGRATED

229

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 1. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of a predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. The foundation to describe coal specific conversion behavior was AFR`s Functional Group and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, which had been previously developed. The combined FG-DVC model was integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model for combustion and coal gasification, PCGC-2, and a one-dimensional model for fixed-bed gasifiers, FBED-1. Progress utilizing these models is described.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

THE EROSION BEHAVIOR OF STEEL AS A FUNCTION OF MICROSTRUCTURE ON SOLID PARTICLE EROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Erosion Problems in Coal Gasification Processes, Speechsystems, especially coal gasification and liquefaction. 5been observed in coal gasification pilot plants caused by

Levy, Alan V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Retorting, Synthane Coal Gasification and COED CoalBeychok, M.R. , "Coal Gasification and the Phenosolvanwaters formed during coal gasification and liquefaction (Ho,

Greminger, Douglas C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF IRON-BASE TERNARY ALLOYS THAT DEVELOP Cr2O3 AND/OR Al2O3 BARRIER SCALES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resistant Alloy for Coal Gasification Service, LockheedI.M. , Table H Coal gasification atmosphere (mol fraction).development of "coal gasification" processes. large number

Nagarajan, V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced “F”-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus® is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics® simulation and integrated with MATLAB® for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB®. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Brief Review of Viscosity Models for Slag in Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many researchers have defined the phenomenon of 'slagging' as the deposition of ash in the radiative section of a boiler, while 'fouling' refers to the deposition of ash in the convective-pass region. Among the important parameters affecting ash deposition that need to be studied are ash chemistry, its transport, deposit growth, and strength development; removability of the ash deposit; heat transfer mechanisms; and the mode of operation for boilers. The heat transfer at the walls of a combustor depends on many parameters including ash deposition. This depends on the processes or parameters controlling the impact efficiency and the sticking efficiency. For a slagging combustor or furnace, however, the temperatures are so high that much of the coal particles are melted and the molten layer, in turn, captures more particles as it flows. The main problems with ash deposition are reduced heat transfer in the boiler and corrosion of the tubes. Common ways of dealing with these issues are soot blowing and wall blowing on a routine basis; however, unexpected or uncontrolled depositions can also complicate the situation, and there are always locations inaccessible to the use of such techniques. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1300 C and 1500 C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa {center_dot} s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. In such cases the slag should be regarded as a non-Newtonian suspension, consisting of liquid silicate and crystals. A better understanding of the rheological properties of the slag, such as yield stress and shear-thinning, are critical in determining the optimum operating conditions. To develop an accurate heat transfer model in any type of coal combustion or gasification process, the heat transfer and to some extent the rheological properties of ash and slag, especially in high-temperature environments need to be understood and properly modeled. The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal (and biomass for co-firing cases) present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. In this report, we first provide a brief review of the various approaches taken by different researchers in formulating or obtaining a slag viscosity model. In general, these models are based on experiments. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied.

Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fluidized-bed catalytic coal-gasification process. [US patent; pretreatment to minimize agglomeration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids impregnated with gasification catalyst constituents are oxidized by contact with a gas containing between 2 vol % and 21 vol % oxygen at a temperature between 50 and 250/sup 0/C in an oxidation zone and the resultant oxidized, catalyst impregnated solids are then gasified in a fluidized bed gasification zone at an elevated pressure. The oxidation of the catalyst impregnated solids under these conditions insures that the bed density in the fluidized bed gasification zone will be relatively high even though the solids are gasified at elevated pressure and temperature.

Euker, C.A. Jr.; Wesselhoft, R.D.; Dunkleman, J.J.; Aquino, D.C.; Gouker, T.R.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthracite coal gasification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

quickly became popular as a household... like Pittsburgh later became principal markets for bituminous coal, which was cheaper than anthracite... : anthracite,...

239

Electrochemical Membrane Separation (EMS) of Hydrogen Sulfide from Coal Gasification Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to prepare an electrolytic cell for scale-up that is capable of removing H2S continuously. The major hurdles that remain are cathode selection and optimizing cell design and operating conditions. Studies have focused upon determining critical cell parameters for process scale-up as well as finding more stable and catalytically active cathode materials.

Burke, A.A.; Winnick, J.; Liu, M.; Li, S.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to determine the rates of reactions involving partially sulfided dolomite and oxygen, which is needed for the design of the reactor system for the stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals. To achieve this objective, samples of partially sulfided dolomite were reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions in a fluidized-bed reactor. The effect of external diffusion was eliminated by using small quantities of the sorbent and maintaining a high flow rate of the reactant gas. The reacted sorbents were analyzed to determine the extent of conversion as a function of operating variables including sorbent particle size, reaction temperature and pressure, and oxygen concentration. The results of sulfation tests indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increasing temperature, increasing oxygen partial pressure, and decreasing sorbent particle size. The rate of the sulfation reaction can be described by a diffuse interface model where both chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion control the reaction rate. The kinetic model of the sulfation reaction was used to determine the requirements for the reactor system, i.e., reactor size and operating conditions, for successful stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals (with in-bed desulfurization using calcium based sorbents). The results indicate that the rate of reaction is fast enough to allow essentially complete sulfation in reactors with acceptable dimensions. The optimum sulfation temperature appears to be around 800{degrees}C for high pressure as well as atmospheric stabilization of the spent sorbents.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feasibility studies of in-situ coal gasification in the Warrior coal field. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies in support of in-situ gasification involved experiments in bench-scale combustors where three parameters were varied independently: initial fuel bed temperature, applied air flow and water vapor influx rate. Methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids at high temperatures were evaluated and measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were made over a temperature range for several samples of coke. (LTN)

Douglas G.W.; McKinley, M.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SLAG CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL USING PULSE DETONATION TECHNOLOGY DURING COAL GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. Conventional slag removal methods including soot blowers and water lances have great difficulties in removing slags especially from the down stream areas of utility power plant boilers. The detonation wave technique, based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. A slight increase in the boiler efficiency, due to more effective ash/deposit removal and corresponding reduction in plant maintenance downtime and increased heat transfer efficiency, will save millions of dollars in operational costs. Reductions in toxic emissions will also be accomplished due to reduction in coal usage. Detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability, important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results describe the parametric study of the input parameters in removing the different types of slag and operating condition. The experimental results show that both the single and multi shot detonation waves have high potential in effectively removing slag deposit from boiler heat transfer surfaces. The results obtained are encouraging and satisfactory. A good indication has also been obtained from the agreement with the preliminary computational fluid dynamics analysis that the wave impacts are more effective in removing slag deposits from tube bundles rather than single tube. This report presents results obtained in effectively removing three different types of slag (economizer, reheater, and air-heater) t a distance of up to 20 cm from the exit of the detonation tube. The experimental results show that the softer slags can be removed more easily. Also closer the slag to the exit of the detonation tube, the better are their removals. Side facing slags are found to shear off without breaking. Wave strength and slag orientation also has different effects on the chipping off of the slag. One of the most important results from this study is the observation that the pressure of the waves plays a vital role in removing slag. The wave frequency is also important after a threshold pressure level is attained.

DR. DANIEL MEI; DR. JIANREN ZHOU; DR. PAUL O. BINEY; DR. ZIAUL HUQUE

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems: Greenfield assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the KRW fluidized-bed gasifier and the transport gasifier case studies were used for this assessment. The transport technology is a high-velocity circulating fluidized-bed reactor currently under development by The M.W. Kellogg Company. In the earlier assessment, seven design concepts or cases were identified; a process design was developed; major equipment items were identified; estimates of capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and cost of electricity were developed; reliability was predicted; and development issues were identified for six studies. Three of the most probable cases were further evaluated for a Greenfield assessment in this report to adequately determine all costs independent of facilities at Plant Wansley.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced coal gasification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.1 Introduction Thermal treatment processes such as combustion, gasification, incineration and pyrolysis of fossil... gases or in pyrolysis or gasification product gases...

245

Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H{sub 2} separation from other light gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO). However, zeolite membranes have not been successful for H{sub 2} separation from light gases because the zeolite pores are either too big or the membranes have a large number of defects. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H{sub 2} separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H{sub 2} selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO{sub 2}CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} were separated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one BZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated B-ZSM-5 membrane was activated, but the CO{sub 2} and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H{sub 2} permeance and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sup 2} /CH{sub 4} separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 molxm-2xs-1xPa-1, and the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H{sub 2} with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H{sub 2} permeance more than one order of magnitude. The H{sub 2} separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Increasing the membrane feed pressure also increased the H{sub 2} flux and the H{sub 2} mole fraction in the permeate stream for both mixtures. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO{sub 2} adsorption inhibited H{sub 2} adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO{sub 2} permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol m-2 s-1 Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H{sub 2} recompression because H{sub 2} remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO{sub 2} feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} sorption selectivity with increased CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H{sub 2} from CH{sub 4} because CH{sub 4} is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity is much lower than the H{sup 2} diffusivity. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity was almost independent of temperature, pressure, and feed composition. Silylation on SAPO-34 membranes increased H{sup 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities but did not increase H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities because silylation only blocked defects in SAPO-34 membranes. Hydr

Mei Hong; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

2006-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1, and the H2/CO2 separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H2 with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H2 permeance more than one order of magnitude. Increasing the membrane feed pressure increased the H2 flux and the H2 mole fraction in the permeate stream for both H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 mixtures. The H2 separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO2 adsorption inhibited H2 adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO2/H2 separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO2 permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H2 recompression because H2 remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO2/H2 separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO2 feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO2/H2 sorption selectivity with increased CO2 partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H2 from CH4 because CH4 is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Characterization of Filter Elements for Service in a Coal Gasification Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a joint Department of Energy/Industry sponsored engineering-scale facility for testing advanced coal-based power generation technologies. High temperature, high pressure gas cleaning is critical to many of these advanced technologies. Barrier filter elements that can operate continuously for nearly 9000 hours are required for a successful gas cleaning system for use in commercial power generation. Since late 1999, the Kellogg Brown & Root Transport reactor at the PSDF has been operated in gasification mode. This paper describes the test results for filter elements operating in the Siemens-Westinghouse particle collection device (PCD) with the Transport reactor in gasification mode. Operating conditions in the PCD have varied during gasification operation as described elsewhere in these proceedings (Martin et al, 2002).

Spain, J.D.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mutagenic and toxic activity of environmental effluents from underground coal gasification experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using bacterial bioassays, researchers have screened for the presence of mutagens and toxins in extracts from groundwater, and in tar from product gas, at the sites of two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in situ experiments: Hoe Creek II and Hoe Creek III. The sites exhibited different potential biological hazards, suggesting that different gasification processes may represent different human health concerns. Researchers found that mutagens are present in groundwater, persist for at least 2 yr after gasification has been terminated, and show a change in activity with time - possibly in parallel with changes in chemical composition. Preliminary evidence suggests that the mutagens in groundwater are quinoline and aniline derivatives, while the toxins in groundwater may be phenolic compounds. In tar from the product gas, the organic bases and neutrals were found to be genotoxic in both bacterial and mammalian cells; the neutral compounds appear to be the major mutagenic health hazards. Neutral compounds constitute most of the tar (85 to 97 wt %) and were mutagenic in both the bacterial and mammalian cell assays. Tar in the gas stream may be a problem for the aboveground environment if gas escapes through fractures in the overburden. Because it is mutagenic and induces chromosomal damage to mammalian cells, the tar may represent a disposal problem as well. However, it is difficult to assess tar quantitatively as a health hazard because its mutagenic activity is low, possibly due to contaminants in the neutral fraction that act to suppress mutagenicity.

