Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Behavioral Factors Influencing Fish Entrapment at Offshore Cooling-Water Intake Structures in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral Factors Influencing Fish Entrapment at Offshore Cooling-Water Intake Structures in Southern California MARK HELVEY Introduction Fish entrapment by offshore cooling-water intake structures. Based on con- comitant in-plant impingement monitoring, it was also learned that these same reef species

2

The influence of range site on diet selection, nutrient intake, and grazing behavior of cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INFLUENCE OF RANGE SITE ON DIET SELECTION, NUTRIENT INTERN, AND GRAZING BEHAVIOR OF CATTLE A Thesis KAREN LYNN HASTEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of EASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Hajor Subject: Range Science THE INFLUENCE OF RANGE SITE ON DIET SELECTION, NUTRIENT INTAKE, AND GRAZING BEHlLVIOR OF CATTLE A Thesis by KAREN hYNN HASTED Approved as to style and content by: er W. S ( ai f...

Mastel, Karen Lynn

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Entrainment sampling at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Savannah River water intakes (1991)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling water for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) L-Reactor, K-Reactor, and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pumphouses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water. They are passed through the reactor heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degree}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is presumably 100%. Apart from a small pilot study conducted in 1989, ichthyoplankton samples have not been collected from the vicinity of the SRS intake canals since 1985. The Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) resume ichthyoplankton sampling for the purpose of assessing entrainment at the SRS Savannah River intakes. This request is due to the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River. The following scope of work presents a sampling plan that will collect information on the spatial and temporal distribution of fish eggs and larvae near the SRS intake canal mouths. This data will be combined with information on water movement patterns near the canal mouths in order to determine the percentage of ichthyoplankton that are removed from the Savannah River by the SRS intakes. The following sampling plan incorporates improvements in experimental design that resulted from the findings of the 1989 pilot study. 1 fig.

Paller, M.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Intake port  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The volumetric efficiency and power of internal combustion engines is improved with an intake port having an intake nozzle, a venturi, and a surge chamber. The venturi is located almost halfway upstream the intake port between the intake valves and the intake plenum enabling the venturi throat diameter to be exceptionally small for providing an exceptionally high ram velocity and an exceptionally long and in turn high efficiency diffuser flowing into the surge chamber. The intake port includes an exceptionally large surge chamber volume for blow down of the intake air into the working cylinder of the engine.

Mendler, Edward Charles

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search Jianhan Zhu BSc Faculty of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy October, 2003 #12;University of Ulster Abstract Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search by Jianhan Zhu Supervisors: Dr. Jun

Zhu, Jianhan

7

active site structure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

matrix 76 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

8

Coarse-grained Classification of Web Sites by Their Structural Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coarse-grained Classification of Web Sites by Their Structural Properties Christoph Lindemann properties which reflect the functionality of a Web site. These structural properties consider the size, the organization, the composition of URLs, and the link structure of Web sites. Opposed to previous work, we

Lindemann, Christoph

9

Deep Resistivity Structure of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area adjacent to a nuclear test. Ground water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, supported by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) stations at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in that area. The primary purpose was to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (late Devonian – Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) in the Yucca Flat area. The MT and AMT data have been released in separate USGS Open File Reports. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology beneath each station. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit are generally well determined in the upper 5 km. Inferences can be made regarding the presence of the Lower Clastic Confining Unit at depths below 5 km. Large fault structures such as the CP Thrust fault, the Carpetbag fault, and the Yucca fault that cross Yucca Flat are also discernable as are other smaller faults. The subsurface electrical resistivity distribution and inferred geologic structures determined by this investigation should help constrain the hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development.

Theodore H. Asch, Brian D. Rodriguez; Jay A. Sampson; Erin L. Wallin; and Jackie M. Williams.

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

Kleyer, Michael

11

Blind Predictions of Local Protein Structure in CASP2 Targets Using the I-Sites Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind Predictions of Local Protein Structure in CASP2 Targets Using the I-Sites Library Christopher ABSTRACT Blind predictions of the local structure of nine CASP2 targets were made using the I-sites library dataset to optimize the method may intro- duce a bias in favor of that set. Blind predictions of data

Bystroff, Chris

12

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility dispose of waste material off a dump ramp in super cell 9. In the foreground, pumps from the water intake structures associated with the K reactors are set for disposal...

13

Shock-less Hypersonic Intakes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The accuracy of CFD for simulating hypersonic air intake flow is verified by calculating the flow inside a Busemann type intake. The CFD results are… (more)

Miri, Seyed Hossein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese ferrite (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn to be tetrahedrally coordinated in these compounds.

Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V. G.; X-Ray Science Division; Inst. of Metal Physics; Northeastern Univ.; Nankai Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

State of structures of the Kolyma hydroelectric station according to data of on-site observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site inspections of the Kolyma hydroelectric power station have been performed since 1979. A large quantity of data has been obtained pertaining to the dam, underground powerhouse, and other structures. Over 2000 measuring instruments were installed for checking the structures and foundations.

Kuznetsov, V.S.; Voinovich, A.P.; Matroshilina, T.V.; Krupin, V.A.; Bulatov, S.N.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Comparison of Protein Active Site Structures for Functional Annotation of Proteins and Drug Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of various genomics efforts has been a vast growth in putative protein sequences that lack any experimental there are numerous examples of proteins with similar folds that lack any significant sequence homology.8Comparison of Protein Active Site Structures for Functional Annotation of Proteins and Drug Design

Powers, Robert

17

Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Yau, W.F. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yau, W.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Air intake shaft performance tests (Shaft 5): In situ data report (May 1988--July 1995). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Thermal/Structural Interactions Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from the Air Intake Shaft Test, an in situ test fielded at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The construction of this shaft, well after the initial three access shafts, presented an unusual opportunity to obtain valuable detailed data on the mechanical response of a shaft for application to seal design. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1987; gage data in this report cover the period from May 1988 through July 1995, with the bulk of the data obtained after obtaining access in November, 1989 and from the heavily instrumented period after remote gage installation between May, 1990, and October, 1991.

Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Hoag, D.L.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baird, G.T.; Jones, R.L. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Structural Origins of Nitroxide Side Chain Dynamics on Membrane Protein [alpha]-Helical Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in their native, hydrophobic environment is important to understanding how these proteins function. EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) can measure dynamics and structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid environment; however, until now the dynamics measured have been qualitative due to limited knowledge of the nitroxide spin label's intramolecular motion in the hydrophobic environment. Although several studies have elucidated the structural origins of EPR line shapes of water-soluble proteins, EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-labeled proteins in detergents or lipids have characteristic differences from their water-soluble counterparts, suggesting significant differences in the underlying molecular motion of the spin label between the two environments. To elucidate these differences, membrane-exposed {alpha}-helical sites of the leucine transporter, LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, were investigated using X-ray crystallography, mutational analysis, nitroxide side chain derivatives, and spectral simulations in order to obtain a motional model of the nitroxide. For each crystal structure, the nitroxide ring of a disulfide-linked spin label side chain (R1) is resolved and makes contacts with hydrophobic residues on the protein surface. The spin label at site I204 on LeuT makes a nontraditional hydrogen bond with the ortho-hydrogen on its nearest neighbor F208, whereas the spin label at site F177 makes multiple van der Waals contacts with a hydrophobic pocket formed with an adjacent helix. These results coupled with the spectral effect of mutating the i {+-} 3, 4 residues suggest that the spin label has a greater affinity for its local protein environment in the low dielectric than on a water-soluble protein surface. The simulations of the EPR spectra presented here suggest the spin label oscillates about the terminal bond nearest the ring while maintaining weak contact with the protein surface. Combined, the results provide a starting point for determining a motional model for R1 on membrane proteins, allowing quantification of nitroxide dynamics in the aliphatic environment of detergent and lipids. In addition, initial contributions to a rotamer library of R1 on membrane proteins are provided, which will assist in reliably modeling the R1 conformational space for pulsed dipolar EPR and NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement distance determination.

Kroncke, Brett M.; Horanyi, Peter S.; Columbus, Linda (UV)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by Nucleotide-Independent Nitroxide Probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In site-directed spin labeling, a covalently attached nitroxide probe containing a chemically inert unpaired electron is utilized to obtain information on the local environment of the parent macromolecule. Studies presented here examine the feasibility of probing local DNA structural and dynamic features using a class of nitroxide probes that are linked to chemically substituted phosphorothioate positions at the DNA backbone. Two members of this family, designated as R5 and R5a, were attached to eight different sites of a dodecameric DNA duplex without severely perturbing the native B-form conformation. Measured X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which report on nitroxide rotational motions, were found to vary depending on the location of the label (e.g., duplex center vs termini) and the surrounding DNA sequence. This indicates that R5 and R5a can provide information on the DNA local environment at the level of an individual nucleotide. As these probes can be attached to arbitrary nucleotides within a nucleic acid sequence, they may provide a means to “scan” a given DNA molecule in order to interrogate its local structural and dynamic features.

Popova, Anna; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Qin, Peter Z.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

CMC intake ramp for hypersonic propulsion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative technology to produce CMC structural components with lower costs and shorter manufacturing times has been developed at the DLR. The process is based on liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) into porous carbon/carbon resulting in a C/C-SiC material whereby the load carrying fibres are internally protected against oxidation by SiC. The material`s adequate strength levels and the high reproducibility of the state-of-the-art process now allows the realization of CMC components. Representing a very complex structure of high integrity, an intake ramp for a hypersonic propulsion system has been designed, manufactured and tested, which is described in this paper.

Kochendoerfer, R.; Krenkel, W. [Institute of Structures and Design, Stuttgart, (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluation of intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once an intake of transuranics occurs, there are only three therapeutic procedures available to the physician for reducing the intake and mitigating the dose: excision of material from wounds, removal of material from the lungs with lavage, and chelation therapy. The only chelation agents approved in the United States for the treatment of occupational intakes of transuranics are the zinc and calcium salts of diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, better known as Zn-DTPA and Ca-DTPA. In the past 35 years, approximately 3000 doses of DTPA have been administrated to over 500 individuals who had intakes of transuranics. The drug is considered to be quiet safe and has few side effects. For the internal dosimetrist, perhaps the most important aspects of chelation therapy is that if enhances the excretion rate of a transuranic and perturbs the shape of the urinary excretion curve. These perturbations last for months and are so great that standard urinary excretion models cannot be used to evaluate the intake. We review here a method for evaluating intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy that has been used with some degree of success at the Savannah River Site for over 20 years.

LaBone, T.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Deep Resistivity Structure of Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. During 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), funded by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from twenty-six Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-Magnetotelluric (AMT) sites at the Nevada Test Site. Data stations were located in and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in those areas. These new stations extend to the west the hydrogeologic study that was conducted in Yucca Flat in 2003. This work has helped to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU – late Devonian to Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale(Bechtel Nevada, 2006)) in the Yucca Flat area and west towards Shoshone Mountain in the south, east of Buckboard Mesa, and onto Rainier Mesa in the north. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology within the region. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit (UCCU) are generally characterized in the upper 5 km. The interpretation is not well determined where conductive TCU overlies conductive Chainman Shale, where resistive Eleana Formation overlies resistive LCA units, or where resistive VTA rock overlies units of the Eleana Formation. The nature of the volcanic units in the west has been refined as are large and small fault structures such as the CP Thrust Fault, the Carpetbag Fault, and the Yucca Fault that cross Yucca Flat. The subsurface electrical resistivity distribution and inferred geologic structures determined by this investigation should help constrain the hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit and areas to the west and in understanding the effects on ground-water flow in the area.

Theodore H. Asch; Brian D. Rodriguez; Jay A. Sampson; Jackie M. Williams; Maryla Deszcz-Pan

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Multi-Summer Climatology of Cumuli at SGP site: Vertical Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform a case study for estimating the impact of the vertical distribution of cloud fraction on the normalized cloud radiative forcing (CRF) using a decade-long (2000-2009) high resolution dataset of cloud macrophysical and radiative properties. This dataset is developed for fair-weather cumuli (FWC) observed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The design of the case study reduces effects associated with non-cloud factors, such as the diurnal changes of aerosol loading and solar zenith angle. The results of the case study suggest that the impact of the vertical cloud structure can be substantial. Therefore, taking into account the vertical distribution of clouds would be beneficial for more comprehensive parameterizations aimed to portray the complex interactions between clouds and radiation more accurately

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 116-F-8, 1904-F Outfall Structure and the 100-F-42, 1904-F Spillway, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-038  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 116-F-8 waste site is the former 1904-F Outfall Structure used to discharge reactor cooling water effluent fro mthe 107-F Retention Basin to the Columbia River. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

29

Site preferences of indium impurity atoms in intermetallics having Al3Ti and Al3Zr crystal structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site preferences of indium impurity atoms in intermetallics having Al3Ti and Al3Zr crystal-04843 (Metals Program) and Praveen Sinha Fund for Physics Research. L12 DO22 DO23 Cu3Au Al3Ti Al3Zr #12;Outline · Indium was doped in samples of Al3V and Al3Ti (Al3Ti structure) and Al3Zr (Al3Zr structure) by arc

Collins, Gary S.

30

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 116-F-8, 1904-F Outfall Structure and the 100-F-42, 1904-F Spillway, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-045  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-F-42 waste site is the portion of the former emergency overflow spillway for the 1904-F Outfall Structure formerly existing above the ordinary high water mark of the Columbia River. The spillway consisted of a concrete flume designed to discharge effluent from the 107-F Retention Basin in the event that flows could not be completely discharged via the river outfall pipelines. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site Selectivity and Magnetic Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structurally Diverse Copper(II) Complexes of Polyaza Ligands Containing 1,2,3-Triazoles: Site, Florida 32306-4390, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Copper(II) acetate mediated coupling, was observed in the copper(II) complexes of L1 -L6 . The preference of copper(II) to two common bidentate 1

Weston, Ken

32

Structural Analyses of a Malate Dehydrogenase with a Variable Active Site*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in eukaryotes, the malate/aspartate shuttle. MDH is highly selective for its 4-carbon dicarboxylic acid substrate, distinguishing malate from the readily avail- able 3-carbon (pyruvate) and 5-carbon on a loop that bends into the active site and form hydrogen bond inter- actions with the 4-carboxyl and 2

Viola, Ronald

33

WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites on macromolecular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites University, Stanford CA 94305 USA Abstract WebFEATURE (http://feature.stanford.edu/webfeature/) is a web and nucleic acids. WebFEATURE is the public interface to the scanning algorithm of the FEATURE package

Brutlag, Doug

34

Hanford Site Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Structures & Conex Boxes Procedure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public Tours Hanford

35

In Situ XAS Studies on the Structure of the Active Site of Supported Gold Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold clusters supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 have been exposed to different mixtures of CO and O2. Their structure has been probed in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Au L3-edge. In all materials, the dominant phase during catalysis is Au0. Both samples show variations of the electronic structure of the gold clusters with changing reaction conditions as evidenced by changes in the X-ray absorption near-edge (XANES) region. These variations are caused by interaction between the gold clusters and the carbon monoxide present in the gas phase. The gold atoms remain zerovalent throughout all experiments confirming the importance of Au0 for catalytic activity.

