Sample records for integrated assessment modeling

  1. Integrated Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

  2. Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models J. R. Mc carbon capture and storage, 2) a natural gas combined cycle technology with carbon capture and storage 1 emissions growth. Both the magnitude and rate of technological change toward low- or no-carbon emitting

  3. Diagnostic indicators for integrated assessment models of climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Petermann, Nils; Krey, Volker; Schwanitz, Jana; Luderer, Gunnar; Ashina, Shuichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Eom, Jiyong; Kitous, Alban; Mejean, Aurelie; Paroussos, Leonidas; Sano, Fuminori; Turton, Hal; Wilson, Charlie; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessments of how climate policy interacts with energy-economic systems can be performed by a variety of models with different functional structures. This article proposes a diagnostic scheme that can be applied to a wide range of integrated assessment models to classify differences among models based on their carbon price responses. Model diagnostics can uncover patterns and provide insights into why, under a given scenario, certain types of models behave in observed ways. Such insights are informative since model behavior can have a significant impact on projections of climate change mitigation costs and other policy-relevant information. The authors propose diagnostic indicators to characterize model responses to carbon price signals and test these in a diagnostic study with 11 global models. Indicators describe the magnitude of emission abatement and the associated costs relative to a harmonized baseline, the relative changes in carbon intensity and energy intensity and the extent of transformation in the energy system. This study shows a correlation among indicators suggesting that models can be classified into groups based on common patterns of behavior in response to carbon pricing. Such a classification can help to more easily explain variations among policy-relevant model results.

  4. Integrated science model for assessment of climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

  5. Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prinn, Ronald [MIT; Webster, Mort [MIT

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

  6. Integrated assessment briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

  7. Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

  8. Model Evaluation and Hindcasting: An Experiment with an Integrated Assessment Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment models have been extensively used for analyzing long term energy and greenhouse emissions trajectories and have influenced key policies on this subject. Though admittedly these models are focused on the long term trajectories, how well these models are able to capture historical dynamics is an open question. In a first experiment of its kind, we present a framework for evaluation of such integrated assessment models. We use Global Change Assessment Model for this zero order experiment, and focus on the building sector results for USA. We calibrate the model for 1990 and run it forward up to 2095 in five year time steps. This gives us results for 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010 which we compare to observed historical data at both fuel level and service level. We focus on bringing out the key insights for the wider process of model evaluation through our experiment with GCAM. We begin with highlighting that creation of an evaluation dataset and identification of key evaluation metric is the foremost challenge in the evaluation process. Our analysis highlights that estimation of functional form of the relationship between energy service demand, which is an unobserved variable, and its drivers is a significant challenge in the absence of adequate historical data for both the dependent and driver variables. Historical data availability for key metrics is a serious limiting factor in the process of evaluation. Interestingly, service level data against which such models need to be evaluated are itself a result of models. Thus for energy services, the best we can do is compare our model results with other model results rather than observed and measured data. We show that long term models, by the nature of their construction, will most likely underestimate the rapid growth in some services observed in a short time span. Also, we learn that modeling saturated energy services like space heating is easier than modeling unsaturated services like space cooling and understanding that how far a service is from its saturation level is a key question which we probably don’t have an answer to. Finally and most importantly, even if long term models partially miss the short term dynamics, the long term insights provides by these models is fairly robust. We conclude by highlighting that our work is the first step in the much wider process of integrated assessment model evaluation and will hence have its own limitations. Future evaluation research work should build upon this zero order experiment for improving our modeling of human and coupled earth systems.

  9. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  10. Valuing Climate Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models: The MIT IGSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a strategy for investigating the impacts of climate change on Earth’s physical, biological and human resources and links to their socio-economic consequences. The features of the integrated global system framework ...

  11. Incorporating carbon capture and storage technologies in integrated assessment models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and storage of CO2 from electric power plants. The electric power sector accounts for a substant a methodology for incorporating technologies into computable general equilibrium economic models and demonstrate; Climate; Technology; General equilibrium; Diffusion 1. Introduction Over the past century, technological

  12. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  13. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  14. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  15. Control Model Integrated Management and Assessment System. These materials are from April 2000 and pertain to Savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Randall B.

    Control Model #12;134 Integrated Management and Assessment System. These materials are from AprilView for contacts. Total biomass, by plant groups As you have already likely noticed, the control model includes and dead biomass, for a typical April to July NCA-Savanna Control Model #12;135 Root biomass for herbaceous

  16. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  17. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  18. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  19. Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

  20. A Flexible Climate Model For Use In Integrated Assessments Andrei P. Sokolov and Peter H. Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    penetration into the deep ocean is comparable with that of other significant uncertainties. 1. Introduction with coupled atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) because of their tremendous computer resource with a diffusive ocean model developed for use in the integrated framework of the MIT Joint Program on the Science

  1. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

  2. LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

  3. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  4. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  5. "Catalyzing Action Towards Sustainability of Deltaic Systems with an Integrated Modeling Framework for Risk Assessment"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    -ecological systems undergoing change (Delta-SRES) 2. Develop and deliver a science-based delta sustainability framework for risk assessment and decision support (Delta-RADS) 3. Build an international repository of data

  6. Flexible Power System Operations Simulation Model for Assessing Wind Integration: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; O'Malley, M.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a model was developed to mimic operator behavior using a combination of security-constrained unit commitment, security-constrained economic dispatch, and automatic generation control programs.

  7. Climate Change Impacts for Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 2. Models and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and contribute to rising global temperatures, it is important to examine how a changing climate may affect natural and managed ecosystems. In this series of papers, we study the impacts of climate change on agriculture, water resources and natural ecosystems in the conterminous United States using a suite of climate change predictions from General Circulation Models (GCMs) as described in Part 1. Here we describe the agriculture model EPIC and the HUMUS water model and validate them with historical crop yields and streamflow data. We compare EPIC simulated grain and forage crop yields with historical crop yields from the US Department of Agriculture and find an acceptable level of agreement for this study. The validation of HUMUS simulated streamflow with estimates of natural streamflow from the US Geological Survey shows that the model is able to reproduce significant relationships and capture major trends.

  8. Integration of Landsat Imagery and an Inundation Model in Flood Assessment and Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    , Alaska, with its large (8-10m) tidal range and extensive mudflat regions is selected as a study area or evaluate the inundation model due to the lack of data on the morphology and topography of the mudflat

  9. Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mathematics, MINES ParisTech Sophia Antipolis, France ABSTRACT Even though policies related to water energy system model. Water footprints for the processes in terms of withdrawals and consumptions were environmental impacts. Some experts refer to water as the new oil, reflecting a growing concern about

  10. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    issues such as life cycle assessment (LCA) fosters the needlife-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) process within in LCA is

  11. One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology – routing – water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

  12. global integrated assessment model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including emissions trading schemes and adaptation meas- ures. · Using GIAM, an illustrative long run include emissions trading schemes, carbon taxes, research and develop- ment schemes to encourage energy

  13. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  14. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  15. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  16. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  17. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  18. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium (indoor air, food, tap water, etc.) and to an exposed individual. Exposure scenarios are used to define plausible pathways for human contact. Recognition of the multiple pathways possible for exposure highlights the importance of a multimedia, multipathway exposure framework.

  19. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

  20. iEMSs 2008:International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software Integrating Sciences and Information Technology for Environmental Assessment and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    to be based on results from integrated Earth System Models (ESMs), C-LAMP is helping to establish the metadata

  1. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  2. Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA®, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow through The Dalles dam. Water also enters the Columbia River via runoff from land. The model runs on a monthly timescale to account for the impact of seasonal variations of climate, streamflows, and water uses. Data for the model prototype were obtained from national databases and ecosystem model results. The WPM can be run from three sources: 1) directly from STELLA, 2) with the isee Player®, or 3) the web version of WPM constructed with NetSim® software. When running any of these three versions, the user is presented a screen with a series of buttons, graphs, and a table. Two of the buttons provide the user with background and instructions on how to run the model. Currently, there are five types of scenarios that can be manipulated alone or in combination using the Sliding Input Devices: 1) interannual variability (e.g., El Niño), 2) climate change, 3) salmon policy, 4) future population, and 5) biodiesel production. Overall, the WPM captured the effects of streamflow conditions on hydropower production. Under La Niña conditions, more hydropower is available during all months of the year, with a substantially higher availability during spring and summer. Under El Niño conditions, hydropower would be reduced, with a total decline of 15% from normal weather conditions over the year. A policy of flow augmentation to facilitate the spring migration of smolts to the ocean would also reduce hydropower supply. Modeled hydropower generation was 23% greater than the 81 TWh reported in the 1995 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database. The modeling capability presented here contains the essential features to conduct basin-scale analyses of water allocation under current and future climates. Due to its underlying data structure iv and conceptual foundation, the WPM should be appropriate to conduct IA modeling at national and global scales.

  3. California Renewable Energy Center Integrated Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in which different renewable resources are co-located. How best to take advantage of this opportunityCalifornia Renewable Energy Center Integrated Assessment of Renewable Energy Technology Options #12;California Renewable Energy Center California has a long history of aggressively pursuing renewable energy

  4. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  5. Model Developments for Development of Improved Emissions Scenarios: Developing Purchasing-Power Parity Models, Analyzing Uncertainty, and Developing Data Sets for Gridded Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zili; Nordhaus, William

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the duration of this project, we finished the main tasks set up in the initial proposal. These tasks include: setting up the basic platform in GAMS language for the new RICE 2007 model; testing various model structure of RICE 2007; incorporating PPP data set in the new RICE model; developing gridded data set for IA modeling.

  6. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ModelEIA), 2005. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey onSurvey (MECS), such as crosscutting technologies like process controls, building controls, waste heat recovery or adjustable speed drives (EIA

  7. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

  8. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  9. Assistance with Incorporating Impacts into Integrated Assessment PI: Thomas J. Wilbanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system modeling (CM/ESM), (b) integrated assess- ment modeling (IAM), and (c) impact, adaptation- quences of Climate Change. SIGNIFICANCE Climate change science is a combination of (a) climate science/earth

  10. Development of Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoMechanics Technologies has completed a geomechanical caprock integrity analysis and risk assessment study funded through the US Department of Energy. The project included: a detailed review of historical caprock integrity problems experienced in the natural gas storage industry; a theoretical description and documentation of caprock integrity issues; advanced coupled transport flow modelling and geomechanical simulation of three large-scale potential geologic sequestration sites to estimate geomechanical effects from CO2 injection; development of a quantitative risk and decision analysis tool to assess caprock integrity risks; and, ultimately the development of recommendations and guidelines for caprock characterization and CO2 injection operating practices. Historical data from gas storage operations and CO2 sequestration projects suggest that leakage and containment incident risks are on the order of 10-1 to 10-2, which is higher risk than some previous studies have suggested for CO2. Geomechanical analysis, as described herein, can be applied to quantify risks and to provide operating guidelines to reduce risks. The risk assessment tool developed for this project has been applied to five areas: The Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California, Kevin Dome in Montana, the Louden Field in Illinois, the Sleipner CO2 sequestration operation in the North Sea, and the In Salah CO2 sequestration operation in North Africa. Of these five, the Wilmington Graben area represents the highest relative risk while the Kevin Dome area represents the lowest relative risk.

  11. Separations and safeguards model integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

  12. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    totaling more than 25 million for 41 projects focused on integration, transmission, and resource assessment and characterization. This report highlights each of these R&D...

  13. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Program’s Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects from FY 2006 to FY 2014.

  14. The Future of Global Water Stress: An Integrated Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    We assess the ability of global water systems, resolved at 282 large river basins or Assessment Sub Regions (ASRs), to the meet water requirements over the coming decades under integrated projections of socioeconomic growth ...

  15. Integrated Assessment of the Energy Savings and Emissions-Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of the Energy Savings and Emissions-Reduction Potential of CHP, June 1999 Integrated Assessment of the Energy Savings and Emissions-Reduction Potential of CHP, June 1999...

  16. Detailed Modeling of Industrial Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Integrated Assessment Model of Long-term Global Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, P.; Wise, M.; Smith, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Characterization of the U.S. Industrial/Commercial Boiler Population (May 2005),Submitted to Oak RidgeNational Laboratory, http://www.eea-inc.com/natgas_reports/BoilersFinal.pdf Edmonds J, Clarke K, Dooley J, Kim S.H, Smith SJ. (2004) “Stabilization of CO2 in a B2...-003 Xenergy,Inc.United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment, (December 2002), Prepared for US Department of Energy’s THE U.S. Department Of Energy’s Office Of Industrial Technologies And Oak RidgeNational Laboratory. http://eereweb.ee.doe.gov/industry/bestpractices/pdfs/mtrmkt.pdf ...

  17. An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

  18. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using...

  19. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  20. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  1. Integrated Safeguards and Security Management Self-Assessment 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunford, Dan; Ramsey, Dwayne

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory deployed the first Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Self-Assessment process, designed to measure the effect of the Laboratory's ISSM efforts. This process was recognized by DOE as a best practice and model program for self-assessment and training. In 2004, the second Self-Assessment was launched. The cornerstone of this process was an employee survey that was designed to meet several objectives: (1) Ensure that Laboratory assets are protected. (2) Provide a measurement of the Laboratory's current security status that can be compared against the 2002 Self-Assessment baseline. (3) Educate all Laboratory staff about security responsibilities, tools, and practices. (4) Provide security staff with feedback on the effectiveness of security programs. (5) Provide line management with the information they need to make informed decisions about security. This 2004 Self Assessment process began in July 2004 with every employee receiving an information packet and instructions for completing the ISSM survey. The Laboratory-wide survey contained questions designed to measure awareness and conformance to policy and best practices. The survey response was excellent--90% of Berkeley Lab employees completed the questionnaire. ISSM liaisons from each division followed up on the initial survey results with individual employees to improve awareness and resolve ambiguities uncovered by the questionnaire. As with the 2002 survey, the Self-Assessment produced immediate positive results for the ISSM program and revealed opportunities for longer-term corrective actions. Results of the questionnaire provided information for organizational profiles and an institutional summary. The overall level of security protection and awareness was very high--often above 90%. Post-survey work by the ISSM liaisons and line management consistently led to improved awareness and metrics, as shown by a comparison of profiles at the end of phase one (August 6, 2004) and phase two (November 1, 2004). The Self-Assessment confirmed that classified information is not held or processed at Berkeley Lab. The survey results also identified areas where increased employee knowledge and awareness of Laboratory policy would be beneficial, the two most prominent being password usage and wireless network service. Line management will be able to determine additional corrective actions based on the results of the Self-Assessment. Future assessments will raise the ratings bar for some existing program elements and add new elements to stimulate further improvements in Laboratory security.

  2. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  3. Data report for the integrity assessment report HNF-4589

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCSHANE, D.S.

    1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to compile supporting documentation for the Integrity Assessment Report (HNF 4589) for Tanks 101 and 102 in the 2194 Facility. This approach minimizes the size of the Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) (HNF-4589) and still provide a path to detailed information. This IAR addresses the evaluation of Tanks 101 and 102 and other existing components located in the 219-5 Waste Handling Facility.

  4. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  5. 241-AZ Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  6. 241-SY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-SY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  7. Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM) is a decision-support software product for resource-and-capacity planning. Users can evaluate changing constraints on schedule performance, projected cost, and resource use. IRPM is a unique software tool that can analyze complex business situations from a basic supply chain to an integrated production facility to a distributed manufacturing complex. IRPM can be efficiently configured through a user-friendly graphical interface to rapidly provide charts, graphs, tables, and/or written results to summarize postulated business scenarios. There is not a similar integrated resource planning software package presently available. Many different businesses (from government to large corporations as well as medium-to-small manufacturing concerns) could save thousands of dollars and hundreds of labor hours in resource and schedule planning costs. Those businesses also could avoid millions of dollars of revenue lost from fear of overcommitting or from penalties and lost future business for failing to meet promised delivery by using IRPM to perform what-if business-case evaluations. Tough production planning questions that previously were left unanswered can now be answered with a high degree of certainty. Businesses can anticipate production problems and have solutions in hand to deal with those problems. IRPM allows companies to make better plans, decisions, and investments.

  8. Calculating Impacts of Energy Standards on Energy Demand in U.S. Buildings under Uncertainty with an Integrated Assessment Model: Technical Background Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data and assumptions employed in an application of PNNL’s Global Change Assessment Model with a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability. The model is used to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The report provides a summary of how residential and commercial buildings are modeled, together with assumptions made for the distributions of state–level population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per worker, efficiency and cost of residential and commercial energy equipment by end use, and efficiency and cost of residential and commercial building shells. The cost and performance of equipment and of building shells are reported separately for current building and equipment efficiency standards and for more aggressive standards. The report also details assumptions concerning future improvements brought about by projected trends in technology.

  9. Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  10. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consequences of microturbine installation estimated, and theImpacts from Microturbine Installation..fuel cell and 2 models of microturbine are available for the

  11. assessment integrating remote: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed appropriate modeling tools in support of an ecosystem-based approach to natural resource manage 100 The quantitative assessment of the benefits of physiological...

  12. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of Electric Steel making Through the Year 2000,by Injection Technology” Steel Times, October 1994 pp.391-Hanes, C. , 1999. USS/Kobe Steel, Personal communication,

  13. Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance Waste Form Degradation Model Integration for Engineered Materials Performance The collaborative...

  14. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  15. Need for an Integrated Risk Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is passed to decision makers * Model is needed that (eventually) will integrate seismic risk with other initiators * Scenario approach definition * R

  16. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development Fixed-yieldModels SwingcutsModels LPPlanningModels Aggregate for the CDU #12;Planning Model Example Typical Refinery Configuration (Adapted from Aronofsky, 1978) Cat Ref

  17. 1998 interim 242-A Evaporator tank system integrity assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) under contract to Lockheed-Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) for Waste Management Hanford (WMH), the 242-A Evaporator (facility) operations contractor for Fluor Daniel Hanford, and the US Department of Energy, the system owner. The contract specifies that FDNW perform an interim (5 year) integrity assessment of the facility and prepare a written IAR in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640. The WAC 173-303 defines a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility tank system as the ``dangerous waste storage or treatment tank and its ancillary equipment and containment.`` This integrity assessment evaluates the two tank systems at the facility: the evaporator vessel, C-A-1 (also called the vapor-liquid separator), and the condensate collection tank, TK-C-100. This IAR evaluates the 242-A facility tank systems up to, but not including, the last valve or flanged connection inside the facility perimeter. The initial integrity assessment performed on the facility evaluated certain subsystems not directly in contact with dangerous waste, such as the steam condensate and used raw water subsystems, to provide technical information. These subsystems were not evaluated in this IAR. The last major upgrade to the facility was project B-534. The facility modifications, as a result of project B-534, were evaluated in the 1993 facility interim integrity assessment. Since that time, the following upgrades have occurred in the facility: installation of a process condensate recycle system, and installation of a package steam boiler to provide steam for the facility. The package boiler is not within the scope of the facility TSD.

  18. Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Assessment draft report will present the results of a literature search and preliminary assessment of the body of research, analysis methods, models and data deemed to be relevant to the Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment research. This report will provide: 1) a description of the problem space and the kinds of information pertinent to the problem space, 2) a discussion of key relevant or representative literature, 3) a discussion of models and modeling approaches judged to be potentially useful to the research, and 4) the next steps of this research that will be pursued based on this preliminary assessment. This draft report represents a technical deliverable for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling (SAM) program. Specifically this draft report is the Task 1 deliverable for project PL09-UtilSocial-PD06, Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment. This project investigates non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessment, including nonproliferation assessment, proliferation resistance assessments, safeguards assessments and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about the State’s posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This project will find and fuse social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation. The aim of this research is to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment.

  19. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ModelEIA), 2005. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey onEIA), 2009. 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey on

  20. Integrated assessment of quality of supply in future electricity networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Gil, Ignacio

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Although power system reliability analysis is a mature research area, there is a renewed interest in updating available network models and formulating improved reliability assessment procedures. The main driver of this ...

  1. ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and Risk CommunicationOakDose modeling

  2. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  3. Spin Foam Models from the Tetrad Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mikovic

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a class of spin foam models of four-dimensional quantum gravity which is based on the integration of the tetrad one-forms in the path integral for the Palatini action of General Relativity. In the Euclidian gravity case this class of models can be understood as a modification of the Barrett-Crane spin foam model. Fermionic matter can be coupled by using the path integral with sources for the tetrads and the spin connection, and the corresponding state sum is based on a spin foam where both the edges and the faces are colored independently with the irreducible representations of the spacetime rotations group.

  4. Modelling Organizational Issues for Enterprise Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Modelling Organizational Issues for Enterprise Integration Eric S. K. Yu and John Mylopoulos Abstract. Organizational and human issues are often crucial to the successful use of technology Introduction It is generally acknowledged that careful attention to organizational issues is crucial

  5. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

  6. Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

  7. Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Presentation by Paul Leiby of Oak...

  8. Modeling for System Integration Studies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K. D.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes some the data requirements needed for grid integration modeling and provides real-world examples of such data and its format. Renewable energy integration studies evaluate the operational impacts of variable generation. Transmission planning studies investigate where new transmission is needed to transfer energy from generation sources to load centers. Both use time-synchronized wind and solar energy production and load as inputs. Both examine high renewable energy penetration scenarios in the future.

  9. An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment* Mark Heckman mechanism is not simply to stop attacks, but to protect a computing resource so that the resource can continue to perform its function. A computing resource, however, is only a component of a larger system

  10. Multimedia-modeling integration development environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelton, Mitchell A.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.

    2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many framework systems available; however, the purpose of the framework presented here is to capitalize on the successes of the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) and Multi-media Multi-pathway Multi-receptor Risk Assessment (3MRA) methodology as applied to the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR) while focusing on the development of software tools to simplify the module developer?s effort of integrating a module into the framework.