Timourian, H.; Felton, J.S.; Stuermer, D.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mutagenic and toxic activity of environmental effluents from underground coal gasification experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using bacterial bioassays, the authors screened for the presence of mutagens and toxins in extracts from ground water, and in tar from product gas, at the sites of two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in situ experiments: Hoe Creek II and Hoe Creek III. The sites exhibited different potential biological hazards, suggesting that different gasification processes may represent different human health concerns. It was found that mutagens are present in groundwater persist for at least 2 years after gasification has been terminated, and show a change in activity with time - possibly in parallel with changes in chemical composition. Preliminary evidence suggests that the mutagens in ground water are quinoline and aniline derivatives, while the toxins in groundwater may be phenolic compounds. In tar from the product gas, the organic bases and neutrals were found to be genotoxic in both bacterial and mammalian cells; the neutral compounds appear to be the major mutagenic health hazards. Neutral compounds constitute most of the tar (85-97 wt%) and were mutagenic in both the bacterial and mammalian cell assays. Tar in the gas stream may be a problem for the above ground environment if gas escapes through fractures in the overburden. Because it is mutagenic and induces chromosomal damage to mammalian cells, the tar may represent a disposal problem as well. However, it is difficult to assess tar quantitatively as a health hazard because its mutagenic activity is low, possibly due to contaminants in the neutral fraction that act to suppress mutagenicity.

Timourian, H.; Felton, J.S.; Stuermer, D.H.; Healy, S.; Berry, P.; Tompkins, M.; Battaglia, G.; Hatch, F.T.; Thompson, L.H.; Carrano, A.V.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

Mead, W.; Raber, E.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

LLL in situ Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed three small-scale, coal-block reactor experiments in order to gain some insight into the performance of the proposed injection well design for the next field test, and to better understand some of the observed in situ phenomena which occurred during the Hoe Creek No. 3 field test. The modeling group has begun to consolidate into a single data base the data from Hoe Creek No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3, permitting some comparisons which are presented and discussed. During and after the Hoe Creek experiments, groundwater samples were collected from wells located at a distance of a few feet to several hundred feet from the gasification cavities. Analysis of the water was performed and work is continuing to understand and to explain the observed increased concentration of several cations. Several sources of information, including two recent papers by Zvyaghintsev covering Soviet UCG stations, have been analyzed. The Soviets developed an effective method for UCG in the 1950's. Plans were developed to increase UCG production from 0.7 billion m/sup 3/ in 1958 to over 40 billion m/sup 3//yr. These plans were not implemented; production peaked in 1966 at 2 billion m/sup 3//yr and declined to 0.7 billion m/sup 3//yr by 1977. The reasons for this decline are presumed to be the poorer heating values, closer wellbore spacings, and higher product gas losses at Angren than expected. Comparable results would produce unfavorable economics in the US. Also, UCG technology in the USSR faced stiff competition from natural gas production and efficient open-pit coal mining.

Olness, D.U. (ed.)

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Formulations, simulations and evaluations associated with thermo-mechanical models for underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model formulations and governing equations for the investigation of the thermo-mechanical, consolidation and failure responses associated with UCG are given. Typical results from sample finite element model representations are presented. The examples quoted include the simulation of the transient temperature profiles, thermo-elastic stresses incorporating temperature dependent material properties and fracture responses. The application of the developed models to the evaluation of field experiments is demonstrated by the simulation of the Hoe Creek II experiments. The numerical experiments for different overburden failure thresholds demonstrated the pronounced sensitivity of the predicted cavity shapes with respect to the assumed properties.

Advani, S.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Support research on chemical, mechanical, and environmental factors in underground coal gasification. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general goal of this research has been to develop basic data and mathematical models in order to better understand information obtained from large scale field experimentation in underground gasification of Texas lignite. The chemical engineering research has focused on the topics of combustion tube studies of water influx, investigation of cavity growth mechanisms, cracking of pyrolysis products, and analysis of flow patterns in UCG. The petroleum engineering research has focused on subsidence analysis, creep testing and modeling, and effects of overburden drying. Good agreement between subsidence model predictions and data from the Hoe Creek No. 2 field experiment has been obtained. Environmental effects of UCG have been studied both for surface processing of wastewater as well as subsurface phenomena. Activated sludge processing of wastewater seems feasible and pertinent laboratory data have been acquired. Adsorption characteristics and microbial activity for different species in contaminated groundwater have been determined for the Tennessee Colony, Texas, field test site. 100 references, 95 figures, 10 tables.

Edgar, T.F.; Humenick, M.J.; Thompson, T.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have continued our laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in small blocks of coal, approximately 1 foot on a side. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. However, because of the small dimensions involved, the information these tests provide is necessarily limited to aspects of cavity growth at very early times. The preliminary process design of the Tono No. 1 field experiment in Washington has been completed. The experimental plan and operational strategy have been developed to ensure that the injection point remains near the bottom of the coal seam and that the experiment continues at least until a period of stable operation has been reached and sustained for a time. We have continued to develop a mathematical model for the small coal block experiments in order to further our understanding of the physical and chemical processes governing the burning of the coal and the growth of the cavity within the block. This model will be adapted, later, to larger-scale coal block experiments, and finally to full-scale field experiments. We hope to obtain scaling laws and other insights from the model. Groundwater samples from wells located at distances of a few feet to several hundred feet from the gasification cavities were collected before, during, and after each of the Hoe Creek tests. The analysis of the groundwater contamination data pertinent to the Hoe Creek No. 3 test was completed. This is an ongoing project, and we will continue to obtain and analyze groundwater samples from these test sites.

Olness, D.U.; Clements, W. (eds.)

1981-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergy General Law (GC-56)The U.S.DepartmentDepartment of

257

ANG coal gasification project management control system report. [Great Plains project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much time, money and effort has been spent in the forefront of this project for project controls. The work breakdown structure for the systems has been custom designed. The systems, both manual and computerized, have been well scrutinized and chosen by ANG to represent the most cost effective and efficient way of controlling a project the magnitude of $1.5 billion. These systems have been developed in a manner so that information can be gathered as detailed or as summarized as necessary, and in the most timely and expeditious ways.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Metal-Organic Frameworks Capture CO2 From Coal Gasification Flue Gas |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells In ThisMetalCenter for Gas

259

In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

Wood, Bernard J. (Santa Clara, CA); Brittain, Robert D. (Cupertino, CA); Sancier, Kenneth M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the Water Gas Shift Reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by concurrent water-gas shift (WGS) and carbonation reactions to enhance H{sub 2} production by incessantly driving the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward and in-situ removing the CO2 product from the gas mixture. The spent sorbent is then regenerated by calcining it to produce a pure stream of CO{sub 2} and CaO which can be reused. However while performing the cyclic carbonation and calcination it was observed that the CO{sub 2} released during the in-situ calcination causes the deactivation of the iron oxide WGS catalyst. Detailed understanding of the iron oxide phase diagram helped in developing a catalyst pretreatment procedure using a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system to convert the deactivated catalyst back to its active magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) form. The water gas shift reaction was studied at different temperatures, different steam to carbon monoxide ratios (S/C) 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and different total pressures ranging from 0-300 psig. The combined water gas shift and carbonation reaction was investigated at temperatures ranging from 600-700C, S/C ratio of 3:1 to 1:1 and at different pressures of 0-300 psig and the calcium looping process was found to produce high purity hydrogen with in-situ CO{sub 2} capture.

Mahesh Iyer; Shwetha Ramkumar; Liang-Shih Fan

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

APPLICATION OF A DAMPED LOCALLY OPTIMIZED COMBINATION OF IMAGES METHOD TO THE SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FAINT COMPANIONS USING AN INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROGRAPH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-contrast imaging instruments are now being equipped with integral field spectrographs (IFSs) to facilitate the detection and characterization of faint substellar companions. Algorithms currently envisioned to handle IFS data, such as the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) algorithm, rely on aggressive point-spread function (PSF) subtraction, which is ideal for initially identifying companions but results in significantly biased photometry and spectroscopy owing to unwanted mixing with residual starlight. This spectrophotometric issue is further complicated by the fact that algorithmic color response is a function of the companion's spectrum, making it difficult to calibrate the effects of the reduction without using iterations involving a series of injected synthetic companions. In this paper, we introduce a new PSF calibration method, which we call 'damped LOCI', that seeks to alleviate these concerns. By modifying the cost function that determines the weighting coefficients used to construct PSF reference images, and also forcing those coefficients to be positive, it is possible to extract companion spectra with a precision that is set by calibration of the instrument response and transmission of the atmosphere, and not by post-processing. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using on-sky data obtained with the Project 1640 IFS at Palomar. Damped LOCI does not require any iterations on the underlying spectral type of the companion, nor does it rely on priors involving the chromatic and statistical properties of speckles. It is a general technique that can readily be applied to other current and planned instruments that employ IFSs.

Pueyo, Laurent [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Dekany, Richard; Bouchez, Antonin; Roberts, Jenny [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil [American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Parry, Ian [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd., Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Beichman, Charles [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Soummer, Remi, E-mail: lap@pha.jhu.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Marin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasificaiton Slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) coal conversion process has been demonstrated to be a clean, efficient, and environmentally acceptable method of generating power; however, it generates solid waste materials in relatively large quantities. For example, a 400-MW power plant using 4000 tons of 10% ash coal per day may generate over 440 tons/day of solid waste of slag, consisting of vitrified mineral matter and unburned carbon. The disposal of the wastes represents significant costs. Regulatory trends with respect to solid wastes disposal, landfill development costs and public concern make utilization of solid wastes a high-priority issue. As coal gasification technologies find increasing commercial applications for power generation or production of chemical feed stocks, it becomes imperative that slag utilization methods be developed, tested and commercialized in order to offset disposal costs. Praxis is working on a DOE/METC funded project to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of making lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates from slags left as solid by-products from the coal gasification process. The project objectives are to develop and demonstrate the technology for producing slag-based lightweight aggregates (SLA), to produce 10 tons of SLA products with different unit weights from two slags, to collect operational and emissions data from pilot-scale operations, and to conduct laboratory and commercial scale evaluations of SLA with conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates.

Choudhry, V.; Hadley, S. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate parameter sets. This result is not surprising and confirms plans for a more sophisticated rubble model as our next step, as well as adding geomechanical collapse modeling and higher accuracy cavity gas reactive transport models. The results are very encouraging and demonstrate that our approach is sound.

Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development: Task 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report presents the results of Task 4 of the Westinghouse ATS Program. The purpose of Task 4 is to determine the technical development needs for conversion of the gas-fired ATS (GFATS). Two closely related, advanced, coal-based power plant technologies have been selected for consideration as the CFATS -- air-blown, coal gasification with hot gas cleaning incorporated into an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), and the Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle. These are described and their estimated performance and emissions in the CFATS are reported. A development program for the CFATS is described that focuses on major commercialization issues. These issues are in the areas of combustion, flow distribution, structural analysis, and materials selection.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fabrication of Pd/Pd-Alloy Films by Surfactant Induced Electroless Plating for Hydrogen Separation from Advanced Coal Gasification Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag composite membranes on microporous stainless steel substrate (MPSS) were fabricated by a novel electroless plating (EP) process. In the conventional Pd-EP process, the oxidation-reduction reactions between Pd-complex and hydrazine result in an evolution of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} gas bubbles. When adhered to the substrate surface and in the pores, these gas bubbles hinder uniform Pd-film deposition which results in dendrite growth leading to poor film formation. This problem was addressed by introducing cationic surfactant in the electroless plating process known as surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP). The unique features of this innovation provide control of Pd-deposition rate, and Pd-grain size distribution. The surfactant molecules play an important role in the EP process by tailoring grain size and the process of agglomeration by removing tiny gas bubbles through adsorption at the gas-liquid interface. As a result surfactant can tailor a nanocrystalline Pd, Cu and Ag deposition in the film resulting in reduced membrane film thickness. Also, it produces a uniform, agglomerated film structure. The Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes on MPSS support were fabricated by sequential deposition using SIEP method. The pre- and post-annealing characterizations of these membranes (Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag on MPSS substrate) were carried out by SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM studies. The SEM images show significant improvement of the membrane surface morphology, in terms of metal grain structures and grain agglomeration compared to the membranes fabricated by conventional EP process. The SEM images and helium gas-tightness studies indicate that dense and thinner films of Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes can be produced with shorter deposition time using surfactant. H{sub 2} Flux through the membranes fabricated by SIEP shows large improvement compared to those by CEP with comparable permselectivity. Pd-MPSS composite membrane was subjected to test for long term performance and thermal cycling (573 - 723 - 573 K) at 15 psi pressure drop for 1200 hours. Pd membranes showed excellent hydrogen permeability and thermal stability during the operational period. Under thermal cycling (573 K - 873 K - 573 K), Pd-Cu-MPSS membrane was stable and retained hydrogen permeation characteristics for over three months of operation. From this limited study, we conclude that SIEP is viable method for fabrication of defect-free, robust Pd-alloy membranes for high-temperature H{sub 2}-separation applications.

Ilias, Shamsuddin; Kumar, Dhananjay

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg continued to actively monitor operations at BI-GAS, Westinghouse and IGT (for peat gasification). Pilot plant/PDU test runs which were monitored and reported included BI-GAS Tests G-18, G-18A and G-18B; Westinghouse PDU Test TP-032-1 and CFSF Test TP-M003; and Peatgas Pilot Plant Test No. 5. Kellogg also monitored winterization/maintenance activities at BI-GAS and Westinghouse and precommissioning of the IGT Wet Carbonization PDU. The final report on the Hygas Data Base Evaluation was issued, while final revisions were completed for the reports concerning PDU data base evaluations of Peatgas and single-stage peat gasification. Efforts toward completion of the brochure describing the DOE/GRI Joint Program proceeded. Normal MPC activities continued. Several technical progress reports were issued during this quarter.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Starr, D.W.; Koneru, P.B.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.; Wong, E.W.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

HIGH TEMPERATURE REMOVAL OF H{sub 2}S FROM COAL GASIFICATION PROCESS STREAMS USING AN ELECTROCHEMICAL MEMBRANE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bench scale set-up was constructed to test the cell performance at 600-700 C and 1 atm. The typical fuel stream inlet proportions were 34% CO, 22% CO{sub 2}, 35% H{sub 2}, 8% H{sub 2}O, and 450-2000 ppm H{sub 2}S. The fundamental transport restrictions for sulfur species in an electrochemical cell were examined. Temperature and membrane thickness were varied to examine how these parameters affect the maximum flux of H{sub 2}S removal. It was found that higher temperature allows more sulfide species to enter the electrolyte, thus increasing the sulfide flux across the membrane and raising the maximum flux of H{sub 2}S removal. The results identify sulfide diffusion across the membrane as the rate-limiting step in H{sub 2}S removal. The maximum H{sub 2}S removal flux of 1.1 x 10-6 gmol H{sub 2}S min{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (or 3.5 mA cm{sup -2}) was obtained at 650 C, with a membrane that was 0.9 mm thick, 36% porous, and had an estimated tortuosity of 3.6. Another focus of this thesis was to examine the stability of cathode materials in full cell trials. A major hurdle that remains in process scale-up is cathode selection, as the lifetime of the cell will depend heavily on the lifetime of the cathode material, which is exposed to very sour gas. Materials that showed success in the past (i.e. cobalt sulfides and Y{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}FeO{sub 3}) were examined but were seen to have limitations in operating environment and temperature. Therefore, other novel metal oxide compounds were studied to find possible candidates for full cell trials. Gd{sub 2}TiMoO{sub 7} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3} were the compounds that retained their structure best even when exposed to high H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O concentrations.

Jack Winnick; Meilin Liu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems: Greenfield assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the KRW fluidized-bed gasifier and the transport gasifier case studies were used for this assessment. The transport technology is a high-velocity circulating fluidized-bed reactor currently under development by The M.W. Kellogg Company. In the earlier assessment, seven design concepts or cases were identified; a process design was developed; major equipment items were identified; estimates of capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and cost of electricity were developed; reliability was predicted; and development issues were identified for six studies. Three of the most probable cases were further evaluated for a Greenfield assessment in this report to adequately determine all costs independent of facilities at Plant Wansley.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Power combiner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, preliminary public design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary Public Design Report (PDR) provides design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. This project is partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program under the provisions of Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Tampa Electric Company, novated on March 5,1992. The project is highlighted by the inclusion of a new hot gas cleanup system. DOE`s project management is based at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in West Virginia. This report is preliminary, and the information contained herein is subject to revision. Definitive information will be available in the final PDR, which will be published at the completion of detailed engineering.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Commercial gasifier for IGCC applications study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This was a scoping-level study to identify and characterize the design features of fixed-bed gasifiers appearing most important for a gasifier that was to be (1) potentially commercially attractive, and (2) specifically intended for us in integrated coal gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) applications. It also performed comparative analyses on the impact or value of these design features and on performance characteristics options of the whole IGCC system since cost, efficiency, environmental traits, and operability -- on a system basis -- are what is really important. The study also reviewed and evaluated existing gasifier designs, produced a conceptual-level gasifier design, and generated a moderately advanced system configuration that was utilized as the reference framework for the comparative analyses. In addition, technical issues and knowledge gaps were defined. 70 figs., 31 tabs.

Notestein, J.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H. [and others

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C9, supplCment au Journal de Physique 111, Volume 3, dCcembre 1993  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Background. Coal gasification technology is close to commercial reality. Several large demonstration plants to produce clean gaseous andlor liquid fuels from coal. Later o n it was thought that integrated coal Corrosion in coal gasificationenvironments at 550 "C W.T. ~ a k k e r ( ' ) ,J.A. ~ o n v a l l e t ( ~ )and

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog Massachusetts Institute of Technology's technology for CO2 separation and capture at three types of power plants: integrated coal gasification (NGCC). The analysis was based on studies from the literature that analyzed the economics of capturing

282

EROSION PREDICTION NEAR A STAGNATION POINT RESULTING FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SOLID PARTICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opera- tion of coal gasification, fired turbine facilities.flow typical of a coal gasification system is analyzed.is typical of coal gasification systems. XBL 7712-6550 U ;)

Laitone, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

DIFFUSION OF A CHEMICAL SPECIES THROUGH A VISCOUS BOUNDARY LAYER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere. . -iv-a highly cor- rosive coal gasification mixture. It is shown2.3 Evaluation of a Coal Gasification Atmosphere The purpose

Keller, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Al MUilE 16 MMTIVl COAL GASIFICATION - HIGH STU 1250 MMCF/Olfacilities, particularly coal gasification plants,coal-fired5 5T/yr ore) Coal Gasification (Hi BTU (80Xl0 9 ft 3/yr)

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Signal Integrity Analysis of a 2-D and 3-D Integrated Potentiostat for Neurotransmitter Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the substrate, power network, and through silicon vias (TSVs). These models are combined integrated implantable systems. I. INTRODUCTION A multichannel potentiostat, integrated with micro and power dissipation. Signal integrity characteristics of a 2- D and 3-D integrated potentiostat

Stanacevic, Milutin

286

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for HDD to provide a pathway to the next generation of emissions control systems CRADA with PACCAR, working closely with DAF Trucks Highly evolving field of work (mostly...

287

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pipeline Compr. H2 Truck Electrolysis Coal Gasification Biomass Gasification Small City Station Rural sequestration) · Coal Gasification (with and without sequestration) · Biomass Gasification · Electrolysis (grid

288

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

THE EFFECT OF COAL CHAR ON THE CORROSION OF 304 SS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Materials for Coal Gasification Applications". of Highcommercially proven coal gasification processes exist. Theseprocesses. more efficient gasification Much of this work is

Foerster, Thomas Friedrich Wilhelm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

292

Fossil fuel gasification technical evaluation services. Final report 1978-83  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical evaluations performed prior to 1981 were published as a separate document, Topical Reports 1978-1980, by C F Braun and Co, November 1982, Report No. GRI-80/0168. These evaluations include the Cities Service-Rockwell, Exxon Catalytic, Mountain Fuels, Slagging Lurgi, U-Gas, and Westinghouse processes for coal gasification, the Peatgas process for peat gasification, the GE Membrane process for acid gas removal, and an integrated test facility for use in the development of gasification processes. Evaluations performed in the 1981 to 1983 period are included in the present document, the Final Report. These evaluations include the Westinghouse process for coal gasification, the Engelhard, Stone and Webster and Texaco processes for gasification of coal derived liquids, the Catalysis Research Corporation (CRC) process for direct methanation of raw gas streams, and the CNG Research Company process for removal of acid gases from coal gasification process streams. Other recent investigations include the evaluation of materials of construction, fundamental design data, and heat recovery technology for coal gasification processes.

Johnson, C.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Harmonic Representation of Combinations and Partitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present article a new method of deriving integral representations of combinations and partitions in terms of harmonic products has been established. This method may be relevant to statistical mechanics and to number theory.

Michalis Psimopoulos

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future: A Preliminary Report Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE BIOMASS FARM GEOTHERMAL HEAT GEOTHERMAL ELECTRIC COAL CENT. ELECTRIC COAL FLUID BED COAL GASIFICATION

Balderston, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DIVISION S-2--SOIL CHEMISTRY Sorption of Pyridine to Suspended Soil Particles Studied by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at waste ation is dominated by the quadrupolar relaxation mech- sites generated from coal gasification

Herbert, Bruce

296

SYSTEMS OPTIMIZATION LABORATORY DEPARTMENT OF OPERATIONS RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquefaction Coal Gasification Thermal Electric Power Generation Oil Shale Conversion Fuel Refining Coal Slurry

Stanford University

297

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal gasification technology in China: Application and Development,” presentation at the China-US Clean

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced combined cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cycle (IGCC) Initiative Summary: ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Initiative Date... and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification...