Weiher, Norbert; Beesley, Angela M.; Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos [Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Louis, Catherine; Delannoy, Laurent [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, UMR 7609 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252, Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schroeder, Sven L. M. [Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemistry, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Analysis of site structure and post-depositional disturbance at two Early Holocene components, Richard Beene site (41BX831), Bexar County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two deeply buried, well-stratified, and well-dated components dating to the Early Holocene period were excavated at the Richard Beene site (41BX831) in Bexar County, Texas. This thesis utilizes both qualitative (interpretation of maps...

Mason, James Bryan

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Type B Investigation Board Report on the April 2, 2002, Worker Fall from Shoring/Scaffolding Structure at the Savannah River Site Tritium Extraction Facility Construction Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On April 2, 2002, a carpenter helping to erect shoring/scaffolding fell about 52” and struck his head. He sustained head injuries requiring hospitalization that exceeded the threshold for a Type B investigation in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 225.1A, Accident Investigation. The accident occurred at the DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) construction site.

38

Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural geology of the CP Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; and regional implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed mapping and structural analysis of upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks in the CP Hills of the Nevada Test Site, together with analysis of published maps and cross sections and a reconnaissance of regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust of Barnes and Poole (1968) actually comprises two separate, oppositely verging Mesozoic thrust systems: (1) the west-vergent CP thrust which is well exposed in the CP Hills and at Mine Mountain, and (2) the east-vergent Belted Range thrust located northwest of Yucca Flat. West-vergence of the CP thrust is indicated by large scale west-vergent recumbent folds in both its hangingwall and footwall and by the fact that the CP thrust ramps up section through hangingwall strata toward the northwest. Regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust forms part of a narrow sigmoidal belt of west-vergent folding and thrusting traceable for over 180 km along strike. The Belted Range thrust represents earlier Mesozoic deformation that was probably related to the Last Chance thrust system in southeastern California, as suggested by earlier workers. A pre-Tertiary reconstruction of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in the region between the NTS and the Las Vegas Range bears a close resemblance to other regions of the Cordillera and has important implications for the development of hinterland-vergent deformation as well as for the probable magnitude of Tertiary extension north of Las Vegas Valley. Subsequent to Mesozoic deformation, the CP Hills were disrupted by at least two episodes of Tertiary extensional deformation: (1) an earlier episode represented by pre-middle Miocene low-angle normal faults, and (2) a later, post-11 Ma episode of high-angle normal faulting. Both episodes of extension were related to regional deformation, the latter of which has resulted in the present basin and range topography of the NTS region.

Caskey, S.J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

Airaksinen, Riikka, E-mail: Riikka.Airaksinen@thl.fi [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland)] [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland)] [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Mannio, Jaakko [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Hallikainen, Anja [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Helsinki (Finland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Reconstruction of Long-Lived Radionuclide Intakes for Techa Riverside Residents: Cesium-137  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive contamination of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) occurred from 1949–1956 due to routine and accidental releases of liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak Production Association. The long-lived radionuclides in the releases were 90Sr and 137Cs. Contamination of the components of the Techa River system resulted in chronic external and internal exposure of about 30,000 residents of riverside villages. Data on radionuclide intake with diet are used to estimate internal dose in the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which was elaborated for the assessment of radiogenic risk for Techa Riverside residents. The 90Sri ntake function was recently improved taking into account the recently available archival data on radionuclide releases and in-depth analysis of the extensive data on 90Sr measurements in Techa Riverside residents. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate the dietary intake of 137Cs by Techa Riverside residents. The 137Cs intake with river water used for drinking was reconstructed on the basis of the 90Sr intake-function and the concentration ratio 137Cs/90Sr in river water. Intake via 137Cs transfer from floodplain soil to grass and cows’ milk was evaluated for the first time. As a result, the maximal 137Cs intake level was indicated near the site of releases in upper-Techa River settlements (8,000–9,000 kBq). For villages located on the lower Techa River the 137Cs intake was significantly less (down to 300 kBq). Cows’ milk was the main source of 137Cs in diet in the upper-Techa.

Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Peremyslova, L. M.; Shagina, N. B.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Structure of the complex of a yeast glucoamylase with acarbose reveals the presence of a raw starch binding site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, shows clearly the influence of cryo-cooling, which is manifested in shrinkage of the mole- cule, one at the active site and the second at a site remote from the active site, curved around Tyr464. fibuligera IFO 0111, a raw starch-degrading enzyme, it is reason- able to expect the presence of the remote

42

Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

44

alcohol intake myocardial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26 Feedback control 27 MathematicalU N C O R R E C T E D P R O O F 1 Short and long-term energy intake patterns and their implications 256 Is Withholding Moderate Wine Intake...

45

alcohol intake cigarette: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26 Feedback control 27 MathematicalU N C O R R E C T E D P R O O F 1 Short and long-term energy intake patterns and their implications 288 Is Withholding Moderate Wine Intake...

46

The crystal structure of human protein ?1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human ?1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of ?1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin ?1-microglobulin (?1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. ?1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including ?1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between ?1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human ?1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of ?1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of ?1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between ?1M and its partners.

Zhang, Yangli [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China) [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical detection of Chongqing, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Gao, Zengqiang [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China)] [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China) [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Zhenzhen [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); Luo, Miao [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China)] [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); Hou, Haifeng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China)] [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China); Huang, Ailong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); Dong, Yuhui, E-mail: dongyh@mail.ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China)] [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang, Deqiang, E-mail: wangd@ustc.edu [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China) [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Disease, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China); College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, YiXueYuanlu-1, Chongqing 400016 (China)

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reliability of concrete in the main structures of the Boguchany hydroelectric station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the construction site of the Boguchany hydroelectric station more than half of the entire volume of concrete is being placed in the main structures. The stage related to the construction of the headwall of the water intakes and pressure conduits, formation of the downstream face, transfer of the diverted flow to the permanent bottom outlets, and start of concreting operations on the hydrostation powerhouse is coming.

Lyadov, Yu.D.; Semenok, S.N.; Sukhotskaya, S.S. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

U2504 Determines the Species Specificity of the A-site Cleft Antibiotics: The sStructures of Tiamulin, Homoharringtonine and Bruceantin Bound to the Ribosome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structures have been obtained for the complexes that tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.65 to 3.2 {angstrom}. They show that all these inhibitors block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the A-site cleft in the peptidyl-transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition, these structures support the hypothesis that the species specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (Escherichia coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms.

Gurel, G.; Blaha, G; Moore, P; Steitz,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Structure and critical function of Fe and acid sites in Fe-ZSM-5 in propane oxidative dehydrogenation with N2O and N2O decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and critical function of Fe and acid sites in Fe-ZSM-5 in propane oxidative species Steamed Fe-zeolites Mössbauer spectroscopy UV­Vis FTIR H2-TPR N2O decomposition Propane oxidative of propane to propene with N2O. The evacuated non-steamed FeH-ZSM-5 contained high concentration of Brønsted

Sklenak, Stepan

50

Understanding Forage Intake in Range Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ruminants classified as browsers (such as white-tailed deer) and interme- diate feeders (like sheep and goats) have mouth parts that allow them to be more selective in their browsing and grazing than ruminants classi- fied as grazers (such as cattle... as important as forage quality, especially when quality is marginal. Forage intake in a rangeland environment is influenced by a num- ber of important factors, including: ? Herbivore species and size. ? Foraging behavior. ? Physiological status. ? Animal...

Lyons, Robert K.; Machen, Richard V.; Forbes, T. D. A.

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

Element-and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films by diffraction anomalous fine structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Element- and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films Received 2 April 2008; accepted 9 July 2008; published online 8 August 2008 Epitaxial manganese ferrite.1063/1.2969406 Spinel ferrites represent an important class of materials that provide high permeability, moderate

Haskel, Daniel

52

Protein active sites, interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for active site identification ! Manual MSA and structure analysis ! Catalytic Site Atlas (homology-based) ! Evolutionary Trace (MSA subfamily- and family-wide conservation; phylogenetic tree and structure analysis) ! 3D", Bartlett et al. J Mol Biol. 2002 Nov 15;324(1):105-21. · "An evolutionary trace method defines binding

Sjölander, Kimmen

53

Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D. (Purdue); (UIC)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Metal dependent structure, dynamics, and function in RNA measured by site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and EPR spectroscopy, distances in RNA duplexes, TAR RNA, and the hammerhead ribozyme have been measured to investigate RNA structures. Kinetic measurements have been performed in the extended hammerhead ribozyme to correlate...

Kim, Nak-Kyoon

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Intake and digestibility of grazed bermudagrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? . 940 -. 0339 165. 3 11. 010 9. 592 307 274 -. 939 -. 0321 246. 3 7. 390 6. 092 245 226 477 266 -. 979 -. 0558 367. 2 4. 957 7. 107 320 246 -. 901 -. 0341 124. 4 14. 634 12. 835 2. 688 3. 539 2. 223 2. 672 5. 217 Correlation coefficient between... Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INTAKE AND DIGESTIBILITY OF GRAZED BERMUDAGRASS A Thesis by WILLIAM HERBERT LOWRY PEREZ Approv to s le an content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of D artment) (Memb ~gg~ z~+ (Member) December 1978 124i043...

Lowry Perez, William Herbert

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Life Cycle Assessment and Comparative Risk Assessment potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the human intake fraction (iF), representing the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess model uncertainty in the human intake fraction, ingestion and inhalation iFs of 367 substances emitted to air and freshwater were calculated with two commonly applied multi-media fate and exposure models, CalTOX and USES-LCA. Comparison of the model outcomes reveal that uncertainty in the ingestion iFs was up to a factor of 70. The uncertainty in the inhalation iFs was up to a factor of 865,000. The comparison showed that relatively few model differences account for the uncertainties found. An optimal model structure in the calculation of human intake fractions can be achieved by including (1) rain and no-rain scenarios, (2) a continental sea water compartment, (3) drinking water purification, (4) pH-correction of chemical properties, and (5) aerosol-associated deposition on plants. Finally, vertical stratification of the soil compartment combined with a chemical-dependent soil depth may be considered in future intake fraction calculations.

Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intake fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions in US urban areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer factors for air pollution health risk assessment.better understanding of air pollution health effects. IntakeFuel combustion, air pollution exposure, and health: The

Marshall, Julian D.; Teoh, Soon-Kay; Nazaroff, William W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

amino acid intake: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

protein intake (PDI) and net portal appearance rate of amino acids by continuous infusion of para-aminohippuric acid via the mesenteric catheter. The amino-acid appearance...

59

Relationships between circadian rhythms and ethanol intake in mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.2.3. Ethanol Vapor Sessions . . . . . . . . .4.2.4.scheduling a?ects subsequent voluntary ethanol 2.1.of circadian period to ethanol intake . . . . . . . . . .

Trujillo, Jennifer L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Program 1994 fiscal year work plan. Work breakdown structure 2.0: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site Management System (SMS) guidance requires a Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) to be prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Mission Area and all related programs. This revision is a complete update to cover the FY 1994 time period. This document describes the overall ER Missions Area and provides FYWP appendices for each of the following five program areas: Remedial Action (RA); Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D); Project Management and Support (PM&S); Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); and Disposal Facilities (DF).

Not Available

1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

U2504 Determines the Species Specificity of the A-Site Cleft Antibiotics: The Structures of Tiamulin, Homoharringtonine, and Bruceantin Bound to the Ribosome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structures have been obtained for the complexes that tiamulin, homoharringtonine, and bruceantin form with the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui at resolutions ranging from 2.65 to 3.2 {angstrom}. They show that all these inhibitors block protein synthesis by competing with the amino acid side chains of incoming aminoacyl-tRNAs for binding in the Asite cleft in the peptidyl-transferase center, which is universally conserved. In addition, these structures support the hypothesis that the species specificity exhibited by the A-site cleft inhibitors is determined by the interactions they make, or fail to make, with a single nucleotide, U2504 (Escherichia coli). In the ribosome, the position of U2504 is controlled by its interactions with neighboring nucleotides, whose identities vary among kingdoms.

Gürel, Güliz; Blaha, Gregor; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Yale

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William (Yale); (Alberta)

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Original article Dynamic of voluntary intake, feeding behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

square design, a late-cut mixed grass hay, an early-cut cocksfoot hay and an early-cut lucerne hay and lucerne respectively. Voluntary DM intake was 1000, 1484 and 1608 g (P and lucerne respectively. Differences in voluntary intake among hays were mostly related to differences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

Site Feeds - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNewsMaterialsX-rayOur‹Simulation,Site

66

Site Screening, Site Selection,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smartversatileplatform chemical.OfficeScreening, Site

67

Identification of structures, systems, and components important to safety at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study recommends which structures, systems, and components of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain are important to safety. The assessment was completed in April 1990 and uses the reference repository configuration in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report and follows the methodology required at that time by DOE Procedure AP6.10-Q. Failures of repository items during the preclosure period are evaluated to determine the potential offsite radiation doses and associated probabilities. Items are important to safety if, in the event they fail to perform their intended function, an accident could result which causes a dose commitment greater than 0.5 rem to the whole body or any organ of an individual in an unrestricted area. This study recommends that these repository items include the structures that house spent fuel and high-level waste, the associated filtered ventilation exhaust systems, certain waste- handling equipment, the waste containers, the waste treatment building structure, the underground waste transporters, and other items listed in this report. This work was completed April 1990. 27 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Klamerus, L.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity water intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

water intake Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activity water intake Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Gestational and early postnatal...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - adequate intakes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the metabolic processing of nutrient intake. Absolute model response... the accuracy of predicting the energetic efficiency of utilizing nutrient intake, as this is...

70

Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Engine Air Intake Manifold Having Built In Intercooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbocharged V type engine can be equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler integrated into the intake manifold, so as to achieve efficiency, cost reductions and space economization improvements. The cooler can take the form of a tube-shell heat exchanger that utilizes a cylindrical chamber in the air intake manifold as the heat exchanger housing. The intake manifold depends into the central space formed by the two banks of cylinders on the V type engine, such that the central space is effectively utilized for containing the manifold and cooler.