  11. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellweg, Stefanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result inexposure models; Life Cycle Assessment; LCA; intake fractionneglected in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Such an omission

  12. Integration of the DAYCENT Biogeochemical Model within a Multi-Model Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues are the largest near term source of cellulosic 13 biomass for bioenergy production, but removing agricultural residues sustainably 14 requires considering the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. 15 Determining sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues has received 16 significant attention and integrated modeling strategies have been built to evaluate 17 sustainable removal rates considering soil erosion and organic matter constraints. 18 However the current integrated model does not quantitatively assess soil carbon 19 and long term crop yields impacts of residue removal. Furthermore the current 20 integrated model does not evaluate the greenhouse gas impacts of residue 21 removal, specifically N2O and CO2 gas fluxes from the soil surface. The DAYCENT 22 model simulates several important processes for determining agroecosystem 23 performance. These processes include daily Nitrogen-gas flux, daily carbon dioxide 24 flux from soil respiration, soil organic carbon and nitrogen, net primary productivity, 25 and daily water and nitrate leaching. Each of these processes is an indicator of 26 sustainability when evaluating emerging cellulosic biomass production systems for 27 bioenergy. A potentially vulnerable cellulosic biomass resource is agricultural 28 residues. This paper presents the integration of the DAYCENT model with the 29 existing integration framework modeling tool to investigate additional environment 30 impacts of agricultural residue removal. The integrated model is extended to 31 facilitate two-way coupling between DAYCENT and the existing framework. The 32 extended integrated model is applied to investigate additional environmental 33 impacts from a recent sustainable agricultural residue removal dataset. The 34 integrated model with DAYCENT finds some differences in sustainable removal 35 rates compared to previous results for a case study county in Iowa. The extended 36 integrated model with DAYCENT also predicts that long term yields will decrease.

  13. Topological Matter, Integrable Models and Fusion Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Nemeschansky; N. P. Warner

    1991-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how topological $G_k/G_k$ models can be embedded into the topological matter models that are obtained by perturbing the twisted $N=2$ supersymmetric, hermitian symmetric, coset models. In particular, this leads to an embedding of the fusion ring of $G$ as a sub-ring of the perturbed, chiral primary ring. The perturbation of the twisted $N=2$ model that leads to the fusion ring is also shown to lead to an integrable $N=2$ supersymmetric field theory when the untwisted $N=2$ superconformal field theory is perturbed by the same operator and its hermitian conjugate.

  14. Metrics for Assessment of Smart Grid Data Integrity Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annarita Giani; Miles McQueen; Russell Bent; Kameshwar Poolla; Mark Hinrichs

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an emerging consensus that the nation’s electricity grid is vulnerable to cyber attacks. This vulnerability arises from the increasing reliance on using remote measurements, transmitting them over legacy data networks to system operators who make critical decisions based on available data. Data integrity attacks are a class of cyber attacks that involve a compromise of information that is processed by the grid operator. This information can include meter readings of injected power at remote generators, power flows on transmission lines, and relay states. These data integrity attacks have consequences only when the system operator responds to compromised data by redispatching generation under normal or contingency protocols. These consequences include (a) financial losses from sub-optimal economic dispatch to service loads, (b) robustness/resiliency losses from placing the grid at operating points that are at greater risk from contingencies, and (c) systemic losses resulting from cascading failures induced by poor operational choices. This paper is focused on understanding the connections between grid operational procedures and cyber attacks. We first offer two examples to illustrate how data integrity attacks can cause economic and physical damage by misleading operators into taking inappropriate decisions. We then focus on unobservable data integrity attacks involving power meter data. These are coordinated attacks where the compromised data are consistent with the physics of power flow, and are therefore passed by any bad data detection algorithm. We develop metrics to assess the economic impact of these attacks under re-dispatch decisions using optimal power flow methods. These metrics can be use to prioritize the adoption of appropriate countermeasures including PMU placement, encryption, hardware upgrades, and advance attack detection algorithms.

  15. CIMS: An Integrated US-Canadian Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyboer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CIMS: An Integrated US-Canadian Model John Nyboer, Simon Fraser University As the US addresses energy supply security and, at a state level, various environmental objectives, it is not clear what effect these will have on Canada's exports... technologies in both countries, one can obtain insight into economic and policy consequences for Canada of various US energy scenarios. ...

  16. Modelling Organizational Issues for Enterprise Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Modelling Organizational Issues for Enterprise Integration Eric S. K. Yu 1 and John Mylopoulos 2 1. Organizational and human issues are often crucial to the successful use of technology in organizations It is generally acknowledged that careful attention to organizational issues is crucial to the success

  17. Advanced Integration in Multi-Scale Mechanics and Welding Process Simulation in Weld Integrity Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitek, J.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.W.; Babu, S.

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, mathematical models that predict the microstructure in pipeline steel welds were to be developed. These models were to be integrated with thermal models that describe the time-temperature history in the weld as a function of location in order to derive the spatial variation of microstructure in the weld. The microstructure predictions were also to be combined with microstructure-hardness relations, based on the additivity principle, to determine the spatial variation of hardness in the weld. EMC2 also developed microstructural models based on empirical relationships. ORNL was to pursue the development of more fundamental, theoretically based models. ORNL applied a previously developed model for inclusion formation to predict the extent and nature of inclusions that form during weld cooling from the liquid. This inclusion model was directly integrated with computational thermodynamics capability. A convenient user interface was developed for both the inclusion model and the thermodynamic phase-stability calculations. The microstructure model was based on the simultaneous transformation theory analysis as applied to the transformation of austenite to various ferrite constituents during weld cooling. The model available on the Materials Algorithm Project web site was used. Extensive modification of this model was required to correct problems with compilation and calculations as a function of the computational platform (Unix, Linux, Windows, etc.) that was used. The user interface for the inclusion model and thermodynamic phase-stability calculations was delivered to EMC2 along with the modified and correct microstructure model. Evaluation of the theoretically based model will be carried out and the predictions will be compared with experimental results as well as predictions based on the empirical models developed by EMC2.

  18. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMar, P.

    2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Energy Systems (IES) combine on-site power or distributed generation technologies with thermally activated technologies to provide cooling, heating, humidity control, energy storage and/or other process functions using thermal energy normally wasted in the production of electricity/power. IES produce electricity and byproduct thermal energy onsite, with the potential of converting 80 percent or more of the fuel into useable energy. IES have the potential to offer the nation the benefits of unprecedented energy efficiency gains, consumer choice and energy security. It may also dramatically reduce industrial and commercial building sector carbon and air pollutant emissions and increase source energy efficiency. Applications of distributed energy and Combined heat and power (CHP) in ''Commercial and Institutional Buildings'' have, however, been historically limited due to insufficient use of byproduct thermal energy, particularly during summer months when heating is at a minimum. In recent years, custom engineered systems have evolved incorporating potentially high-value services from Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) like cooling and humidity control. Such TAT equipment can be integrated into a CHP system to utilize the byproduct heat output effectively to provide absorption cooling or desiccant humidity control for the building during these summer months. IES can therefore expand the potential thermal energy services and thereby extend the conventional CHP market into building sector applications that could not be economically served by CHP alone. Now more than ever, these combined cooling, heating and humidity control systems (IES) can potentially decrease carbon and air pollutant emissions, while improving source energy efficiency in the buildings sector. Even with these improvements over conventional CHP systems, IES face significant technological and economic hurdles. Of crucial importance to the success of IES is the ability to treat the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, water heating, lighting, and power systems loads as parts of an integrated system, serving the majority of these loads either directly or indirectly from the CHP output. The CHP Technology Roadmaps (Buildings and Industry) have focused research and development on a comprehensive integration approach: component integration, equipment integration, packaged and modular system development, system integration with the grid, and system integration with building and process loads. This marked change in technology research and development has led to the creation of a new acronym to better reflect the nature of development in this important area of energy efficiency: Integrated Energy Systems (IES). Throughout this report, the terms ''CHP'' and ''IES'' will sometimes be used interchangeably, with CHP generally reserved for the electricity and heat generating technology subsystem portion of an IES. The focus of this study is to examine the potential for IES in buildings when the system perspective is taken, and the IES is employed as a dynamic system, not just as conventional CHP. This effort is designed to determine market potential by analyzing IES performance on an hour-by-hour basis, examining the full range of building types, their loads and timing, and assessing how these loads can be technically and economically met by IES.

  19. A Distributed Multi-User Role-Based Model Integration Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorow, Kevin E.; Gorton, Ian; Thurman, David A.

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated computational modeling can be very useful in making quick, yet informed decisions related to environmental issues including Brownfield assessments. Unfortunately, the process of creating meaningful information using this methodology is fraught with difficulties, particularly when multiple computational models are required. Common problems include the inability to seamlessly transfer information between models, the difficulty of incorporating new models and integrating heterogeneous data sources, executing large numbers of model runs in a reasonable time frame, and adequately capturing pedigree information that describes the specific computational steps and data required to reproduce results. While current model integration frameworks have successfully addressed some of these problems, none have addressed all of them. Building on existing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we have created an extensible software architecture for the next generation of model integration frameworks that addresses these issues. This paper describes this architecture that is being developed to support integrated water resource modeling in a metropolitan area.

  20. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

  1. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

  2. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

  3. Modeling fabrication of nuclear components: An integrative approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hench, K.W.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. This dissertation presents an integrative two-stage approach to modeling the casting operation for fabrication of nuclear weapon primary components. The first stage optimizes personnel radiation exposure for the casting operation layout by modeling the operation as a facility layout problem formulated as a quadratic assignment problem. The solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

  4. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  5. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  6. An integrated evolutionary model approach to small satellite engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Joseph B. (Joseph Brian)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deficiency exists in the use of detailed integrated modeling in the design, fabrication, and operations of small satellites (<180kg). This need led to the design of the Integrated Evolutionary Model (IEM) approach to ...

  7. ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or state regulatory compliance requirements are being met during the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Dose modeling is an important step in the...

  8. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  9. assessing graft integrity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: technology analysis Noon Lunch 1:15 California off-shore wind technology assessment 1:45 Technical assessmentRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY...

  10. DOD/NREL Model Integrates Vehicles, Renewables & Microgrid (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet on microgrid model created by the Electric Vehicle Grid Integration program at the Fort Carson Army facility.

  11. ModelBased Information Integration in a Neuroscience Mediator System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludäscher, Bertram

    Model­Based Information Integration in a Neuroscience Mediator System Bertram Lud¨ascher ? Amarnath

  12. Integrating a life-cycle assessment with NEPA: Does it make sense?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1998-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides the basic national charter for protection of the environment in the US. Today NEPA has provided an environmental policy model which has been emulated by nations around the world. Recently, questions have been raised regarding the appropriateness and under what conditions it makes sense to combine the preparation of a NEPA analysis with the International Organization for Stnadardization (ISO) - 14000 Standards for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). This paper advantages a decision making tool consisting of six discrete criteria which can be employed by a user in reaching a decision regarding the integration of NEPA analysis and LCA. Properly applied, this tool should reduce the risk that a LCA may be inappropriately prepared and integrated with a NEPA analysis.

  13. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C W [ed.] [ed.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  14. Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologie...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IMPACT CENTER FOR INTEGRATED NANOTECHNOLOGIES AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIESNEW MEXICO The United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security...

  15. Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model (FPHLM): Research Experience in System Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model (FPHLM): Research Experience in System Integration 1 Shu International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA hamids@fiu.edu ABSTRACT The Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model on probabilistic assessment of insured hurricane wind risk to residential properties and has successfully passed

  16. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  17. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment andCharacteri...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment and Characterization Projects More Documents & Publications Environmental Wind Projects Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects Offshore Wind Projects...

  18. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  19. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  20. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste. Within the UFDC, the components for a general system model of the degradation and subsequent transport of UNF is being developed to analyze the performance of disposal options [Sassani et al., 2012]. Two model components of the near-field part of the problem are the ANL Mixed Potential Model and the PNNL Radiolysis Model. This report is in response to the desire to integrate the two models as outlined in [Buck, E.C, J.L. Jerden, W.L. Ebert, R.S. Wittman, (2013) “Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation,” FCRD-UFD-2013-000290, M3FT-PN0806058

  1. A toolkit for integrated deterministic and probabilistic assessment for hydrogen infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina; Tchouvelev, Andrei V.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been increasing interest in using Quantitative Risk Assessment [QRA] to help improve the safety of hydrogen infrastructure and applications. Hydrogen infrastructure for transportation (e.g. fueling fuel cell vehicles) or stationary (e.g. back-up power) applications is a relatively new area for application of QRA vs. traditional industrial production and use, and as a result there are few tools designed to enable QRA for this emerging sector. There are few existing QRA tools containing models that have been developed and validated for use in small-scale hydrogen applications. However, in the past several years, there has been significant progress in developing and validating deterministic physical and engineering models for hydrogen dispersion, ignition, and flame behavior. In parallel, there has been progress in developing defensible probabilistic models for the occurrence of events such as hydrogen release and ignition. While models and data are available, using this information is difficult due to a lack of readily available tools for integrating deterministic and probabilistic components into a single analysis framework. This paper discusses the first steps in building an integrated toolkit for performing QRA on hydrogen transportation technologies and suggests directions for extending the toolkit.

  2. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.

  3. assessment integrated approaches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  4. Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologie...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Assessment March 2003 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION In 1999, the United States government announced the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI)...

  5. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heating, and Power for Industry: A Market Assessment, August 2003 The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating,...

  6. Should different impact assessment instruments be integrated? Evidence from English spatial planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, Ryo, E-mail: tajima.ryo@nies.go.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-9 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokoyama City, Kanagawa, 226-8502 (Japan)] [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-9 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokoyama City, Kanagawa, 226-8502 (Japan); Fischer, Thomas B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at providing empirical evidence to the question as to whether integration of different instruments is achieving its aim in supporting sustainable decision making, focusing on SEA inclusive sustainability appraisal (SA) and other impact assessments (IAs) currently used in English spatial planning. Usage of IAs in addition to SA is established and an analysis of the integration approach (in terms of process, output, and assessor) as well as its effectiveness is conducted. It is found that while integration enhances effectiveness to some extent, too much integration, especially in terms of the procedural element, appears to diminish the overall effectiveness of each IA in influencing decisions as they become captured by the balancing function of SA. -- Highlights: ? The usage of different impact assessments in English spatial planning is clarified. ? The relationship between integration approach and effectiveness is analyzed. ? Results suggest that integration does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. ? Careful consideration is recommended upon process integration.

  7. Database integration in a multimedia-modeling environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorow, Kevin E.

    2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of data from disparate remote sources has direct applicability to modeling, which can support Brownfield assessments. To accomplish this task, a data integration framework needs to be established. A key element in this framework is the metadata that creates the relationship between the pieces of information that are important in the multimedia modeling environment and the information that is stored in the remote data source. The design philosophy is to allow modelers and database owners to collaborate by defining this metadata in such a way that allows interaction between their components. The main parts of this framework include tools to facilitate metadata definition, database extraction plan creation, automated extraction plan execution / data retrieval, and a central clearing house for metadata and modeling / database resources. Cross-platform compatibility (using Java) and standard communications protocols (http / https) allow these parts to run in a wide variety of computing environments (Local Area Networks, Internet, etc.), and, therefore, this framework provides many benefits. Because of the specific data relationships described in the metadata, the amount of data that have to be transferred is kept to a minimum (only the data that fulfill a specific request are provided as opposed to transferring the complete contents of a data source). This allows for real-time data extraction from the actual source. Also, the framework sets up collaborative responsibilities such that the different types of participants have control over the areas in which they have domain knowledge-the modelers are responsible for defining the data relevant to their models, while the database owners are responsible for mapping the contents of the database using the metadata definitions. Finally, the data extraction mechanism allows for the ability to control access to the data and what data are made available.

  8. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

  9. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    topics related to ESI Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) A Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems(Jain and Alleyne 2012) more Group members (12)...

  10. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

  11. Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Enhancing a Facility-Level Model for Proliferation Resistance Assessment of a Nuclear Enegry System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Olson, Jarrod; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment project (PL09-UtilSocial) investigates the use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessments, including nonproliferation assessments, Proliferation Resistance (PR) assessments, safeguards assessments, and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about a host State and its posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system (NES) to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This objective of this project is to find and integrate social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation; and to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment. This report describes a modeling approach and how it might be used to support a location-specific assessment of the PR assessment of a particular NES. The report demonstrates the use of social modeling to enhance an existing assessment process that relies on primarily technical factors. This effort builds on a literature review and preliminary assessment performed as the first stage of the project and compiled in PNNL-18438. [ T his report describes an effort to answer questions about whether it is possible to incorporate social modeling into a PR assessment in such a way that we can determine the effects of social factors on a primarily technical assessment. This report provides: 1. background information about relevant social factors literature; 2. background information about a particular PR assessment approach relevant to this particular demonstration; 3. a discussion of social modeling undertaken to find and characterize social factors that are relevant to the PR assessment of a nuclear facility in a specific location; 4. description of an enhancement concept that integrates social factors into an existing, technically based nuclear facility assessment; 5. a discussion of a way to engage with the owners of the PR assessment methodology to assess and improve the enhancement concept; 6. a discussion of implementation of the proposed approach, including a discussion of functionality and potential users; and 7. conclusions from the research. This report represents technical deliverables for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program. Specifically this report is the Task 2 and 3 deliverables for project PL09-UtilSocial.

  12. Comprehensive country energy assessments using the MARKAL-MACRO model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisman, A.W.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of comprehensive country energy assessments were performed in the late 1970s and early 1980s in cooperation with the governments of various countries. The assessments provided a framework for analyzing the impacts of various national strategies for meeting energy requirements. These analyses considered the total energy framework. Economics, energy supply, national resources, energy use, environmental impacts, technologies, energy efficiencies, and sociopolitical impacts were some of the factors addressed. These analyses incorporated the best available data bases and computer models to facilitate the analyses. National policy makers identified the various strategies to examine. The results of the analyses were provided to the national policy makers to support their decision making. Almost 20 years have passed since these assessments were performed. There have been major changes in energy supply and use, technologies, economics, available resources, and environmental concerns. The available tools for performing the assessments have improved drastically. The availability of improved computer modeling, i.e., MARKAL-MACRO, and improved data collection methods and data bases now permit such assessments to be performed in a more sophisticated manner to provide state of the art support to policy makers. The MARKAL-MACRO model was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory over the last 25 years to support strategic energy planning. It is widely used in the international community for integrating analyses of environmental options, such as reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. It was used to perform the analyses in the least cost energy strategy study for the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Improvements continue to be made to MARKAL-MACRO and its capabilities extended. A methodology to conduct Country Energy Assessments using MARKAL-MACRO is discussed.

  13. Process integrated modelling for steelmaking Life Cycle Inventory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iosif, Ana-Maria [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: ana-maria.iosif@arcelormittal.com; Hanrot, Francois [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: francois.hanrot@arcelormittal.com; Ablitzer, Denis [LSG2M, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.ablitzer@mines.inpl-nancy.fr

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During recent years, strict environmental regulations have been implemented by governments for the steelmaking industry in order to reduce their environmental impact. In the frame of the ULCOS project, we have developed a new methodological framework which combines the process integrated modelling approach with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method in order to carry out the Life Cycle Inventory of steelmaking. In the current paper, this new concept has been applied to the sinter plant which is the most polluting steelmaking process. It has been shown that this approach is a powerful tool to make the collection of data easier, to save time and to provide reliable information concerning the environmental diagnostic of the steelmaking processes.

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  15. Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

  16. Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartmentEnergy Integrated EnergyIntegrated

  17. AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

  18. Integration of an Aggregate Flow Model with a Traffic Flow Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integration of an Aggregate Flow Model with a Traffic Flow Simulator Robert Hoffman , Dengfeng Sun restrictions to aircraft movement are applied by air traffic controllers and traffic managers in response to demand overages or capacity shortfalls in sectors of airspace. To estimate and assess the efficiency

  19. Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  20. Improving the Usability of Integrated Assessment for Adaptation Practice: Insights from the U.S. Southeast Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Preston, Benjamin; Rice, Jennie S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy systems comprise a key sector of the U.S. economy, and one that has been identified as potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. However, understanding of adaptation processes in energy companies and private entities more broadly is limited. It is unclear, for example, the extent to which energy companies are well-served by existing knowledge and tools emerging from the impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (IAV) and integrated assessment modeling (IAM) communities and/or what experiments, analyses, and model results have practical utility for informing adaptation in the energy sector. As part of a regional IAM development project, we investigated available evidence of adaptation processes in the energy sector, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast region. A mixed methods approach of literature review and semi-structured interviews with key informants from energy utilities was used to compare existing knowledge from the IAV community with that of regional stakeholders. That comparison revealed that much of the IAV literature on the energy sector is climate-centric and therefore disconnected from the more integrated decision-making processes and institutional perspectives of energy utilities. Increasing the relevance of research and assessment for the energy sector will necessitate a greater investment in integrated assessment and modeling efforts that respond to practical decision-making needs as well as greater collaboration between energy utilities and researchers in the design, execution, and communication of those efforts.

  1. Integral Model of a Multiphase Plume in Quiescent Stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crounse, B. C.

    The writers present a one-dimensional integral model to describe multiphase plumes discharged to quiescent stratified receiving waters. The model includes an empirical submodel for detrainment, and the capability to include ...

  2. Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program (managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE) is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

  3. Seamlessly Integrating Software & Hardware Modelling for Large-Scale Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Engineering, with the math- ematical modelling approach, Modelica, to address the software/hardware integration problem. The environment and hardware components are modelled in Modelica and integrated software-hardware codesign, large-scale sys- tems, Behavior Engineering, Modelica. 1. Introduction

  4. Multimedia Modeling Using MPEG-7 for Authoring Multimedia Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Multimedia Modeling Using MPEG-7 for Authoring Multimedia Integration Tien Tran-Thuong WAM Project In this paper, we describe an approach to audiovisual data modeling for multimedia integration and synchronization. The approach chosen consists in using description tools from Multimedia Description Schemes

  5. Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics by Sarah A. Shull B #12;Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics by Sarah A. Shull to establish a manned outpost on the lunar surface, it is essential to consider the logistics of both

  6. Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics Sarah A. Shull, Olivier Campaign Logistics by Sarah A. Shull B.S.E. Aerospace Engineering (2001) The University of Michigan) #12;4 Integrated Modeling and Simulation of Lunar Exploration Campaign Logistics by Sarah A. Shull

  7. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  8. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Integrated Disposal Facility 2005 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Saripalli, Prasad; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2MHill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is designing and assessing the performance of an Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) to receive immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Wastes (LLW/MLLW), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) melters used to vitrify the ILAW. The IDF Performance Assessment (PA) assesses the performance of the disposal facility to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. The PA requires prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities, which is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CHG in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL’s tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information were previously presented in a report prepared for the 2001 ILAW PA. This report updates the parameter estimates for the 2005 IDF PA using additional information and data collected since publication of the earlier report.