299

EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

9: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN EIS-0429: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated...

300

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process for Simultaneous Production of CO2 and H2 from Synthesis Gas Produced by Coal Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to evaluate the extensive feasibility of a novel concept called Thermal Swing Sorption Enhanced Reaction (TSSER) process to simultaneously produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} as a single unit operation in a sorber-reactor. The successful demonstration of the potential feasibility of the TSSER concept implies that it is worth pursuing further development of the idea. This can be done by more extensive evaluation of the basic sorptive properties of the CO{sub 2} chemisorbents at realistic high pressures and by continuing the experimental and theoretical study of the TSSER process. This will allow us to substantiate the assumptions made during the preliminary design and evaluation of the process and firm up the initial conclusions. The task performed under this project consists of (i) retrofitting an existing single column sorption apparatus for measurement of high pressure CO{sub 2} sorption characteristics, (ii) measurement of high pressure CO{sub 2} chemisorption equilibria, kinetics and sorption-desorption column dynamic characteristics under the conditions of thermal swing operation of the TSSER process, (iii) experimental evaluation of the individual steps of the TSSER process (iv) development of extended mathematical model for simulating cyclic continuous operation of TSSER to aid in process scale-up and for guiding future work, (v) simulate and test SER concept using realistic syngas composition, (vi) extensive demonstration of the thermal stability of sorbents using a TGA apparatus, (vii) investigation of the surfaces of the adsorbents and adsorbed CO{sub 2} ,and (viii) test the effects of sulfur compounds found in syngas on the CO{sub 2} sorbents.

Shivaji Sircar; Hugo S. Caram; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael G. Beaver; Fan Ni; Agbor Tabi Makebe

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pilot Plant and Process Development Unit Monitoring continued through August 1982; thereafter, such activities (and also MPC participation) were terminated in accordance with contract modifications. Testing monitored included PDU test run IP-033-1 and CFSF Tests TP-M005 and TP-M007-1 at Westinghouse, and wet carbonization PDU Test PB-5 at IGY. A draft report of the Westinghouse CFSF was issued for approval. Work on the descriptive brochure of the DOE/GRI Joint Program is nearly complete.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Starr, D.W.; Koneru, P.B.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.; Wong, E.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities included continued monitoring of test operations at the Hygas, BI-GAS, Westinghouse, Exxon, Rockwell and Bell plant sites, and of peat gasification laboratory activities. Pilot plant/PDU test runs monitored and reported were: Hygas Tests 85 and 86; BI-GAS Tests G-11C, 11D, 11E, 11F, G-12 and G-12A; Westinghouse test runs TP-023-4, TP-027-1, TP-027-2 and TP-027-3; Exxon test periods 13 through 17; and Rockwell Tests 318-063 through 318-073. Kellogg made significant progress toward completion of the Operating Plan Requirements for the individual developers, and began an evaluation of the Hygas data base. The final report on Westinghouse Risk Analysis were issued. Progress was made in completing the reports of the screening evaluations of Exxon, Rockwell and Westinghouse. The safety assurance study continued, as did normal participation in MPC activities. New task orders for technical/economic studies were submitted for review and approval.

Bostwick, L.E.; Brancheau, R.J.; Chen, R.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During July-September 1981 Kellogg continued to actively monitor operations at BI-GAS, Westinghouse and IGT (for peat gasification). Pilot plant/PDU tests which were monitored and reported included BI-GAS Tests G-17D, G-17E, and G-17F; Westinghouse PDU test runs TP-0282 and TP-028-3 and CFSF Tests TP-M002-2 and TP-M006-1; Peatgas pilot plant Tests number 2 and number 3; and single-stage peat gasification PDU Test BF-21. Work on several task orders was completed with the issue of final reports on technical/economic assessments of Exxon, Westinghouse and Peatgas, the technical/economic comparison of Westinghouse and U-Gas, safety audits, safety assurance, peat harvesting and dewatering, gasifier vessel design and carbonyl formation. Kellogg continued its efforts toward completion of the descriptive brochure for the DOE/GRI Joint program and of the reports on the Hygas and Peatgas data bases. A new subtask, to evaluate the data base for single-stage peat gasification, was undertaken, and Kellogg participated in reviews of the Hygas final report. Normal MPC activities continued.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Gilwood, W.C.; Glasgow, P.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Singer, D.L.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities during the first quarter of 1980 included the continued monitoring of test operations at the Hygas, BI-GAS, Westinghouse, Exxon, and Rockwell plant sites. Test runs monitored and reported were: Hygas test 85, BI-GAS tests G-11, G-11A, G-11B, Westinghouse test TP-023-4, Exxon test periods 7 through 12, and Rockwell tests 318-044 through 318-062. Kellogg continued to monitor design and construction of the Bell Aerospace PDU, and bench-scale test activities on peat at the IGT laboratories. Kellogg personnel attended the DOE/GRI Operating Committee meeting on 4 March, and program review meetings for Westinghouse, on 1 February, and Rockwell, on 26 March. Kellogg continued their participation in Metals Properties Council activities. On 3-6 March, Mr. S. Sathe attended the 1980 meeting of MPC Phase Group VII, which was held in conjunction with the NACE Corrosion '80 meeting in Chicago. The final report on DOE Task No. 6, Westinghouse Risk Analysis, was issued for approval by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee. Preparation of the final report for the PDU Screening Evaluation (Task No. 4) is underway. Process and estimating work is complete for each of the processes being evaluated. Kellogg continued work on Task No. 5, Safety Assurance Study. Information on the safety-related aspects of each process is still being received and evaluated.

Bostwick, L.E.; Brancheau, R.J.; Castiglioni, B.P.; Gunderson, J.M.; Hare, R.M.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jacks, J.P.G.; Smith, M.R.; Starr, D.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Monthly technical progress report, 27 February-26 March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During March, Kellogg continued to monitor operations at BI-GAS, Westinghouse and IGT Peatgas. Test runs monitored and reported were: BI-Gas tests G-18A and G-18B; Westinghouse PDU test: TP-032-1, and CFSF test TP-M003; Peatgas pilot plant test No. 5 at IGT. Kellog personnel briefed the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Project Advisors in regard to recent tasks and attended the Westinghouse briefing for GRI. Meetings of the DOE/GRI Joint Operating Committee were attended to discuss the Data Base Evaluation of Single-Stage Peat Gasification and the Joint Program Brochure. Kellogg proceeded to finalize the data base evaluation report and to institute necessary changes in the brochure.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Starr, D.W.; Hubbard, D.A.; Koneru, P.B.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.; Wong, E.W.; Zeis, L.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities included continued monitoring of test operations at BI-GAS, Westinghouse, Exxon and IGT (for peak gasification). Pilot plant/PDU test runs which were monitored and reported included: BI-GAS tests G-14, G-14A, G-15 and G-15A; Westinghouse PDU tests TP-027-5 and TP-031-1 and CFSF tests TP-M001-1, 2, 3 and 4; Exxon run periods No. 23 and No. 24; and IGT single-stage peat gasification tests BF-1 through BF-6. Draft reports were submitted regarding Hygas data base evaluation, gasifier vessel design and scaleup risks of the Westinghouse oxygen-blown gasifier. Evaluation of the Hygas data base continued, and a similar study of the Peatgas PDU data base was initiated. Work was begun on preparation of a descriptive brochure for the DOE/GRI joint program. Kellogg personnel participated in investigations of welding materials with the MPC. Significant progress was made in the technical/economic assessments of Westinghouse, Exxon and Peatgas and in the technical/economic comparison of Westinghouse and U-gas, with technical definitions being essentially finished and cost estimation begun. Technical definition and preliminary capital cost estimates were completed for the peat harvesting/dewatering study. Work continued in the study of carbonyl formation. Following reviews by the developers, Kellogg began finalization of the report on screening evaluations of Westinghouse, Exxon and Rockwell. Work on the safety assurance study continued, with the commencement of safety audit visits.

Bostwick, L.E.; Brancheau, R.J.; Chen, R.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI Coal Gasification Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report for the period October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities included the continued monitoring of test operations at the Hygas, BI-GAS, Westinghouse, Exxon and Rockwell plant sites. Test runs monitored and reported were: Hygas tests 83 and 84, BI-GAS tests G-9, G-10 and G10A, Westinghouse tests TP-025-2 and TP-023-3, Exxon test periods 3 through 6 and Rockwell tests 318-024 through 318-043. Kellogg initiated monitoring of the test program at Bell Aerospace. Bench-scale test activities for the IGT Peatgas program were monitored. Kellogg continued their participation in Metals Properties Council activities. The final report on DOE Task No. 3, Consultation on Westinghouse PDU, was completed and issued. The report on Task No. 6, Westinghouse Risk analysis, is complete and in the final review stage. Work continued on the PDU Screening Evaluation, Rockwell and Exxon processes: process work is essentially complete and cost estimation assurance study is in various stages of completion for each of the processes being monitored. Further information on the safety-related aspects of the processes is still being received and evaluated.

Bostwick, L.E.; Brancheau, R.J.; Castiglioni, B.P.; Gunderson, J.M.; Hare, R.M.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jacks, J.P.G.; Smith, M.R.; Starr, D.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technical and economic assessment of the IGT peat-gasification process. Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI Coal Gasification Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg has completed a moderately detailed design and cost estimate of a 250 billion Btu/Day grass-roots SNG plant using the Peatgas process. Results indicate that the cost of SNG would be $4.40/MM Btu, using a cost of $1.50/MM Btu for peat feedstock at 50% moisture. The SNG cost is reasonably competitive with that currently estimated for SNG from coal, and Kellogg would anticipate that capital cost reductions, via design optimization, could reduce the NSG cost to a level which is quite competitive. The cost of peat feedstock is a critical area of concern in evaluating economics of the Peatgas process. The value chosen for the base-case economics ($1.50/MM Btu) is in the higher portion of the price range considered typical by most investigators; the price of $1.50/MM Btu was chosen arbitrarily to represent a 50% increase over the cost of coal ($1.00/MM Btu) used by Kellogg in parallel studies, to reflect higher costs for land use and reclamation and for harvesting and dewatering of peat. In a study concurrent with that reported here, Kellogg found that one method of wet harvesting and mechanical/thermal dewatering yields a peat (50% moisture) cost which is unfavorably high and was therefore rejected for use as a base-case cost since much cheaper feedstock is apparently available by other harvesting/dewatering methods. The base-case cost of SNG is moderate somewhat by the values placed on the benzene and oil coproducts (i.e., $1.10 and $0.75 per gallon, respectively). The total of such credits amounts to about 39% of the gross operating cost; a reduction in value of the coproducts would adversely affect the cost of SNG. Certain technical factors are discussed: materials handling problems, high reactivity, low sulfur content, and limited gasification data.