Freese, V, Charles E. (Westland, MI)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Intake Air Oxygen Sensor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Robert Bosch at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about intake air oxygen sensors.

73

A preliminary investigation of the structure of southern Yucca Flat, Massachusetts Mountain, and CP basin, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, based on geophysical modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New gravity and magnetic data collected in the vicinity of Massachusetts Mountain and CP basin (Nevada Test Site, NV) provides a more complex view of the structural relationships present in the vicinity of CP basin than previous geologic models, helps define the position and extent of structures in southern Yucca Flat and CP basin, and better constrains the configuration of the basement structure separating CP basin and Frenchman Flat. The density and gravity modeling indicates that CP basin is a shallow, oval-shaped basin which trends north-northeast and contains ~800 m of basin-filling rocks and sediment at its deepest point in the northeast. CP basin is separated from the deeper Frenchman Flat basin by a subsurface ridge that may represent a Tertiary erosion surface at the top of the Paleozoic strata. The magnetic modeling indicates that the Cane Spring fault appears to merge with faults in northwest Massachusetts Mountain, rather than cut through to Yucca Flat basin and that the basin is downed-dropped relative to Massachusetts Mountain. The magnetic modeling indicates volcanic units within Yucca Flat basin are down-dropped on the west and supports the interpretations of Phelps and KcKee (1999). The magnetic data indicate that the only faults that appear to be through-going from Yucca Flat into either Frenchman Flat or CP basin are the faults that bound the CP hogback. In general, the north-trending faults present along the length of Yucca Flat bend, merge, and disappear before reaching CP hogback and Massachusetts Mountain or French Peak.

Geoffrey A. Phelps; Leigh Justet; Barry C. Moring, and Carter W. Roberts

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

TRACKING SITE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

75

Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Taniguchi, Kayoko; /Wako, RIKEN; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; /Washington U., Seattle; Maeda, Mizuo; /SLAC,; Kovacs, Julie A.; /Washington U., Seattle; Odaka, Masafumi; /Wako, RIKEN; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

EA-1523: Finding of No Significant Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

77

Structural Analysis of Phospholipase A2 from Functional Perspective. 2. Characterization of a Molten Globule-Like State Induced by Site-Specific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the hydrophobic channel, the interfacial binding site, and the calcium-binding loop) are located in the remainder

Tsai, Ming-Daw

78

Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films E. Kravtsov,1,2 D. Haskel,1 A. Cady,1 A. Yang,3 C. Vittoria,3 X. Zuo,4 and V. G. Harris3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site-specific local structure of Mn in artificial manganese ferrite films E. Kravtsov,1,2 D. Haskel in manganese ferrite films grown under nonequilibrium conditions. The DAFS spectra were measured at a number. INTRODUCTION There has been considerable long-term interest in spinel ferrite materials due

Haskel, Daniel

79

DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of the RNA-Editing Reaction of ADAR2 with Structural and Fluorescent Analogues of the GluR-B R/G Editing Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R-B R/G Editing Site Olen M. Stephens, Hye Young Yi-Brunozzi, and Peter A. Beal* Department of Chemistry

Beal, Peter A.

83

EA-1523: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Parish, Louisiana

84

Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli , Philippe are provided using advanced Diesel engine developed under AMEsim. I. INTRODUCTION The modern Diesel engine has of the functioning of a air-path in a Diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation circuit is presented. More

Boyer, Edmond

85

Walk-in Intake Form First Year Advising & Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walk-in Intake Form First Year Advising & Exploration Student Development and Enrollment Services (Rev. 12/04/2012) Name: Current Major(s): PID: Current Minor(s): First Year Advising and Exploration process Course Withdrawal Other: 4. List any classes of concern and the reason(s) of your concern below: 5

Wu, Shin-Tson

86

Intake and digestibility of four forages by Ilamas and sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intake and digestibility of four forages by Ilamas and sheep R Cordesse M Inesta, JL Gaubert ENSA of llamas to ingest and digest forages. We measured these capacities on 4 forages in comparison with sheep. The digestibility was measured by total col- lection of feces on the last 10 days of each period. Sheep had

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Potentials for developing an intake protein conserving agent for ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this work, did not overcome the inhibitory effect of DIC on deamination. Results of this study indicate that the microbial protease inhibitors E-64 and leupeptin and the deaminase inhibitor DIC may be potentially useful as an intake protein conserving agent...

Ramirez Pineres, Maria Alejandra

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 decreases ethanol intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 decreases ethanol intake in mice Wei Hu Rationale Cyclic AMP (cAMP)­protein kinase A signal- ing has been implicated in the regulation of ethanol intracellular cAMP levels in the brain. However, the role of PDE4 in ethanol consumption remains unknown

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity fluid intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between CT activity and salt intake in male... , Striegel-Moore, & Rodin, 1998; Stricker et al., 1991). NaCl intake may compensate for the fluid... (Danielson & Buggy, 1979;...

90

Does monetary poverty reflect caloric intake? Ibrahima BOCOUM CIRAD, UMR MOISA, F-34398 Montpellier, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Does monetary poverty reflect caloric intake? Ibrahima BOCOUM CIRAD, UMR MOISA, F-34398 poverty. Using a Maliansurvey thatincorporatesexceptionally detailed information on food consumption, we: poverty, food insecurity, caloric intake, household surveys, Mali 1 Introduction Estimating the number

Boyer, Edmond

91

Fecal pats help to predict nutrient intake by cattle during summer on California's annual rangelands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article t Fecal pats help to predict nutrient intake byof California rangelands will help to identify nutritional

Jinks, Angela D.; Oltjen, James W; Robinson, Peter H; Calvert, Chris C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. (IT Corporation (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Digestibility and energy retention by young rabbits fed different levels of intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Digestibility and energy retention by young rabbits fed different levels of intake Fernando in digestibility cages, were fed a standard diet at four levels of intake: ad libitum (AL), 60, 40 and 10 % of the AL intake. Digestibility of dietary dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and ash

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Influence of Fluctuating Feed Intake on Feedlot Cattle Growth-Performance and Digestive Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of Fluctuating Feed Intake on Feedlot Cattle Growth-Performance and Digestive Function R the influence of a 20% fluctuation in daily feed intake on performance and digestive function in Holstein steers-performance and digestive function were similar for both treatment groups. Implications A daily fluctuation in feed intake

Delany, Mary E.

95

Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep H Abdouli-dried. The aim of the present study was to compare fresh to air-dried leaves for their intake, digestibility to the diets for the first 15 days and intake, digestibility and rumen fermentation parameters were measured

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public Tours Hanford Site

97

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Forebay and Turbine Intakes Flows for the Bonneville Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural resource applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are becoming more frequent with the advances in computational power and the availability of commercial meshing software and verified CFD solver applications. The Bonneville Lock and Dam Project, constructed and operated by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, is the westernmost dam on the Columbia River, and is located about 40 miles upstream of Portland, Oregon. A set of 3D CFD models have been developed for the Bonneville Project forebay and turbine intakes; the CFD models provide a tool to predict the impact of proposed changes in operational rules both for the overall river flow patterns and near the turbine intakes. These models also offer rapid insight into the performance of proposed or existing hydraulic structures. The creation of a computational domain for Bonneville was complex and required the use of many software tools to integrate the diverse data sources that described the river and powerhouse geometry into a single computational domain. Once the computational mesh was created, flows were simulated by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations together with a two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model. The model was validated using velocity data measured in reduced scale physical models and in the field.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

31.jpg Gallery: 200 West Pump and Treat Title: Keywords: 200 West, pump and treat, groundwater Description: Structural steel is hoisted for placement...

99

Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Committees | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Committees Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Committees Oak Ridge's Site Specific Advisory Board uses its committee structure to achieve its mission and conduct many of its...

100

Intake retention functions and derived investigation levels for selected radioelements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an element is preferentially excreted via feces, as in clearance of class Y material from the lung. In addition, the ICRP recommends its use in special investigations, particularly following a known or suspected intake by inhalation of class W or Y... compounds (ICRP 1988). DEDICATION "With gratitude to those I love" ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First and foremost, I would like to express my appreciation and thanks to my advisor, Dr. John Poston, for his professionalism, support and guidance. I am also grateful...

Buitron Sanchez, Susana

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Structure and Density of Mo and Acid Sites in Mo-Exchanged H-ZSM5 Catalysts for Nonoxidative Methane Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas to higher hydrocar- bons and aromatics remains an important industrial challenge Methane Conversion Richard W. Borry III, Young Ho Kim, Anne Huffsmith, Jeffrey A. Reimer, and Enrique and gas phase transport, exchange at acid sites, and react to form H2O. The amount of H2O evolved during

Iglesia, Enrique

102

Use of integrated geologic and geophysical information for characterizing the structure of fracture systems at the US/BK Site, Grimsel Laboratory, Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fracture systems form the primary fluid flow paths in a number of rock types, including some of those being considered for high level nuclear waste repositories. In some cases, flow along fractures must be modeled explicitly as part of a site characterization effort. Fractures commonly are concentrated in fracture zones, and even where fractures are seemingly ubiquitous, the hydrology of a site can be dominated by a few discrete fracture zones. We have implemented a site characterization methodology that combines information gained from geophysical and geologic investigations. The general philosophy is to identify and locate the major fracture zones, and then to characterize their systematics. Characterizing the systematics means establishing the essential and recurring patterns in which fractures are organized within the zones. We make a concerted effort to use information on the systematics of the fracture systems to link the site-specific geologic, borehole and geophysical information. This report illustrates how geologic and geophysical information on geologic heterogeneities can be integrated to guide the development of hydrologic models. The report focuses on fractures, a particularly common type of geologic heterogeneity. However, many aspects of the methodology we present can be applied to other geologic heterogeneities as well. 57 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab.

Martel, S.J.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

28.jpg Gallery: 200 West Pump and Treat Title: Keywords: 200 West, pump and treat, groundwater Description: Workers guide a section of structural steel as it is lifted for...

104

Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurementsÃ?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply remote sensing methods to retrieve vertical profiles of precipitation over the DOE ARM CART sites using currently available remote sensors. While the ARM Program invested very heavily into developments of remote sensing methods and instruments for water vapor and non-precipitating cloud parameter retrievals, precipitation retrievals and studies lagged behind. Precipitation, however, is a crucial part of the water cycle, and without detailed information on rainfall and snowfall, significant improvements in the atmospheric models of different scales (i.e., one of the ARM Program's main goals) is difficult to achieve. Characterization of the vertical atmospheric column above the CART sites is also incomplete without detailed precipitation information, so developments of remote sensing methods for retrievals of parameters in precipitating cloud condition was essential. Providing modelers with retrieval results was also one of the key objectives of this research project.

Dr. Sergey Matrosov

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analysis of Substrate Access to Active Sites in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenase Hydroxylases: X-Ray Crystal Structure of Xenon-Pressurized Phenol Hydroxylase from Pseudomonas Sp Ox1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In all structurally characterized bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase proteins, a series of hydrophobic cavities in the ?-subunit trace a conserved path from the protein exterior to the carboxylate-bridged ...

McCormick, Michael S.

106

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary Moniz atfacilityrecovery Waste Site

107

Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success Stories ContactSite Map

108

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery:Act-funded KPER TV14 WhiteShimkus CongressmanSite

109

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywoodroadship Shipping Mixed,sites 212R

110

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywoodroadship Shipping Mixed,sites

111

Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's | HTML |

112

Sacandaga Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga Site Certification tp2ket

113

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visit EdBoard3

114

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visit

115

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visitARRA

116

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite

117

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSiteSubcontract for

118

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSiteSubcontract

119

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTFIrrigationBasin Waste Site

120

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTFIrrigationBasin Waste SiteReactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dopant site selectivity in BaCe0.85M0.15O3-by extended x-ray absorption fine structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 S. M. Webb and S. Brennan, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Received 17 February 2004; accepted 12, and thereby introduce oxygen vacancies into the perovskite structure. Recent studies indicate the possibility

Haile, Sossina M.

122

A-site deficient perovskites in the SrO-ZrO{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} system: Composition dependent structures from neutron powder diffraction data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of A-site deficient perovskite-type phases was synthesised and characterised in the SrO-ZrO{sub 2}-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} system. The composition range was established as Sr{sub 0.70+x}Zr{sub 0.40+2x}Nb{sub 0.60-2x}O{sub 3}, {approx}0.02{<=}x{<=}0.30, and the resulting structures refined using high resolution neutron powder diffraction data. While structures in this composition range are closely related to the cubic perovskite parent, the symmetry for all investigated compositions is lowered to tetragonal or orthorhombic. For x<0.15 the resulting space group is tetragonal I4/mcm, for x>0.15 it is orthorhombic Pnma and for x=0.15 two phases co-exist, in space groups I4/mcm and Pnma. - Graphical abstract: Structured diffuse intensity indicating additional short range order in the defect perovskite Sr{sub 0.72}Zr{sub 0.44}Nb{sub 0.56}O{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-site deficient perovskites synthesised in Sr{sub 0.70+x}Zr{sub 0.40+2x}Nb{sub 0.60-2x}O{sub 3}, {approx}0.02 {<=}x{<=}0.30. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Space groups established from X-ray, electron and neutron powder diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures refined and phase transition established from neutron diffraction data.

Schmid, Siegbert, E-mail: S.Schmid@chem.usyd.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Withers, Ray L. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow StraightenersSensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straightenersprobes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver

Fisk, William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol intake-induced myocardial Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

education, smoking, alcohol intakes, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension had... such as sex, age, educational achievement, marital status and tobacco and alcohol consumption...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual limit of intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Appendix H: Chemicals Appendix H: Chemicals H-3 Summary: Prior to the 1998 annual environmental report, the "calculated daily intakes," based on chemical... exposed to chemicals...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing calcium intake Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: intake (Kcalday)). To assess interaction between protein and calcium for fracture risk, we then included... excretion (RNAE) estimate) and fracture risk vary according...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidental intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Mexico State University Collection: Engineering 3 Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments Julian David Marshall Summary: inhalation intake of these...