  9. ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

  10. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  11. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - FESTIV Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport Available

  12. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport AvailableForecasting NREL researchers

  13. Receptor modeling assessment of particle total exposure assessment methodology data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovleva, E.; Hopke, P.K.; Wallace, L.

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the 1991 Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (PTEAM) study in Riverside, CA, were analyzed using a new receptor modeling method. In this study, ambient (outdoor), indoor, and personal particulate matter (PM) concentrations and elemental concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} were measured for a number of participants. These measurements made is possible to relate the pollution to which people were exposed throughout their daily activities with the outdoor air conditions. Personal daytime concentrations of the PM{sub 10} and majority of elements were significantly higher than outdoor or indoor concentrations, suggesting that a significant part of personal aerosol exposure is the result of personal daily activities. Possible sources of additional particulate mass include resuspension of particles that penetrate from the outdoors and formation of new particles during cooking, smoking, etc. Positive matrix factorization analysis was performed to describe the sources of personal exposure. To identify relative contribution of different sources, regression of the particulate matter mass against the factor contributions was performed. Major sources of PM{sub 2.5} were oil combustion, nonferrous metal operations, and motor vehicles. The mass contributions of particles from these sources were similar for outdoor air and personal exposure. Personal exposure to particles from these sources can be controlled by changing outdoor sources. The primary source of PM{sub 10} was soil.

  14. Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of Training April 30,WindAssessment ofASSESSMENTNational

  15. Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion...

  16. Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Elliott, D.B.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost effective energy projects at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Patrick AFB which is located south of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume.2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance, and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value and value index of each ERO.

  17. Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  18. An Integrated Assessment of China’s Wind Energy Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, D.

    Computable general equilibrium (CGE) models seeking to evaluate the impacts of electricity policy face difficulties incorporating detail on the variable nature of renewable energy resources. To improve the accuracy of ...

  19. 34-in. onshore gasline: Integrity assessment and rehabilitation costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amorelli, A.; Fassina, P. [AGIP SpA, Milan (Italy); Abougfeefa, M. [AGIP Oil, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes all the activities carried out to evaluate the integrity of a 34-in. onshore gasline, in order to establish the best strategies to manage the gasline for the next 20 years, taking into account the future operating conditions. Three different alternatives have been considered: the first one was a new pipeline laying, the second the replacement of all damaged stroke line, more or less half of the line, and the last one was a refurbishment of the line by the removal of just the most significant defects. A cost analysis has been performed for all these alternatives. The third one has been selected on the basis of technical and economical evaluations.

  20. NREL: Technology Deployment - Integrated Deployment Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |InfrastructureAerial photo of theIntegrated

  1. Model for assessing bronchial mucus transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, J.E.; Bateman, J.R.M.; Pavia, D.; Clarke, S.W.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a scheme for the assessment of regional mucus transport using inhaled Tc-99m aerosol particles and quantitative analysis of serial gamma-camera images. The model treats input to inner and intermediate lung regions as the total of initial deposition there plus subsequent transport into these regions from more peripheral airways. It allows for interregional differences in the proportion of particles deposited on the mucus-bearing conducting airways, and does not require a gamma image 24 hr after particle inhalation. Instead, distribution of particles reaching the respiratory bronchioles or alveoli is determined from a Kr-81m ventilation image, while the total amount of such deposition is obtained from 24-hr Tc-99m retention measured with a sensitive counter system. The model is applicable to transport by mucociliary action or by cough, and has been tested in ten normal and ten asthmatic subjects.

  2. WATER DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INTEGRATIONS WITH MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Acquisition (SCADA) system that can control operations in treatment plants, as well as continuously check and SCADA interfaces for even more integrated analyses, which is important since many suppliers are implementing SCADA systems. However, only about thirty-five (35) percent of the suppliers have a functioning

  3. Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

  4. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  5. Automated inter-model parameter connection synthesis for simulation model integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ligon, Thomas (Thomas Crumrine)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New simulation modeling environments have been developed such that multiple models can be integrated into a single model. This conglomeration of model data allows designers to better understand the physical phenomenon being ...

  6. An approach for integrating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment: The dibutyl phthalate case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y., E-mail: euling.susan@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Chiu, Weihsueh A. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Benson, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, Mail code 8P-W, 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for evaluating and integrating genomic data in chemical risk assessment was developed based on the lessons learned from performing a case study for the chemical dibutyl phthalate. A case study prototype approach was first developed in accordance with EPA guidance and recommendations of the scientific community. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was selected for the case study exercise. The scoping phase of the dibutyl phthalate case study was conducted by considering the available DBP genomic data, taken together with the entire data set, for whether they could inform various risk assessment aspects, such as toxicodynamics, toxicokinetics, and dose–response. A description of weighing the available dibutyl phthalate data set for utility in risk assessment provides an example for considering genomic data for future chemical assessments. As a result of conducting the scoping process, two questions—Do the DBP toxicogenomic data inform 1) the mechanisms or modes of action?, and 2) the interspecies differences in toxicodynamics?—were selected to focus the case study exercise. Principles of the general approach include considering the genomics data in conjunction with all other data to determine their ability to inform the various qualitative and/or quantitative aspects of risk assessment, and evaluating the relationship between the available genomic and toxicity outcome data with respect to study comparability and phenotypic anchoring. Based on experience from the DBP case study, recommendations and a general approach for integrating genomic data in chemical assessment were developed to advance the broader effort to utilize 21st century data in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Performed DBP case study for integrating genomic data in risk assessment • Present approach for considering genomic data in chemical risk assessment • Present recommendations for use of genomic data in chemical risk assessment.

  7. Cost modeling in the integrated supply chain strategic decision process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Todd (Todd Christopher)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on an internship at Honeywell Aerospace's Integrated Supply Chain (ISC) Leadership division. This work focuses on the role and use of analytical cost models in the strategy development process. The ...

  8. Integration of engineering models in computer-aided preliminary design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajoie, Ronnie M.

    The problems of the integration of engineering models in computer-aided preliminary design are reviewed. This paper details the research, development, and testing of modifications to Paper Airplane, a LISP-based computer ...

  9. An Integrated Evolutionary Model Approach to Small Satellite Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Col (Ret.) John Keesee, David W. Miller May 2010 SSL #5-10 #12;#12;An Integrated Evolutionary Model 2010 SSL #5-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Joseph Robinson submitted

  10. A design tool for reusing integration knowledge in simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Sangmok

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the academic field of computer-aided product development, the role of the design tool is to support engineering designers to develop and integrate simulation models. Used to save time and costs in product development ...

  11. Scalable computational architecture for integrating biological pathway models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiva, V. A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grand challenge of systems biology is to model the cell. The cell is an integrated network of cellular functions. Each cellular function, such as immune response, cell division, metabolism or apoptosis, is defined by an ...

  12. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  13. Perspectives of Integrated Modeling at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalmsthePersonnel Management

  14. Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    gradient method or Generalized Minimum RESidual (GMRES) method, is how to choose the residual tolerance for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using

  15. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  16. Risk assessment compatible fire models (RACFMs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Sherman, M.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Compatible Fire Models (RACFMs) has been developed to represent the hazard posed by a pool fire to weapon systems transported on the B52-H aircraft. These models represent both stand-off (i.e., the weapon system is outside of the flame zone but exposed to the radiant heat load from fire) and fully-engulfing scenarios (i.e., the object is fully covered by flames). The approach taken in developing the RACFMs for both scenarios was to consolidate, reconcile, and apply data and knowledge from all available resources including: data and correlations from the literature, data from an extensive full-scale fire test program at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) at China Lake, and results from a fire field model (VULCAN). In the past, a single, effective temperature, T{sub f}, was used to represent the fire. The heat flux to an object exposed to a fire was estimated using the relationship for black body radiation, {sigma}T{sub f}{sup 4}. Significant improvements have been made by employing the present approach which accounts for the presence of temperature distributions in fully-engulfing fires, and uses best available correlations to estimate heat fluxes in stand-off scenarios.

  17. Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models G. Arhonditsis for assessing the risk of eutrophication in marine coastal embayments. The procedure followed of exogenous nutrient loading. Ã? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Eutrophication; Coastal

  18. A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the necessary balancing reserves for wind. Hydropower's flexibility and capacity are limited, however, by non-power resources that can adjust their output rapidly to keep power supply in balance with demand. HydropowerA Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation by Mitch A. Clement

  19. Assessing the Impacts of Wind Integration in the Western Provinces Amy Sopinka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and utilize high levels of renewable energy technology, such as wind power, depends upon the composition penetrations in the Alberta grid under various balancing protocols. We find that adding #12;iv wind capacityAssessing the Impacts of Wind Integration in the Western Provinces by Amy Sopinka B.A., Queen

  20. NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing Integrated ESH Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing 1 Integrated ESH Assessment: Cu CVD and ALD Unit Process Optimization (Thrust C, Task C-5) Wei Lei, Soon Cho for System Research University of Maryland, College Park Department of Chemical and Environmental

  1. ESD.864 Modeling and Assessment for Policy, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selin, Noelle

    ESD.864 Modeling and Assessment for Policy explores how scientific information and quantitative models can be used to inform policy decision-making. Students will develop an understanding of quantitative modeling techniques ...

  2. A modeling study of the PMK-NVH integral test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Parzer, I.; Petelin, S. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A way of modeling the PMK-NVH integral test facility with RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic code is presented. Two code versions, MOD2/36.05 and MOD3 5m5, are compared and assessed. Modeling is demonstrated for the International Atomic Energy Agency standard problem exercise no. 2, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, performed on the PMK-NVH integral test facility. Three parametric studies of the break vicinity modeling are outlined, testing different ways of connecting the cold leg and hydroaccumulator to the downcomer and determining proper energy loss discharge coefficients at the break. Further, the nodalization study compared four different RELAP5 models, varying from a detailed one with more than 100 nodes, down to the miniature one, with only [approximately] 30 nodes. Modeling of some VVER-440 features, such as horizontal steam generators and hot-leg loop seal, is discussed.

  3. Integration of Life Cycle Assessment into Environmental Process Engineering Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Benko

    I would like to thank my supervisor Prof. Dr. Peter Mizsey for his guidance and support during the course of this research. I am grateful for his encouragement and for giving me an opportunity to use all the facilities available at the Department of Chemical and Environmental Process Engineering. I would like to thank Dr. Daniela Jacob and the colleagues at the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology for their help and support in the field of atmospheric simulations and modelling during my visit at the Institute in Hamburg, Germany. I also would like to thank Professor Sandor Kemeny for his help with statistical problems. Moreover, I would like to thank all the colleagues at the department, especially to Mrs. Gabriella Ling-Mihalovics, for helping me even with technical, scientific, and intellectual questions, and for maintaining a friendly and family atmosphere at the department. I am forever indebted to my parents, my brother Peter, and Viola for encouraging and supporting my studies and helping me get through the difficulties I encountered.

  4. Integrated energy and water conservation modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsabert, S. de; Liner, B.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is required to provide federal facility managers with a clear determination of the impact of water conservation practices on energy consumption. This paper introduces the WATERGY model, which is a spreadsheet model to analyze total energy savings associated with water conservation efforts. The contribution of this effort is the development of a synergistic model based on engineering algorithms as opposed to lumped parameter estimates. The model explicitly details the relationships between direct and indirect water and energy savings. Irrigation, plumbing fixture, appliance, and boiler blowdown savings comprise the direct water component of the model. Reduction in leakage and unaccounted-for water in the distribution system are calculated as indirect water savings. Direct energy savings are calculated for hot water production. Indirect energy savings associated with distribution and collection, electric line losses, and unaccounted-for gas are determined by the model. Data sources, algorithms, and engineering assumptions used in the development of the model are detailed. The model capabilities are demonstrated for a hypothetical federal facility.

  5. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  6. Dark energy in some integrable and nonintegrable FRW cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuralay Esmakhanova; Nurgissa Myrzakulov; Gulgasyl Nugmanova; Yerlan Myrzakulov; Leonid Chechin; Ratbay Myrzakulov

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest challenges in cosmology today is to determine the nature of dark energy, the sourse of the observed present acceleration of the Universe. Besides the vacuum energy, various dark energy models have been suggested. The Friedmann - Robertson - Walker (FRW) spacetime plays an important role in modern cosmology. In particular, the most popular models of dark energy work in the FRW spacetime. In this work, a new class of integrable FRW cosmological models is presented. These models induced by the well-known Painlev$\\acute{e}$ equations. Some nonintegrable FRW models are also considered. These last models are constructed with the help of Pinney, Schr$\\ddot{o}$dinger and hypergeometric equations. Scalar field description and two-dimensional generalizations of some cosmological models are presented. Finally some integrable and nonintegrable $F(R)$ and $F(G)$ gravity models are constructed.

  7. Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koschorke, Albrecht; Musanovic, Emina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration By Albrecht Koschorkeby Emina Musanovic [Integration (from Lat. integrare, “toa social unity. Social integration is distinct from systemic

  8. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhart, M.; et al,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

  9. Assessing the Degree of Spot Market Integration For U.S. Natural Gas: Evidence from Daily Price Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to decouple the production and trading of the commodity natural gas from its transportation. Advocates arguedAssessing the Degree of Spot Market Integration For U.S. Natural Gas: Evidence from Daily Price Economics Abstract: This paper assesses the degree of market integration in the U.S. natural gas market

  10. DESIGNER INTEGRATION IN TRAINING CYCLES : IEEE LTSA MODEL ADAPTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DESIGNER INTEGRATION IN TRAINING CYCLES : IEEE LTSA MODEL ADAPTATION Alain Corbière & Chistophe as the distance learning platform architectures such as IEEE LTSA (Learning and Training System Architecture of the course's progression. It is based on the LTSA architectural model and the studies on the Learning Object

  11. Integration of Groundwater Transport Models with Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Qi "Chee"

    Integration of Groundwater Transport Models with Wireless Sensor Networks Kevin Barnhart1 , I.jayasumana@colostate.edu, Fort Collins, CO, USA ABSTRACT Groundwater transport modeling is intended to aid in remediation be conceptualized in the WSN context. INTRODUCTION As groundwater contamination is an established problem with many

  12. assessment models risk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    practice in the use of spreadsheets in business. Butler, Raymond J 2008-01-01 13 Eutrophication risk assessment in coastal embayments using simple statistical models...

  13. UCSF Chimera, MODELLER, and IMP: An integrated modeling system Zheng Yang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    UCSF Chimera, MODELLER, and IMP: An integrated modeling system Zheng Yang a , Keren Lasker b we present the integration of several modeling tools into UCSF Chimera. These include com- parative probabilities and local interactions by Chimera. Ã? 2011 Published by Elsevier Inc. 1. Introduction Proteins

  14. Yield learning model for integrated circuit package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Gaurishankar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the Plastic Quad Flat Pack and the Ceramic Ball Grid Array at IBM, and the Plastic Ball Grid Array at Motorola. This model has been used as a management toot for making yield predictions, resource allocations, understanding operating practices and provide what...

  15. Three-integral models for axisymmetric galactic discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Famaey; K. Van Caelenberg; H. Dejonghe

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new equilibrium component distribution functions that depend on three analytic integrals in a Stackel potential, and that can be used to model stellar discs of galaxies. These components are generalizations of two-integral ones and can thus provide thin discs in the two-integral approximation. Their most important properties are the partly analytical expression for their moments, the disc-like features of their configuration space densities (exponential decline in the galactic plane and finite extent in the vertical direction) and the anisotropy of their velocity dispersions. We further show that a linear combination of such components can fit a van der Kruit disc.

  16. APT Blanket System Model Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Integrated 1D TRAC System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the approaches taken in establishing a 1-dimensional integrated blanket system model using the TRAC code, developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  17. Student Learning Assessment: Towards an Environmental Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Student Learning Assessment: Towards an Environmental Model for Academic and Student Services in the classroom. · And, implicitly, design assessment methods that lead to documentation and improvement. #12;MSCHE and Student Learning Assessment #12;The NJIT Academic Affairs Institutional Level Learning Goals 1

  18. FIRESTRUC - Integrating advanced three-dimensional modelling methodologies for predicting thermo-mechanical behaviour of steel and composite structures subjected to natural fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Stephen; Miles, Steward; Kumar, Suresh; Lemaire, Tony; Chan, Alan

    A hierarchy of coupling strategies for integrating advanced three-dimensional modelling methodologies for prediction of the thermo-mechanical response of structures in fire has been developed and systematically assessed. ...

  19. -Successful Integration of Life Cycle Assessment in to Civil Engineering Course -CIVL 498C Life Cycle Analysis of UBC Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to teaching the science-based environmental impact assessment method of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA). Through, through being capable of; · Completing a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study in accordance with ISO 14040- Successful Integration of Life Cycle Assessment in to Civil Engineering Course - CIVL 498C Life

  20. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  1. Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling X. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky and G.A. McCulla Abstract: Improving the utilisation of transformers requires that the hot-spot and top. An alternative method for assessing transformer model reliability is provided. 1 Introduction The maximally

  2. Technical and Energy Assessment of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Systems applied to the UAE Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhi, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical and Energy Assessment of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Systems applied to the UAE Office Buildings Hassan Radhi Assistant Professor College of Engineering UAE University Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates ABSTRACT In the market... due to the PV panels represents an important factor when the EPBT is estimated Keywords: BiPV, embodied energy, UAE commercial buildings. INTRODUCTION Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a...

  3. Technical and Energy Assessment of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Systems applied to the UAE Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhi, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical and Energy Assessment of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Systems applied to the UAE Office Buildings Hassan Radhi Assistant Professor College of Engineering UAE University Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates ABSTRACT In the market... due to the PV panels represents an important factor when the EPBT is estimated Keywords: BiPV, embodied energy, UAE commercial buildings. INTRODUCTION Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a...

  4. Verification of the Equilibrium and MHD Stability Codes within the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verification of the Equilibrium and MHD Stability Codes within the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force

  5. Integrated farm sustainability assessment for the environmental management of rural activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stachetii Rodrigues, Geraldo, E-mail: stacheti@cnpma.embrapa.b [Embrapa Labex Europe, Agropolis International, Avenue Agropolis, 34394, Montpellier (France); Aparecida Rodrigues, Izilda, E-mail: isis@cnpma.embrapa.b [Environmental Management Laboratory, Embrapa Environment, Rodovia SP340, km 127.5, Jaguariuna (SP), CEP 13820-000 (Brazil); Almeida Buschinelli, Claudio Cesar de, E-mail: buschi@cnpma.embrapa.b [Environmental Management Laboratory, Embrapa Environment, Rodovia SP340, km 127.5, Jaguariuna (SP), CEP 13820-000 (Brazil); Barros, Inacio de, E-mail: indebarros@antilles.inra.f [INRA, Unite de Recherche Agropedoclimatique da la Zone Caraibe, Domaine Duclos, 97170 Petit-Bourg (France)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmers have been increasingly called upon to respond to an ongoing redefinition in consumers' demands, having as a converging theme the search for sustainable production practices. In order to satisfy this objective, instruments for the environmental management of agricultural activities have been sought out. Environmental impact assessment methods are appropriate tools to address the choice of technologies and management practices to minimize negative effects of agricultural development, while maximizing productive efficiency, sound usage of natural resources, conservation of ecological assets and equitable access to wealth generation means. The 'system for weighted environmental impact assessment of rural activities' (APOIA-NovoRural) presented in this paper is organized to provide integrated farm sustainability assessment according to quantitative environmental standards and defined socio-economic benchmarks. The system integrates sixty-two objective indicators in five sustainability dimensions - (i) Landscape ecology, (ii) Environmental quality (atmosphere, water and soil), (iii) Sociocultural values, (iv) Economic values, and (v) Management and administration. Impact indices are expressed in three integration levels: (i) specific indicators, that offer a diagnostic and managerial tool for farmers and rural administrators, by pointing out particular attributes of the rural activities that may be failing to comply with defined environmental performance objectives; (ii) integrated sustainability dimensions, that show decision-makers the major contributions of the rural activities toward local sustainable development, facilitating the definition of control actions and promotion measures; and (iii) aggregated sustainability index, that can be considered a yardstick for eco-certification purposes. Nine fully documented case studies carried out with the APOIA-NovoRural system, focusing on different scales, diverse rural activities/farming systems, and contrasting spatial/territorial contexts, attest to the malleability of the method and its applicability as an integrated farm environmental management tool.

  6. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinan E

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main bottleneck in modeling transport in molecular devices is to develop the correct formulation of the problem and efficient algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure and dynamics using, for example, the time-dependent density functional theory. We have divided this task into several steps. The first step is to developing the right mathematical formulation and numerical algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure using density functional theory. The second step is to study time-dependent density functional theory, particularly the far-field boundary conditions. The third step is to study electronic transport in molecular devices. We are now at the end of the first step. Under DOE support, we have made subtantial progress in developing linear scaling and sub-linear scaling algorithms for electronic structure analysis. Although there has been a huge amount of effort in the past on developing linear scaling algorithms, most of the algorithms developed suffer from the lack of robustness and controllable accuracy. We have made the following progress: (1) We have analyzed thoroughly the localization properties of the wave-functions. We have developed a clear understanding of the physical as well as mathematical origin of the decay properties. One important conclusion is that even for metals, one can choose wavefunctions that decay faster than any algebraic power. (2) We have developed algorithms that make use of these localization properties. Our algorithms are based on non-orthogonal formulations of the density functional theory. Our key contribution is to add a localization step into the algorithm. The addition of this localization step makes the algorithm quite robust and much more accurate. Moreover, we can control the accuracy of these algorithms by changing the numerical parameters. (3) We have considerably improved the Fermi operator expansion (FOE) approach. Through pole expansion, we have developed the optimal scaling FOE algorithm.