Bostwick, L.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Laramore, R.W.; Senules, E.A.; Shah, K.V.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg continued to actively monitor operations at BI-GAS Westinghouse and IGT (for peat gasification). Pilot plant/PDU testing which was monitored and reported includes Westinghouse PDU tests TP-030-3 and TP-031-3 and CFSF test TP-M003-1; Peatgas Pilot Plant test No. 4; and single-stage peat gasification PDU tests BF-22 and BF-23. Kellogg personnel briefed the GRI Project Advisors on current tasks and a DOE representative on peat-related work. The report on the Hygas Data Base Evaluation was approved for issue. Progress was made toward finalizing the report on the Peatgas Data Base Evaluation and the Descriptive Brochure for the DOE/GRI Joint Program. Work on the evaluation of the data base for single-stage peat gasification continued. Review of the Hygas final report was completed.

Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Starr, D.W.; Shah, K.V.; Hubbard, D.A.; Koneru, P.B.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.; Wong, E.W.; Zeis, L.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report for the period January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg activities during January to March 1981 included continued monitoring of the test operations at the BI-GAS, Westinghouse and Exxon plant sites. Peat gasification laboratory tests were monitored along with modification of Hygas pilot plant for testing of the Peatgas process. Testing at Rockwell ended during June 1980 and testing at Bell was suspended by DOE during July 1980. Pilot plant/PDU test runs monitored and reported were: BI-GAS Tests G-16 and G-16A, Westinghouse test runs TP-M001-1, 2, 3 and 4, Exxon test runs 25, 26 and 27, and single-stage fluidized bed peat gasification tests BF-7 through BF-12. Kellogg continued their participation in Metals Properties Council activities. The final report on the Westinghouse Risk Analysis (Kellogg Task 08) was approved by DOE and is ready for publication. Substantial progress was made on other listed Kellogg tasks. Work continued on subtasks involving Hygas and Peatgas data base evaluations, to incorporate in the draft reports the additional information and comments obtained from IGT.

Bostwick, L.E.; Chen, R.G.; Ethridge, T.R.; Hare, R.M.; Hubbard, D.A.; Senules, E.A.; Singer, D.L.; Smith, M.R.; Shah, K.V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Engineering-support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellog activities during April to June 1981 included continued monitoring of activities at Bi-Gas, Westinghouse, Exxon and IGT (for peat gasification). Pilot plant/PDU tests which were monitored and reported include Bi-Gas tests G-16B, G-17, G-17A, G-17B, and G-17C; Westinghouse PDU test runs TP-029-1/030-1, TP-030-2 and TP-028-1 and CFSF tests TP-M002-1 and TP-M002-2; Exxon run period number 28; Peatgas pilot plant Test RF-1 and gasification Test number 1; and IGT single-stage peat gasification PDU Tests BF-13 through BF-20. Significant milestones were reached with the issue of draft reports for several tasks, including carbonyl formation, peat harvesting/dewatering, technical/economic assessments of Exxon, Westinghouse and PeatGas, technical/economic comparison of Westinghouse and U-Gas, gasifier design, safety audits, Hygas data base evaluation and the safety assurance study. In addition, final reports were issued for the Westinghouse oxygen blown gasifier risk analysis and for the PDU screening evaluations of Exxon, Westinghouse and Rockwell. Work on the Peatgas PDU data base evaluation continued, and a review of the Hygas final report was begun.

Bernard, D.M.; Bostwick, L.E.; Ethridge, T.R.; Gilwood, W.C.; Hubbard, D.A.; Montgomery, R.L.; Senules, E.A.; Singer, D.L.; Smith, M.R.; Ward, W.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Utilization of Illinois coal gasification slags for production of ultra-lightweight aggregates. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was aimed at testing and developing the expansion potential of solid residues (slag) from gasification of Illinois coals to manufacture ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA). Conventional ULWAs are manufactured by pyroprocessing perlite or vermiculite ores and have unit weights in the 5--12 lb/ ft{sup 3} range. These materials sell for approximately $200/ton ($1.00/ft{sup 3}) and have numerous applications. The incentive for this effort was based on previous experimental results in which lightweight aggregates (LWA) with unit weights of 25--55 lb/ft{sup 3} were produced from Illinois slag using a direct-fired furnace. In this program, bench-scale expansion tests conducted with two Illinois coal slags resulted in product unit weights of 12 and 18.5 lb/ ft{sup 3}, thus confirming the feasibility of producing ULWA from Illinois slags. During initial pilot vertical shaft furnace test runs, two Illinois slags were expanded to generate products with unit weights of 12.5--26.5 and 20--52 lb/ ft{sup 3}. Further attempts to lower the product unit weights resulted in fusion of the slag. This problem could be overcome by methods including surface treatment of the slag, blending the slag with other materials, or utilization of indirect firing methods. To lower the product unit weights, an indirect-fired horizontal shaft furnace was used and products with unit weights of 12.4--52.0 lb/ft{sup 3} were generated, thus indicating that this method can be used to produce a wide range of expanded products. A large batch of expanded slag was produced using an 18-in. diameter x 12-ft long indirect-fired pilot furnace. A sample from this batch was characterized. Specimens of insulating concrete made from expanded slag had a unit weight 43.3 lb/ft{sup 3} and thermal conductivity of 1.34 Btu-in./h/ft{sup 2}/{degrees}F. This compares well with a value of 1. 2 Btu-in./h/ft{sup 2}/{degrees}F for insulating concrete of a similar weight made from perlite, as per ASTM C 332-82.

Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States); Zimmerle, T. [Silbrico Corp. (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hanna IV, underground coal gasification site, Wyoming, and comparison to other Wyoming UCG sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of 21 post-burn cores taken from the Hanna IV UCG site allows 96 m (315 ft) of overburden to be subdivided into four local stratigraphic units. The 7.6 m (25 ft) thick Hanna No. 1 coal seam is overlain by a laterally discontinuous, 3.3 m (11 ft) thick shaley mudstone (Unit A') in part of the Hanna IV site. A more widespread, 30 m (90 ft) thick well-indurated sandstone (Unit A) overlies the A' unit. Unit A is the roof rock for both of the Hanna IV cavities. Overlying Unit A is a 33 m (108 ft) thick sequence of mudstone and claystone (Unit B), and the uppermost unit at the Hanna IV site (Unit C) is a coarse-grained sandstone that ranges in thickness from 40 to 67 m (131 to 220 ft). Two elliptical cavities were formed during the two phases of the Hanna IV experiment. The larger cavity, Hanna IVa, is 45 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 18 m (59 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity; the Hanna IVb cavity is 40 x 15 m in plan and has a maximum height of 11 m (36 ft) from the base of the coal seam to the top of the cavity. Geotechnical tests indicated that the Hanna IV overburden rocks were moderately strong to strong, based on the empirical classification of Broch and Franklin (1972), and a positive, linear correlation exists between rock strength and volume percent calcite cement. There is an inverse linear correlation between rock strength and porosity for the Hanna IV overburden rocks. 28 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs..

Marcouiller, B.A.; Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Commercial low-Btu coal-gasification plant. Feasibility study: General Refractories Company, Florence, Kentucky. Volume I. Project summary. [Wellman-Galusha  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a 1980 Department of Energy solicitation, the General Refractories Company submitted a Proposal for a feasibility study of a low Btu gasification facility for its Florence, KY plant. The proposed facility would substitute low Btu gas from a fixed bed gasifier for natural gas now used in the manufacture of insulation board. The Proposal from General Refractories was prompted by a concern over the rising costs of natural gas, and the anticipation of a severe increase in fuel costs resulting from deregulation. The proposed feasibility study is defined. The intent is to provide General Refractories with the basis upon which to determine the feasibility of incorporating such a facility in Florence. To perform the work, a Grant for which was awarded by the DOE, General Refractories selected Dravo Engineers and Contractors based upon their qualifications in the field of coal conversion, and the fact that Dravo has acquired the rights to the Wellman-Galusha technology. The LBG prices for the five-gasifier case are encouraging. Given the various natural gas forecasts available, there seems to be a reasonable possibility that the five-gasifier LBG prices will break even with natural gas prices somewhere between 1984 and 1989. General Refractories recognizes that there are many uncertainties in developing these natural gas forecasts, and if the present natural gas decontrol plan is not fully implemented some financial risks occur in undertaking the proposed gasification facility. Because of this, General Refractories has decided to wait for more substantiating evidence that natural gas prices will rise as is now being predicted.

none,

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Grid Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Insolation integrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

Dougherty, John J. (Norristown, PA); Rudge, George T. (Lansdale, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive gain integrating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is based on a hybrid combination of gain scheduling, B- spline... combination of gain scheduling, B-spline approximation, variable structure control and integral control... the...

320

Using and Measuring the Combined Heat and Power Advantage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, refers to the integration of thermal energy with power generation. CHP is a powerful energy conservation measure that has been identified as an important greenhouse gas reduction measure...

John, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An analysis of the TR-BDF2 integration scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We intend to try to better our understanding of how the combined L-stable 'Trapezoidal Rule with the second order Backward Difference Formula' (TR-BDF2) integrator and the standard A-stable Trapezoidal integrator perform ...

Dharmaraja, Sohan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Grand Challenges of Enterprise Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enterprise Integration connects and combines people, processes, systems, and technologies to ensure that the right people and the right processes have the right information and the right resources at the right time. A consensus roadmap for Technologies for Enterprise Integration was created as part of an industry/government/academia partnership in the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Initiative (IMTI). Two of the grand challenges identified by the roadmapping effort will be addressed here--Customer Responsive Enterprises and Totally Connected Enterprises. Each of these challenges is briefly discussed as to the current state of industry and the future vision as developed in the roadmap.

Brosey, W.D; Neal, R.E.; Marks, D.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

control systems Probe interaction of DPF-SCR couples to better understand the optimization of the coupled units Determine system limitations, define basic requirements for...

325

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for HDD to provide a pathway to the next generation of emissions control systems CRADA with PACCAR, working intimately with PTC and DAF Trucks N.V. Evolving field of work...

326

EIS-0431: Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EISStatement |This EIS evaluates thein(HECA)Cycle and

327

Combination & Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codes and StandardsColleenActionDepartment of

328

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codes and StandardsColleenActionDepartmentDepartment

329

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codes and

330

Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR Aftertreatment Technologies |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codes andDepartment of Energy 0 DOE Vehicle

331

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Â… Combining Fluid Loops in Electric  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.IndianaofPilot ProjectDepartment of EnergyDrive

332

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Â… Combining Fluid Loops in Electric  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.IndianaofPilot ProjectDepartment of EnergyDriveDrive

333

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Â… Combining Fluid Loops in Electric  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.IndianaofPilot ProjectDepartment of

334

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuel Oil8Status of technologies

335

FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of coal--the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States with supplies projected to last 250 years. FutureGen's co-production of power and hydrogen will also serve as a stepping-stone to an environmentally sustainable energy future.

Zitney, S.E.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment, September 2002 Integrated Energy Systems (IES) combine on-site power or distributed generation technologies with thermally...

337

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Techniques for evaluating and quantifying integrated transient and continuous heat loads of combined systems incorporating electric drive systems operating primarily under transient duty cycles.

Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production Response1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production of intense ongoing study, but understanding how the consequent downstream signaling networks integrate hypothesized that a quantitative combination of key downstream network signals across multiple pathways must

339

HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis gas by coal gasification is very expensive andin the cost of coal gasification would have a significantas K co , to promote gasification would be beneficial s1nce

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION Annual Report 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stainless Steel in Coal Gasification Environments, LBL-733Z.of Materials Used in Coal Gasification Plants, AGA- ERDA-MPCon ~hterials for the Gasification of Coal, presented to the

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Conservation Conservation ResourcesConservation Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration,, coal gasification, carbon sequestration, energy storage, highenergy storage, highConfirm cost & availability of promising resources ­­ Oil sandsOil sands cogencogen, coal gasification, carbon

342

GEOMETRIC COMPUTATIONAL ELECTRODYNAMICS WITH VARIATIONAL INTEGRATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOMETRIC COMPUTATIONAL ELECTRODYNAMICS WITH VARIATIONAL INTEGRATORS AND DISCRETE DIFFERENTIAL develop a structure-preserving discretization of the Lagrangian framework for electromagnetism, combining) and remains one of the most successful numerical meth- ods used in the field of computational electromagnetics

Desbrun, Mathieu

343

Integration Multi-Year Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems CHP combined heat and power DER distributed energy resources DG distributed generation DOE U Energy EMS energy management system ERO electric reliability organizations ESI energy systems integration ESS energy storage system EV electric vehicles EY electrolyzer FC fuel cell FCEV fuel cell electric

344

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

o f U r b a n A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the river's noticeable pollution This kudzu patch was once used as a coal gasification plant and a dump site

Rosemond, Amy Daum

346

solicitations | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal Gasification Magazine Solicitations FAQs All NETL Solicitations Funding Opportunity...

347

Duke, China's Huaneng to 'explore' clean tech  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vaguely worded press release said the two companies will focus on carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and coal gasification.

NONE

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pilot plant used to develop load and pressure controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Viewed from the perspective of the power-generation mixture in Japan, nuclear power plants will continue to be operated to meet the base load. Meanwhile, integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants will be required to serve as thermal power plants to cover the middle load, as is the case with conventional thermal power plants. In terms of operational performance, therefore, IGCC power plants will need to have a capability of following a wide range of load demand at high speed. For this purpose, a load and pressure controller was developed and tested during the operational research on a 200 tons/day entrained flow IGCC pilot plant at the Nakoso Power Station by the Engineering Research Association for IGCC Power Systems (IGC Association). This article reports on the development of the load and pressure controller and the results of the control test carried out to check the load follow capability of the pilot plant, while touching upon the simulation study also being conducted.

Nagata, Kazue; Yamada, Toshihiro; Hiza, Tomoyuki

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy technology for coal gasification with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into three separate streams of hydrogen-rich gas, sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in gas turbines. This is the draft final report for the first stage of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program. The UFP technology development program encompassed lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP concept. Modeling and economic assessments were also key parts of this program. The chemical and mechanical feasibility were established via lab and bench-scale testing, and a pilot plant was designed, constructed and operated, demonstrating the major UFP features. Experimental and preliminary modeling results showed that 80% H{sub 2} purity could be achieved, and that a UFP-based energy plant is projected to meet DOE efficiency targets. Future work will include additional pilot plant testing to optimize performance and reduce environmental, operability and combined cycle integration risks. Results obtained to date have confirmed that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Raul Subia; Arnaldo Frydman; Parag Kulkarni; Jennifer Schwerman; Valadimir Zamansky; John Reinker; Kanchan Mondal; Lubor Stonawski; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ACLP: Integrating Abduction and Constraint Solving \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACLP: Integrating Abduction and Constraint Solving \\Lambda Antonis Kakas 75 Kallipoleos St. CY­1678, Nicosia, Cyprus. Email: antonis@cs.ucy.ac.cy Abstract ACLP is a system which combines abductive reasoning and constraint solving by integrating the frameworks of Abductive Logic Programming (ALP) and Constraint Logic

Kakas, Antonis C.

353

Klystron-linac combination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

Stein, W.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines Steven Simmons February 27 2014 1 #12;CCCT Today's Discussion 1 Meeting Pricing of 4 advanced units using information from Gas Turbine World Other cost estimates from E E3 EIA Gas Turbine World California Energy Commission Date 2010 Oct 2012, Dec 2013 Apr 2013 2013 Apr

355

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Liquefaction+Storage +Dispensing+Transporting+Storage +Compression/Vaporization Centralized SMR Coal Gasification Biomass, etc Wind Electrolysis plus power X X X X X X Coal Gasification with CO2 Capture X X X X X Coal Gasification without CO2 Capture X X X X X Biomass gasification without CO2 Capture X X X X X Biomass gasification

356

2008 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Colorado State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results Status: Submitted Date Submitted: 03/31/09 2008 Colorado State University Combined Research, integrated and interactive efforts from Colorado State University research and extension programs. Integral

357

The combined ν  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceThe publication of4combined ν µ

358

Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

Anita Lewis

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

High Efficiency Integrated Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ? 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

Ibbetson, James

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Europ. J. Combinatorics (1995) 16,357-369 Integral Bases and p-Twisted Digrapbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of the basis vectors. We call such a set of cycles an integral cycle-basis for D. The fundamental connected digraph D = (V, A) there exists a set of directed cycles the incidence vectors of which form, every integral circulation can be written as an integral combination of these vectors. In this paper, we

Schneider, Hans

362

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants E. Meng1 1 University of Southern California, Los technological deficiencies can be addressed by integrating microfluidics with electrodes and electrochemical sensors. Multimodality neural interfaces that combine electronics and microfluidics open new possibilities

Meng, Ellis

365

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

366

Distribution Grid Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

367

Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on developing and testing large-scale distributed energy systems for grid-connected, stand-alone, and microgrid applications. The laboratory can accommodate large power system components such as inverters for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems, diesel and natural gas generators, battery packs, microgrid interconnection switchgear, and vehicles. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at the ESIF, the Power Systems Integration Laboratory will offer power testing capability of megawatt-scale DC and AC power systems, as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Thermal heating and cooling loops and fuel also allow testing of combined heating/cooling and power systems (CHP).

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Accelerating Combined Heat & Power Deployment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ACCELERATING COMBINED HEAT & POWER DEPLOYMENT An Industry Consultation by the United States Energy Association August 31, 2011 Cover Photograph: CHP Plant at the Mueller Energy...

369

Membrane separation advances in FE hydrogen program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its inception in Fiscal Year 2003 the US Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Hydrogen from Coal Program has sponsored more than 60 projects and made advances in the science of separating out pure hydrogen from syngas produced through coal gasification. The Program is focusing on advanced hydrogen separation technologies, which include membranes, and combining the WGS reaction and hydrogen separation in a single operation known as process intensification. The article explains the technologies and describes some key FE membrane projects. More details are available from http://www.fossil.energy.gov. 1 fig.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Building-integrated solar energy devices based on wavelength selective films.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A potentially attractive option for building integrated solar is to employ hybrid solar collectors which serve dual purposes, combining solar thermal technology with either thin… (more)

Ulavi, Tejas U.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Clean coal technology using process integration : a focus on the IGCC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is the most environmentally friendly coal-fired power generation technology that offers near zero green house gas emissions. This… (more)

Madzivhandila, Vhutshilo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Second-Generation Biofuels from Multi-Product Biorefineries Combine Economic Sustainability With Environmental Sustainability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy Second-Generation Biofuels from Multi-Product Biorefineries Combine Economic Sustainability With Environmental Sustainability Martin Sabarsky, Chief Executive Officer, Cellana

373

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol process. Technical progress report number 8, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallon per day (260 tons per day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small (10 TPD), DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology is being integrated with existing coal-gasifiers. A carefully developed test plan will allow operations at Eastman to simulate electricity demand load-following in coal-based IGCC facilities. The operations will also demonstrate the enhanced stability and heat dissipation of the conversion process, its reliable on/off operation, and its ability to produce methanol as a clean liquid fuel without additional upgrading.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipis: An Integrated Baseline for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

digestion (AD) for energy and nutrient recycling. Energy recycling was accomplished by biogas combustion in a combined heat and power (CHP) system that was heat-integrated with the...

375

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal ID Rationale Space/Time scale; Location; Platforms Parameters Combined Drizzle Dataset (CD ID) Collocated precipitation, aerosol and cloud micro, precip. rate, cloud Cross- Section Dataset (XS-ID) Data on E-W cross- section along 20°S from coast

Wood, Robert

376

Combined Experiment Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT)? The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI coal-gasification research program. Evaluation of the data base for single-stage gasification of peat. [IGT 6 inch, single stage, fluidized bed (not PEATGAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kellogg has reviewed the data base generated by IGT in the 6 inch PDU for the single stage fluidized bed gasification of peat. Kellogg's central finding is that the existing data base should be expanded by further testing in the PDU, after necessary modifications, to investigate further the effects of operating parameters within the ranges of interest. The existing data base consists of 20 PDU runs. Kellogg has concentrated on the Minnesota peat data base, since an insufficient number of runs exist for Maine and North Carolina peats to establish any valid trends. Consequently, the evaluation presented concerns only the Minnesota peat data base with respect to ranges of operating parameters studied, the criteria for good fluidized-bed operation and the effects of the key operating parameters on the performance. In Kellogg's opinion the existing data base demonstrates that: gasification of peat at 90+% carbon conversion is possible in a single stage fluidized bed reactor; the most significant operating parameters have been identified; the single stage fluidized bed peat gasifier has merit because of simplicity of operation, near-zero production of liquids and potential of operation without steam and at low pressure. However, Kellogg notes the following shortcomings:relatively small number of experimental runs and lack of data at certain levels of operating parameters studied; sintering occurred in 35% of the runs; in all the 20 test runs, fines losses exceeded in 5% of the feed and for the Minnesota peat data base, fines losses averaged 12.8%; use of large amounts of fluidizing gas (in this case N/sub 2/), which does not reflect commercial operation; and lack of data with higher peat feed moisture content. Thus, in Kellogg's opinion, considerable advantage is to be gained by expanding the existing data base and lists its specific recommendations.

Bostwick, L.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Do, L.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Autonomous grain combine control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Clean and Secure Energy from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Utah, through their Institute for Clean and Secure Energy (ICSE), performed research to utilize the vast energy stored in our domestic coal resources and to do so in a manner that will capture CO2 from combustion from stationary power generation. The research was organized around the theme of validation and uncertainty quantification (V/UQ) through tightly coupled simulation and experimental designs and through the integration of legal, environment, economics and policy issues. The project included the following tasks: • Oxy-Coal Combustion – To ultimately produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. • High-Pressure, Entrained-Flow Coal Gasification – To ultimately provide a simulation tool for industrial entrained-flow integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gasifier with quantified uncertainty. • Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) – To develop a new carbon-capture technology for coal through CLC and to transfer this technology to industry through a numerical simulation tool with quantified uncertainty bounds. • Underground Coal Thermal Treatment – To explore the potential for creating new in-situ technologies for production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) from deep coal deposits and to demonstrate this in a new laboratory-scale reactor. • Mercury Control – To understand the effect of oxy-firing on the fate of mercury. • Environmental, Legal, and Policy Issues – To address the legal and policy issues associated with carbon management strategies in order to assess the appropriate role of these technologies in our evolving national energy portfolio. • Validation/Uncertainty Quantification for Large Eddy Simulations of the Heat Flux in the Tangentially Fired Oxy-Coal Alstom Boiler Simulation Facility – To produce predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for the heat flux in commercial-scale, tangentially fired, oxy-coal boilers.