128

The three-dimensional structure of MAP kinase p38[beta]: different features of the ATP-binding site in p38[beta] compared with p38[alpha  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases are activated in response to environmental stress and cytokines and play a significant role in transcriptional regulation and inflammatory responses. Of the four p38 isoforms known to date, two (p38{alpha} and p38{beta}) have been identified as targets for cytokine-suppressive anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it was reported that specific inhibition of the p38{alpha} isoform is necessary and sufficient for anti-inflammatory efficacy in vivo, while further inhibition of p38{beta} may not provide any additional benefit. In order to aid the development of p38{alpha}-selective compounds, the three-dimensional structure of p38{beta} was determined. To do so, the C162S and C119S,C162S mutants of human MAP kinase p38{beta} were cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Initial screening hits in crystallization trials in the presence of an inhibitor led upon optimization to crystals that diffracted to 2.05 {angstrom} resolution and allowed structure determination (PDB codes 3gc8 and 3gc9 for the single and double mutant, respectively). The structure of the p38{alpha} C162S mutant in complex with the same inhibitor is also reported (PDB code 3gc7). A comparison between the structures of the two kinases showed that they are highly similar overall but that there are differences in the relative orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains that causes a reduction in the size of the ATP-binding pocket in p38{beta}. This difference in size between the two pockets could be exploited in order to achieve selectivity.

Patel, Sangita B.; Cameron, Patricia M.; O'Keefe, Stephen J.; Frantz-Wattley, Betsy; Thompson, Jed; O'Neill, Edward A.; Tennis, Trevor; Liu, Luping; Becker, Joseph W.; Scapin, Giovanna; Merck

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Site Analysis Shadow Analysis Site Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On ­ Site Rainwater Collection o Composting Toilets o Green Roof o Indigenous Landscape - Wetlands Building

Kyte, Michael

131

26th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A 3D SCRAMJET INTAKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

26th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A 3D SCRAMJET INTAKE Birgit U. Reinartz CATS, RWTH Aachen University, Germany Keywords: scramjet, hypersonic, intake, CFD Abstract A combined experimental as well as computa- tional analysis of a complete scramjet

132

Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution ALEXANDER Y. BIGAZZI- clists may experience increased inhalation of traffic-related air pollutants. Bicyclists have two to five regarding urban bicyclists' intake and uptake of traffic-related air pollution and to identify key knowledge

Bertini, Robert L.

133

Using cuticular wax alkanes to estimate herbage intake in animals fed supplements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) were offered diets of lucerne chaff : oat grain in the ratios 593 : 107, 488 : 214 and 378 : 322 g DM Res, 43, 1711-1724). Intakes of lucerne chaff were then calculated from the concentrations of adjacent and the diet components. Three estimates of lucerne intake were thus possible, based on the alkane pairs C28/C

Boyer, Edmond

134

DIEL MOVEMENT AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE ANADROMOUS FISH IN TURBINE INTAKES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIEL MOVEMENT AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE ANADROMOUS FISH IN TURBINE INTAKES BY CLIFFORD, WASH. 98102 ABSTRACT The behavior of fingerling salmonids was measured in turbine intakes of The Dalles in Kaplan turbines. At The Dalles Dam, diel movement and vertical distribution were sampled at both ends

135

Intake and digestibility of different forages in Hamas compared to sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Intake and digestibility of different forages in Hamas compared to sheep Jean-Pierre Dulphy 1997) Abstract - Results of four trials, in which intake and digestibility of nine roughages had been ingest more straw and a lower quantity of high-graded forages than sheep. Overall mean digestibility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Intake and digestibility of hay supplemented with Chamaecytisus palmensis (tree lucerne) by sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intake and digestibility of hay supplemented with Chamaecytisus palmensis (tree lucerne) by sheep was to compare the effect of Tagasaste supplementation on intake and digestibility of good, medium and low with rumen, abomasal and ileal cannulae. Partial digestion of organic matter and disappearance of non ammonia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

137

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

138

Do measures of plant intake and digestibility from captive feeding trials align with foraging patterns of free-ranging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do measures of plant intake and digestibility from captive feeding trials align with foraging. Email: wirsinga@uw.edu Abstract Context. Measures of intake and digestibility from captive feeding of snowshoe hares in captive intake and digestion trials with those of free-living conspecifics in the species

139

The effect of L-lysine intake on egg component yield and composition in laying hens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by lysine intake of 2083 mg/HD compared to 686 mg/HD (Table 4). Albumen crude protein level was significantly increased by 2083 rng lysine/HD intake compared to 686 and 1409 mg lysine/HD (Table 4). No significant differences were observed among...-C Values within columns with no common superscript differ significantly ( P ( . 01 l. HD = Per live hen per day Table 4. Influences of lysine intake on egg component total solids and crude protein content, Experiment 1. Lysine Albumen Albumen Yolk Yolk...

Prochaska, Jerry Fred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Influence of contrasting Prosopis/Acacia communities on diet selection and nutrient intake of steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the diets. Principle woody species consumed were 1 t~hf fg, ff 1 t t, Sit alit fl, h ~proso is glandulosa. Browse consumption only became important as grass and forb biomass depleted to levels lower than 1000 kg/ha. Intake of browse great. er than 20'L... Characteristics Diet Characteristics Whole diet Contrasts c v t ~f0 p Diet Com osition Selection Ratio. Morphology of Dietary Frag)nents. Nutrient. Intake. Digestible Organic Matter, Crude Protein. I ecal Output Organic Maiter Intake. Digestible Energy...

Hanson, David Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SUBCONTRACTOR SITE ACCESS GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 5 5. Projects with Off-site Parking Arrangements.................................................................................6 5.1 Initial Screening and Off-site Parking Process................................................................. 9 7.2 Substitute Contractors with Off-site Parking

Eisen, Michael

142

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An Exploration of Biological Mechanisms that Impact Intake and Feed Efficiency in the Grazing Animal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological mechanisms that potentially contribute to residual feed intake (RFI) have not been fully understood in the grazing animal. The objective of this study was to determine the differences of RFI measured in confinement (RFIc) or grazing (RFIg...

Wiley, Leanne

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Population strategies to decrease sodium intake : a global cost-effectiveness analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excessive sodium consumption is both prevalent and very costly in many countries around the world. Recent research has found that more than 90% of the world's adult population live in countries with mean intakes exceeding ...

Webb, Michael William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The relationship between parental labor force participation and adolescents' dietary intake and risks to cardiovascular health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' intake of vitamin Biq regressed on mothers' work history and mothers' work importance 104 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Aspects of occupational life and family life interact in a variety of complex manners For many people in the American society, labor...

Godwin, Anne Louise

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - air intake filter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: air intake filter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fault Tolerant Oxygen Control of a Diesel Engine Air System Summary: which is the oxygen concentration in the...

147

INTERNSHIP GUIDE FOR SITE SUPERVISORS UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-MORRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNSHIP GUIDE FOR SITE SUPERVISORS UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-MORRIS CONTENTS: Benefits to Employers and Students Responsibilities of the Internship Site Responsibilities of the Student Internship Time Line Structuring an Internship Compensation Intern Selection Process Internship Learning Contract

Amin, S. Massoud

148

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site February 22, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis The stacks and support structures of the 284 West Power House at the...

149

Tissue magnesium and calcium concentration in relation to magnesium and calcium intake in rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TISSUE MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM CONCENTRATION IN RELATION TO MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM INTAKE IN RATS A Thesis by CARRIE STANTON PINKRAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirerrents... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Nutrition TISSUE MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM CONCENTRATION IN RELATION TO MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM INTAKE IN RATS A Thesis by CARRIE STANTON PINKHAM Approved as to style and content by: Karen S...

Pinkham, Carrie Stanton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Magnesium and pyridoxine intake and mineral content of selected tissues and physical development in rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNESIUM AND PYRIDOXINE INTAKE MINERAL CONTENT OF SELECTED TISSUES PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN RATS A Thesis by SU S AN ELA I NE EDGAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Nutrition MAGNESIUM AND PYRIDOXINE INTAKE MINERAL CONTENT OF SELECTED TISSUES PHYS ICAL DEVELOPMENT IN RATS A Thesis by SUSAN ELAINE EDGAR Approved as to style and content by: 'KAREN...

Edgar, Susan Elaine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

An investigation into the use of biokinetic models when assessing intakes of plutonium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF BIOKINETIC MODELS WHEN ASSESSING INTAKES OF PLUTONIUM A Thesis by BRIAN ANDREW HRYCUSHKO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Health Physics AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF BIOKINETIC MODELS WHEN ASSESSING INTAKES OF PLUTONIUM A Thesis by BRIAN ANDREW HRYCUSHKO Submitted...

Hrycushko, Brian Andrew

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hanford Site Annual Report Radiological Dose Calculation Upgrade Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, result in the release of radioactive materials to offsite residents. Site authorities are required to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed offsite resident. Due to the very low levels of exposure at the residence, computer models, rather than environmental samples, are used to estimate exposure, intake, and dose. A DOS-based model has been used in the past (GENII version 1.485). GENII v1.485 has been updated to a Windows®-based software (GENII version 2.08). Use of the updated software will facilitate future dose evaluations, but must be demonstrated to provide results comparable to those of GENII v1.485. This report describes the GENII v1.485 and GENII v2.08 dose exposure, intake, and dose estimates for the maximally exposed offsite resident reported for calendar year 2008. The GENII v2.08 results reflect updates to implemented algorithms. No two environmental models produce the same results, as was again demonstrated in this report. The aggregated dose results from 2008 Hanford Site airborne and surface water exposure scenarios provide comparable dose results. Therefore, the GENII v2.08 software is recommended for future offsite resident dose evaluations.

Snyder, Sandra F.

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the first document for the UMTRA Ground Water Project to address site-specific activities to meet compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)). In support of the activities the regulatory framework and drivers are presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. A combination of the two compliance strategies that will be recommended for this site are no remediation with the application of alternate concentration levels (ACL) and natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. ACLs are to be applied to constituents that occur at concentrations above background levels but which are essential nutrients and occur within nutritional ranges and/or have very low toxicity and high dietary intake rates compared to the levels detected in the ground water. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels within 1 00 years. These two recommended compliance strategies were evaluated by applying Riverton site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement. There are three aquifers beneath the site: a surficial unconfined aquifer, a middle semiconfined aquifer, and a deeper confined aquifer. The milling-related contamination at the site has affected both the surficial and semiconfined aquifers, although the leaky shale aquifers separating these units limits the downward migration of contamination into the semiconfined aquifer. A shale aquitard separates the semiconfined aquifer from the underlying confined aquifer which has not been contaminated by milling-related constituents.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PHP SCILAB | .. | 1 (Web Site) Web Site ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHP SCILAB | .. | 1 Chapter 1 , (Web Site) Web Site , (World Wide Web) : http://school.obec.go.th/borkruwitt/inter/internet01.gif HTML PHP,JavaScript,ASP PHP SCILAB AppServ PHP http://www.appservnetwork.com #12; PHP SCILAB | .. | 2 1. 2. Next 3. I

Kovintavewat, Piya

155

Evaluation of structural fragilities for an IPEEE seismic probabilistic risk assessment study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the main issues and results of a structural fragility analysis for a Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) study of a nuclear power plant (NPP) in the Eastern US. The fragility evaluations were performed for the Reactor Building, Auxiliary Building, Intake Structure and Diesel Generator Building. The random seismic input is defined in terms of the Uniform Hazard Spectrum (UHS) earthquake on the NPP site anchored to a reference level of 0.40 g Zero Period Ground Acceleration (ZPGA). Because of the soft soil conditions new Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses were performed using the original finite element (stick) structural models and the complex frequency approach. The soil deposit randomness was described by the variations in both the low strain soil shear modules and in its dependence with the shear strain. The probabilistic SSI analyses were performed using digital simulation techniques. The critical failure modes for each structure are investigated and the fragility evaluations are discussed. Concluding remarks and recommendations for improving the quality of the structural fragility analyses are included.

Ghiocel, D.M.; Wilson, P.R.; Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Association of Energy Intake with Body Mass in Children With and Without Probable Developmental Coordination Disorder.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Objective To determine if there is an association between energy intake (EI) and overweight or obesity status (OWOB) in children with and without probable developmental… (more)

Pryzbek, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Managing contaminated sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book summarizes the generic principles of contaminated site management. The book walks the reader through contaminated site identification, risk assessment and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. The book is divided into two major sections, problem diagnosis and development of site restoration. In problem diagnosis, the general principles of site investigation are discussed, including the objectives and differences between tier 1,2, and 3 investigations. The principles of data collection and analysis are presented. A small quantitative discussion of statistical analysis is presented but in keeping with the objectives of the text is not sufficient comprehensive or detailed to provide much of a guide for the practitioner. Chapters on contaminant fate and transport processes and risk assessment help the reader understand the role of these issues in site investigation and remedial planning. A chapter is also included on elements of a site characterization activity, which summarizes some of the key considerations in conducting a site investigation.

Asante-Duah, D.K.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nutrient intake of steers in a continuous and a rotational grazing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CITED Acooks, J. p. H. 1966. Ron-selective grazing as a means of veld reclamation. Proc. , Grassld. Soc. So. Africa. 1:33-40 Allden, W. G. and J. A. Whittaker. 1970. The determinants of herbage intake by grazing sheep& the interreiationshi, p... oondition and intensity of grazing upon daily intake and nutritive value oi the diets on desert ranges. J. Range Manage. 15:1-6. Cook, C. W. , L. E. Harris, and N. C. Young. 1967. Botantioal and nutritive content of diets of cattle and'sheep under single...

McKown, Charles David

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

1 Short and long-term energy intake patterns and their implications for 2 human body weight regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD, United States 5 6 balance 23 Food intake 24 Energy intake 25 Body weight regulation 26 Feedback control 27 Mathematical physical work. Therefore, even weight-stable humans are 48 practically always in a state of energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. E. Estell, E. L. Fredrickson, D. M. Anderson and M. D. Remmenga mixtures on alfalfa pellet and sesquiterpene mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs1 R. E. Estell,*2 E. L. Fredrickson,* D. M. Anderson. Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of terpenes on intake of alfalfa pellets

162

The effects of ruminal and duodenal casein infusion on dry matter (DM) intake of red clover silage and rumen pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of ruminal and duodenal casein infusion on dry matter (DM) intake of red clover silage) infused continuously into rumen (R), duodenum (D) or both (RD) on forage intake, milk yield, chewing, J Anim Sci, 70, 3528-3540). Ruminal casein infusion tended to increase (P

Boyer, Edmond

163

Derivation and implementation of an annual limit on intake and a derived air concentration value for uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring workers and work areas at the Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites is complex because all radionuclides in the {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U decay chains may be present in an airborne uranium mill tillings matrix. Previous monitoring practices involved isotopic analysis of the air filter to determine the activity of each radionuclide of concern and comparing the results to the specified derived air concentration. The annual limit on intake and derived air concentration values have been derived here for the uranium mill tailings matrix to simplify the procedure for evaluation of air monitoring results and assessment of the need for individual monitoring. Implementation of the derived air concentration for uranium mill tailings involves analyzing air samples for long-lived gross alpha activity and comparing the activity concentration to the derived air concentration. Health physics decisions regarding assessment of airborne concentrations is more cost-effective because isotopic analysis of air samples is not necessary. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

Reif, R.H. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Andrews, D.W. [RUST Federal Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nevada National Security Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities.  In support of national defense initiatives...