  7. On Models and Ontologies -A Layered Approach for Model-based Tool Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    On Models and Ontologies - A Layered Approach for Model-based Tool Integration Gerti Kappel1 Schwinger3 , and Manuel Wimmer1 1 Business Informatics Group, Vienna University of Technology {gerti

  8. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Models Guide summarizes the IBS use of several computer models for predicting the results of emergency situations. These include models for predicting dispersion/doses of airborne contaminants, traffic evacuation, explosion effects, heat radiation from a fire, and siren sound transmission. The guide references additional technical documentation on the models when such documentation is available from other sources. The audience for this manual is chiefly emergency management planners and analysts, but also data managers and system managers.

  9. Integrated modeling of the electric grid, communications, and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Miller, Laurie E [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a central concern in modeling and simulating electric grids and the information infrastructure that monitors and controls them: hybrid modeling and simulation. We argue that imminent modernizations and new technologies will require a joint (hybrid) modeling of the continuous world of power systems and the discrete world of events sparked by external contingencies, and by communication, computation, and control operations. The power systems community requires methods to model and simulate hybrid scenarios for systems as large and complex as the electric grid. We discuss an approach based on DEVS and present a scenario in which the integrated information and electric grid infrastructures address a frequency maintenance problem.

  10. An integrated pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic model for an Aurora kinase inhibitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    An integrated pharmacokinetic­pharmacodynamic model for an Aurora kinase inhibitor Hiroko Kamei of chromosomes prior to cell division at mitosis. Aurora kinases play critical roles in mitotic progression and hence small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinases have been developed as a new class of potential anti

  11. Tackling Automotive Challenges with an Integrated RE & Design Artifact Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching, Germany {penzenst}@in.tum.de Abstract. The automotive industry faces the needTackling Automotive Challenges with an Integrated RE & Design Artifact Model Birgit Penzenstadler, Documentation, Automotive, Em- bedded Systems 1 Introduction A well-known fact is that the complexity

  12. A Process Model of Applicant Faking on Overt Integrity Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Janie

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the cognitive processes associated with faking behaviors, Ajzen?s Theory of Planned Behavior was adapted to the study of faking on overt integrity tests. This decision-based model is then expanded through the inclusion of a key...

  13. innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore

  14. An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

  15. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  16. Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashdown, BG

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

  17. AMFIBIA: A Meta-Model for the Integration of Business Process Modelling Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kindler, Ekkart

    AMFIBIA: A Meta-Model for the Integration of Business Process Modelling Aspects Bj¨orn Axenath that formalizes the essential as- pects and concepts of business process modelling. Though AMFIBIA is not the first approach to formalizing the aspects and concepts of busi- ness process modelling, it is more

  18. Subtask 2.4 - Integration and Synthesis in Climate Change Predictive Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a brief evaluation of the existing status of predictive modeling to assess options for integration of our previous paleohydrologic reconstructions and their synthesis with current global climate scenarios. Results of our research indicate that short-term data series available from modern instrumental records are not sufficient to reconstruct past hydrologic events or predict future ones. On the contrary, reconstruction of paleoclimate phenomena provided credible information on past climate cycles and confirmed their integration in the context of regional climate history is possible. Similarly to ice cores and other paleo proxies, acquired data represent an objective, credible tool for model calibration and validation of currently observed trends. It remains a subject of future research whether further refinement of our results and synthesis with regional and global climate observations could contribute to improvement and credibility of climate predictions on a regional and global scale.

  19. ANNUAL SUMMARY OF THE INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the US. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) and as implemented by the ''Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment'' (Mann 2004), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. A draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA was sent to the DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) in April 2001 for review and approval. The DOE approved (DOE 2001) the draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA and issued a new version of the Hanford Site waste disposal authorization statement (DAS). Based on comments raised during the review, the draft version was revised and the 2001 ILAW PA was formally issued (Mann et al. 2001). The DOE (DOE 2003a) has reviewed the final 2001 ILAW PA and concluded that no changes to the DAS were necessary. Also as required by the DOE order, annual summaries have been generated and approved. The previous annual summary (Mann 2003b) noted the change of mission from ILAW disposal to the disposal of a range of solid waste types, including ILAW. DOE approved the annual summary (DOE 2003c), noting the expanded mission. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 2001 ILAW PA remain valid as they pertain to ILAW disposal. The new data also suggest that impacts from the disposal of the other solid waste will be lower than initially estimated in the ''Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment'' (Mann 2003a). A performance assessment for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) will be issued in the summer of 2005.

  20. Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of the 490-Q1 tank system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gee, C.W.; Graser, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (US)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of used freon storage tanks 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 has been prepared in response to 40 CFR 265.192(a) and 22 CCR 66265.192(a) for new tank systems that store hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer before the tank system is placed in use as a hazardous waste storage tank system. The technical assessments for the 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 tank systems have been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified that the tank systems have sufficient structural integrity, are acceptable for transferring and storing hazardous waste, are compatible with the stored waste, and the tanks and containment system are suitably designed to achieve the requirements of the applicable regulations so they will not collapse, rupture, or fail.

  1. Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of the 177-R2 tank system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graser, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Schwartz, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of retention tanks 177-R2U1, 177-R2Al, and 177-R2A2 has been prepared in response to 40 CFR 265.192(a) and 22 CCR 66265.192(a) for new tank systems that store hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer before the tank system is placed in use as a hazardous waste storage tank system. The technical assessments for the 177-R2Ul, 177-R2A1, and 177-R2A2 tank systems have been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified that the tank systems have sufficient structural integrity, are acceptable for transferring and storing hazardous waste, are compatible with the stored waste, and the tanks and containment system are suitably designed to achieve the requirements of the applicable regulations so they will not collapse, rupture, or fail. This document will be kept on file by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Environment Protection Department.

  2. Learning Usability Assessment Models for Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Paul

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    students pursuing advanced degrees in the area of computer-human interaction. These students were divided into two groups and given different scenarios of use of a Web site. They assessed the usability of Web pages from the site, and their data was divided...

  3. Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non-hydrostatic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non- hydrostatic model Vincent Guénard, Center for Energy is developed for assessing the wind resource and its uncertainty. The work focuses on an existing wind farm mast measurements. The wind speed and turbulence fields are discussed. It is shown that the k

  4. Integrated Dam Assessment Models Towards Sustainability of Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    populations past (1900) ~300,000 present (2005) ~50,000 Steelhead populations past (1900) ~200,000 present Bolivia--Brazil-- Colombia-- Ecuador-- Guyana--Peru-- Suriname-- Venezuela 6 Treaty for Amazonian

  5. MODEL INTEGRATION FOR ASSESSING FUTURE HYDROCLIMATE IMPACTS ON WATER RESOURCES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    and boron in the San Joaquin River High levels of salt and boron not only affect the water quality but also: San Joaquin Basin San Joaquin River, Millerton Lake Merced River, Exchequer Reservoir Tuolumne River, New Don Pedro Reservoir Stanislaus River, New Melones Reservoir SACRAMENTO BASIN DELTA Vernalis SAN

  6. Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doligez, B.; Eschard, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France); Geffroy, F. [Centre de Geostatistique, Fontainebleau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

  7. ASSESSING FRANCE AS A MODEL OF SOCIETAL SUCCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of this "French model": the French economy being heavily regulated, the well-oiled state tightly controls market crisis," "The French model: Vive la difference!"2 ), and also from free-market minded internationalASSESSING FRANCE AS A MODEL OF SOCIETAL SUCCESS �loi Laurent Sciences-Po Michèle Lamont Harvard

  8. Design and evaluation of the ReKon : an integrated detection and assessment perimeter system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabling, Jeffrey Glenn; Andersen, Jason Jann; McLaughlin, James O. [Stonewater Control Systems, Inc., Kannapolis, NC

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kontek Industries (Kannapolis, NC) and their subsidiary, Stonewater Control Systems (Kannapolis, NC), have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement with Sandia to jointly develop and evaluate an integrated perimeter security system solution, one that couples access delay with detection and assessment. This novel perimeter solution was designed to be configurable for use at facilities ranging from high-security military sites to commercial power plants, to petro/chemical facilities of various kinds. A prototype section of the perimeter has been produced and installed at the Sandia Test and Evaluation Center in Albuquerque, NM. This prototype system integrated fiber optic break sensors, active infrared sensors, fence disturbance sensors, video motion detection, and ground sensors. This report documents the design, testing, and performance evaluation of the developed ReKon system. The ability of the system to properly detect pedestrian or vehicle attempts to bypass, breach, or otherwise defeat the system is characterized, as well as the Nuisance Alarm Rate.

  9. Binaural model-based speech intelligibility enhancement and assessment in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Binaural model-based speech intelligibility enhancement and assessment in hearing aids beamforming and the effect on binaural cues and speech intelligibility . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.3.4 Cepstral smoothing of masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2.4 Binaural CASA speech

  10. Integrated Baseline Bystem (IBS) Version 1.03: Models guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Baseline System)(IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planning and analysis. This document is the models guide for the IBS and explains how to use the emergency related computer models. This document provides information for the experienced system user, and is the primary reference for the computer modeling software supplied with the system. It is designed for emergency managers and planners, and others familiar with the concepts of computer modeling. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other IBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary.

  11. Web Services-Enhanced Agile Modeling and Integrating Business Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belouadha, Fatima-Zahra; Roudiès, Ounsa

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a global business context with continuous changes, the enterprises have to enhance their operational efficiency, to react more quickly, to ensure the flexibility of their business processes, and to build new collaboration pathways with external partners. To achieve this goal, they must use e-business methods, mechanisms and techniques while capitalizing on the potential of new information and communication technologies. In this context, we propose a standards, model and Web services-based approach for modeling and integrating agile enterprise business processes. The purpose is to benefit from Web services characteristics to enhance the processes design and realize their dynamic integration. The choice of focusing on Web services is essentially justified by their broad adoption by enterprises as well as their capability to warranty interoperability between both intra and inter-enterprises systems. Thereby, we propose in this chapter a metamodel for describing business processes, and discuss their dynamic in...

  12. Studio Education for Integrated Practice Using Building Information Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O?zener, Ozan O?zener

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ; M.Arch., Istanbul Technical University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mark J. Clayton This research study posits that an altered educational approach to design studio can produce future professionals who apply Building Information Modeling... (BIM) in the context of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) to execute designs faster and produce designs that have demonstrably higher performance. The combination of new technologies and social/contractual constructs represents an alternative...

  13. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  14. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  15. MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) Version 2: Model Description and Baseline Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) is designed for analyzing the global environmental changes that may result from anthropogenic causes, quantifying the uncertainties associated with the projected changes, and ...

  16. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Carnegie Mellon University EWO Meeting ­ March 2011 1 #12;I t d tiIntroduction Refinery production planning models Optimizing refinery operation C d l ti Crude selection Maximizing profit; minimizing cost

  17. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bascietto, J.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US). RCRA/CERCLA Div.; Dunford, R.W. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (US); Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  18. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F. [ORNL] [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P. [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal Reactor–Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  19. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 1: National assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [6714 Norway Road, Dallas, TX (United States); Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

  20. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  1. Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, T.; Shen, E.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to use existing simulation tools to quantify the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings. An EnergyPlus medium office benchmark simulation model (V1.0_3.0) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) was used as a baseline model for this study. The baseline model was modified to examine the energy savings benefits of three possible control strategies compared to a benchmark case across 16 DOE climate zones. Two controllable subsystems were examined: (1) dimming of electric lighting, and (2) controllable window transmission. Simulation cases were run in EnergyPlus V3.0.0 for building window-to-wall ratios (WWR) of 33percent and 66percent. All three strategies employed electric lighting dimming resulting in lighting energy savings in building perimeter zones ranging from 64percent to 84percent. Integrated control of electric lighting and window transmission resulted in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) energy savings ranging from ?1percent to 40percent. Control of electric lighting and window transmission with HVAC integration (seasonal schedule of window transmission control) resulted in HVAC energy savings ranging from 3percent to 43percent. HVAC energy savings decreased moving from warm climates to cold climates and increased when moving from humid, to dry, to marine climates.

  2. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  3. Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of Hawai`i Clean Energy Policies 9.2 Deliverable Economic and Environmental Modeling of Island Energy Systems By the Hawai`i Natural of Hawai`i Economic Research Organization August 2012 #12;2 Acknowledgement: This material is based upon

  4. Model-based Safety Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Peter

    development life-cycle, in order to identify critical system requirements, such as safety requirements their effectiveness, early in the system development life-cycle, on models derived directly from natural language of functional requirements of arbitrary detail ­ whether it is very early in the life-cycle when functions

  5. Post-2020 climate agreements in the major economies assessed in the light of global models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Aboumahboub, Tino; Bowen, Alex; Calvin, Katherine V.; Campiglio, Emanuele; Kober, Tom; Jewell, Jessica; Luderer, Gunnar; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David; van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Zimmer, Anne; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment models can help in quantifying the implications of international climate agreements and regional climate action. This paper reviews scenario results from model intercomparison projects to explore different possible outcomes of post-2020 climate negotiations, recently announced pledges and their relation to the 2°C target. We provide key information for all the major economies, such as the year of emission peaking, regional carbon budgets and emissions allowances. We highlight the distributional consequences of climate policies, and discuss the role of carbon markets for financing clean energy investments, and achieving efficiency and equity.

  6. SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community.

  7. Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to developing testable hypotheses for the macro-level assessment methodologies is provided. The outcome of this works suggests that we should develop a Bayes Net for micro-level analysis and continue to focus on Bayes Net, System Dynamics and Economic Input/Output models for assessing macro-level problems. Simultaneously, we need to develop metrics for assessing intent in export control, including the risks and consequences associated with all aspects of export control.

  8. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

  9. CASL-U-2015-0015-000 Modeling Integral Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . CL25-000 Modeling Integral

  10. Ontologies for the Integration of Air Quality Models and 3D City Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    -city densification may limit air pollution, carbon emissions, and energy use through reduced transportation of the most important environmental problems is air pollution, mostly induced by vehicle traffic1 Ontologies for the Integration of Air Quality Models and 3D City Models Claudine Metral Institut

  11. A proposed tool to integrate environmental and economical assessments of products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthil, Kumaran D.; Ong, S.K.; Nee, A.Y.C.; Tan, Reginald B.H

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt has been made to interpret the outcomes of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in terms of environmental costs. This attempt ensures the environmental accountability of the products while LCA ensures their eco-friendly nature. Keeping this as an objective, a Life Cycle Environmental Cost Analysis (LCECA) model was developed. This new tool incorporates costing into the LCA practice. This model prescribes a life cycle environmental cost model to estimate and correlate the effects of these costs in all the life cycle stages of the product. The newly developed categories of eco-costs are: costs of effluent treatment/control/disposal, environmental management systems, eco-taxes, rehabilitation, energy and savings of recycling and reuse strategies. The mathematical model of LCECA determines quantitative expressions between the total cost of products and the various eco-costs. The eco-costs of the alternatives are compared with the computational LCECA model. This method enables the environmental as well as the economic assessment of products, which leads to cost-effective, eco-friendly design of products.

  12. Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  14. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  15. Tile-in-ONE: A web platform which integrates Tile Calorimeter data quality and calibration assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivolella Gomes, Andressa; The ATLAS collaboration; Maidantchik, Carmen; Solans, Carlos; Burghgrave, Blake; Solodkov, Alexander

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter assesses the quality of data in order to ensure its proper operation. A number of tasks are then performed by running several tools and systems, which were independently developed to meet distinct collaboration’s requirements and do not necessarily builds an effective connection among them. Thus, a program is usually implemented without a global perspective of the detector, requiring basic software features. In addition, functionalities may overlap in their objectives and frequently replicate resources retrieval mechanisms. Tile-in-ONE is a unique platform that assembles various web systems used by the calorimeter community through a single framework and a standard technology. It provides an infrastructure to support the code implementation, avoiding duplication of work while integrating with an overall view of the detector status. Database connectors smooth the process of information access since developers do not need to be aware of where records are placed and how to extract th...

  16. Assessing the Power Requirements for Sawtooth Control in ITER Through Modelling and Joint Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the Power Requirements for Sawtooth Control in ITER Through Modelling and Joint Experiments

  17. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  18. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  19. Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

  20. Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System Management System in the Midin NWSG mixes beneficial to forage, biofuels production, and wildlife habitatp , 3. identify wildlife habitat benefits associated with varying forage and biofuels management strategies 4. identify optimum

  1. PERFORMANCE MODELING OF DAYLIGHT INTEGRATED PHOTOSENSOR- CONTROLLED LIGHTING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jain; R. R. Creasey; J. Himmelspach; K. P. White; M. Fu; Richard G. Mistrick

    Some building energy codes now require the incorporation of daylight into buildings and automatic photosensor-controlled switching or dimming of the electric lighting system in areas that receive daylight. This paper describes enhancements to the open-source Daysim daylight analysis software that permit users to model a photosensor control system as it will perform in a real space, considering the directional sensitivity of the photosensor, its mounting position, the space and daylight aperture geometry, window shading configuration; the electric lighting equipment and control zones; exterior obstructions; and site weather conditions. System output includes assessment of the daylight distribution in a space throughout the year, the photosensor’s ability to properly track the daylight and modify electric lighting system output, and the energy savings provided by the modeled control system. The application of daylight coefficients permits annual simulations to be conducted efficiently using hourly or finer weather data time increments. 1

  2. Utrecht University Academic Integrity Complaints Procedure This complaints procedure follows the national Model Complaints Procedure Academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    integrity or its researchers and guarantees it will investigate all well-founded suspicions of misconduct1 Utrecht University Academic Integrity Complaints Procedure This complaints procedure follows the national Model Complaints Procedure Academic Integrity of the joint Dutch universities. The model

  3. RELAP5/MOD3 subcooled boiling model assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devkin, A.S.; Podosenov, A.S. [Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Safety Inst.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the assessment of the RELAP5/Mod3 (5m5 version) code subcooled boiling process model which is based on a variety of experiments. The accuracy of the model is confirmed for a wide range of regime parameters for the case of uniform heating along the channel. The condensation rate is rather underpredicted, which may lead to considerable errors in void fraction behavior prediction in subcooled boiling regimes for nonuniformly or unheated channels.

  4. Assessing streamaquifer interactions through inverse modeling of flow routing q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Assessing stream­aquifer interactions through inverse modeling of flow routing q Jozsef Szilagyi a and Nieber, 1977; Troch et al., 1993; Brutsaert and Lopez, 1998; Szilagyi et al., 1998; Par- lange et al., 2001; Szilagyi, 2003a). Knowledge of this inter- action between streamflow and groundwater during flood

  5. Numerical simulation of a lattice polymer model at its integrable point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bedini; A. L. Owczarek; T. Prellberg

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit an integrable lattice model of polymer collapse using numerical simulations. This model was first studied by Bl\\"ote and Nienhuis in J. Phys. A. {\\bf 22}, 1415 (1989) and it describes polymers with some attraction, providing thus a model for the polymer collapse transition. At a particular set of Boltzmann weights the model is integrable and the exponents $\

  6. Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and MODPATH Abstract Modeling. This paper addresses groundwater modeling which is one of the many entities in environmental modeling in ArcView 3.2a. The objective was to create an integrated system where a user could do groundwater

  7. Integration of health into urban spatial planning through impact assessment: Identifying governance and policy barriers and facilitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Laurence, E-mail: Laurence.carmichael@uwe.ac.uk [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Barton, Hugh [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Gray, Selena [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom); Lease, Helen [RPS Planning and Development, 2420 The Quadrant, Aztec West, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4AQ (United Kingdom); Pilkington, Paul [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the results of a review of literature examining the barriers and facilitators in integrating health in spatial planning at the local, mainly urban level, through appraisals. Our literature review covered the UK and non UK experiences of appraisals used to consider health issues in the planning process. We were able to identify four main categories of obstacles and facilitators including first the different knowledge and conceptual understanding of health by different actors/stakeholders, second the types of governance arrangements, in particular partnerships, in place and the political context, third the way institutions work, the responsibilities they have and their capacity and resources and fourth the timeliness, comprehensiveness and inclusiveness of the appraisal process. The findings allowed us to draw some lessons on the governance and policy framework regarding the integration of health impact into spatial planning, in particular considering the pros and cons of integrating health impact assessment (HIA) into other forms of impact assessment of spatial planning decisions such as environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environment assessment (SEA). In addition, the research uncovered a gap in the literature that tends to focus on the mainly voluntary HIA to assess health outcomes of planning decisions and neglect the analysis of regulatory mechanisms such as EIA and SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governance and policy barriers and facilitators to the integration of health into urban planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review of literature on impact assessment methods used across the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knowledge, partnerships, management/resources and processes can impede integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA evaluations prevail uncovering research opportunities for evaluating other techniques.

  8. Integrated pore blockage-cake filtration model for crossflow filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Russell, Renee L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Smith, Harry D.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crossflow filtration is to be a key process in the treatment and disposal of approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is assessing filter performance with waste simulant materials that mimic the chemical and physical properties of Hanford tank waste. Prior simulant studies indicated that waste filtration performance may be limited by pore and cake fouling. To limit the shutdown of waste treatment operations, the pre-treatment facility plans to recover filter flux losses from cake formation and filter fouling by frequently backpulsing the filter elements. The objective of the current paper is to develop a simple model of flux decline resulting from cake and pore fouling and potential flux recovery through backpulsing of the filters for Hanford waste filtration operations. To this end, a model capable of characterizing the decline in waste-simulant filter flux as a function of both irreversible pore blockage and reversible cake formation is proposed. This model is used to characterize the filtration behavior of Hanford waste simulants in both continuous and backpulsed operations. The model is then used to infer the optimal backpulse frequency under specific operating conditions.

  9. Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

  10. Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

  11. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  12. Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, D.B.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments.