Smith, Philip; Davies, Lincoln; Kelly, Kerry; Lighty, JoAnn; Reitze, Arnold; Silcox, Geoffrey; Uchitel, Kirsten; Wendt, Jost; Whitty, Kevin

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

IGCC repowering project clean coal II project public design report. Annual report, October 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) is participating in a $270 million coal gasification combined cycle repowering project that was designed to provide a nominal 60 MW of electricity to City, Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) in Springfield, Illinois. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system consists of CE`s air-blown entrained flow two-stage gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup system; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-BTU gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment, The project is currently completing the second budget period of five. The major activities to date are: (1) Establishment of a design, cost, and schedule for the project; (2) Establishment of financial commitments; (3) Acquire design and modeling data; (4) Establishment of an approved for design (AFD) engineering package; (5) Development of a detailed cost estimate; (6) Resolution of project business issues; (7) CWL&P renewal and replacement activities; and (8) Application for environmental air permits. A Project Management Plan was generated, The conceptual design of the plant was completed and a cost and schedule baseline for the project was established in Budget Period One. This information was used to establish AFD Process Flow Diagrams, Piping and Instrument Diagrams, Equipment Data Sheets, material take offs, site modification plans and other information necessary to develop a plus or minus 20% cost estimate. Environmental permitting activities were accomplished, including the Air Permit Application, completion of the National Environmental Policy Act process, and the draft Environmental Monitoring Plan. At the end of 1992 the DOE requested that Duke Engineering and Services Inc., (DESI) be used to complete the balance of plant cost estimate. DESI was retained to do this work, DESI completed the material take off estimate and included operations, maintenance, and startup in the estimate.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Capturing the emerging market for climate-friendly technologies: opportunities for Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the factors driving the growing demand for climate-friendly technologies, some of the key existing companies, organizations, and resources in Ohio, and the potential for Ohio to become a leading supplier of climate solutions. These solutions include a new generation of lower-emitting coal technologies, components for wind turbines, and the feedstocks and facilities to produce biofuels. Several public-private partnerships and initiatives have been established in Ohio. These efforts have encouraged the development of numerous federal- and state-funded projects and attracted major private investments in two increasingly strategic sectors of the Ohio economy: clean-coal technology and alternative energy technology, with a focus on fuel cells. Several major clean-coal projects have been recently initiated in Ohio. In April 2006, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio approved American Electric Power's (AEP) plan to build a 600 MW clean-coal plant along the Ohio River in Meigs County. The plant will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology which makes it easier to capture carbon dioxide for sequestration. Three other potential coal gasification facilities are being considered in Ohio: a combination IGCC and synthetic natural gas plant in Allen County by Global Energy/Lima Energy; a coal-to-fuels facility in Lawrence County by Baard Energy, and a coal-to-fuels facility in Scioto County by CME North American Merchant Energy. The paper concludes with recommendations for how Ohio can capitalize on these emerging opportunities. These recommendations include focusing and coordinating state funding of climate technology programs, promoting the development of climate-related industry clusters, and exploring export opportunities to states and countries with existing carbon constraints.

NONE

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

INTEGRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS INTO PUBLIC SECTOR PERFORMANCE CONTRACTS IN DELAWARE FINAL for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware February 2006 #12;INTEGRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC..................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Photovoltaics in Performance Contracts: An Overview

Delaware, University of

389

Transmission Commercial Project Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improvement (CBPI) Customer Forum Energy Imbalance Market Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Network Integration Transmission Service (NT Service) Network Open...

390

Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withconditioning in buildings featuring integrated design withof a building with advanced integrated design involving one

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

Gerald P. Huffman

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gasifier selected for development under this contract is an innovative and patented hybrid technology which combines the best features of both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed types. PyGas{trademark}, meaning Pyrolysis Gasification, is well suited for integration into advanced power cycles such as IGCC. It is also well matched to hot gas clean-up technologies currently in development. Unlike other gasification technologies, PyGas can be designed into both large and small scale systems. It is expected that partial repowering with PyGas could be done at a cost of electricity of only 2.78 cents/kWh, more economical than natural gas repowering. It is extremely unfortunate that Government funding for such a noble cause is becoming reduced to the point where current contracts must be canceled. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project was initiated to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology at a cost approaching $1,000 per kilowatt for electric power generation applications. The project was to include an innovative, advanced, air-blown, pressurized, fixed-bed, dry-bottom gasifier and a follow-on hot metal oxide gas desulfurization sub-system. To help defray the cost of testing materials, the facility was to be located at a nearby utility coal fired generating site. The patented PyGas{trademark} technology was selected via a competitive bidding process as the candidate which best fit overall DOE objectives. The paper describes the accomplishments to date.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

On Walley's Combination Rule for Statistical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dempster’s rule of combination is the commonly used rule for combining independent belief functions. In 1987, Peter Walley proposed an alternative rule for combining belief function representations of independent ...

Cinicioglu, Esma N.; Shenoy, Prakash P.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

LHC Higgs boson mass combination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is $m_{H} = 125.09\\pm0.21\\,\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm0.11\\,\\mathrm{(syst.)}~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

Adye, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Algal Integrated Biorefineries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Algae Program works closely with the Demonstration and Deployment Program on projects that can validate advancements toward commercialization at increasing scales. Integrated biorefineries...

397

Technology Integration Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

398

Technology Integration Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-Technology Integration Overview - Dennis A. Smith Connie Bezanson U. S. Department of Energy Headquarters Office - Washington, D.C. May 2013 Project ID: TI000 2013 Department of...

399

Integrated Technology Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

400

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis. Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system

Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Integration (SI) subprogram works closely with industry, universities, and the national laboratories to overcome technical barriers to the large-scale deployment of solar technologies. To support these goals, the subprogram invests primarily in four areas: grid integration, technology validation, solar resource assessment, and balance of system development.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Modular Integrated Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 5 Prototype Development Reference Design DocumentationModular Integrated Energy Systems Prepared for: Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Building 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 April 27, 2006 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

406

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Biomass Pyrolysis Electrolysis Hydrogen Storage Compressed Gas Liquefied Gas Metal Hydride Carbon Hydrogen Production Steam Methane Reforming Noncatalytic Partial Oxidation Coal Gasification Biomass

409

Short-Term Oxidation Studies on Nicrofer- 6025HT in Air at Elevated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Several advanced air separation unit (ASU) designs being considered for use in coal gasification rely on the use of solid state mixed ionic and electronic conductors....

410

presentations | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal Gasification Magazine Solicitations FAQs Overview of DOE's C&CBTL Program (Dec 2014) The C&CBTL...

411

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ND Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process .... Coal gasification in existing R&D pilot facility. Preliminary testing...

412

Comparative Life-Cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification- methanation gasification technologies that use coal to produce SNG. This National Gasification Strategy calls

Jaramillo, Paulina

413

advanced-fuels-synthesis-index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal Gasification Magazine...

414

inno process tech index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for advanced fossil energy applications, including oxy-fuel combustion, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), advanced turbines, coal gasification, and advanced boiler systems....

415

HYDROGENATION AND CRACKING OF COAL RELATED FUSED-RING STRUCTURES USING ZnCl2 AND AlCl3 CATALYSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective catalyst for coal gasification at severe reactionliquefaction as well as gasification has been observed (3).and susceptibility to gasification (4,5). of Ross et al.

Salim, Sadie S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Liquefaction and Gasification of Western Coals", in5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthest

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project, Clean770. Stiegel, G. J. 2006, Gasification Technologies Advancedtechnologies/- coalpower/gasification/pubs/pdf/Gasification-

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22. 5. X. Sha, Coal gasification. Coal, oil shale, natural7. C. Higman, M. Burgt, Gasification. 2003. Elsevier/Gulfbiomass ( part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curtail-chinas-coal- gasification-for-fuel-yet-conversion-Biogas and Biomass Gasification Liquid Biofuels Bioethanolcombustion, biomass gasification and biomass co-fired coal

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pathways to the Future: A Manufacturer's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power plants, coal gasification, fuel cells, membrane separation technology Material systems with improved stability and reliability, optimized for use under extreme conditions, lead to higher technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbonaceous Chemistry for Computational Modeling Licensing and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to access a variety of kinetic processes and reaction mechanisms typically found in coal gasification, gas clean-up, and carbon capture processes. This unique software provides...

422

AUREX95P  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Aurex95p, a coal gasification chamber lining invented at NETL made up of a chromium-aluminum matrix, and modified by phosphate.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

423

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of metric tons per year. Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in...

424

AUREX95P  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aurex95p, a coal gasification chamber lining invented at NETL made up of a chromium-aluminum matrix, and modified by phosphate.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.; Boni, A.A. [PSI-Environmental Instruments Corp., Andover, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

427

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Surface-gasification materials program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. The Program is divided into two subprograms: (1) the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program and (2) the Materials Application and Development Program. The purpose of the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. The purpose of the Materials Application and Development Program is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. The management of materials projects in support of surface gasification sponsored by the Headquarters DOE Gasification Division has been defined in an April 16, 1982 METC-sponsored agreement transmitted to DOE field offices and performing contractors. This agreement recognizes the lead role in fossil energy materials delegated by METC to the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating organizations. Distribution is as shown on pages 59 to 63. Future reports will be issued on a semiannual basis to a similar distribution.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Surface Gasification Materials Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Surface Gasification Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for application to the specific needs of coal gasification systems. The Program is divided into two subprograms: (1) the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program and (2) the Materials Application and Development Program. The purpose of the Gasification Systems Fabrication Technology Program is to evaluate innovative fabrication methods which have the potential to lower costs and improve reliability and safety for gasifier vessels and components. The purpose of the Materials Application and Development Program is to conduct engineering-scale development and application of materials for coal gasification systems to ensure that the materials of construction for pilot plants and future large-scale plants can be properly selected and specified. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), in its lead role for gasification projects, is responsible for ensuring that the Surface Gasification Materials Program is responsive to the needs for gasification systems. Under its lead role for fossil energy materials, the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO), is responsible for the planning, implementation, and management of the program in accordance with guidance received from METC. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating organizations.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

PEV Integration with Renewables (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses current research at NREL on integrating plug-in electric vehicles with the grid and using renewable energy to charge the grid. The Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) and Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) are addressing the opportunities and technical requirements for vehicle grid integration that will increase marketability and lead to greater petroleum reduction.

Markel, T.