166

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

168

Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Review of Urban Bicyclists' Intake and Uptake of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Alexander Y of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Abstract Bicycling as a mode of transportation is enjoying a boost in many while bicycling, bicyclists may experience increased inhalation of traffic-related air pollutants

Bertini, Robert L.

169

Evaluation of Intake Limiting Agents in a Self-fed Dried Distillers' Supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and initial rates consisted of sodium chloride (NACL, 10%), urea (UREA, 2%), sodium bicarbonate (LIME, 1.68%), DL-malic acid (MLAC, 3%), calcium propionate (CAPR, 3%), and sodium bicarbonate plus urea (LIUR, 1.68% + 2%). Supplement intake was recorded daily...

Sugg, Joel D

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Influence of three types of treated straw on intake and growth rate in beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of three types of treated straw on intake and growth rate in beef cattle WX Zhang JK Yuan treated wheat straw (AS), an untreated wheat straw (US), and a microbe-fermented wheat straw (MS). Thirty.544 (AS), 0.479 (US) and 0.551 (MS). It is concluded that both urea and microbe treated straw can

Boyer, Edmond

171

Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Cole, Roger L. (Elmhurst, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Control of voluntary intake of precision-chopped silages by ruminants: a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level, the physical control of intake is generally not involved. On the other hand the fermentation between amino acids and energy, and high levels of acids to be metab- olized). Fermentation products induce most of the observed reactions. For well-preserved silages, high quantities of lactic and acetic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Stork, Kevin C. (Chicago, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspidiotus nerii structural Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;AERIAL SITE VIEW UCSF MEDICAL CENTER AT MISSION BAY PARKING STRUCTURE 12;SITE PLAN UCSF... MEDICAL CENTER AT MISSION BAY PARKING STRUCTURE 12;APPROACH FROM MEDICAL...

176

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Colorado, Processing Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North SiteD&D

180

Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public ToursOfficial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hanford Site Safety Standards - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public

182

Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite PublicAbout Us >Program

183

Site Manager Y-12 Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local students forStorm2 |Y-12 Site

184

VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8,Hanford Site

185

Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s)Excel workbook (version 5.2) is aAUGUST 2014Site

186

Potential Release Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy, but some are located within the Los Alamos town boundaries, on private property, Los Alamos County property, or U.S. Forest Service land. Number of sites...

187

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values...

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

190

Risk analysis study of non-routine turbine/generator shutdown events and intake gate evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corps of Engineers has undertaken a study to perform a reliability and risk analysis for evaluating non-routine turbine/generator shutdown scenarios. The study will evaluate the risks associated with events that would require a powerhouse to shut down a turbine/generator by using intake gates. The goal of this project is to estimate any potential damage that could occur for various intake gate configurations and closure times. The data obtained can also be used to evaluate any of the systems that affect reliability of the turbine/generator using established methods of risk analysis. This paper will briefly outline the study objectives and describe the progress of the study to this point.

Bardy, D.M. [Hydroelectric Design Center, Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Oxygen nonstoichiometry and defect structure analysis of B-site mixed perovskite-type oxide (La, Sr)(Cr, M)O{sub 3-{delta}} (M=Ti, Mn and Fe)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The defect chemical relationships in various B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics were investigated by means of high-temperature gravimetry. The nonstoichiometric deviation, {delta}, in (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3-{delta}} (y=0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) (LSCT){sub ,} (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM) and (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) were measured as a function of oxygen partial pressure, P{sub O{sub 2}}, at temperatures between 973 and 1373 K. The effects of partial replacement of the donor on Cr-sites were examined in LSCT. In LSCM and LSCF, effects of the partial substitution of isovalent transition metals on Cr-sites are discussed. Oxygen nonstoichiometries of various B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics were compared with those of A-site substituted perovskite-type oxides, (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})MO{sub 3-{delta}} (where x=0-0.3, M=Cr, Mn and Fe). The partial substitution of the different elements on Cr-sites drastically changed the P{sub O{sub 2}} and temperature dependence of oxygen vacancy formation in LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics. The defect equilibrium relationships of the localized electron well explained the oxygen vacancy formation in B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics. Oxygen vacancy formation in (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3-{delta}} (y=0.1 and 0.2) and (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 0.7}Ti{sub 0.3})O{sub 3-{delta}} was explained by redox reaction of Cr and Ti ions, respectively. The defect equilibrium relationships of LSCM and LSCF were interpreted by redox reaction of Mn ions and Fe ions, respectively. No significant change in valence state of Cr{sup 3+} ions in LSCM and LSCF was confirmed under the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen nonstoichiometry of (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} was plotted as the functions of partial oxygen pressure and temperature. The results were well explained by the localized electron on the Fe-sites and the equilibrium constants of the defect chemical equation were determined. A hysteresis was observed under the reducing atmospheres above 1173 K due to decomposition of Fe ions.

Oishi, Masatsugu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: oishi@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yashiro, Keiji; Sato, Kazuhisa; Mizusaki, Junichiro [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawada, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

A comparison of dietary intakes and obstetric performances among low income adolescents and women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, defined as low income by their participation in federally-funded programs (such as Medicaid or WIC). Dietary intake was measured by use of a three-day food record. A questionnaire completed by all participants supplied socioeconomic and medical... was gathered from the participants' medical records. Infant birthweight, length of pregnancy, one- and five-minute Apgar scores, method of infant delivery and the presence of labor and delivery complications were compared between the two subject groups...

Anding, Jenna DeBaun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Internal combustion engine with rotary valve assembly having variable intake valve timing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine has rotary valves associated with movable shutters operable to vary the closing of intake air/fuel port sections to obtain peak volumetric efficiency over the entire range of speed of the engine. The shutters are moved automatically by a control mechanism that is responsive to the RPM of the engine. A foot-operated lever associated with the control mechanism is also used to move the shutters between their open and closed positions.

Hansen, Craig N. (Eden Prairie, MN); Cross, Paul C. (Shorewood, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of Postpartum Reproductive Performance in Brahman Females with Divergent Residual Feed Intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- day trials have become the most common practice. Robinson et al. (1997) observed distinct differences between Bos taurus and Bos indicus cattle in feeding patterns when maintained in the same feedlot environment. Therefore, Archer and Bergh... by development of a functional corpus luteum (Short, 1984; Kinder et al., 1987). After this point, reproduction can occur and puberty is achieved (Robinson, 1977). Placement of heifers in an environment of limited dietary intake or on a low plane...

Poovey, Anna Kathryn

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

An investigation of the relationship between blood flow and maximal oxygen intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exercise physiolojists consider maximal oxygen intake as a good, if not the best, measure of cardiorespiratory fitness (38, 43). Lung ventilation, pulmonary diffusion, oxygen and carbon di oxide transport by the blood, cardiac function, vascular... kilogram of body weight is the meaningful value since it describes the maximum quantity of oxidative energy available for moving the body along the ground. For examining the performance of the cardiorespiratory system, the va'1ues should be expressed...

Riggs, Charles Elmer

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effects of Crude Protein Content on Intake and Digestion of Coastal Bermudagrass Hay by Horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Lambs fed the BMR ration had 29% greater VDMI and greater hemicellulose and cellulose digestibility than those offered the control rations. Greater intakes and digestibilities were attributed to reduced gastrointestinal fill associated with lower... and assistance during my research. Also, thanks go to the remaining member of my committee, Dr. Redmon, for his participation and support. I would like to acknowledge my wonderful friends. Special thanks go to Amanda and Amy whose visits to College Station...

Spurgin, Chelsey L.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

198

Cellulose and psyllium supplementation in 10 females: the effect on food intake and in vitro fermentation variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CELLULOSE AND PSYLLIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN 10 FEMALES: THE EFFECT ON FOOD INTAKE AND IN VITRO FERMENTATION VARIABLES A Thesis by SUSAN RENEE HAYNES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition CELLULOSE AND PSYLLIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN 10 FEMAI ES: THE EFFECT ON FOOD INTAKE AND IN VITRO FERMENTATION VARIABLES A Thesis by SUSAN RENEE HAYNES Approved...

Haynes, Susan Renee

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The effects of a suboptimal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on parturition, growth, and viability in the rat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF A SUBOPTIMAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON PARTURITION, GROWTH, AND VIABILITY IN THE RAT A Thesis by SONJA D'AWN CARSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AEM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition THE EFFECTS OF A SUBOPTIMAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON PARTURITIONe GROWTH, AND VIABILITY IN THE RAT A Thesis by SONJA D'AWN CARSON...

Carson, Sonja D'Awn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A meta-analysis of literature data relating to the relationships between cadmium intake and toxicity indicators in humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between cadmium (Cd) intake and cadmium toxicity indicators by meta-analysis of literature data, in particular {beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2MC), and to compare the results with the current Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) set by FAO/WHO. The literature survey identified 79 feeding trials involving 27,537 people that were suitable for extraction of cadmium intake, levels in blood and urine and {beta}2-microglobulin in urine. There was an exponential increase in {beta}2-microglobulin with increases in cadmium intake above 302 {mu}g/day, which corresponds to a PTWI of 3.02 {mu}g/kg of body weight, when a safety margin of 10 is included. This compares with the current level set by FAO/WHO of 7 {mu}g/kg of body weight. Cadmium in blood and urine were also positively related to cadmium intake and participants' age. There were two principal components of variation in the data set, first: cadmium intake, concentrations of cadmium in blood, urine and {beta}2-microglobulin in urine, and second: duration and age of exposure.

Omarova, A. [Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES (United Kingdom); Institute of Human and Animal Physiology, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Phillips, C.J.C. [Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: c.phillips@uq.edu.au

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Site Map - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success Stories ContactSite MapSite

203

Site map | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success StoriesSite Map Site

204

Sandia National Laboratories: Siting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking WorkTransformationSiting Siting At the residential and

205

Site Map | DOEpatents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |Site Map

206

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |SiteMaps

207

Hanford Private Tours - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Private Tours Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tour Restrictions Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tours for Governmental Officials Hanford Tours for Tribal Affairs Hanford Private Tours Media...

208

Study of soils buried under embankments to determine the potential of burial as a preservation technique for archaeological sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . Thermodynamics Approach . . . . . 1 0 10 , . . . . . 1 3 . . 1 4 Ferrolysis and Other Reactions in Periodically-Saturated Soils. . . . . . . . . . . . . , . 1 7 . . . 21 Literature Review. Navajo Site Cunningham Site. Riverside Site. . Levee Site.... . . . 68 Discussion on Site Variability. Physical and Morphological Changes. Horizon Thickness. . . . . . 70 . . . . . 7 1 . . . . 7 2 Color . . . . 7 6 Texture. . . . . . 7 7 Structure. . Mottling. Calcium Carbonate Concretions. . . . . 78...

Gonzalez, Tania

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization Site Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization Site Design No frames No Flash intro o with links are OK Image maps are not OK ­ search engine crawlers will not follow the links Implement a site. Proprietary 1 March 2007 #12;Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization There should

Goldman, Steven A.

210

Solar Site Survey Toolkit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

211

Proposed Drill Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Proposed Drill Sites  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

Lane, Michael

213

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of the Dallas Thompson Riverscreen Site on the Touchet River.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Riverscreen irrigation pumps are a relatively new design in which the pump intake floats on the river surface, pulling water in only from the bottom side and surrounded by a self-cleaning screen. The Walla Walla County Conservation District recently started replacing old pump screens with the Riverscreen and was interested in whether the screens are protective of juvenile salmonids. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated approach velocities and operations at the Riverscreen installation on the Dallas Thompson property, approximately 3 mi. north of Touchet, Washington and 300 ft north of Hofer Dam, on June 18, 2007. Evaluation of this site consisted of underwater videography and water velocity measurements. The Dallas Thompson Riverscreen was pumping approximately 930 gpm during our evaluation, which is close to the maximum pumping rate for this model. Underwater videography showed only slow movement of water-borne particulates toward the pump intake, and the screen material was clean. All water velocity measurements were taken below the pump intake opening and between 3 to 6 in. from the screen face. All approach velocities (flow toward the screen and pump) were below National Marine Fisheries Service draft guidelines for juvenile fish screens.

Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

216

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Site Selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A site selection study was conducted to identify a suitable location for the construction and operation of a new Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility to be sited is a single processing facility and support buildings that could house either of three technology alternatives being developed by the High Level Waste Systems Engineering Team: Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation, Crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange or Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. A fourth alternative, Direct Disposal in grout, is not part of the site selection study because a location has been identified that is unique to this technology (i.e., Z-Area). Facility site selection at SRS is a formal, documented process that seeks to optimize siting of new facilities with respect to facility-specific engineering requirements, sensitive environmental resources, and applicable regulatory requirements. In this manner, the prime objectives of cost minimization, environmental protection, and regulatory compliance are achieved. The results from this geotechnical characterization indicated that continued consideration be given to Site B for the proposed SDF. Suitable topography, the lack of surface hydrology and floodplain issues, no significant groundwater contamination, the presence of minor soft zones along the northeast portion of footprint, and no apparent geological structure in the Gordon Aquitard support this recommendation.

Gladden, J.B.; Rueter, K.J.; Morin, J.P.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) .................................................8 3.1.3 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA#12;Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport for Calendar Year1997 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Table of Contents Page 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

220

Competitive Dynamics of Web Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a dynamical model of web site growth in order to explore the effects of competition among web sites and to determine how they affect the nature of markets. We show that under general conditions, as the competition between sites increases, the model exhibits a sudden transition from a regime in which many sites thrive simultaneously, to a "winner take all market" in which a few sites grab almost all the users, while most other sites go nearly extinct. This prediction is in agreement with recent measurements on the nature of electronic markets.