  13. Fuel cycle assessment: A compendium of models, methodologies, and approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to profile analytical tools and methods which could be used in a total fuel cycle analysis. The information in this document provides a significant step towards: (1) Characterizing the stages of the fuel cycle. (2) Identifying relevant impacts which can feasibly be evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively. (3) Identifying and reviewing other activities that have been conducted to perform a fuel cycle assessment or some component thereof. (4) Reviewing the successes/deficiencies and opportunities/constraints of previous activities. (5) Identifying methods and modeling techniques/tools that are available, tested and could be used for a fuel cycle assessment.

  14. Solar Resource Assessment: Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet for Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008: ?Solar Resource Assessment Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources

  15. UNCOVERING THE DESIGN PRINCIPLES OF POLYAMINE REGULATION IN YEAST: AN INTEGRATED MODELLING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    UNCOVERING THE DESIGN PRINCIPLES OF POLYAMINE REGULATION IN YEAST: AN INTEGRATED MODELLING frameshifting mechanism. The resulting stochastic model is based on data obtained from specially designed model of the polyamine "controller" reproduces experimental data and predicts polyamine content under

  16. Assessing Models of Public Understanding In ELSI Outreach Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce V. Lewenstein, Ph.D.; Dominique Brossard, Ph.D.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the science of genetics have implications for individuals and society, and have to be taken into account at the policy level. Studies of ethical, legal and social issues related to genomic research have therefore been integrated in the Human Genome Project (HGP) since the earliest days of the project. Since 1990, three to five percent of the HGP annual budget has been devoted to such studies, under the umbrella of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Programs of the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institute of Health, and of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE-ELSI budget has been used to fund a variety of projects that have aimed at ?promoting education and help guide the conduct of genetic research and the development of related medical and public policies? (HGP, 2003). As part of the educational component, a significant portion of DOE-ELSI funds have been dedicated to public outreach projects, with the underlying goal of promoting public awareness and ultimately public discussion of ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding availability of genetic information (Drell, 2002). The essential assumption behind these projects is that greater access to information will lead to more knowledge about ethical, legal and social issues, which in turn will lead to enhanced ability on the part of individuals and communities to deal with these issues when they encounter them. Over the same period of time, new concepts of ?public understanding of science? have emerged in the theoretical realm, moving from a ?deficit? or linear dissemination of popularization, to models stressing lay-knowledge, public engagement and public participation in science policy-making (Lewenstein, 2003). The present project uses the base of DOE-funded ELSI educational project to explore the ways that information about a new and emerging area of science that is intertwined with public issues has been used in educational public settings to affect public understanding of science. After a theoretical background discussion, our approach is three-fold. First, we will provide an overview, a ?map? of DOE-funded of outreach programs within the overall ELSI context to identify the importance of the educational component, and to present the criteria we used to select relevant and representative case studies. Second, we will document the history of the case studies. Finally, we will explore an intertwined set of research questions: (1) To identify what we can expect such projects to accomplish -in other words to determine the goals that can reasonably be achieved by different types of outreach, (2) To point out how the case study approach could be useful for DOE-ELSI outreach as a whole, and (3) To use the case study approach as a basis to test theoretical models of science outreach in order to assess to what extent those models accord with real world outreach activities. For this last goal, we aim at identifying what practices among ELSI outreach activities contribute most to dissemination, or to participation, in other words in which cases outreach materials spark action in terms of public participation in decisions about scientific issues.

  17. Workshop on Current Issues in Predictive Approaches to Intelligence and Security Analytics: Fostering the Creation of Decision Advantage through Model Integration and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing asymmetric nature of threats to the security, health and sustainable growth of our society requires that anticipatory reasoning become an everyday activity. Currently, the use of anticipatory reasoning is hindered by the lack of systematic methods for combining knowledge- and evidence-based models, integrating modeling algorithms, and assessing model validity, accuracy and utility. The workshop addresses these gaps with the intent of fostering the creation of a community of interest on model integration and evaluation that may serve as an aggregation point for existing efforts and a launch pad for new approaches.

  18. Modelling of Remediation Technologies at the Performance Assessment Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parton, N.J.; Paksy, A.; Eden, L.; Trivedi, D.P. [Nexia Solutions Limited, Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, Cheshire, UK, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents approaches to modelling three different remediation technologies that are designed to support site operators during their assessment of remediation options for the management of radioactively contaminated land on nuclear licensed sites in the UK. The three selected technologies were soil washing, permeable reactive barrier and in-situ stabilisation. The potential exists to represent electrokinetics in the future. These technologies were chosen because it was considered that enough information already existed for site operators to assess mature technologies such as soil dig and disposal and groundwater pump and treat. Using the software code GoldSim, the models have been designed to allow site operators to make both a reasonable scoping level assessment of the viability of treatment and understand the cost-benefits of each technology. For soil washing, a standard soil leaching technique was simulated whereby the soil is separated into fines and oversize particles, and subsequently a chemical reagent is used to strip contamination off the soil. The cost benefit of this technology in terms of capital costs for the plant and materials, operational costs and waste disposal costs can also be assessed. The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) model can represent either a continuous wall or a funnel and gate system. The model simulates the transport of contaminants through the reactive material contained in the PRB. The outputs from the model include concentration of contaminants in the groundwater flow downstream of the PRB, mass of contaminants retained by the PRB, total mass and volume of waste and the various costs associated with the PRB remediation technology. The in-situ stabilisation (ISS) model has the capability to represent remediation by the addition of reagents that immobilise contaminated soil. The model simulates the release of contaminants from the treated soil over time. Performance is evaluated by comparison of the mass of contaminants retained and released to the area outside the treatment zone. Other outputs include amount of spoil generated (to be treated as waste) and the costs associated with the application of the ISS technology. These models are aimed to help users select a technology or technologies that are potentially suitable for a particular site. It is anticipated that they will prompt the user to undertake more detailed assessments to tailor the selected technology to their site specific circumstances and contaminated land conditions. (author)

  19. Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, Consuelo Juanita

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

  20. Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Paul Breckenridge

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

  1. Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

  2. Structural Integrity Assessment of Steam Generator Tubes Using a New EPRI Statistical Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesus Miranda, Carlos Alexandre de; Mattar Neto, Miguel [IPEN-CNEN/SP, inst. pesquisas energeticas nucleares, 05499 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental step in tube plugging management of a Steam Generator (SG), in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), is the tube structural integrity evaluation. The degradation of SG tubes may be considered one of the most serious problems found in PWRs operation, mainly when the tube material is the Inconel 600. The first repair criterion was based on the degradation mode where a uniform tube wall thickness corrosion thinning occurred. Thus, a requirement of a maximum depth of 40% of the tube wall thickness was imposed for any type of tube damage. A new approach considers different defects arising from different degradation modes, which comes from the in-service inspections (NDE) and how to consider the involved uncertainties. It is based on experimental results, using statistics to consider the involved uncertainties, to assess structural limits of PWR SG tubes. In any case, the obtained results, critical defect dimensions, are within the regulatory limits. In this paper this new approach will be discussed and it will be applied to two cases (two defects) using typical data of SG tubes of one Westinghouse NPP. The obtained results are compared with 'historical' approaches and some comments are addressed from the results and their comparison. (authors)

  3. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Huang, Shiew-Mei, E-mail: shiewmei.huang@fda.hhs.go [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  4. On Integrating the M OBIUS and MODEST Modeling Tools Henrik Bohnenkampa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    On Integrating the M ¨OBIUS and MODEST Modeling Tools Henrik Bohnenkampa , Tod Courtneyb , David This tool paper presents the integration of the MODEST specification language into the M ¨OBIUS framework imple- mented in the M ¨OBIUS tool. The MODEST modeling language. MODEST [1] is a modeling language

  5. A FLEXIBLE, MODULAR APPROACH TO INTEGRATED SPACE EXPLORATION CAMPAIGN LOGISTICS MODELING, SIMULATION, AND ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    A FLEXIBLE, MODULAR APPROACH TO INTEGRATED SPACE EXPLORATION CAMPAIGN LOGISTICS MODELING Students #12;2 A FLEXIBLE, MODULAR APPROACH TO INTEGRATED SPACE EXPLORATION CAMPAIGN LOGISTICS MODELING in Aeronautics and Astronautics #12;3 Abstract A space logistics modeling framework to support space exploration

  6. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    to assess the nation's military preparedness. However, risk management is not a panacea for the problemsThe Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow

  7. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  8. Message passing for integrating and assessing renewable generation in a redundant power grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified model of a redundant power grid is used to study integration of fluctuating renewable generation. The grid consists of large number of generator and consumer nodes. The net power consumption is determined by the difference between the gross consumption and the level of renewable generation. The gross consumption is drawn from a narrow distribution representing the predictability of aggregated loads, and we consider two different distributions representing wind and solar resources. Each generator is connected to D consumers, and redundancy is built in by connecting R {le} D of these consumers to other generators. The lines are switchable so that at any instance each consumer is connected to a single generator. We explore the capacity of the renewable generation by determining the level of 'firm' generation capacity that can be displaced for different levels of redundancy R. We also develop message-passing control algorithm for finding switch sellings where no generator is overloaded.

  9. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  10. An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaqun Costa reservoir as a case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11931199 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case study A. Navas1 , B of the main environments in the reservoir. Records of known flood events and of reservoir management data have

  11. The Effect of Government Actions on Environmental Technology Innovation: Applications to the Integrated Assessment of Carbon Sequestration Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, E. S.; Hounshell, D. A.; Yeh, S.; Taylor, M.; Schrattenholzer, L.; Riahi, K.; Barreto, L.; Rao, S.

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project seeks to improve the ability of integrated assessment models (IA) to incorporate changes in technology, especially environmental technologies, cost and performance over time. In this report, we present results of research that examines past experience in controlling other major power plant emissions that might serve as a reasonable guide to future rates of technological progress in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) systems. In particular, we focus on U.S. and worldwide experience with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technologies over the past 30 years, and derive empirical learning rates for these technologies. The patterns of technology innovation are captured by our analysis of patent activities and trends of cost reduction over time. Overall, we found learning rates of 11% for the capital costs of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system for SO{sub 2} control, and 13% for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO{sub x} control. We explore the key factors responsible for the observed trends, especially the development of regulatory policies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control, and their implications for environmental control technology innovation.

  12. Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Integrated Deployment model to accelerate market adoption of alternative energy solutions to power homes, businesses, and vehicles through a comprehensive and aggressive approach.

  13. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth... KINETIC MODELING AND ASSESSMENT OF LIME PRETREATMENT OF POPLAR WOOD A Dissertation by ROCIO SIERRA RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  14. eMarketplace Model: An Architecture for Collaborative Supply Chain Management and Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huhns, Michael N.

    1 eMarketplace Model: An Architecture for Collaborative Supply Chain Management and Integration.shen@nrc.gc.ca Abstract. The current economic climate forces businesses to collaborate more frequently and build efficient management and integration platform. It supports coordination mecha- nisms and integration at the business

  15. Integrable Gross-Neveu models with fermion-fermion and fermion-antifermion pairing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Thies

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The massless Gross-Neveu and chiral Gross-Neveu models are well known examples of integrable quantum field theories in 1+1 dimensions. We address the question whether integrability is preserved if one either replaces the four-fermion interaction in fermion-antifermion channels by a dual interaction in fermion-fermion channels, or if one adds such a dual interaction to an existing integrable model. The relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach is adequate to deal with the large N limit of such models. In this way, we construct and solve three integrable models with Cooper pairing. We also identify a candidate for a fourth integrable model with maximal kinematic symmetry, the "perfect" Gross-Neveu model. This type of field theories can serve as exactly solvable toy models for color superconductivity in quantum chromodynamics.

  16. Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

  17. Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

  18. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  19. HyperKhaler Metrics Building and Integrable Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. H. Saidi; M. B. Sedra

    2005-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods developed for the analysis of integrable systems are used to study the problem of hyperK\\"ahler metrics building as formulated in D=2 N=4 supersymmetric harmonic superspace. We show, in particular, that the constraint equation $\\beta\\partial^{++2}\\omega -\\xi^{++2}\\exp 2\\beta\\omega =0$ and its Toda like generalizations are integrable. Explicit solutions together with the conserved currents generating the symmetry responsible of the integrability of these equations are given. Other features are also discussed

  20. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  1. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  2. Analysis of Mesoscale Model Data for Wind Integration (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Wan, Y. H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supports examination of implications of national 20% wind vision, and provides input to integration and transmission studies for operational impact of large penetrations of wind on the grid.

  3. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

  4. Waste package performance assessment: Deterministic system model, program scope and specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connell, W.J.; Drach, R.S.

    1986-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessments of the performance of nuclear waste package designs must be made in order to qualify waste package designs with respect to containment time and release-rate requirements. PANDORA is a computer-based model of the waste package and of the processes affecting it over the long terms, specific to conditions at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site. The processes PANDORA models include: changes in inventories due to radioactive decay, gamma radiation dose rate in and near the package, heat transfer, mechanical behavior, groundwater contact, corrosion, waste form alteration, and radionuclide release. The model tracks the development and coupling of these processes over time. The process models are simplified ones that focus on major effects and on coupling. This report documents our conceptual model development and provides a specification for the computer program. The current model is the first in a series. Succeeding models will use guidance from results of preceding models in the PANDORA series and will incorporate results of recently completed experiments and calculations on processes affecting performance. 22 refs., 21 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. A Process Model of Applicant Faking on Overt Integrity Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Janie

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ?????????????????????????? 37 Procedure?????????????????????????... 44 STUDY 1 RESULTS?..??????????????????????. 47 Descriptive statistics?????????????????????. 47 Manipulation checks?????????????????????. 47 Relationship between cognitions and intentions... Interaction between applicant faking behavior (SR) and applicant integrity test validity for CWB ?????????? 69 22 Interaction between impression management and applicant integrity test validity for CWB ?????????????? 69 1 INTRODUCTION...

  6. Reliability-yield allocation for semiconductor integrated circuits: modeling and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Chunghun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops yield and reliability models for fault-tolerant semiconductor integrated circuits and develops optimization algorithms that can be directly applied to these models. Since defects cause failures in microelectronics systems...

  7. Identi cation Tasking and Networking (ITN) Model For The FBI's Integrated Automated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, John

    Identi cation Tasking and Networking (ITN) Model For The FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint September 29, 1994 Abstract This document describes the model developed for the ITN/FBI using the SES

  8. An Inspector's Assessment of the New Model Safeguards Approach for Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference paper assesses the changes that are being made to the Model Safeguards Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants.

  9. Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronstert, Axel

    Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A: Bronstert 1 Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A con- straint for development in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil. Quanti cation of natural water

  10. Exact Thermodynamics of the Uimin-Sutherland Model via Nonlinear Integral Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damerau, Jens

    Exact Thermodynamics of the Uimin-Sutherland Model via Nonlinear Integral Equations Jens Damerau) Thermodynamics of the US Model ISQS 16, Prague 07 1 / 11 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Definition of the Uimin approach to thermodynamics Definition of suitable auxiliary functions Finite set of nonlinear integral

  11. Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  12. Structural integrity assessment of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels using a simplified fracture mechanics procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. (Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simplified fracture analysis procedure which was developed by Pellini to quantify fracture critical-crack sizes and crack-arrest temperatures of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels. Fracture analysis diagrams have been developed using the simplified analysis procedure for various grades of carbon and low-alloy steels used in the construction of ASME, Section VIII, Division 1 pressure vessels. Structural integrity assessments have been conducted from the analysis diagrams.

  13. HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership Assessment in Biotechnology & Drugs Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broomes, Peter; Dornfeld, David A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000 Broomes, Peter. , “HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership2000 Broomes, Peter. , “HVAC Results Comparison”, April,HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership Assessment in

  14. The FIT Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Meliisa C Teague; Gregory M Teske; Kurt G Vedros

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010] are an initial step by the FCR&D program toward a global analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. The question originally posed to the “system losses study” was the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, waste management, etc. versus the separation efficiency. In other words, are the costs associated with marginal reductions in separations losses (or improvements in product recovery) justified by the gains in the performance of other systems? We have learned that that is the wrong question. The right question is: how does one adjust the compositions and quantities of all mass streams, given uncertain product criteria, to balance competing objectives including cost? FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles using common bases to determine how chemical performance changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say used fuel cooling times or separation efficiencies) affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT estimates impurities in fuel and waste via a rough estimate of physics and mass balance for a set of technologies. If feasibility is an issue for a set, as it is for “minimum fuel treatment” approaches such as melt refining and AIROX, it can help to make an estimate of how performances would have to change to achieve feasibility.

  15. An integrated methodology for quantitative assessment of proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear systems using probabilistic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ham, Hyeongpil

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proliferation is the results of a competition between the proliferating country (proliferation) and the party to resist the proliferation efforts (safeguarder). An integrated evaluation methodology to evaluate proliferation ...

  16. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members appointed by the state governor, county governments, and city governments. This structure (1) enables state and local governments to work together to maximize job and tax benefits to local communities and the state, (2) provides a mechanism to address local concerns such as airport noise, and (3) creates an institutional structure with large incentives to maximize the value of the common asset, the runway. A repository site authority would have a similar structure and be the local interface to any national waste management authority. (authors)

  17. Integrating life-cycle impact assessment with environmental assessment techniques to satisfy the needs of ISO 14000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, S.P.; Brown, L. [Scientific Certification Systems, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After three years of negotiations, the ISO 14000 standards on Environmental Management Tools are now making rapid progress toward completion and international adoption. At the outset of this standardization effort, one methodological tool--life-cycle assessment (LCA)--was singled out for standardization, while the remaining standards were focused on management frameworks and applications--environmental management systems, environmental performance evaluation, environmental labeling and environmental auditing. The reason for singling out LCA was the belief that it could serve as a tool for evaluating the environmental impacts associated with competing production technologies, alternative materials, product options and packaging choices, and for supporting environmental claims in the marketplace. Of particular importance was LCA`s system-wide, cradle-to-grave, scope, which was considered essential for accurate and fair assessments and comparisons. This presentation examines the evolution of LCA standardization within the ISO-14000 process, describes the LCSEA framework and methodology, and explores the role of environmental professionals in this context.

  18. web page: http://w3.pppl.gov/~ zakharov At the ground level of integrated modeling1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    web page: http://w3.pppl.gov/~ zakharov At the ground level of integrated modeling1 Leonid E-independent environment and integrating them with its capabilities (e.g., java). (f) . . . of other integrations (WEB of D

  19. Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.

  20. Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  1. ESIF Plugs Utility-Scale Hardware into Simulated Grids to Assess Integration Effects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), integrated, megawatt-scale power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) capability allows researchers and manufacturers to test new energy technologies at full power in real-time simulations - safely evaluating component and system performance and reliability before going to market.

  2. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  3. An integrated assessment of electric power resource options in the US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chronowski, R.A. [Alternative Energy Development, Inc., Silver Springs, MD (United States); Shapiro, A.M. [Vermont Energy Investment Corp., Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As with other island-based, insular power systems, the avoided cost of power for the Water and Power Authority (WAPA) of the US Virgin Islands (USVI) is high relative to that of US mainland electric utilities. First, the need to produce potable water requires that WAPA`s electric generating system operate at efficiency levels lower than would result in the absence of the need to jointly produce water and power. Second, the inability to purchase power from neighboring utilities necessitates higher reserve margins. These two operating conditions suggest that integrated resource planning (IRP) should be especially attractive to WAPA. IRP is a planning paradigm that gives electric utilities more options to choose from when making resource selections and, therefore, generally results in lower costs. Utilities look to the demand side as a source of resources--i.e., demand side management (DSM)--in this planning process. They then select the least-cost mix of resource options. In this study, we take the first steps toward implementing an IRP process in the USVI. Using its existing resource base and the supply and DSM options that it has in the future, we simulated WAPA`s resource selection process over a 20-year planning horizon using SafePlan, an IRP planning model. The results suggest that WAPA can significantly reduce its cost of providing electricity by implementing DSM programs. The cost of generating electricity and the amount of kWh needed can be reduced nearly nine percent by implementing cost-effective DSM programs. Cost and kWh savings are greater under less favorable assumptions about (1) the input costs for generating electricity and (2) other conditions that WAPA will confront in the future. The results also indicate that DSM programs targeted at the residential sector can save, 500 gallons of water annually for participants in the program.

  4. Energy policy modeling: United States and Canadian experiences. Volume II. Integrative energy policy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemba, W.T.; Schwartz, S.L. (eds.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Energy Policy Modeling Conference, held in North Vancouver, May 18-20, 1978, was organized to assess the state of the art in energy modeling in North America. A major aim of the conference was to determine the extent to which energy modeling had and could make a contribution to the energy-policy decision-making process. Two volumes contain revised and updated versions of the major papers presented at the conference plus edited transcripts of the panel discussions and several additional papers aimed at particular topics deemed worthy of further study. For this volume, Vol. II, a separate abstract was prepared for each of 17 papers, 2 panel discussions, and three session-introduction commentaries for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 7 abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  5. Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Agency with the use of the World En- ergy Model for the World Energy Outlook 2009, OrganizationHuman health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2

  6. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  7. DYNAMIC MODELING Commercial Office Building Measurements and Dynamic Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    in significantly increased consumption of natural gas (or other fuels). Implications: 1.Fuel risk · How do the gas infrastructure handle DG (both on the micro and macro scales)? 3.Natural gas or other fuel costs markets? Integration Issues: Regulation Regulation is necessary to make DG economical and safe

  8. Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

  9. The potential use of Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate the predictions of environmental radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, C.R.; Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Lesslie, P.A.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.; Till, J.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Model Validation Committee were to collaborate with US and foreign scientists to collect, manage, and evaluate data for identifying critical research issues and data needs to support an integrated assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; test environmental transport, human dosimetric, and health effects models against measured data to determine their efficacy in guiding decisions on protective actions and in estimating exposures to populations and individuals following a nuclear accident; and apply Chernobyl data to quantifications of key processes governing the environmental transport, fate and effects of radionuclides and other trace substances. 55 refs.