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Solar Energy and Residential Building Integration Technology and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building energy saving needs solar energy, but the promotion of solar energy has to be integrated with the constructions. Through analyzing the energy-saving significance of solar energy, and the status and features of it, this paper has discussed the solar energy and building integration technology and application in the residential building, and explored a new way and thinking for the close combination of the solar technology and residence.

Ding Ma; Yi-bing Xue

434

An introduction to InP-based generic integration technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ring lasers and, when used in combination with a wavelength tunable reflec- tor, also tunable lasers. By using a short SOA section in reverse bias as a saturable absorber we can make picosecond pulse lasers. And a SOA in reverse bias can also be used... multiplexers. And by making use of the nonlinear properties of SOAs integrated in an MZI we can make ultrafast switches. An advantage of generic integration technologies is that because they serve many different applications, they justify the investments...

Smit, Meint; Leijtens, Xaveer; Ambrosius, Huub; Bente, Erwin; van der Tol, Jos; Smalbrugge, Barry; de Vries, Tjibbe; Geluk, Erik-Jan; Bolk, Jeroen; van Veldhoven, Rene; Augustin, Luc; Thijs, Peter; D’Agostino, Domenico; Rabbani, Hadi; Lawniczuk, Katarzyna; Stopinski, Stanislaw; Tahvili, Saeed; Corradi, Antonio; Kleijn, Emil; Dzibrou, Dzmitry; Felicetti, Manuela; Bitincka, Elton; Moskalenko, Valentina; Zhao, Jing; Santos, Rui; Gilardi, Giovanni; Yao, Weiming; Williams, Kevin; Stabile, Patty; Kuindersma, Piet; Pello, Josselin; Bhat, Srivathsa; Jiao, Yuqing; Heiss, Dominik; Roelkens, Gunther; Wale, Mike; Firth, Paul; Soares, Francisco; Grote, Norbert; Schell, Martin; Debregeas, Helene; Achouche, Mohand; Gentner, Jean-Louis; Bakker, Arjen; Korthorst, Twan; Gallagher, Dominic; Dabbs, Andrew; Melloni, Andrea; Morichetti, Francesco; Melati, Daniele; Wonfor, Adrian; Penty, Richard; Broeke, Ronald; Musk, Bob; Robbins, Dave

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Integrated Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Off The Grid Sensor Integration Natural Daylight Base and Peak Energy Reduction 11 Lowest Cost Renewable Solar Integrated Lighting $1.0 million/MW $6 – 9 million/MW Wind $1.3 - 1.9 million/MW Biomass $1.5 – 2.5 million/MW Geothermal $1.6 million...Integrated Energy Efficiency Steve Heins VP Communications and Government Affairs Orion Energy Systems, Inc. 2 MegaTrend Convergence We need companies to commercialize technologies that use less energy without compromise to operations. Energy...

Heins, S.

436

Combined SO sub 2 /NO sub x reduction technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments and passage of state legislation leading to more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) regulations have fueled research and development efforts on technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Combined PET/MRI scanner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

Schlyer, David (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig L. (Setauket, NY); Rooney, William (Miller Place, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Stoll, Sean (Wading River, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Combining ESP and baghouse technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a progressive application in the field of air pollution control technology. The content of this paper should appeal to operators who must operate out-of-compliance electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), or to those who strive for optimal emission control. St. Lawrence Cement Company, a plant in Beauport Canada, has been in operation since 1955. Their two wet process kilns have utilized electrostatic precipitator (ESP) filters since inception. Since 1965, this company has strived to reduce energy consumption by using alternative waste fuel. This, combined with the increased demand of low alkali cement, took its toll on the ESPs, causing the equipment and its performance to deteriorate. Pressure from environmental agencies to lower outlet emissions forced the company to consider ESP modifications. After investigating several alternatives, the optimal modification was to combine the ESP with bag filters. In addition to being the best choice from a performance standpoint, it was also the least expensive. This modification also allowed a reduced alkali dust from the ESP hoppers to be recirculated to the kilns. The latter two-thirds of the ESP were converted to a baghouse, and optimal system performance was achieved by using high efficiency expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane filter bags. Despite the high moisture, submicron particle size, and cohesive nature of the alkaline dust, very low pressure differentials and extremely low emissions were achieved. Most notably, this complex project was completed within nine months, from concept to commissioning. The plant was shut down for only six weeks during the entire retrofit process. This economically attractive idea was readily accepted by St. Lawrence Cement personnel and the permitting agencies. After the first successful kiln/ESP retrofit, the second kiln/ESP conversion was completed the following year.

Rowland, B.; Ganatra, C.P.; Woolston, J. [W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Elkton, MD (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "integrated coal-gasification combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wellbore Integrity Network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we review the current state of knowledge on wellbore integrity as developed in the IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme's Wellbore Integrity Network. Wells are one of the primary risks to the successful implementation of CO{sub 2} storage programs. Experimental studies show that wellbore materials react with CO{sub 2} (carbonation of cement and corrosion of steel) but the impact on zonal isolation is unclear. Field studies of wells in CO{sub 2}-bearing fields show that CO{sub 2} does migrate external to casing. However, rates and amounts of CO{sub 2} have not been quantified. At the decade time scale, wellbore integrity is driven by construction quality and geomechanical processes. Over longer time-scales (> 100 years), chemical processes (cement degradation and corrosion) become more important, but competing geomechanical processes may preserve wellbore integrity.

Carey, James W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bachu, Stefan [Alberta Innovates

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

SOLAR PROGRAM: SYSTEMS INTEGRATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 2. Current Request for Information (RFI) 3. Questions 4 | Systems Integration eere.energy.gov Summary of 1W Workshop Date: August 11th and 12th, 2010 Attendees: 86 total;...

444

IDC Integrated Master Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrating farming and wastewater management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Source separating wastewater systems are often motivated by their integration with farming. It is thus important to scrutinise the critical factors associated with such integration.… (more)

Tidĺker, Pernilla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Systems Integration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Integration Systems Integration Through the SunShot Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of innovative, cost-effective solutions that...

448

Systems Integration | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Integration SHARE Systems Integration The Distributed Energy Communications and Controls (DECC) Laboratory offers a unique test bed for testing distributed energy...

449

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integration: Workshop Proceedings Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings Proceedings for the Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop...

450

Integrating the Integrators - A Roadmap to Success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management's (DOE-EM) investments in science and technology, as well as science and technology investments associated with other parts of the DOE are aimed at meeting the Departments cleanup goals. These investments, primarily focused on EM's cleanup mission, comprise the Environmental Quality Research and Development (R&D) portfolios. Synchronizing EM's Cleanup Project Managers (operations facility and process owners throughout the DOE complex) operational needs with EM R&D including the extensive work of the six Focus Areas (major thrust areas within DOE-EM) has been a continuing challenge. This recent initiative to better integrate the R&D program is in response to evolving needs within the Department to apply proven system engineering methods to clarify requirements and define EM's process to effectively orchestrate their R&D Program. To optimize this partnership, DOE-EM's Integration Program is successfully unifying the operational needs with the R&D as described in this paper.

Olson, Craig Stott; Conner, Craig C

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Integrating the Integrators - A Roadmap to Success  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management's (DOE-EM) investments in science and technology, as well as science and technology investments associated with other parts of the DOE are aimed at meeting the Departments cleanup goals. These investments, primarily focused on EM's cleanup mission, comprise the Environmental Quality Research and Development (R&D) portfolios. Synchronizing EM's Cleanup Project Managers (operations facility and process owners throughout the DOE complex) operational needs with EM R&D including the extensive work of the six Focus Areas (major thrust areas within DOE-EM) has been a continuing challenge. This recent initiative to better integrate the R&D program is in response to evolving needs within the Department to apply proven systems engineering methods to clarify requirements and define EM's process to effectively orchestrate their R&D Program. To optimize this partnership, DOE-EM's Integration Program is successfully unifying the operational needs with the R&D as described in this paper.

C. Conner; C. Olson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integrated Micro Nano Systems Integrated Micro Nano Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Integrated Micro Nano Systems 2 #12;Integrated Micro Nano Systems 3 Val Jones (Ed.) Symposium on Integrated Micro Nano Systems: Convergence of bio and nanotechnologies, Enschede, The Netherlands, June 2006 Micro Nano Systems 4 #12;Integrated Micro Nano Systems 5 Preface In order to explore the convergence

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

453

Applying technology strategy with enterprise architecting : a case study in transformation planning for integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this thesis combines Enterprise Architecture and Technology Strategy for analyzing, evaluating, and recommending appropriate solutions for integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into the ...

Richardson, Kristina L. (Kristina Lynn)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Forecast Combination With Outlier Protection Gang Chenga,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Combination With Outlier Protection Gang Chenga, , Yuhong Yanga,1 a313 Ford Hall, 224 Church St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 Abstract Numerous forecast combination schemes with distinct on combining forecasts with minimizing the occurrence of forecast outliers in mind. An unnoticed phenomenon

Yuhong, Yang

455

CONSULTANT REPORT COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT COMBINED HEAT AND POWER: POLICY ANALYSIS AND 2011 ­ 2030 MARKET ASSESSMENT This report analyzes the potential market penetration of combined heat and power systems in California from 2011 to 2030. This analysis evaluates the potential contribution of new combined heat and power

456

CONSULTANT REPORT COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT COMBINED HEAT AND POWER: POLICY ANALYSIS AND 2011 ­ 2030 MARKET ASSESSMENT ABSTRACT This report analyzes the potential market penetration of combined heat and power systems the markets, applications, technologies, and economic competition for combined heat and power over

457

Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

458

Information integration for data fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data fusion has been identified by the Department of Defense as a critical technology for the U.S. defense industry. Data fusion requires combining expertise in two areas - sensors and information integration. Although data fusion is a rapidly growing area, there is little synergy and use of common, reusable, and/or tailorable objects and models, especially across different disciplines. The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project had two purposes: to see if a natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used for data fusion problems, and if so, to determine whether this methodology would help identify commonalities across areas and achieve greater synergy. The project confirmed both of the initial hypotheses: that the natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used effectively in data fusion areas and that commonalities could be found that would allow synergy across various data fusion areas. The project found five common objects that are the basis for all of the data fusion areas examined: targets, behaviors, environments, signatures, and sensors. Many of the objects and the specific facts related to these objects were common across several areas and could easily be reused. In some cases, even the terminology remained the same. In other cases, different areas had their own terminology, but the concepts were the same. This commonality is important with the growing use of multisensor data fusion. Data fusion is much more difficult if each type of sensor uses its own objects and models rather than building on a common set. This report introduces data fusion, discusses how the synergy generated by this LDRD would have benefited an earlier successful project and contains a summary information model from that project, describes a preliminary management information model, and explains how information integration can facilitate cross-treaty synergy for various arms control treaties.

Bray, O.H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project Mohammad Hasan Khoshgoftar Manesh, Vahid Mazhari Iran Power Projects Management Company The combination of changing...

Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

460

Simulation, integration, and economic analysis of gas-to-liquid processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specifications. Next, energy and mass integration studies are performed to address the following items: (a) heating and cooling utilities, (b) combined heat and power (process cogeneration), (c) management of process water, (c) optimization of tail-gas allocation...

Bao, Buping

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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