Sebastian M. Maurer; Bernardo A. Huberman

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

Wyatt, D.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet NORTH ST. LOUIS SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS

US Army Corps of Engineers

223

Oak Ridge Site Specific  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge, TennesseeSite Specific

224

ARM - Site Instruments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infrared LandSystem W-BandGangesPointgovSitesNorth

225

ARM - Site Index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights Media Contact Hanna GossgovScienceResearchgovSite

226

RMOTC RMOTC -Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProductionSite

227

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success Stories ContactSite

228

PNNL: Site index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Ashby Photo Dr.1999alt=SearchSite Index

229

Disposal Information - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates The Office ofDispelling aHanford Site

230

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r. awC' 1kires/L

231

ColumbusSites.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CTColumbus,

232

Princeton Site Ofice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil'sof EnergyReserve |DiscussesMonth,Princeton Site Ofice

233

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS-S IDCSTE 1 h2p'SITE

234

Getting Started - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance Get AssistanceGetting InsideHanford Site

235

ORISE: Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships, Scholarships and FellowshipsInterestedSite

236

Annual Reports - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4 Early813412

237

Annual Site Environmental Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4 Early813412Annual

238

Site Transition Guidance  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy Agency |AwardJohnson, Steve5,ShiprockPaducahSite

239

Small Site Closures  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy AgencyImpact of Teaming Arrangements onModular ReactorSite

240

Salmon, Mississippi, Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga Site CertificationSalmon,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

TWP Manus Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and

242

TWP Nauru Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities

243

Tank Farms - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWPCarbonTake aTalentTammyProjects

244

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Title I Disposal Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Office of Legacy Management and the Navajo Nation have been discussing an item specified in the Long Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Mexican Hat site for some time now, and we have come to a resolution on the matter. The LTSP specifies seep sampling at the site to confirm that the disposal cell is operating as designed. Typically, this is to be done for a specific time and then reevaluated, but, in this LTSP there is no time frame given. After 8 years of experience in sampling and observing these six seeps, it has been found that most are not flowing at all, and those that have any water running are so limited in flow that it is difficult to obtain a sample. In addition, several risk assessments have been performed over the years to evaluate the possible ecological risks associated with exposure to this seep water. The analysis indicates there would be no eco-risk based on the historic data to any wildlife or livestock. This information and a full analysis of the situation was submitted to the Navajo Nation for their consideration, and, in further discussions, they have agreed to limit the sampling to only making observations during the annual cell inspection, and if water is observed to be increased compared to historic observations, then sampling will resume. Their agreement to this change is noted in the enclosed copy of their letter to DOE dated July 25, 2006. I have enclosed a copy of this report,

Mr. Bill; Von Till

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

1996 Site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Coupled Li{sup 1+}/Nb{sup 5+} and O{sup 2-}/F{sup -} ordering on the Na and Cl sites of the average NaCl structure of Li{sub 4}NbO{sub 4}F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The average, as well as the cation and anion 'disordered', crystal structure of Li{sub 4}NbO{sub 4}F has been carefully investigated via coupled neutron and X-ray powder diffraction studies as well as via electron diffraction studies. The existence of a spectacular highly structured diffuse intensity distribution in the latter provides strong evidence for coupled Li{sup 1+}/Nb{sup 5+} and O{sup 2-}/F{sup -} ordering on the Na and Cl sites of the average NaCl structure of Li{sub 4}NbO{sub 4}F. Bond valence sum calculations have been used to investigate local crystal chemistry as well as to suggest plausible local crystal chemical constraints while ab initio DFT based theoretical calculations of a 2x2x2 supercell have been carried out in order to provide additional insight into the local crystal chemistry of this compound. - Graphical abstract: An <001> zone axis EDP typical of Li{sub 4}NbO{sub 4}F.

Noren, Lasse [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Withers, Ray L., E-mail: withers@rsc.anu.edu.a [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Goossens, Darren J. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Elcombe, Margaret; Kearley, Gordon J. [Bragg Institute, Building 87, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report DOE/ORO/2445 2012 #12;Cover Image Jeff Riggs Logistical Services Design Creative Media Communications Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2012 #12;DOE/ORO/2445 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental

Pennycook, Steve

250

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report DOE/ORO-2473 2013 #12;Cover Image & Design Creative Media Communications Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2013 #12;DOE/ORO/2473 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2013 on the World

Pennycook, Steve

251

Dietary fiber and food energy intakes of women and their children at breakfast, snacks and food away from home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIETARY FIBER AND FOOD ENERGY INTAKES OF WOMEN AND THEIR CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST, SNACKS AND FOOD AWAY FROM HOME A Thesis COLLEEN ANNE TRACEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition DIETARY FIBER AND FOOD ENERGY INTAKES OF WOMEN AND THEIR CHILDREN AT BREAKFAST, SNACKS AND FOOD AWAY FROM HOME A Thesis by COLLEEN ANNE TRACEY Approved as to style...

Tracey, Colleen Anne

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The effects of a marginal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on growth, gestation, and lactation in the rat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B6 Major Subject: Nutrrtion THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Approved...

McLaughlin, Cynthia Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ambi-site substitution of Mn in lanthanum germanate apatites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron diffraction study at 4 K of the Mn doped lanthanum germanate apatite-type oxide ion conductor of nominal starting composition 'La{sub 9.5}Mn{sub 0.5}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2.75}' is reported. The structure was refined in space group P6{sub 3}/m, although high thermal displacement parameters were observed for the oxide ion sites (particularly O3, and O4). Reduced thermal displacement parameters were obtained by splitting the O3 site, and allowing the O4 oxygen to move off site, which may indicate local regions of lower symmetry within the structure. In addition, the data suggested ambi-site substitution of Mn, with it being present on both the Ge site and the La site. Assuming no change in La:Mn:Ge ratio, a composition of La{sub 9.18}Mn{sub 0.28}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 5.8}(MnO{sub 4}){sub 0.2}O{sub 2} was determined. As such there are nominally no interstitial oxide ions, but rather cation vacancies on the La site. Therefore, the high conductivity for this sample is most likely related to the introduction of Frenkel-type defects at higher temperature, as previously proposed for other apatite-type systems containing vacancies on the La site.

Kendrick, E. [Chemical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Knight, K.S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, P.R., E-mail: p.r.slater@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

260

Site Management Guide (Blue Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

None

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate.

Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie [IAEA, Vienna and NECSA (South Africa)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman 2012 BINF 731 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Increase catalytic activity Change substrate binding site to increase specificity Change the thermal stability Increase proteins resistance to proteases Change codon composition Protein Engineering

Vaisman, Iosif

264

Variation in energy expenditures between growing steers with divergent residual feed intakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.32 -0.01 0.15 -0.03 -0.25 ND ND Feed intake 0.72 0.69 0.60 0.79 0.70 0.64 0.56 ND .09 .43 Feed conversion ratio 0.53 0.66 0.57 0.85 0.61 0.70 ND ND ND ND Feed conversion ratio: ADG -0.74 -0.62 -0.46 ND c ND ND ND ND ND ND BW b 0... efficiency of ME use for protein deposition and (or) maintaining these tissues once they were deposited. Oddy and Herd (2001) summarized that energy retention in the body accounts for only 5 to 12% of the variation in RFI, but the remaining 88-95...

White, Monte Blaine III

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to resist the urge to eat requires the proper functioning of neuronal circuits involved in top-down control to oppose the conditioned responses that predict reward from eating the food and the desire to eat the food. Imaging studies show that obese subjects might have impairments in dopaminergic pathways that regulate neuronal systems associated with reward sensitivity, conditioning and control. It is known that the neuropeptides that regulate energy balance (homeostatic processes) through the hypothalamus also modulate the activity of dopamine cells and their projections into regions involved in the rewarding processes underlying food intake. It is postulated that this could also be a mechanism by which overeating and the resultant resistance to homoeostatic signals impairs the function of circuits involved in reward sensitivity, conditioning and cognitive control.

Volkow N. D.; Wang G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Baler, R.D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

An analysis of the nutrition messages in the mass media and dietary intake of high and low media users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'use of the media and dietary intake. Twenty-eight news programs about food or nutrition, 1071 food advertisements, 36 prime-time programs that mentioned food or nutrition and 37 nutrition articles from newspapers and magazines were analyzed by content analysis...

Usry, Cheryl Lynne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOOD SECURITY STATUS AND DIETARY INTAKE AND WEIGHT FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN INDIVIDUALS WITH SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weekly, and dietary recalls were taken at the beginning and end of each month (at weeks 1, 4, 5, and 8). The healthy eating index (HEI) was used to determine diet quality. All dietary recalls were entered into NDSR and HEI, and energy intake...

Taylor, Lauren Olivia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of digestive infusions of volatile fatty acids or glucose on food intake in lactating or dry cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of digestive infusions of volatile fatty acids or glucose on food intake in lactating lactating (30 kg of milk/d) and 3 non pregnant dry dairy cows. The effect of each energetic infusion) control solutions of VFA and glucose treatments were infused at the same vol, pH and osmolarity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline: findings of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive,2 , Commenges Daniel1,2 , Helmer Catherine2,3 , Jean-François Dartigues2,3 . Abbreviations: Al, Aluminum; AD, Alzheimer's Disease; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; Si, Silica Running head: Aluminum, silica in water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

The differential effects of supplementation with fodder from different tree legumes on feed intake and digestibility of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and digestibility of nutrients in sheep fed on maize stover E Masama JH Topps NT Ngongoni BV Maasdorp 1 Department protein content and poor digestibility due to high neutral detergent fibre content. Supplementation with affordable forage legumes is expected to improve both intake and digestibility. Fodder from Leucaena

Boyer, Edmond

271

Effects of undegraded intake protein supplementation on milk production, calf weight gain and reproductive performance in Brahman cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eighty multiparous and 51 primiparous Brahman females were allotted to one of three diets based on; parity, sex of calf and breed of calf sire (Angus, Brahman or Tuli). Diets contained either 38.1% Undegraded Intake Protein (UIP) (Low), 56.3% UIP...

Triplett, Brian Lee

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Montgomery, James M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

N /A

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

2007 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

Ratel,K.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM; (MANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORS)

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nevada National Security Site Industrial Sites Project Closeout - 12498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is responsible for environmental restoration (ER) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This includes remediation at Industrial Sites where past nuclear testing activities and activities that supported nuclear testing may have or are known to have resulted in the release of contaminants into the environment. Industrial Sites at the NNSS have included nuclear facilities that supported the nuclear rocket/missile development programs, gas stations, landfills, spill sites, ordnance sites, and numerous other waste disposal and release sites. The NNSS Industrial Sites activities neared completion at the end of fiscal year 2011 while other activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and part of the same NNSS ER Project are forecasted to extend to 2027 or beyond. With the majority of Industrial Sites corrective action units (CAUs) completed (more than 250 CAUs and over 1,800 corrective action sites), it was determined that an activity closeout process should be implemented to ensure that the work completed over the past 15 years is well documented in a comprehensive and concise summary. While the process used to close each individual CAU is described in approved documents, no single document describes in summary fashion the work completed to close the many individual Industrial Sites. The activity closeout process will be used to develop an Industrial Sites closeout document that describes these years of work. This document will summarize the number of Industrial Sites closed under the FFACO and provide general descriptions of projects, contaminants removed, and sites closed in place with corresponding Use Restrictions. Other pertinent information related to Industrial Sites work such as the project history, closure decisions, historical declarations, remediation strategies, and final CAU status will be included in the closeout document, along with a table listing each CAU and corresponding corrective action sites within each CAU. Using this process of conducting the activity closeout and developing a closeout document may prove useful for other ER projects within the DOE complex in describing how a long period of ER can be summarized in a single document. The NNSS Industrial Sites activities were completed over the span of 15 years and involved the investigation, cleanup or Use Restriction, and closure of more than 260 CAUs and over 1,800 sites. These activities will conclude in FY 2012 (with the exception of one CAU). In order to capture the work completed over this length of time and document decisions made during the activities, a closeout effort was initiated. The closeout will review the work conducted during the Industrial Sites activities and produce a single document that summarizes Industrial Sites activities. This closeout is being conducted at an interim stage in the overall NNSA/NSO ER Project since the Soils and UGTA activities will continue for a number of years, but the completion of the Industrial Sites project warrants conducting a closeout now while personnel are available and information is still current. The process followed by NNSA/NSO in conducing project closeout for the Industrial Sites portion of the ER program may prove useful within the DOE complex in demonstrating how a large ER project can be summarized. (authors)

Cabble, Kevin [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Krauss, Mark [S.M. Stoller for Navarro-Intera, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Matthews, Pat [Navarro-Intera, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 8919 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

History of the Hanford Site: 1943-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet was developed to highlight the national and international historical events that occurred in association with the development of the Hanford Site. The purpose of the booklet is to increase the awareness Hanford Site employees have of the historical significance of the Site's contributions and missions during the Manhattan Project (1943-1946) and Cold War era (1946-1990). By increasing knowledge and understanding of the Site's unique heritage, it is hoped this publication will help generate an appreciation of the Site's historic buildings and structures, and, thus, instill a sense of ''ownership'' in these buildings. One cannot appreciate the historic significance of a place or building without first knowing its story.

D.W. Harvey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

280

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

Not Available

1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Site environmental report - CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental compliance activities are described for the NPR-3 site from January 1997 through December 1997. Hazardous waste storage activities and storage tank testing are included.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Chernobyl’s waste site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the prospects for using the Chernobyl exclusion zone for development of a spent fuel store, waste disposal site and other nuclear facilities.

Schmieman, Eric A.; Paskevych, Sergiy; Sizov, Andrey; Batiy, Valeriy

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

284

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT x 2003 Site Environmental Report Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT x 2003 Site Environmental Report Team The SER Team realizes. The Environmental and Waste Management Services Division Field SamplingTeam (photo, center right) (From left to right) Robert Metz, Carlee Ogeka, Richard Lagattolla, and Lawrence Lettieri The Environmental

Homes, Christopher C.

285

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

CSMRI Site Proposed Plan Proposed Plan for CSMRI Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also includes summaries of other alternatives that were evaluated for use at the Site. This document participation responsibilities under the Section 300.430(f)(2) of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances on the Site that were removed in the mid-1990s. A settling pond, located between the building complex

288

Annual update for the Nevada Test Site site treatment plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the purpose and scope of the Draft Annual Update for the Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan, the framework for developing the Annual Update, and the current inventory of mixed waste covered under the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Compliance Act Consent Order and stored at the Nevada Test Site. No Site Treatment Plan milestones or Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order deadlines have been missed for fiscal year 1996. The Shipping Cask, a portion of the solvent sludge waste stream, and eight B-25 boxes from the lead-contaminated soil waste stream have been deleted from the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order, in accordance with Part XI of the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Site Cleanup Report for Sites PBF-33 and PBF-34  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summaries the actions taken to remove asbestos-reinforced-concrete (transite) pipe and miscellaneous debris from Power Purst Facility (PBF)-33 and PBF-34 sites. Removal of pipe and debris were performed in November 2006 in accordance with the requirements discussed in notice of soil disturbance NSD-PBF-07-01. Debris at these two sites were classified as industrial waste that could be disposed at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) landfill at the Idaho National Laboratory. Asbestos removal was performed as Class IV asbestos cleanup work. All transite pipe was double bagged and dispositioned in the INL Landfill Complex at CFA. The remaining miscellaneous debris was loaded into dump trucks and taken to the INL Landfill Complex at CFA for final disposition. Cleanup actions are complete for both sites, and no debris or hazardous constituents remain. Therefore, both sites will be classified as No action sites.