  10. MaramaEML: An Integrated Multi-View Business Process Modelling Environment with Tree-Overlays, Zoomable Interfaces and Code Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grundy, John

    for integrating complex enterprise system models. (5) We have integrated a 3rd party LTSA engine to verify

  11. A Mobility Model for Cost Analysis in Integrated Cellular/WLANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Nirmala

    A Mobility Model for Cost Analysis in Integrated Cellular/WLANs Nirmala Shenoy, Bruce Hartpence, Information Technology Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester NY 14623, USA Rafael Mantilla that can be used to study the costs and benefits of integrating cellular and Wireless LANs, from a vendor

  12. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  13. Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application) Key Words: failure, damage, regeneration, availability assessment, stochastic activity networks, Monte Carlo simulations SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS Availability is a determining factor in systems characterization

  14. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

  15. Utility system integration and optimization models for nuclear power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, Paul Ferris

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power management model suitable for nuclear utility systems optimization has been developed for use in multi-reactor fuel management planning over periods of up to ten years. The overall utility planning model ...

  16. Modeling a solar energy collector with an integrated phase-change material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Alexander Adrian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a finite-element computer model was created to simulate a solar air heater with an integrated-phase change material. The commercially available finite element package ADINA-Fluid was used to generate the ...

  17. Integrated Water Management and Modeling at Multiple Spatial Scales David Ezechiel Rosenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    Integrated Water Management and Modeling at Multiple Spatial Scales Abstract Water shortages from actions that minimize costs or maximize benefits across a variety of water shortage conditions, describe interdependencies when adopting multiple actions together. Fourth, list the shortage or water

  18. Emissions and Energy: An Integral Approach Using an Online Energy Management and Optimization Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, D.; Ruiz, C.; Santollani, O.; Reitmeier, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examples and results corresponding to the application of such systems to refineries will be discussed. In addition, the integration of CO2 emission costs and constraints into the online energy system models and their optimization is also explained....

  19. Integrated environmental degradation model for Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in irradiated aqueous solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pleune, Thomas Todd, 1974-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated model has been developed to evaluate the effect of reactor flux, fluence, and other operating conditions on crack growth rates in austenitic stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. The ...

  20. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  1. Integrating Models and Simulations of Continuous Dynamics into SysML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this paper, we combine modeling constructs from SysML and Modelica to improve the support for Model, structures, functions, and behaviors. Complementing these SysML constructs, the Modelica language has emerged and the corresponding Modelica models; and the integration of simulation experiments with other SysML constructs

  2. An Agent-Based Model for Integrated Contagion and Regulation of Negative Mood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    An Agent-Based Model for Integrated Contagion and Regulation of Negative Mood Azizi Ab Aziz, Jan. Computational contagion models usually do not take into account such regulation. This paper introduces an agent behaviours as posed in the literature. Keywords: emotion contagion and regulation, agent-based model 1

  3. An integrated modelling approach for in vitro to in vivo extrapolations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 / 25 An integrated modelling approach for in vitro to in vivo extrapolations Frédéric Y. Bois 1 physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models able to simulate concentration-time profiles in human or rat of Mathematical Modelling for Systems Toxicology, Royallieu Research Centre, BP 20529, 60205 Compiegne Cedex

  4. Integrating Empirical-Modeling Approaches to Improve Understanding of Terrestrial Ecology Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Heather [University of Oklahoma; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent decades have seen tremendous increases in the quantity of empirical ecological data collected by individual investigators, as well as through research networks such as FLUXNET (Baldocchi et al., 2001). At the same time, advances in computer technology have facilitated the development and implementation of large and complex land surface and ecological process models. Separately, each of these information streams provides useful, but imperfect information about ecosystems. To develop the best scientific understanding of ecological processes, and most accurately predict how ecosystems may cope with global change, integration of empirical and modeling approaches is necessary. However, true integration - in which models inform empirical research, which in turn informs models (Fig. 1) - is not yet common in ecological research (Luo et al., 2011). The goal of this workshop, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program, was to bring together members of the empirical and modeling communities to exchange ideas and discuss scientific practices for increasing empirical - model integration, and to explore infrastructure and/or virtual network needs for institutionalizing empirical - model integration (Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA). The workshop included presentations and small group discussions that covered topics ranging from model-assisted experimental design to data driven modeling (e.g. benchmarking and data assimilation) to infrastructure needs for empirical - model integration. Ultimately, three central questions emerged. How can models be used to inform experiments and observations? How can experimental and observational results be used to inform models? What are effective strategies to promote empirical - model integration?

  5. On the breakdown of perturbative integrability in large N matrix models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Klose

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the perturbative integrability of the planar sector of a massive SU(N) matrix quantum mechanical theory with global SO(6) invariance and Yang-Mills-like interaction. This model arises as a consistent truncation of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a three-sphere to the lowest modes of the scalar fields. In fact, our studies mimic the current investigations concerning the integrability properties of this gauge theory. Like in the field theory we can prove the planar integrability of the SO(6) model at first perturbative order. At higher orders we restrict ourselves to the widely studied SU(2) subsector spanned by two complexified scalar fields of the theory. We show that our toy model satisfies all commonly studied integrability requirements such as degeneracies in the spectrum, existence of conserved charges and factorized scattering up to third perturbative order. These are the same qualitative features as the ones found in super Yang-Mills theory, which were enough to conjecture the all-loop integrability of that theory. For the SO(6) model, however, we show that these properties are not sufficient to predict higher loop integrability. In fact, we explicitly demonstrate the breakdown of perturbative integrability at fourth order.

  6. Assessment of a Molecular Diffusion Model in MELCOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang OH; Richard Moore

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MELCOR (version 1.8.5) [1] computer code with INEEL revisions is being improved for the analysis of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors [2]. Following a loss-of-coolant accident, flow through the reactor vessel may initially stagnate due to a non-uniform concentration of helium and air. However, molecular diffusion will eventually result in a uniform concentration of air and helium. The differences in fluid temperatures within the reactor vessel will then result in the establishment of a natural circulation flow that can supply significant amounts of air to the reactor core. The heat released by the resulting oxidation of graphite in the reactor core has the potential to increase the peak fuel temperature. In order to analyze the effects of oxidation on the response of the reactor during accidents, a molecular diffusion model was added to MELCOR. The model is based on Fick's Second Law for spatially uniform pressure and temperature. This paper describes equimolal counter diffusion experiments in a two bulb diffusion cell and the results of the assessment calculations.

  7. Final Report for Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In collaboration with researchers at Vanderbilt University, North Carolina State University, Princeton and Oakridge National Laboratory we developed multiscale modeling and simulation methods capable of modeling the synthesis, assembly, and operation of molecular electronics devices. Our role in this project included the development of coarse-grained molecular and mesoscale models and simulation methods capable of simulating the assembly of millions of organic conducting molecules and other molecular components into nanowires, crossbars, and other organized patterns.

  8. advanced integrated modeling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  9. Integrated Global System Modeling Framework | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown,Innoferm GmbHCaltech CenterArea,Integrated

  10. Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry Research Project IntegratedSystem: (1)

  11. Integrating Tactile and Force Feedback with Finite Element Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , impedances of robot arms, and the computational model. We also describe an implementation of a compliance rendering system combining a low-impedance robot arm for large workspace kinesthetic force feedback, a high on a low-impedance robot arm, used here as a force feedback device. A real-time FEM model accepts user

  12. Integration of Different Wave Forcing Formulations with Nearshore Circulation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Abhishek

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave-induced circulation in general coastal environments is simulated by coupling two widely-used finite-element models, namely, a refraction-diffraction-reflection model based on the elliptic mild-slope equation, and a two-dimensional (depth...

  13. ForReviewers Integrating Theoretical Components: A Graphical Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Chelse M.

    , especially with younger researchers. Failure to understand prior work can lead to85 wasted research effort in particular217 environments with minimizing heat stress in those environments. In order to translate218 that model into testable hypotheses, the researcher utilizes thermodynamics models of219 heat exchange

  14. Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    were modeled using apparent fixity level, Randolph elastic continuum, and modified cone models. The offshore wind turbine structures were developed using a finite element formulation. A two-bladed 3.0 megawatt (MW) and a three-bladed 1.5 MW capacity...

  15. Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    1 Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources Anthony Papavasiliou. In order to accurately assess the impacts of renewable energy integration and demand response integration model for assessing the impacts of the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources

  16. Hydrodynamic and Ecological Assessment of Nearshore Restoration: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Thom, Ronald M.; Fuller, Roger

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Along the Pacific Northwest coast, much of the estuarine habitat has been diked over the last century for agricultural land use, residential and commercial development, and transportation corridors. As a result, many of the ecological processes and functions have been disrupted. To protect coastal habitats that are vital to aquatic species, many restoration projects are currently underway to restore the estuarine and coastal ecosystems through dike breaches, setbacks, and removals. Information on physical processes and hydrodynamic conditions are critical for the assessment of the success of restoration actions. Restoration of a 160- acre property at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River in Puget Sound has been proposed. The goal is to restore native tidal habitats and estuary-scale ecological processes by removing the dike. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed for the Stillaguamish River estuary to simulate estuarine processes. The model was calibrated to observed tide, current, and salinity data for existing conditions and applied to simulate the hydrodynamic responses to two restoration alternatives. Responses were evaluated at the scale of the restoration footprint. Model data was combined with biophysical data to predict habitat responses at the site. Results showed that the proposed dike removal would result in desired tidal flushing and conditions that would support four habitat types on the restoration footprint. At the estuary scale, restoration would substantially increase the proportion of area flushed with freshwater (< 5 ppt) at flood tide. Potential implications of predicted changes in salinity and flow dynamics are discussed relative to the distribution of tidal marsh habitat.

  17. Linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM Model for Performance Assessment of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility - 13429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Yu, Charley; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kamboj, Sunita; Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Liu, Chen-Wuing [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments are crucial steps for the long-term radiological safety requirements of low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility. How much concentration of radionuclides released from the near-field to biosphere and what radiation exposure levels of an individual can influence on the satisfactory performance of the LLW disposal facility and safety disposal environment. Performance assessment methodology for the radioactive waste disposal consists of the reactive transport modeling of safety-concerned radionuclides released from the near-field to the far-field, and the potential exposure pathways and the movements of radionuclides through the geosphere, biosphere and man of which the accompanying dose. Therefore, the integration of hydrogeochemical transport model and dose assessment code, HYDROGEOCHEM code and RESRAD family of codes is imperative. The RESRAD family of codes such as RESRAD-OFFSITE computer code can evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The HYDROGEOCHEM is a 3-D numerical model of fluid flow, thermal, hydrologic transport, and biogeochemical kinetic and equilibrium reactions in saturated and unsaturated media. The HYDROGEOCHEM model can also simulate the crucial geochemical mechanism, such as the effect of redox processes on the adsorption/desorption, hydrogeochemical influences on concrete degradation, adsorption/desorption of radionuclides (i.e., surface complexation model) between solid and liquid phase in geochemically dynamic environments. To investigate the safety assessment of LLW disposal facility, linking RESRAD-OFFSITE and HYDROGEOCHEM model can provide detailed tools of confidence in the protectiveness of the human health and environmental impact for safety assessment of LLW disposal facility. (authors)

  18. Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

  19. Human Growth and Body Weight Dynamics: An Integrative Systems Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and ...

  20. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mixed Potential Model Re-direct Destination: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel...

  1. Integrated experimental and modeling study of the ionic conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling study of the ionic conductivity of samaria-doped ceria thin films. Abstract: Oxygen diffusion and ionic conductivity of samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films have been...

  2. Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study developed basic dynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the response behavior of a near-shore wind turbine structure with monopile, suction caisson, or gravity-based foundation systems. The marine soil conditions...

  3. Integrating Comprehensive Air Quality Modeling with Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity demand. Many of generators are uncontrolled diesel engines which have a high social cost. Adding Electricity Generation Elisabeth Anne Gilmore Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements Air Quality Modeling with Policy Analysis: Applications for Distributed Electricity Generation

  4. Integral equation models for thermoacoustic imaging of dissipative tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowar, Richard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In case of non-dissipative tissue the inverse problem of thermoacoustic imaging basically consists of two inverse problems. First, a function $\\phi$ depending on the \\emph{electromagnetic absorption function}, is estimated from one of three types of projections (spherical, circular or planar) and secondly, the \\emph{electromagnetic absorption function} is estimated from $\\phi$. In case of dissipative tissue, it is no longer possible to calculate explicitly the projection of $\\phi$ from the respective pressure data (measured by point, planar or line detectors). The goal of this paper is to derive for each of the three types of pressure data, an integral equation that allows estimating the respective projection of $\\phi$. The advantage of this approach is that all known reconstruction formulas for $\\phi$ from the respective projection can be exploited.

  5. Models for the configuration and integrity of partially oxidized fuel rod cladding at high temperatures -- Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. The modeling was improved in five areas. First, the configuration defined for melted metallic cladding retained by an adjacent oxide layer was improved. Second, the empirical model to account for the effect on oxidation of intact cladding is not significantly reduced by the presence of a rather high concentration of relocated material. Third, models for the dissolution of the oxide layer by the metallic layer were implemented into the code. Fourth, a model was added to calculate the thermal stress applied to the oxide layer by the temperature gradient across the oxide layer and to compare this stress to the ultimate strength of the oxide layer. Fifth, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The assessment of these models and their integration into SCDAP/RELAP5 showed that the calculated axial distribution in cladding oxidation and relocation are in significantly better agreement with experimental results than is currently the case. The modeling changes account for three aspects of behavior that were not previously calculated correctly. The implementation of these models eliminates to a significant extent the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material.

  6. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures - Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. The modeling was improved in five areas. First, the configuration defined for melted metallic cladding retained by an adjacent oxide layer was improved. Second, the empirical model to account for the effect on oxidation of intact cladding is not significantly reduced by the presence of a rather high concentration of relocated material. Third, models for the dissolution of the oxide layer by the metallic layer were implemented into the code. Fourth, a model was added to calculate the thermal stress applied to the oxide layer by the temperature gradient across the oxide layer and to compare this stress to the ultimate strength of the oxide layer. Fifth, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The assessment of these models and their integration into SCDAP/RELAP5 showed that the calculated axial distribution in cladding oxidation and relocation are in significantly better agreement with experimental results than is currently the case. The modeling changes account for three aspects of behavior that were not previously calculated correctly. The implementation of these models eliminates to a significant extent the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material.

  7. SLUDGE BATCH 4: MODEL BASED ASSESSMENTS OF THE FEBRUARY 2007 SLUDGE PROJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Kevin Fox, K

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed, and continues to enhance, its integrated capability to evaluate the impact of proposed sludge preparation plans on the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF's) operation. One of the components of this integrated capability focuses on frit development which identifies a viable frit or frits for each sludge option being contemplated for DWPF processing. A frit is considered viable if its composition allows for economic fabrication and if, when it is combined with the sludge option under consideration, the DWPF property/composition models (the models of DWPF's Product Composition Control System (PCCS)) indicate that the combination has the potential for an operating window (a waste loading (WL) interval over which the sludge/frit glass system satisfies processability and durability constraints) that would allow DWPF to meet its goals for waste loading and canister production. This report documents the results of SRNL's efforts to identify candidate frit compositions and corresponding predicted operating windows (defined in terms of WL intervals) for the February 2007 compositional projection of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) developed by the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO). The nominal compositional projection was used to assess projected operating windows (in terms of a waste loading interval over which all predicted properties were classified as acceptable) for various frits, evaluate the applicability of the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} PCCS limit to the glass systems of interest, and determine the impact (or lack thereof) to the previous SB4 variability studies. It should be mentioned that the information from this report will be coupled with assessments of melt rate to recommend a frit for SB4 processing. The results of this paper study suggest that candidate frits are available to process the nominal SB4 composition over attractive waste loadings of interest to DWPF. Specifically, two primary candidate frits for SB4 processing, Frit 510 and Frit 418, have projected operating windows that should allow for successful processing at DWPF. While Frit 418 has been utilized at DWPF, Frit 510 is a higher B{sub 2}O{sub 3} based frit which could lead to improvements in melt rate. These frits provide relatively large operating windows and demonstrate robustness to possible sludge compositional variation while avoiding potential nepheline formation issues. In addition, assessments of SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility indicate that the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit in PCCS is applicable for the Frit 418 and the Frit 510 based SB4 glass systems.

  8. Automated Software Engineering Process Assessment: Supporting Diverse Models using an Ontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    , ISO 9001). It also provides an in-the-loop automated process assessment capability that can help, ISO 9001), and suitable performance and scalability. The approach can reduce the effort required assessment while simultaneously supporting diverse process assessment reference models (CMMI, ISO/IEC 15504

  9. Modelling of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with Applications to Accident Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    Modelling of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with Applications to Accident Risk Assessment #12;The SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS TO ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT DISSERTATION to obtain the doctor's degree promotor Prof. dr. A. Bagchi #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 1.1 Accident risk assessment

  10. Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

  11. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  12. Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rogers

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

  13. Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    275 Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving neural model of the animal behavior known as path integra- tion, a navigation process requiring a compass mention of the simi- larity of their compass sensors to the known properties of the polarization

  14. Integrating the Document Object Model with Hyperlinks for Enhanced Topic Distillation and Information Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Soumen

    Integrating the Document Object Model with Hyperlinks for Enhanced Topic Distillation://www.cse.iitb.ernet.in/~soumen ABSTRACT Topic distillation is the process of finding authoritative Web pages and comprehensive "hubs distillation has been traditionally applied to a macroscopic Web model where documents are nodes in a directed

  15. Model-Integrated Embedded Systems Akos Ledeczi, Arpad Bakay, and Miklos Maroti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    and systems management during the entire life cycle of the system [7]. Partly to accomplish these and also software systems. Making the design- time models available at run-time benefits the development of dynamicModel-Integrated Embedded Systems Akos Ledeczi, Arpad Bakay, and Miklos Maroti Institute

  16. Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software in the scientific literature for determining indoor daylighting values. They are classified in three categories. The originality of our paper relies on the coupling of several simplified models of indoor daylighting

  17. Integrated Estimation and Tracking of Performance Model Parameters with Autoregressive Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodside, C. Murray

    1 Integrated Estimation and Tracking of Performance Model Parameters with Autoregressive Trends Tao the model parameters can be tracked by an estimator such as a Kalman Filter, so that decisions can excessive cost (as is usually the case for the CPU time of a service). Because there may be significant

  18. VIRTUAL REALITY DRIVING SIMULATION: Integrating Infrastructure Plans, Traffic Models, and Driving Behaviors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to include 3D models, animated traffic and human characters, as well as functions that allow users to take-1- VIRTUAL REALITY DRIVING SIMULATION: Integrating Infrastructure Plans, Traffic Models@forum8.co.jp Summary: This paper presents a virtual reality (VR) system that enables large

  19. An Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Exact Modeling of Signal Statistics in Energy-integrating X-ray Computed Tomography Yi Fan1 used by modern computed tomography (CT) scanners and has been an interesting research topic 1. INTRODUCTION In x-ray computed tomography (CT), Poisson noise model has been widely used in noise

  20. Integrated Design of Simulation Models for Passive Houses Petr Novak, Radek Sindelar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Design of Simulation Models for Passive Houses Petr Nov´ak, Radek Sindel´ar Christian. The use-case shows that the design of simulation models for passive houses can be user-friendly and feasible even for non-experts as it is based on a graphical tool that enables to draw a passive house floor

  1. Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L80'sInside Ice Under High(SC)

  2. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment(LeMar

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan RunhuaInner Mongolia FengweiCSU InstituteIntegrated2002) |

  3. assessment modeling approach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  4. Integrated C3 Feedstock and Aggregated Distillation Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Polypropylene Propane return Reactor effluent Distillation Polymerization FeedTank Propylene (91%) Goal: Select rates Constraints on composition of Propane Return, Distillation Overhead & Reactor Feed Limits Distillation Model Relates overhead composition of propane with flowrate of propane feed to the splitter

  5. Integrated biomechanical model of cells embedded in extracellular matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muddana, Hari Shankar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of cells, which in turn gives rise to the characteristic form for the organism. Morphogenesis is a multi-scale modeling problem that can be studied at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Here, we study the problem of morphogenesis at the cellular...

  6. A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a regional bottom-up model for assessing space cooling energy and related greenhouse gas emissions. The model was developed with the aim of improving the quality and quantity of cooling energy and emission data, especially...

  7. RECENT JOURNAL ARTICLES and BOOK CHAPTERS Bertram Gallant, T., & Drinan, P. (in press). Toward a Model of Academic Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kritsuk, Alexei

    RECENT JOURNAL ARTICLES and BOOK CHAPTERS Bertram Gallant, T., & Drinan, P. (in press). Toward a Model of Academic Integrity Institutionalization: Informing Practice in Higher Education. Canadian, T. & Drinan, P. (2006). Institutionalizing academic integrity: Administrator perceptions

  8. Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

  9. 11/05/2007 16:29 1 Bayesian Belief Network Model for the Safety Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenton, Norman

    11/05/2007 16:29 1 Bayesian Belief Network Model for the Safety Assessment of Nuclear Computer assessment task for computer and software based nuclear systems important to safety. Our model is developed University P.-J. Courtois AV Nuclear Brussels, Belgium Abstract The formalism of Bayesian Belief Networks

  10. Assessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    with a regional groundwater model to assess the hydrologic impact of potential MAR placement and operating planning, including evaluation of options for enhancing groundwater resources. Introduction ManagedAssessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling by Tess A. Russo1

  11. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  12. Techniques and equipment for assessing the structural integrity of subterranean tower anchor rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hinz, William R. (Martinez, GA); Parker, Matthew J. (Martinez, GA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques and equipment for evaluating structural integrity of buried anchor rods in situ are disclosed. The techniques avoid excavation of soil and avoid, or at least reduce, the possibility of damage to the rods or the concrete in which they may be embedded when evaluations are conducted. Instead, ultrasonic energy is transmitted through the rod from a portable transducer, and returned energy (in either or both of direct and mode-converted states) may be analyzed to assist in detecting flaws, corrosion, wastage, or other degradation of the rod. Data from a field evaluation may be compared with baseline data maintained either for a specific rod or for rods of similar composition and length (or both), and periodic field evaluations of a rod may be used to analyze trends in its structure over time.