W. L. Jolley

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Biomembrane Structure Unit, Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and membrane proteins. However, the lack of essential high-resolution structural details at the molecular level Watts Abstract | Observing drugs and ligands at their site of action in membrane proteins is now targets in the future will be membrane proteins. This is, perhaps, not surprising, as most (~85

Watts, Anthony

291

2010 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental issues and community concerns. The Laboratory's motto, 'Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future,' and its Environmental, Safety, Security and Health Policy reflect the commitment of BNL's management to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its mission and operations.

Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Site environmental report for 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

Holland, R.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Considerations for PV Site Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and building codes determine how a solar-electric (photovoltaic; PV) system is installed. A site survey- grid system, if solar energy is not collected, then the electrical loads may not be supported withoutConsiderations for PV Site Surveys John Wiles Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy this loss

Johnson, Eric E.

294

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Site Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 126 Site Selection Date Last Modified Modified by: 09 References none #12;SOP 126: Site Selection 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure field conditions, and for ease of operation and maintenance. IMPROVE aerosol samplers are generally

Fischer, Emily V.

295

RECERTIFICATION OVERVIEW The WIPP Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's only permanent disposal site for transuranic (TRU) radio- active waste created during the research and production of nuclear weapons. The WIPP site is located outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where TRU waste Facts Recertification requires DOE to submit documentation of WIPP began waste disposal operations

296

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the Savannah River Site FB-Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Greg Rudy, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

298

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Existing data on the 216-Z liquid waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 36 years of operation at the Hanford Site, the ground has been used for disposal of liquid and solid transuranic and/or low-level wastes. Liquid waste was disposed in surface and subsurface cribs, trenches, French drains, reverse wells, ditches and ponds. Disposal structures associated with Z Plant received liquid waste from plutonium finishing and reclamation, waste treatment and laboratory operations. The nineteen 216-Z sites have received 83% of the plutonium discharged to 325 liquid waste facilities at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this document is to support the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement by drawing the existing data together for the 216-Z liquid waste disposal sites. This document provides an interim reference while a sitewide Waste Information Data System (WIDS) is developed and put on line. Eventually these and additional site data for all Hanford waste disposal sites will be available on WIDS. Compilation of existing data is the first step in evaluating the need and developing the technology for long-term management of these waste sites. The scope of this document is confined to data describing the status of the 216-Z waste sites as of December 31, 1979. Information and sketches are taken from existing documents and drawings.

Owens, K.W.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the level of an individual nucleotide. As these probes can be attached to arbitrary nucleotides within a nucleic acid sequence, they may provide a means to “scan” a...

302

Structure, Stratigraphy, and Tectonics of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Site,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACAOpen EnergyInsulated Panel AssociationCrater,

303

Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing

304

Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report PAD-REG-1021  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Order (DOE) 231.1B. The data and information contained in this report were collected in accordance with the Paducah Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (LATA...

305

Estimation of /sup 244/Cm intake by bioassay measurements following a contamination incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An employee was contaminated with radioactive material consisting primarily of /sup 244/Cm and /sup 246/Cm as a consequence of handling a curium nitrate solution at a reprocessing facility. In vivo gamma analysis and in vitro (urine and fecal) analysis were initiated soon after the incident. Further in vivo measurements were performed regularly through hour 528, and in vitro bioassay measurements were obtained through day 74. A sample of the curium solution from the workplace was obtained to confirm that the nitrate was the chemical form and to identify the curium isotopes present. The mass ratio of /sup 244/Cm:/sup 246/Cm was determined to be 91:7. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) was administered on hours 33 and 71. Observed excretion rates were consistent with available information for curium in the literature. In this paper, the results of the in vivo and in vitro measurements are presented and intake estimates for the incident are developed using various excretion rate functions. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Thein, M.; Bogard, J.S.; Eckerman, K.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wear and wear mechanism simulation of heavy-duty engine intake valve and seat inserts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A silicon-chromium alloy frequently used for heavy-duty diesel engine intake valves was tested against eight different insert materials with a valve seat wear simulator. Wear resistance of these combinations was ranked. For each test, the valve seat temperature was controlled at approximately 510 C, the number of cycles was 864,000 (or 24 h), and the test load was 17,640 N. The combination of the silicon-chromium valve against a cast iron insert produced in the least valve seat wear, whereas a cobalt-base alloy insert produced the highest valve seat wear. In the overall valve seat recession ranking, however, the combination of the silicon-chromium valve and an iron-base chromium-nickel alloy insert had the least total seat recession, whereas the silicon-chromium valve against cobalt-base alloy, cast iron, and nickel-base alloy inserts had significant seat recession. Hardness and microstructure compatibility of valve and insert materials are believed to be significant factors in reducing valve and insert wear. The test results indicate that the mechanisms of valve seat and insert wear are a complex combination of adhesion and plastic deformation. Adhesion was confirmed by material transfer, while plastic deformation was verified by shear strain (or radial flow) and abrasion. The oxide films formed during testing also played a significant role. The prevented direct metal-to-metal contact and reduced the coefficient of friction on seat surfaces, thereby reducing adhesive and deformation-controlled wear.

Wang, Y.S.; Narasimhan, S.; Larson, J.M.; Schaefer, S.K. [Eaton Corp., Marshall, MI (United States). Engine Components Operations] [Eaton Corp., Marshall, MI (United States). Engine Components Operations

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of physiological status, supplementation and monensin on forage intake, digestibility, and digesta turnover in cattle grazing range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was not initiated until the completion of trial 1. Data from this initial trial served as the covariate for an analysis of covariance for trials 1, 2 and 3. Previous grazing pressure and sheep were used to maintain similar stocking rates among the pastures...EFFECTS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL STATUS, SUPPLEMENTATION AND MONENSIN ON FORAGE INTAKE, DIGESTIBILITY, AND DIGESTA TURNOVER IN CATTLE GRAZING RANGE A Thesis by RICHARD VAUGHN MACHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

Machen, Richard Vaughn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Site Environmental Report for 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Site Environmental Report for 2001 Volume I August 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley ..............................................................................................2-1 3 Environmental Program Summary Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) prepares an integrated report on its environmental

311

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Photos on This Web Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most of the geothermal energy photos used on this web site can be obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Photographic Information eXchange (PIX). Before using a photo, please read...

313

SiteEnvironmentalReport BROOKHAVENNATIONALLABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species are known to nest on site. The Red-tailed hawk, a bird of prey, is protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Chapter 6 of this report discusses habitat management and protection efforts

314

Does Increased Exercise or Physical Activity Alter Ad-Libitum Daily Energy Intake or Macronutrient Composition in Healthy Adults? A Systematic Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background The magnitude of the negative energy balance induced by exercise may be reduced due to compensatory increases in energy intake. Objective To address the question: Does increased exercise or physical activity alter ad-libitum daily...

Donnelly, Joseph E.; Herrmann, Stephen D.; Lambourne, Kate; Szabo, Amanda N.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparison Of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And Mcnary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

Gore, Bryan F.; Blackburn, Tyrone R.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mara, Neil L.; Phan, Hahn K.; Bardy, David M.; Hollenbeck, Robert E.

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Implementation of Brownfield Initiative transforming a former steel manufacturing site into an industrial park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of Brownfield Redevelopment, or Land Recycling, alleviates the pressure to develop new sites while leaving former industrial sites dormant. This case history discusses the environmental methodology used to transform a former steel manufacturing facility into an industrial park. The investigation and remediation work was performed while the Pennsylvania`s Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Act 2) was being developed. The Beaver County Corporation for Economic development (BCCED) purchased a former LTV manufacturing facility in Aliquippa, PA. Down gradient of the sites are the intakes of drinking water wells that supply the city of Akiquippa. Phase 1, 2 and 3 Environmental Site Assessments (ESAs) identified polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), asbestos and heavy metal contamination. The groundwater assessment revealed traces of chlorinated compounds. An accelerated remedial investigation and focused feasibility study (RI/FFS) determined environmental and economic risks. Innovative and statistical techniques were used in the preparation of investigation workplans. Multiple media were samples. Complementary investigation phases were performed affording time for the regulatory agencies to interface with the engineer and owner. The use of a combined remedial actions derived from the proposed end-use proved to be most cost effective.

Salguero, J.P.; Quinlisk, J.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Catic A, et al. Preferred in vivo ubiquitination sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this question have proven difficult, because of the redundancy of ligases and the lack of strictly required known ubiquitination sites in 95 proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show clear structural preferences for ubiquitin ligation to target proteins, and compartment-specific amino acid patterns in close

Church, George M.

318

Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 Inftastructure Program Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition.

Dieterle, S.E.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Site environmental report for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1994 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. A summary of the findings is provided below.

Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.; Gordon, K.W. [ed.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2012 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2012 2012 More Documents & Publications Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013 2014 Site Sustainability Plan Site...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina,41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

None

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

Site Environmental Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California's Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment. Chapter 3, ''Compliance Summary,'' reviews the site's various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1998 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public.

Holland, R.C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Hanford Site focus, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes what the Hanford Site will look like in the next two years. We offer thumbnail sketches of Hanford Site programs and the needs we are meeting through our efforts. We describe our goals, some recent accomplishments, the work we will do in fiscal year (FY) 1994, the major activities the FY 1995 budget request covers, and the economic picture in the next few years. The Hanford Site budget shows the type of work being planned. US Department of Energy (DOE) sites like the Hanford Site use documents called Activity Data Sheets to meet this need. These are building blocks that are included in the budget. Each Activity Data Sheet is a concise (usually 4 or 5 pages) summary of a piece of work funded by the DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management budget. Each sheet describes a waste management or environmental restoration need over a 5-year period; related regulatory requirements and agreements; and the cost, milestones, and steps proposed to meet the need. The Hanford Site is complex and has a huge budget, and its Activity Data Sheets run to literally thousands of pages. This report summarizes the Activity Data Sheets in a less detailed and much more reader-friendly fashion.

Peterson, J.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Serum carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes as potential biomarkers of dietary intake and their relation with incident type 2 diabetes: the EPIC-Norfolk study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as potential nutritional biomarkers for dis- tinguishing between meat, fish, and plant-based foods, which are isotopically distinct. The technique has a long history in ar- cheology and ecology as a method of dietary analysis (14, 15), but few epidemiologic... intake (g/d) was calculated from the frequency and amount (medium serving size) of each reported food by using in- house software (30). Protein intake from different food sources (fish, meat, dairy products, egg, vegetables, and cereal) was calculated...

Patel, Pinal S.; Cooper, Andrew J.M.; O’Connell, Tamsin C.; Kuhnle, Gunter G.C.; Kneale, Catherine K.; Mulligan, Angela M.; Luben, Robert N.; Brage, Soren; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Forouhi, Nita G.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports and Corrective Actions #12;Assessor Training 2009Site Report form ·NVLAP OnSite Assessment Review form #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports · Nonconformities cited #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports & Corrective Actions 44 Evaluating

327

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

Menascé, Daniel A.

328

Environmental remediation of contamination sites at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts currently are under way to remediate the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. Because of the complexity and extent of environmental contamination that has resulted from decades of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal practices, an innovative approach to remediating the site was required. A comprehensive study of waste disposal and environmental monitoring data with field investigations, referred to as the 200 Aggregate Area Management Study (AAMS) program, was conducted in 1992 to assess the scope of the remediation effort and to develop a plan to expedite the cleanup progress.

Wittreich, C.D.; Johnson, W.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawandaUniversity21PreparedRffi Prepared

330

Instrumentation for CTA site characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the "Cherenkov Telescope Array" CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision or the comparability to allow for a comprehensive characterization of the proposed sites to be made. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize ...

Fruck, Christian; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandát, Dušan; Schweizer, Thomas; Häfner, Dennis; Bulik, Tomasz; Cieslar, Marek; Costantini, Heide; Dominik, Michal; Ebr, Jan; Garczarczyk, Markus; Lorentz, Eckart; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pech, Miroslav; Puerto-Giménez, Irene; Teshima, Masahiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Off-Site Movement of Herbicides Brad Hanson, University of California, Davis, Dept. of Plant Sciences, bhanson@ucdavis.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Off-Site Movement of Herbicides Brad Hanson, University of California, Davis, Dept. of Plant structure. There are four primary ways that herbicides can move off-site: volatilization, physical particle for any type of off-site herbicide movement is greatly affected by the chemistry of the specific herbicide

Hanson, Brad

332

Salt site performance assessment activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

U-206: WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

6: WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site Request Forgery, and Information Disclosure Attacks U-206: WordPress Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Site...

335

Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy Ryan Wiser,of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though theseEconomics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California,

Wiser, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-F-2, 183-F Clearwells, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-017  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 126-F-2 site is the clearwell facility formerly used as part of the reactor cooling water treatment at the 183-F facility. During demolition operations in the 1970s, potentially contaminated debris was disposed in the eastern clearwell structure. The site has been remediated by removing all debris in the clearwell structure to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of radiological surveys and visual inspection of the remediated clearwell structure show neither residual contamination nor the potential for contaminant migration beyond the clearwell boundaries. The results of verification sampling at the remediation waste staging area demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1%AU62 &REFHRYO-@-Y? ALTERNATE

338

2011 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2011 (SRNS-STI-2012-00200) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1 B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are and interested individuals. The report’s purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts.

Meyer, A.; Eddy, T.; Jannik, T.; Terry, B.; Cauthen, K.; Coward, L.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.; Wilson, M.; Hutchison, J.; O'Quinn, S.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NNSA Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiatives InitiativesShippingHowTheMissionofNAICSNNSA Sites NNSA Sites

340

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL SiteMidAtl PANE MA Site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014 In replySite Portsmouth Site

342

Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » Sites » Sites Pending Transfer

343

Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » Sites » Sites Pending

344

Site Map | ScienceCinema  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |Site

345

Site survey method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

APPROPRIATE ZOOPLANKTON SAMPLING METHODOLOGY FOR OTEC SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites. Participants J.Zooplankton Sampling for OTEC Sites t~thodology Edited bywho gave an overview of the OTEC program, and the policies

Commins, M.L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hanford Site Fire June 2000 AM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Fire on the morning of June 29, 2000. Fire crews working to contain a fire on the Hanford Site in June 2000.

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

349

Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site - September...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site - September 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site - September 2004 September 2004 Security and Emergency Management Pilot Integrated Performance Tests at the...