  13. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic operation while maintaining adequate safety margins.

  14. Trace Metal Bioremediation: Assessment of Model Components from Laboratory and Field Studies to Identify Critical Variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Jaffe; Herschel Rabitz

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to gain an insight into the modeling support needed for the understanding, design, and operation of trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation. To achieve this objective, a workshop was convened to discuss the elements such a model should contain. A ''protomodel'' was developed, based on the recommendations of the workshop, and was used to perform sensitivity analysis as well as some preliminary simulations in support for bioremediation test experiments at UMTRA sites. To simulate the numerous biogeochemical processes that will occur during the bioremediation of uranium contaminated aquifers, a time-dependent one-dimensional reactive transport model has been developed. The model consists of a set of coupled, steady state mass balance equations, accounting for advection, diffusion, dispersion, and a kinetic formulation of the transformations affecting an organic substrate, electron acceptors, corresponding reduced species, and uranium. This set of equations is solved numerically, using a finite element scheme. The redox conditions of the domain are characterized by estimating the pE, based on the concentrations of the dominant terminal electron acceptor and its corresponding reduced specie. This pE and the concentrations of relevant species are passed to a modified version of MINTEQA2, which calculates the speciation and solubilities of the species of interest. Kinetics of abiotic reactions are described as being proportional to the difference between the actual and equilibrium concentration. A global uncertainty assessment, determined by Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR), was performed to attain a phenomenological understanding of the origins of output variability and to suggest input parameter refinements as well as to provide guidance for field experiments to improve the quality of the model predictions. Results indicated that for the usually high nitrate contents found ate many DOE sites, overall bioremediation of trace metals was highly sensitive to the formulation of the denitrification process. Simulations were performed to illustrate the effect of biostimulation on the transport and precipitation of uranium in the subsurface, at conditions equivalent to UMTRA sites. These simulations predicted that uranium would precipitate in bands that are located relatively close to the acetate injection well. The simulations also showed the importance of properly determining U(IV) oxidative dissolution rates, in order to assess the stability of precipitates once oxygenated water reenters the aquifer after bioremediation is discontinued. The objective of this project was to provide guidance to NABIR's Systems Integration Element, on the development of models to simulate the bioremediation of trace metals and radionuclides. Such models necessarily need to integrate hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological processes. In order to gain a better understanding of the key processes that such a model should contain, it was deemed desirable to convene a workshop with experts from these different fields. The goal was to obtain a preliminary consensus on the required level of detail for the formulations of these different chemical, physical, and microbiological processes. The workshop was held on December 18, 1998.

  15. Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xi

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    workflow is illustrated in Figure 3.3. The approach starts with a fracture simulator, which uses a geomechanical model, to calculate fracture width during the pad injection. A hydraulic fracture is created at the defined injection condition. Next, we... be directly found from the output of Fracpro. Table 3.1 shows an output file example from Fracpro for a fracture geometry at the end of a pad injection. The geometry data is restored in an “.fpx” file, named “PROJECT_NAME.fpx” and can be read using any text...

  16. Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al diffusion from the coating into the substrate. An effective diffusion barrier interlayer coating was developed to prevent inward Al diffusion. The fire-side corrosion test results showed that the nanocrystalline coatings with a minimum number of defects have a great potential in providing corrosion protection. The coating tested in the most aggressive environment showed no evidence of coating spallation and/or corrosion attack after 1050 hours exposure. In contrast, evidence of coating spallation in isolated areas and corrosion attack of the base metal in the spalled areas were observed after 500 hours. These contrasting results after 500 and 1050 hours exposure suggest that the premature coating spallation in isolated areas may be related to the variation of defects in the coating between the samples. It is suspected that the cauliflower-type defects in the coating were presumably responsible for coating spallation in isolated areas. Thus, a defect free good quality coating is the key for the long-term durability of nanocrystalline coatings in corrosive environments. Thus, additional process optimization work is required to produce defect-free coatings prior to development of a coating application method for production parts.

  17. Solvable and/or integrable many-body models on a circle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oksana Bihun; Francesco Calogero

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Various many-body models are treated, which describe $N$ points confined to move on a plane circle. Their Newtonian equations of motion ("accelerations equal forces") are integrable, i. e. they allow the explicit exhibition of $N$ constants of motion in terms of the dependent variables and their time-derivatives. Some of these models are moreover solvable by purely algebraic operations, by (explicitly performable) quadratures and, finally, by functional inversions. The techniques to manufacture these models are not new; some of these models are themselves new; others are reinterpretations of known models.

  18. Assessment of the Aggregation State of Integral Membrane Proteins in Reconstituted Phospholipid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vesicles Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering John F. Hunt1 , Pierre D. McCrea1 , Giuseppe ZaccaõÈ2- dopsin as a model system. # 1997 Academic Press Limited Keywords: small angle neutron scattering and severity. A system has been developed that allows observation of the small angle scattering pro

  19. Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant issues can arise with the timing, location, and volume of surface water withdrawals associated with hydraulic fracturing of gas shale reservoirs as impacted watersheds may be sensitive, especially in drought years, during low flow periods, or during periods of the year when activities such as irrigation place additional demands on the surface supply of water. Significant energy production and associated water withdrawals may have a cumulative impact to watersheds over the short-term. Hence, hydraulic fracturing based on water withdrawal could potentially create shifts in the timing and magnitude of low or high flow events or change the magnitude of river flow at daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly time scales. These changes in flow regimes can result in dramatically altered river systems. Currently little is known about the impact of fracturing on stream flow behavior. Within this context the objective of this study is to assess the impact of the hydraulic fracturing on the water balance of the Fayetteville Shale play area and examine the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on river flow regime at subbasin scale. This project addressed that need with four unique but integrated research and development efforts: 1) Evaluate the predictive reliability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model based at a variety of scales (Task/Section 3.5). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate the across-scale water balance and the respective impact of hydraulic fracturing. A second hypothetical scenario was designed to assess the current and future impacts of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing on the flow regime and on the environmental flow components (EFCs) of the river. The shifting of these components, which present critical elements to water supply and water quality, could influence the ecological dynamics of river systems. For this purpose, we combined the use of SWAT model and Richter et al.’s (1996) methodology to assess the shifting and alteration of the flow regime within the river and streams of the study area. 2) Evaluate the effect of measurable land use changes related to gas development (well-pad placement, access road completion, etc.) on surface water flow in the region (Task/Section 3.7). Results showed that since the upsurge in shale-gas related activities in the Fayetteville Shale Play (between 2006 and 2010), shale-gas related infrastructure in the region have increase by 78%. This change in land-cover in comparison with other land-cover classes such as forest, urban, pasture, agricultural and water indicates the highest rate of change in any land-cover category for the study period. A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) flow model of the Little Red River watershed simulated from 2000 to 2009 showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. A forecast scenario based on the assumption that 2010 land-cover does not see any significant change over the forecast period (2010 to 2020) also showed a 10% increase in storm water runoff. Further analyses showed that this change in the stream-flow regime for the forecast period is attributable to the increase in land-cover as introduced by the shale-gas infrastructure. 3) Upgrade the Fayetteville Shale Information System to include information on watershed status. (Tasks/Sections 2.1 and 2.2). This development occurred early in the project period, and technological improvements in web-map API’s have made it possible to further improve the map. The current sites (http://lingo.cast.uark.edu) is available but is currently being upgraded to a more modern interface and robust mapping engine using funds outside this project. 4) Incorporate the methodologies developed in Tasks/Sections 3.5 and 3.7 into a Spatial Decision Support System for use by regulatory agencies and producers in the play. The resulting system is available at http://fayshale.cast.uark.edu and is under review the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission.

  20. Application of the NCSA Habanero tool for collaboration on structural integrity assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, B.R.; Kruse, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dodds, R.H. Jr. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Malik, S.N.M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Habanero software was developed by the National Center for Superconducting Applications at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, as a framework for the collaborative sharing of Java applications. The Habanero tool performs distributed communication of single-user, computer software interactions to a multiuser collaborative environment. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of the Habanero tool in providing an Internet-based collaborative framework for researchers located at different sites and operating on different workstations. These collaborative sessions focused on the sharing of test data and analysis results from materials engineering areas (i.e., fracture mechanics and structural integrity evaluations) related to reactor pressure vessel safety research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report defines collaborative-system requirements for engineering applications and provides an overview of collaborative systems within the project. The installation, application, and detailed evaluation of the performance of the Habanero collaborative tool are compared to those of another commercially available collaborative product. Recommendations are given for future work in collaborative communications.

  1. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m{sup 3} of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  2. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This project represented a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee (UT), and Florida State University (FSU). ORNL served as the lead in-stitution with Dr. A.V. Palumbo responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliver-ables. In situ uranium bioremediation is focused on biostimulating indigenous microorganisms through a combination of pH neutralization and the addition of large amounts of electron donor. Successful biostimulation of U(VI) reduction has been demonstrated in the field and in the laboratory. However, little data is available on the dynamics of microbial populations capable of U(VI) reduction, and the differences in the microbial community dynamics between proposed electron donors have not been explored. In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for optimization of bioremediation strategies, structure-function relationships of microbial populations were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  3. The National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) is an integrated energy, water, and ecosystem research effort for sustainable hydroelectricity generation and water management. The NHAAP conducts research on new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) is an integrated energy, water conducts research on new development opportunities and provides a comprehensive hydropower database integrating information about existing hydropower plants. Research Summary and Resources Example: · Existing

  4. [10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

  5. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound...

  6. Model for a web based medical technology assessment system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhu, Gopal

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology is the primary driving force for change in today's healthcare environment. Understanding the dynamics of medical technology and applying probative management measures can be accomplished with a medical technology assessment program...

  7. Modeling Techniques to Assess Long-term Reliability of Environmental Flows in Basin Scale Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale Planning Thesis directed by Edith Zagona One aspect of integrated water resources management of the rivers but management can help sustain the river ecosystem through modifications to reservoir operations be incorporated into the model to capture reservoir operations. Finally, after addressing the integration of new

  8. Model for a web based medical technology assessment system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhu, Gopal

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6. Figure 3. 7. Figure 3. 8. Figure 3. 9. Telemetry Assessment 37 ECG Assessment. 39 The Home Page 43 Clinical Engineer Registration. Clinical Engineer Login. . 44 45 Search Results When User Searches for Defibrillator by ID. . 41 Figure... to those, which your facility is considering, or the information may be dated (pers. comm. N. Cram). The Internet is a computer network that connects millions of computers globally and provides worldwide communications to businesses, homes, schools...

  9. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 1. Scenarios and Context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Brown, Robert A.; Wigley, T. M.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As CO2 and other greenhouse gasses accumulate in the atmosphere and contribute to rising global temperatures, it is important to examine how a changing climate may affect natural and managed ecosystems. In this series of papers, we study the impacts of climate change on agriculture, water resources and natural ecosystems in the conterminous United States using a suite of climate change projections from General Circulation Models (GCMs) and three biophysical models. In this paper we present the climate change scenarios used to drive the impact analyses. The assumed levels of global-mean climate changes are discussed and placed in the context of recent work on climate-change scenarios for the next 100 years. The spatial variation of these changes given by the GCM results used for the impact analyses are also discussed.

  10. Integrated Geologic and Geophysical Assessment of the Eileen Gas Hydrate Accumulation, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy S. Collett; David J. Taylor; Warren F. Agena; Myung W. Lee; John J. Miller; Margarita Zyrianova

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using detailed analysis and interpretation of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, along with modeling and correlation of specially processed log data, a viable methodology has been developed for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ) and associated ''sub-hydrate'' free gas prospects in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska (Figure 1). The seismic data, in conjunction with modeling results from a related study, was used to characterize the conditions under which gas hydrate prospects can be delineated using conventional seismic data, and to analyze reservoir fluid properties. Monte Carlo style gas hydrate volumetric estimates using Crystal Ball{trademark} software to estimate expected in-place reserves shows that the identified prospects have considerable potential as gas resources. Future exploratory drilling in the Milne Point area should provide answers about the producibility of these shallow gas hydrates.

  11. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  12. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

  13. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 4. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Brown, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply a suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios that could occur over the next century as atmospheric CO2 concentrations reach double the pre-industrial level to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States. In Part 4 we examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the US as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The changes in water yield driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than +/-50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest US. Interannual variability is likely to increase with reduced water yield but decrease with wetter conditions.

  14. Dilaton-scalar models in context of generalized affine gravity theories: their properties and integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davydov, E A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the evolution of the universe was driven by some scalar degrees of freedom both on its early stage and at present. The corresponding cosmological models often involve some scalar fields introduced ad hoc. In this paper we cultivate a different approach, which is based on a derivation of new scalar degrees of freedom from fundamental modifications of Einstein's gravity. In elaboration of our previous work, we here investigate properties of the dilaton-scalar gravity obtained by dimensional reductions of a recently proposed affine generalized gravity theory. We show that these models possess the same symmetries as related models of GR with ordinary scalar fields. As a result, for a rather general class of dilaton-scalar gravity models we construct additional first integrals and formulate an integral equation well suited for solving by iterations.

  15. Development of the integrated environmental control model. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalagnanam, J.R.; Rubin, E.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this contract is to develop and refine the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). In its current configuration, the IECM provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integrated into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of different costs and performance results. The work in this contract is divided into two phases. Phase I deals with further developing the existing version of the IECM and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the model. Phase H deals with creating new technology modules, linking the IECM with PETC databases, and training PETC personnel on the effective use of the updated model. The present report summarizes recent progress on the Phase I effort during the period April 1, 1995 through June 30, 1995. This report presents additional revisions to the new cost models of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology initially reported in our fourth quarterly report. For convenience, the complete description of the revised FGD models are presented here.

  16. 1 | P a g e Implementing an Integrated Distributed Model in Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    1 | P a g e Implementing an Integrated Distributed Model in Finance There are significant changes taking place, effective today, across the University's Finance function. These changes reflect some key opportunities for our finance professionals through mentoring, talent development, career laddering, mobility

  17. Integration Schemes for Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations: From Softly Interacting Systems Towards Hybrid Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilpo Vattulainen; Mikko Karttunen; Gerhard Besold; J. M. Polson

    2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the performance of various commonly used integration schemes in dissipative particle dynamics simulations. We consider this issue using three different model systems, which characterize a variety of different conditions often studied in simulations. Specifically we clarify the performance of integration schemes in hybrid models, which combine microscopic and meso-scale descriptions of different particles using both soft and hard interactions. We find that in all three model systems many commonly used integrators may give rise to surprisingly pronounced artifacts in physical observables such as the radial distribution function, the compressibility, and the tracer diffusion coefficient. The artifacts are found to be strongest in systems, where interparticle interactions are soft and predominated by random and dissipative forces, while in systems governed by conservative interactions the artifacts are weaker. Our results suggest that the quality of any integration scheme employed is crucial in all cases where the role of random and dissipative forces is important, including hybrid models where the solvent is described in terms of soft potentials.

  18. TEOS 04 Carbon Flux and C Pipe: Integrating sensor outputs to models Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    , Staff · Thomas Unwin, Staff · Hai Vo, Undergrad * Primary Contact Overview Our goal is to integrate model [Katul et. al. 2003] to estimate carbon and water fluxes. System(s) Description and/or Experiments] where Cw is water capacity, h is water pressure head, t is time, z is depth, K(h) is hydraulic constant

  19. Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    geometrical effects on divertor erosion dynamics. Lithium expansion in divertor and SOL areas may potentiallyAccepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi

  20. Forthcoming: Journal of Applied Business and Economics (2011) Integrating Financial Statement Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forthcoming: Journal of Applied Business and Economics (2011) Integrating Financial Statement Modeling and Sales Forecasting Using EViews John T. Cuddington Colorado School of Mines Irina Khindanova of the financial forecasts. INTRODUCTION In most business school programs students are exposed to financial

  1. Integrated Modeling and Design of Lightweight, Active Mirrors for Launch Survival and On-Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Orbit Performance Lucy E. Cohan and David W. Miller June 2010 SSL# 2-10 #12;#12;Integrated Modeling and Design June 2010 SSL# 2-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Lucy Cohan submitted

  2. A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable energy Jinxu Ding and Arun Somani Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Email: {jxding,arun}@iastate.edu Abstract--The current energy infrastructure heavily

  3. Integrating Security and Systems Engineering: Towards the Modelling of Secure Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrating Security and Systems Engineering: Towards the Modelling of Secure Information Systems for information systems. Traditionally, security is considered after the definition of the system. However the health sector to military. As the use of Information Systems arises, the demand to secure those systems

  4. Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems Why is Integration Needed in Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems #12;Why is Integration Needed in Ecology? Great advances have been made by dividing ecology into subdisciplines. But too much focus on subdisciplines has also hindered ecology · too little study of the interface between disciplines · tended to narrow focus

  5. Designing a Collaborative Problem Solving Environment for Integrated Water Resource Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman, David A.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Taira, Randal Y.; Frodge, Jonathan

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our approach for designing a collaborative problem solving environment for hydrologists, water quality planners and natural resource managers, all roles within a natural resource management agency and stakeholders in an integrated water resource management process. We describe our approach in context of the Integrated Water Resource Modeling System (IWRMS), under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Natural Resources and Parks in King County, Washington. This system will integrate a collection of water resource models (watersheds, rivers, lakes, estuaries) to provide the ability to address water, land use, and other natural resource management decisions and scenarios, with the goal of developing an integrated modeling capability to address future land use and resource management scenarios and provide scientific support to decision makers. Here, we discuss the five-step process used to ascertain the (potentially opposing) needs and interests of stakeholders and provide results and summaries from our experiences. The results of this process guide user interface design efforts to create a collaborative problems solving environment supporting multiple users with differing scientific backgrounds and modeling needs. We conclude with a discussion of participatory interface design methods used to encourage stakeholder involvement and acceptance of the system as well as the lessons learned to date.

  6. Integrated Dynamic Optimization and Control in Reservoir Engineering using Locally Identified Linear Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    on dynamic real-time optimization (D- RTO) of waterflooding strategies in petroleum reservoirs haveIntegrated Dynamic Optimization and Control in Reservoir Engineering using Locally Identified, the used large-scale, nonlinear, physics-based reservoir models suffer from vast parametric uncertainty

  7. Fort Irwin National Training Center integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most difficult problems encountered at federal sites in reducing energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where energy is being used and what technologies can be employed to decrease energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, the energy manager may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This limitation can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has been tasked by the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is assisting FEMP in this effort. This is part of a model program that PNL has developed to provide a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities. The program (1) identifies the building groups and end uses using the most energy (not just having the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a road map to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites.

  8. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus® conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus® conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  9. Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Using Cybernomic Computational Models: Tailored for Industrial Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Federick T. [University of Memphis; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many influencing economic factors to weigh from the defender-practitioner stakeholder point-of-view that involve cost combined with development/deployment models. Some examples include the cost of countermeasures themselves, the cost of training and the cost of maintenance. Meanwhile, we must better anticipate the total cost from a compromise. The return on investment in countermeasures is essentially impact costs (i.e., the costs from violating availability, integrity and confidentiality / privacy requirements). The natural question arises about choosing the main risks that must be mitigated/controlled and monitored in deciding where to focus security investments. To answer this question, we have investigated the cost/benefits to the attacker/defender to better estimate risk exposure. In doing so, it s important to develop a sound basis for estimating the factors that derive risk exposure, such as likelihood that a threat will emerge and whether it will be thwarted. This impact assessment framework can provide key information for ranking cybersecurity threats and managing risk.

  10. Climate Change Modeling and Downscaling Issues and Methodological Perspectives for the U.S. National Climate Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janetos, Anthony C.; Collins, William D.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah; Hayhoe, Katharine; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hurtt, George

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the full workshop report for the modeling workshop we did for the National Climate Assessment, with DOE support.

  11. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 5. Irrigated Agriculture and National Grain Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the next century global warming will lead to changes in weather patterns, affecting many aspects of our environment. In the United States, the one sector of the economy most likely to be directly impacted by the changes in climate is agriculture. We have examined potential changes in dryland agriculture (Part 2) and in water resources necessary for crop production (Part 3). Here we assess to what extent, under a set of climate change scenarios, water supplies will be sufficient to meet the irrigation requirement of major grain crops in the U.S. In addition, we assess the overall impacts of changes in water supply on national grain production. We applied 12 climate change scenarios based on the predictions of General Circulation Models to a water resources model and a crop growth simulator for the conterminous United States. We calculate national production in current crop growing regions by applying irrigation where it is necessary and water is available. Irrigation declines under all climate change scenarios employed in this study. In certain regions and scenarios, precipitation declines so much that water supplies are too limited; in other regions it plentiful enough that little value is derived from irrigation. Total crop production is greater when irrigation is applied, but corn and soybean production declines under most scenarios. Winter wheat production responds significantly to elevated atmospheric CO2 and appears likely to increase under climate change.

  12. Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable tool to assess the system performance-scale experimental, multizone network, zonal, and CFD) for predicting ventilation performance in buildings, which can

  13. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

  14. A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery; published 30 January 2004. [1] Solar radiation assessment by satellite is constrained by physical Composition and Structure: Transmission and scattering of radiation; KEYWORDS: solar radiation, satellite

  15. Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size of the local living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing residential exposure to urban noise using environmental models: does the size on the quantification of the exposure level in a surface defined as the subject's exposure area. For residential residential buildings. Twelve noise exposure indicators have been used to assess inhabitants' exposure

  16. GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Jeffrey Keith

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . CHAPTER vll I INTRODUCTION. II REVIEW OF PREVIOUS RESEARCH III JUSTIFICATION AND OBJECTIVES. 3. 1 Justification. 3. 2 Project Objectives. IV METHODOLOGY . . . 15 . 15 . . . 17 . . 19 4. 1 The Study Site. 4. 2 Pollution Plume Dispersion Data.... 4. 3 Spatial and Demographic Data. 4. 4 Data Integration. V RESULTS. . . . . 19 . . . 21 . . . 36 . . 45 VI CONCLUSIONS. . . . . 60 6. 1 Conclusions, 6. 2 Room for Improvement. REFERENCES. APPENDIX A: Charts and Data Sheets. 60 . . . 61...

  17. Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Multi- model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models V. Eyring1, I. Cionni1, G. E. Bodeker2, A September 2010 ­ Published: 7 October 2010 Abstract. Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite

  18. Towing tank PIV measurement system, data and uncertainty assessment for DTMB Model 5512

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    Basin (DTMB) model 5512. The mean velocities are compared with previous 5-hole pitot probe dataTowing tank PIV measurement system, data and uncertainty assessment for DTMB Model 5512 L. Gui, J stresses at the nominal-wake plane of a model-scale ship. The mean velocities are compared with previous 5

  19. Assessing ocean-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties I. Andreu Burillo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing ocean-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties I. Andreu Burillo,1 G. Caniaux,1 M-equation open-ocean model, induced by uncertainties in wind forcing. Statistics calculated from an ensemble-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29(18), 1858, doi:10.1029/2001GL014473, 2002

  20. Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and mor- tality in Loslinking chronic air pollution exposure to health outcomes. J2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects with

  1. Final Technical Report - Integrated Hydrogeophysical and Hydrogeologic Driven Parameter Upscaling for Dual-Domain Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, John M

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The three major components of this research were: 1. Application of minimally invasive, cost effective hydrogeophysical techniques (surface and borehole), to generate fine scale (~1m or less) 3D estimates of subsurface heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is defined as spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity and/or hydrolithologic zones. 2. Integration of the fine scale characterization of hydrogeologic parameters with the hydrogeologic facies to upscale the finer scale assessment of heterogeneity to field scale. 3. Determination of the relationship between dual-domain parameters and practical characterization data.

  2. New modeling and control solutions for integrated microgrid system with respect to thermodynamics properties of generation and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fang-Yu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates microgrid control stability with respect to thermodynamics behaviors of generation and demand. First, a new integrated microgrid model is introduced. This model consists of a combined cycle power ...

  3. A Qualitative Readiness-Requirements Assessment Model for Enterprise Big-Data Infrastructure Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system s readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMA-DMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system s data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

  4. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  5. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  6. Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Development of the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics Model (IBSAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Biomass Supply & Logistics (IBSAL) model is a dynamic (time dependent) model of operations that involve collection, harvest, storage, preprocessing, and transportation of feedstock for use at a biorefinery. The model uses mathematical equations to represent individual unit operations. These unit operations can be assembled by the user to represent the working rate of equipment and queues to represent storage at facilities. The model calculates itemized costs, energy input, and carbon emissions. It estimates resource requirements and operational characteristics of the entire supply infrastructure. Weather plays an important role in biomass management and thus in IBSAL, dictating the moisture content of biomass and whether or not it can be harvested on a given day. The model calculates net biomass yield based on a soil conservation allowance (for crop residue) and dry matter losses during harvest and storage. This publication outlines the development of the model and provides examples of corn stover harvest and logistics.

  8. Integrating digital human modeling into virtual environment for ergonomic oriented design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtual human simulation integrated into virtual reality applications is mainly used for virtual representation of the user in virtual environment or for interactions between the user and the virtual avatar for cognitive tasks. In this paper, in order to prevent musculoskeletal disorders, the integration of virtual human simulation and VR application is presented to facilitate physical ergonomic evaluation, especially for physical fatigue evaluation of a given population. Immersive working environments are created to avoid expensive physical mock-up in conventional evaluation methods. Peripheral motion capture systems are used to capture natural movements and then to simulate the physical operations in virtual human simulation. Physical aspects of human's movement are then analyzed to determine the effort level of each key joint using inverse kinematics. The physical fatigue level of each joint is further analyzed by integrating a fatigue and recovery model on the basis of physical task parameters. All the pr...

  9. Integrating Building Information Modeling with Object-Oriented Physical Modeling for Building Thermal Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Woon Seong

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the framework, and (2) the model manually created using Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Modelica Buildings library. The results show that the framework: (1) enables BIM models to be translated into ModelicaBEM models, (2) enables system interface...

  10. analytical model assessing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    272 Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines CERN Preprints Summary: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both...

  11. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chlorinated pesticides, e.g. , DDT) based on Swedish marketInvestigating the global fate of DDT: Model evaluation anddichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and its degradation

  12. A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigator(s) George Danko, UNR Other Principal Investigators Jens Birkholzer, LBNL; Jaak Daemen, UNR Targets Milestones The model development work follows three main...

  13. assessment models version: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Szilagyi a is modeled with a spatially and temporally discretized version of the linear kinematic wave equation written-aquifer interactions; Baseflow separation; Flow routing;...

  14. assessment model version: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Szilagyi a is modeled with a spatially and temporally discretized version of the linear kinematic wave equation written-aquifer interactions; Baseflow separation; Flow routing;...

  15. Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

  16. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  17. Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Department of EnergyMobileAssessment

  18. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL’s MBM Framework for Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter A.; Clark, Blythe; Glazoff, Michael; Homer, Eric

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models (Homer et al., 2013; Tikare and Schultz, 2012). The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  19. Aquifer sensitivity assessment modeling at a large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.C.; Abert, C.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 480 square-mile region within Will County, northeastern Illinois was used as a test region for an evaluation of the sensitivity of aquifers to contamination. An aquifer sensitivity model was developed using a Geographic Information System (GIS) with ARC/INFO software to overlay and combine several data layers. Many of the input data layers were developed using 2-dimensional surface modeling (Interactive Surface Modeling (ISM)) and 3-dimensional volume modeling (Geologic Modeling Program (GMP)) computer software. Most of the input data layers (drift thickness, thickness of sand and gravel, depth to first aquifer) were derived from interpolation of descriptive logs for water wells and engineering borings from their study area. A total of 2,984 logs were used to produce these maps. The components used for the authors' model are (1) depth to sand and gravel or bedrock, (2) thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer, (3) drift thickness, and (4) absence or presence of uppermost bedrock aquifer. The model is an improvement over many aquifer sensitivity models because it combines specific information on depth to the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer with information on the thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer. The manipulation of the source maps according to rules-based assumptions results in a colored aquifer sensitivity map for the Will County study area. This colored map differentiates 42 aquifer sensitivity map areas by using line patterns within colors. The county-scale model results in an aquifer sensitivity map that can be a useful tool for making land-use planning decisions regarding aquifer protection and management of groundwater resources.

  20. A comparison of radiological risk assessment models: Risk assessment models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and EPA (for NESHAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, L.E.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological risk assessments and resulting risk estimates have been developed by numerous national and international organizations, including the National Research Council`s fifth Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR V), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A fourth organization, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has also performed a risk assessment as a basis for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). This paper compares the EPA`s model of risk assessment with the models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, and ICRP. Comparison is made of the values chosen by each organization for several model parameters: populations used in studies and population transfer coefficients, dose-response curves and dose-rate effects, risk projection methods, and risk estimates. This comparison suggests that the EPA has based its risk assessment on outdated information and that the organization should consider adopting the method used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, or ICRP.

  1. assessing local model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ying; Peng Xinguang 243 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  2. Model Assessment with Renormalization Group in Statistical Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GingQuo, Wang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering: 50 years beyond K-means,” Pattern Recognitionas Fig. 2a). Perform the k-means clustering algorithm, whichThe coarse set and model. The k-means clustering algorithm—

  3. Using species distribution models to inform IUCN Red List assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syfert, Mindy M.; Joppa, Lucas; Smith, Matthew J.; Coomes, David A.; Bachman, Steven P.; Brummitt, Neil A.

    2014-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    .g. hurricanes) or anthropogenic effects (e.g. deforestation) not included in the model fitting process (Elith and Leathwick 2009). Additionally, the SDM approach we have taken here does not explicitly take into account non-equilibrium species dynamics. While...

  4. Assessment of reduced mechanisms using One Dimensional Stochastic Turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien, Li-Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    turbulence model for a syngas jet flame. Proceeding of FallKerstein 2002), a turbulent syngas (CO/H2/NO) jet flame wasand DNS results of the syngas jet flame was recently done

  5. Integrating Empirical Measures of Energy Efficiency into an Energy Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating Empirical Measures of Energy Efficiency Into An Energy Modeling Framework Gale Boyd, Argonne National Laboratory Tools such as Data Envelopment Analysis and Stochastic Frontier Regressions provide a basis for empirical measures... of efficiency. The definition of efficiency these tools encompass can be as broadly defined as total factor productivity, or narrowly defined in terms of single inputs like energy. Given the ability to generate empirical measures of energy efficiency...

  6. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  7. Long-time integration methods for mesoscopic models of pattern-forming systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Vlachos, Dionisios G., E-mail: vlachos@udel.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Katsoulakis, Markos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion (Greece); Plexousakis, Michael [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion (Greece)

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral methods for simulation of a mesoscopic diffusion model of surface pattern formation are evaluated for long simulation times. Backwards-differencing time-integration, coupled with an underlying Newton-Krylov nonlinear solver (SUNDIALS-CVODE), is found to substantially accelerate simulations, without the typical requirement of preconditioning. Quasi-equilibrium simulations of patterned phases predicted by the model are shown to agree well with linear stability analysis. Simulation results of the effect of repulsive particle-particle interactions on pattern relaxation time and short/long-range order are discussed.

  8. Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    1 Using beryllium-7 to assess cross-tropopause1 transport in global models2 3 Hongyu Liu1 , David B, MA13 14 Short Title: Beryllium-7 and cross-tropopause transport15 Index Terms: 0368 Troposphere Initiative (GMI) modeling framework the29 utility of cosmogenic beryllium-7 (7 Be), a natural aerosol tracer

  9. The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a country’s nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a country’s likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

  10. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  11. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  12. An Assessment of Converter Modelling Needs for Offshore Wind Power Plants Connected via VSC-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    An Assessment of Converter Modelling Needs for Offshore Wind Power Plants Connected via VSC- HVDC, especially in case of connection of offshore wind power plants (OWPPs). Modelling challenges are faced Networks Jakob Glasdam, Lorenzo Zeni, Jesper Hjerrild, Lukasz Kocewiak, Bo Hesselbaek Wind Power

  13. Environmental Modeling and Assessment (2005) 10:6379 DOI 10.1007/s10666-004-4267-z Springer 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Modeling and Assessment (2005) 10:63­79 DOI 10.1007/s10666-004-4267-z Springer 2005 Application of a checklist for quality assistance in environmental modelling to an energy model James Risbey a present considerable challenges to develop and test. Uncertainty assessments of such models provide only

  14. First Prev Next Last Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Model Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    ·First ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model Assessment and Selection Axel ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model Assessment and Selection 2 Topics Predictive · Restriction · Selection · Regularization #12;·First ·Prev ·Next ·Last ·Go Back ·Full Screen ·Close ·Quit Model

  15. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  16. Towards an assessment of skill acquisition in student modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacef, Kalina

    /her operational skill in dynamic and highly risky domains, such as Air Traffic Control, nuclear plant operations,leila]@cmis.csiro.au Abstract: This paper presents an approach to student modelling in the context of a simulation-based ITS of the expertise. Examples are given in the domain of Air Traffic Control simulation training for conflict

  17. Common-Cause Failure Treatment in Event Assessment: Basis for a Proposed New Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Kelly; Song-Hua Shen; Gary DeMoss; Kevin Coyne; Don Marksberry

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Event assessment is an application of probabilistic risk assessment in which observed equipment failures and outages are mapped into the risk model to obtain a numerical estimate of the event’s risk significance. In this paper, we focus on retrospective assessments to estimate the risk significance of degraded conditions such as equipment failure accompanied by a deficiency in a process such as maintenance practices. In modeling such events, the basic events in the risk model that are associated with observed failures and other off-normal situations are typically configured to be failed, while those associated with observed successes and unchallenged components are assumed capable of failing, typically with their baseline probabilities. This is referred to as the failure memory approach to event assessment. The conditioning of common-cause failure probabilities for the common cause component group associated with the observed component failure is particularly important, as it is insufficient to simply leave these probabilities at their baseline values, and doing so may result in a significant underestimate of risk significance for the event. Past work in this area has focused on the mathematics of the adjustment. In this paper, we review the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, which underlies most current risk modelling, discuss the limitations of this model with respect to event assessment, and introduce a proposed new framework for common-cause failure, which uses a Bayesian network to model underlying causes of failure, and which has the potential to overcome the limitations of the Basic Parameter Model with respect to event assessment.

  18. Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge L. Sarmiento - Princeton PI, Anand Gnanadesikan - Princeton Co-I, Nicolas Gruber - UCLA PI, Xin Jin - UCLA PostDoc, Robert Armstrong - SUNY /Stony Brook Consultant

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

  19. Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  20. Exact solvability, non-integrability, and genuine multipartite entanglement dynamics of the Dicke model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu He; Liwei Duan; Qing-Hu Chen

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the finite size Dicke model of arbitrary number of qubits is solved analytically in an unified way within extended coherent states. For the $N=2k$ or $2k-1$ Dicke models ($k$ is an integer), the $G$-function, which is only an energy dependent $k \\times k$ determinant, is derived in a transparent manner. The regular spectrum is completely and uniquely given by stable zeros of the $G$-function. The closed-form exceptional eigenvalues are also derived. The level distribution controlled by the pole structure of the $G$-functions suggests non-integrability for $N>1$ model at any finite coupling in the sense of recent criterion in literature. A preliminary application to the exact dynamics of genuine multipartite entanglement in the finite $N$ Dicke model is presented using the obtained exact solutions.

  1. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States) [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Church, Michael [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM{sub 110,?} mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%–40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ? 50 MeV electron beam and 70–80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ?5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ?4.3 ?m/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation.

  2. BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

  3. Comparative evaluation of life cycle assessment models for solid waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, Joerg [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Sites Treatment, TU Dresden Faculty of Forestry, Geo and Hydro Sciences, Pratzschwitzer Str. 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany); Bilitewski, Bernd [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Sites Treatment, TU Dresden Faculty of Forestry, Geo and Hydro Sciences, Pratzschwitzer Str. 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany)], E-mail: abfall@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication compares a selection of six different models developed in Europe and America by research organisations, industry associations and governmental institutions. The comparison of the models reveals the variations in the results and the differences in the conclusions of an LCA study done with these models. The models are compared by modelling a specific case - the waste management system of Dresden, Germany - with each model and an in-detail comparison of the life cycle inventory results. Moreover, a life cycle impact assessment shows if the LCA results of each model allows for comparable and consecutive conclusions, which do not contradict the conclusions derived from the other models' results. Furthermore, the influence of different level of detail in the life cycle inventory of the life cycle assessment is demonstrated. The model comparison revealed that the variations in the LCA results calculated by the models for the case show high variations and are not negligible. In some cases the high variations in results lead to contradictory conclusions concerning the environmental performance of the waste management processes. The static, linear modelling approach chosen by all models analysed is inappropriate for reflecting actual conditions. Moreover, it was found that although the models' approach to LCA is comparable on a general level, the level of detail implemented in the software tools is very different.

  4. Integrated Process Model Development and Systems Analyses for the LIFE Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R; Anklam, T; Abbott, R; Erlandson, A; Halsey, W; Miles, R; Simon, A J

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an integrated process model (IPM) for a Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) power plant. The model includes cost and performance algorithms for the major subsystems of the plant, including the laser, fusion target fabrication and injection, fusion-fission chamber (including the tritium and fission fuel blankets), heat transfer and power conversion systems, and other balance of plant systems. The model has been developed in Visual Basic with an Excel spreadsheet user interface in order to allow experts in various aspects of the design to easily integrate their individual modules and provide a convenient, widely accessible platform for conducting the system studies. Subsystem modules vary in level of complexity; some are based on top-down scaling from fission power plant costs (for example, electric plant equipment), while others are bottom-up models based on conceptual designs being developed by LLNL (for example, the fusion-fission chamber and laser systems). The IPM is being used to evaluate design trade-offs, do design optimization, and conduct sensitivity analyses to identify high-leverage areas for R&D. We describe key aspects of the IPM and report on the results of our systems analyses. Designs are compared and evaluated as a function of key design variables such as fusion target yield and pulse repetition rate.

  5. A Preliminary Study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delchini, Marc Olivier

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of the fluid. ? The sound speed, c, is assumed to be constant even if it usually depends on the temperature and the pressure. This is a good approximation for liquids but not for gases. The sound speed is reactor-dependent. ? The Equation Of State (EOS... to the temperature. This parameter is assumed constant in this model. 7 ? ???P is the dilatation of the density due to the pressure. This parameter is also assumed constant but is different for different sound speeds. Its expression is as follows: ?? ?P = 1...

  6. A Case Study on the Model-Based Design and Integration of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    A Case Study on the Model-Based Design and Integration of Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems Di--Cyber-physical systems (CPS), such as automotive systems, are very difficult to design due to the tight interactions of an integrated automotive control system. The system is composed of two independently designed controllers

  7. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third quarterly report of DOE Contract No. DE-AC22- 87PC79864, entitled Modeling of Integrated Environmental Control Systems for Coal-Fired Power Plants.'' This report summarizes accomplishments during the period April 1, 1988 to June 30, 1988. Our efforts during the last quarter focused on, (1) completion of a sulfuric acid plant model (used in conjunction with by-product recovery processes for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal) and, (2) an update the NOXSO process model. Other accomplishments involved revision and expansion of the enthalpy data algorithms used for process energy balances. The sections below present the details of these developments. References are included at the end of each section.

  8. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  9. An integrated model for the post-solidification shape and grain morphology of fusion welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidess, Anton; Duggan, Gregory; Browne, David J; Kenjereš, Saša; Richardson, Ian; Kleijn, Chris R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an integrated macroscale/mesoscale computational model, we investigate the developing shape and grain morphology during the melting and solidification of a weld. In addition to macroscale surface tension driven fluid flow and heat transfer, we predict the solidification progression using a mesoscale model accounting for realistic solidification kinetics, rather than quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics. The tight coupling between the macroscale and the mesoscale distinguishes our results from previously published studies. The inclusion of Marangoni driven fluid flow and heat transfer, both during heating and cooling, was found to be crucial for accurately predicting both weld pool shape and grain morphology. However, if only the shape of the weld pool is of interest, a thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium solidification model, neglecting solidification kinetics, was found to suffice when including fluid flow and heat transfer. We demonstrate that the addition of a sufficient concentration of approximately 1 $\\...

  10. SOCIAL MODELING IN ASSESSEMENT OF A STATE’S PROPENSITY FOR NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, Angela C.; Whitney, Paul D.; Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents approach for assessing a State’s propensity for nuclear weapons proliferation using social modeling. We supported this modeling by first reviewing primarily literature by social scientists on factors related to the propensity of a State to proliferation and by leveraging existing relevant data compiled by social scientists. We performed a number of validation tests on our model including one that incorporates use of benchmark data defining the proliferation status of countries in the years between 1945 and 2000. We exercise the BN model against a number of country cases representing different perceived levels of proliferation risk. We also describe how the BN model could be further refined to be a proliferation assessment tool for decision making.

  11. Integrated canopy, building energy and radiosity model for 3D urban design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdet, Etienne; Morand, Denis; Diab, Youssef

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an integrated, three dimensional, model of urban canopy, building energy and radiosity, for early stage urban designs and test it on four urban morphologies. All sub-models share a common descriptions of the urban morphology, similar to 3D urban design master plans and have simple parameters. The canopy model is a multilayer model, with a new discrete layer approach that does not rely on simplified geometry such as canyon or regular arrays. The building energy model is a simplified RC equivalent model, with no hypotheses on internal zoning or wall composition. We use the CitySim software for the radiosity model. We study the effects of convexity, the number of buildings and building height, at constant density and thermal characteristics. Our results suggest that careful three dimensional morphology design can reduce heat demand by a factor of 2, especially by improving insolation of lower levels. The most energy efficient morphology in our simulations has both the highest surface/volume ratio and ...

  12. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  13. Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

  14. Modeling the Integrated Performance of Dispersion and Monolithic U-Mo Based Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Douglas E. Burkes; Steven L. Hayes; Karen Moore; Greg Miller; Gerard Hofman; Yeon Soo Kim

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation and prediction of integrated fuel performance is a critical component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The PLATE code is the primary tool being developed and used to perform these functions. The code is being modified to incorporate the most recent fuel/matrix interaction correlations as they become available for both aluminum and aluminum/silicon matrices. The code is also being adapted to treat cylindrical and square pin geometries to enhance the validation database by including the results gathered from various international partners. Additional modeling work has been initiated to evaluate the thermal and mechanical performance requirements unique to monolithic fuels during irradiation.

  15. seca-model-simul-team-integration-mtg | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendiNeedModeling and Simulation

  16. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Integrating CCHP with NW Food Processing Plant #1: Modeling Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Wagner, Anne W.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Thornton, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has launched a project funded by the Bonneville Power Association (BPA) to identify strategies for increasing industrial energy efficiency and reducing energy costs of Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA) plants through deployment of novel combinations and designs of variable-output combined heat and power (CHP) distributed generation (DG), combined cooling, heating and electric power (CCHP) DG and energy storage systems. Detailed evaluations and recommendations of CHP and CCHP DG systems will be performed for several Northwest (NW) food processing sites. The objective is to reduce the overall energy use intensity of NW food processors by 25% by 2020 and by 50% by 2030, as well as reducing emissions and understanding potential congestion reduction impacts on the transmission system in the Pacific Northwest.

  17. Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the 580th meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), February10-12, 2011, we reviewed the staff’s white paper, “A Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysisand...

  18. A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Normal University, Beijing, China. 9 School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University levels. G1 involves a reduction in solar irradiance to counteract the radiative forcing5 in abrupt4xCO2

  19. Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come standards for ambient air pollutants to protect the public from adverse e ects. Much of the evidence for air

  20. A System for 3D Error Visualization and Assessment of Digital Elevation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gousie, Michael B.

    A System for 3D Error Visualization and Assessment of Digital Elevation Models Michael B. Gousie that displays a DEM and possible errors in 3D, along with its associated contour or sparse data and detail. The cutting tool is semi-transparent so that the profile is seen in the context of the 3D surface