350

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from unreasonable degradation caused by irresponsible siting of electric transmission, pipeline, and geothermal facilities. The...

351

National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B&W Pantex FROM: Johnnie F. Guelker, Assistant Manager for Environmental & Site Engineering Programs SUBJECT: Notice of Approval of an On-Site Sewage Facility Please reference...

352

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

353

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized Siting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: Washington Energy...

356

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Library Site Finder MAIN LIBRARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Site Finder MAIN LIBRARY Burlington Street Tel: 0161 275 3751 THE ALAN GILBERT LEARNING COMMONS Oxford Road Tel: 0161 306 4306 ART & ARCHAEOLOGY LIBRARY Mansfield Cooper Building Tel: 0161 275 3657 BRADDICK LIBRARY School of Physics & Astronomy Brunswick Street Tel: 0161 275 4078 EDDIE DAVIES

Sidorov, Nikita

358

CTBT on-site inspections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site inspection (OSI) is a critical part of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The OSI verification regime provides for international inspectors to make a suite of measurements and observations on site at the location of an event of interest. The other critical component of the verification regime is the International Monitoring System (IMS), which is a globally distributed network of monitoring stations. The IMS along with technical monitoring data from CTBT member countries, as appropriate, will be used to trigger an OSI. After the decision is made to carry out an OSI, it is important for the inspectors to deploy to the field site rapidly to be able to detect short-lived phenomena such as the aftershocks that may be observable after an underground nuclear explosion. The inspectors will be on site from weeks to months and will be working with many tens of tons of equipment. Parts of the OSI regime will be tested in a field exercise in the country of Jordan late in 2014. The build-up of the OSI regime has been proceeding steadily since the CTBT was signed in 1996 and is on track to becoming a deterrent to someone considering conducting a nuclear explosion in violation of the Treaty.

Zucca, J. J. [Principal Deputy, Global Security Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

evaluation o TAD sites p  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% D tot par T com ma T T crim com dis des 20 evaluation o ocument im TAD sites p ng, and mon ulation. Fou St. Croix trib dels: Milwau Any New Cri After TAD Di 18% Within 1 The University of Kit R. Van Stelle, http:// TAD particip minal convic mmitted a n scharge, bett scribed

Sheridan, Jennifer

360

Guidance on site selection for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harvestingbrash materialfollowingtimber harvestingto supply biomass for heat and power generation. A numberGuidance on site selection for brash removal Forest Research, May 2009 The Research Agency SELECTION FOR BRASH REMOVAL | Forest Research | May 09 #12;Brash Removal Background Interest is growingin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Characterizing Commercial Sites Selected for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selected for energy efficiency monitoring Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean such as solar thermal absorption chillers, building energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The twoCharacterizing Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring This report presents data

362

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med); (Des Moines U)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effect of body condition and dietary lipid intake on lipid metabolism, gonadotropin secretion and luteal activity in postpartum beef cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF BODY CONDITION AND DIETARY LIPID INTAKE ON LIPID METABOLISM, GONADOTROPIN SECRETION AND LUTEAL ACTIVITY IN POSTPARTUM BEEF COWS A Thesis by ALLAN RAE MORGAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... IN POSTPARTUM BEEF COWS A Thesis by ALLAN RAE MORGAN Approved as to style and content by: ary L. Williams (Co-chair of Committee) David W. Forrest (Co-chair of Committee) James G. Anderson (Member) Gary C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1989...

Morgan, Allan Rae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Determining biological sources of variation in residual feed intake in Brahman heifers during confinement feeding and on pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there was little decrease in the variation of RFI. Accuracy of measurements decreased when BW estimates were taken greater than two weeks apart. As would be expected, increasing the number of measurements taken decreases variability. Wang et al. (2006) supported... 56 d 79 d 70 d 70 d Simmental Bull 63 d 35 d 42 d 63 d Bos taurus Steers Wang et al. (2006) a FCR = Feed intake required to produce one unit of weight gain. b RFI = Difference in expected DMI for maintenance and growth at a given level...

Dittmar (III), Robert Otto

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Determining biological sources of variation in residual feed intake in Brahman heifers during confinement feeding and on pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there was little decrease in the variation of RFI. Accuracy of measurements decreased when BW estimates were taken greater than two weeks apart. As would be expected, increasing the number of measurements taken decreases variability. Wang et al. (2006) supported... 56 d 79 d 70 d 70 d Simmental Bull 63 d 35 d 42 d 63 d Bos taurus Steers Wang et al. (2006) a FCR = Feed intake required to produce one unit of weight gain. b RFI = Difference in expected DMI for maintenance and growth at a given level...

Dittmar (III), Robert Otto

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site- April 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and Occupational Medicine Program Allegations at the Hanford Site

368

Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites Mike Duniway USGS-Southwest Biological Science of vegetation? Why do sites differ in response to disturbance & management? #12;Ecological Sites & Soil Properties · Within a climatic zone (e.g. MLRA), differentiation of ecological sites based on soil

369

Small Wind Site Assessor Guidelines Document (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on what the small wind site assessor guidelines document will cover and timeline for completion.

Preus, R.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSE MANUAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS LAB FIELD SITE MEDINA LIST OF CONTACTS ­ SITE MANAGERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PAGE 20 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION PAGE 21 2 #12 is too trivial. The Bureau's test-site manager is responsible for orienting you previous to your arrival

Texas at Austin, University of

371

Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages Mike Perkowitz Oren Etzioni Department interfaces Abstract The creation of a complex web site is a thorny problem in user interface design. In IJCAI '97, we challenged the AI community to address this problem by creating adaptive web sites: sites

Etzioni, Oren

372

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT CATERING WEB SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT CATERING WEB SITE Food Venue Manual #12;Sodexo - Food Venue of 1 STATEMENT Services at the University of Vermont. #12;Sodexo - Food Venue of 1 WEB SITE ADDRESS;Sodexo - Food Venue 4 of 1 WEB SITE ADDRESS Connect to University Dining Services Catering Web site

Bermingham, Laura Hill

373

Site Environmental Report GROUNDWATER STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING CENTER FOR FUNCTIONAL NANOMATERIALS Green Buildings BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY #12;2008 SITE

374

Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

Noridin, J. S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L. W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

1997 BNL Site Environmental Report B -1 METHODOLOGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intake, µCi DCF = Dose Conversion Factor, rem/µCi (6.3E-5 rem/µCi) P = Exposed population To determine as shown in the previous section. The same DOE Order 5400.5 dose conversion factors are used. The only Equivalent factors (in rem per µCi intake) based on the ICRP 26 model were applied. They are as follows: #12

376

Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

Spencer, Charles G

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Wind resource assessment and siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of employing wind power as a possible energy source to the New Hampshire power grid. Wind data was obtained from the New Hampshire State Forestry Service, the State Climatologist as well as other miscellaneous sources. Data on power generation and the power grid system was received from the Public Service Company of New Hampshire. Using this information as a data base, siting studies were made which indicated that there was a potential for a wind energy system in New Hampshire. Costs of fossil fuel generated power were compared to estimated wind generated production costs of electric energy fed into the Public Service Company of New Hampshire lines for various potential WECS sites. Based on the data and analysis provided in this study, it appears that WECS can be usefully developed in New Hampshire which would result in significant savings in fuel oil consumption.

Bortz, S.A. (IIT Research Inst., Chicago, IL); Fieldhouse, I.; Budenholzer, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChief Medical Officerof EnergyCleanup Sites Cleanup

379

Completed Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChief MedicalDepartment ofCompleted Sites Completed

380

PHYTOPLANKTON AND BIOMASS DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES P. W. Johnson and A.DISTRIBUTION AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES LBL9054 P. W. Johnsonparameters at potential OTEC sites. Site Dactyliosolen

Johnson, P.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013 2013 Site Sustainability Plan More Documents & Publications Site...

382

Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 2010 More Documents & Publications Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2012 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2013...

383

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed below. SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) did not conduct a facility inspection of SLAC during 2006, though it did visit the site on four different occasions. The BAAQMD did compliment SLAC for the overall configuration of SLAC's gasoline dispensing facility and of SLAC's asbestos/demolition notification program during two of the visits. DOE awarded SLAC the 2006 Best in Class for Pollution Prevention and Environmental Stewardship Accomplishment in recognition of SLAC's CMS program which manages the procurement and use of chemicals. As an example of the efficiency of the CMS, SLAC reviewed its use of gases and associated tanks and phased out numerous gas tanks that were no longer needed or were not acceptable for long-term storage, in turn, reducing SLAC's on-site chemical inventory. As part of SLAC's waste minimization and management efforts, more than one thousand tons of municipal solid waste was recycled by SLAC during 2006. SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions. During 2006, SLAC obtained a new facility-wide wastewater discharge permit which replaced four separate permits that were previously issued to SLAC. In 2006, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls and low concentrations of lead in soil. SLAC is regulated under a site cleanup requirements order (board or

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

386

Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSampling at the Grand Junction,GroundwaterSlick

387

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite PublicAbout Us >

388

Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Variational theory for site resolved protein folding free energy surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a microscopic variational theory for the free energy surface of a fast folding protein that allows folding kinetics to be resolved to the residue level using Debye-Waller factors as local order parameters. We apply the method to lambda-repressor and compare with site directed mutagenesis experiments. The formation of native structure and the free energy profile along the folding route are shown to be well described by the capillarity approximation but with some fine structure due to local folding topology.

John J. Portman; Shoji Takada; Peter G. Wolynes

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOIL-SITE RELATIONSHIPS TO PHOTODELINEATED FOREST TYPES A Thesis by DALE ROBERT KING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major... to Photodelineated Forest Types (December 1975) Dale Robert King, B. A. , Catawba College; Directed by: Dr. David M. Moehring The objective of this study was to determine the structural characteristics of selected forest types and investigate the feasibility...

King, Dale Robert

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase?mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ? Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ? RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation. ? Translocation of p47phox and MAPKs phosphorylation are downstream effectors. ? Acute ethanol consumption increases the risk for acute vascular injury.

Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E. [Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mecawi, André S. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)] [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C. [Department of General and Specialized Nursing, College of Nursing of Ribeirão Preto, USP, São Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of General and Specialized Nursing, College of Nursing of Ribeirão Preto, USP, São Paulo (Brazil); Antunes-Rodrigues, José [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)] [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Regina H. [Department of Clinical, Toxicological and Food Science Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, USP, São Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Clinical, Toxicological and Food Science Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, USP, São Paulo (Brazil); Touyz, Rhian M. [Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Tirapelli, Carlos R., E-mail: crtirapelli@eerp.usp.br [Department of Psychiatric Nursing and Human Sciences, Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Nursing of Ribeirão Preto, USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of three-dimensional site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov equation and application to electrolyte solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov (SSSV) equation enables us to directly calculate van Hove time correlation function, which describes diffusion process in molecular liquids. Recently, the theory had been extended to treat solute-solvent system by Iida and Sato [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034506 (2012)]. Because the original framework of SSSV equation is based on conventional pair correlation function, time evolution of system is expressed in terms of one-dimensional solvation structure. Here, we propose a new SSSV equation to calculate time evolution of solvation structure in three-dimensional space. The proposed theory was applied to analyze diffusion processes in 1M NaCl aqueous solution and in lithium ion battery electrolyte solution. The results demonstrate that these processes are properly described with the theory, and the computed van Hove functions are in good agreement with those in previous works.

Kasahara, Kento [Department of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Sato, Hirofumi, E-mail: hirofumi@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein Structure Analysis Iosif Vaisman 2009 BINF 731 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering Increase catalytic activity Change substrate binding site to increase specificity Change the thermal152S -1.08 1goj S152T 1.12 Protein Engineering Protein Engineering #12;Protein Engineering Protein

Vaisman, Iosif

403

Original article Effects of moderate fat intake with different n-3 fatty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ratios on serum and structural lipids in rats L Frémont MT Gozzelino T Hojjat INRA, laboratoire de fatty acids (PUFA) on serum and membrane lipids in rats fed diets containing moderate levels of fats (6, which has a stimulating effect on triacylglycerol synthesis and secretion, was less incorporated

Boyer, Edmond

404

Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007(ASER)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2007 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2007/2008 (October 2007 through May 2008), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423 and DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', SLAC effectively implemented and integrated the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2007, SLAC focused on development and implementation of SLAC management systems to ensure continual improvement. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13148. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC) and thirteen objectives and targets were established for 2007. For each objective and target, a work plan, or Environmental Management Program (EMP) was completed and progress reports were routinely provided to SLAC senior management. During 2007, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2007. SLAC replaced two process tanks at the Plating Shop which previously contained chromium solutions with non-chromium containing solutions, reducing the overall use of hazardous chemicals. In addition, 346 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated capacitors were replaced with non-PCB capacitors, reducing the potential of a release of oil with PCBs during an event such as a fire or an earthquake. SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions. During 2007, SLAC obtained a new facility-wide wastewater discharge permit which replaced four separate permits that were previously issued to SLAC. In 2007, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. Specifically, the Radiation Protection Radiological Waste Management (RPRWM) Group developed a training course to certify Radioactive Waste Generators, conducted a training pilot, and developed a list of potential radioactive waste generators to train. In 2007, the SLAC Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls and low concentrations of lead in soil. SLAC is regulated under a site cleanup requirements order (board order) issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RW

Sabba, D

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Rulison Site Surface Closure Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report provides documentation for closure of the Rulison Site surface and summarizes the data from groundwater monitoring conducted quarterly in 1996 and 1997. The quarterly groundwater monitoring was conducted to demonstrate that no contaminants are migrating from the pond after completion of the pond remediation activities. The Rulison Site is located in the North 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 95 West of the 6` Principal Meridian, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 19 kilometers (km) (12 miles [mi]) southwest of Rifle, Colorado, and approximately 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado (Figure I - 1). The site is situated on the north slope of Battlement Mesa on the upper reaches of Battlement Creek at an elevation of approximately 2,500 meters (m) (8,200 feet [ft]). The valley is open to the north-northwest and is bounded on the other three sides by steep mountain slopes that rise to elevations above 2,927 m (9,600 ft). Project Rulison was a joint U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment. It was conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low- permeability, gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2, 568 m (8,426 ft) below ground surface on September 10, 1969, followed by natural gas production testing in 1970 and 1971 (AEC, 1973).

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy-conserving site design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information useful to landscape architects, architects, planners, engineers, students, and homeowners is presented. The concepts and examples needed to create more energy-efficient landscapes are described. The book is organized into five sections, including: an overview and history of energy-efficient design research; detailed information and new strategies on site analysis and planning; energy-efficient landscape design of clustered and single residences; alternative energy-conserving scenarios for the future; and appendices. The appendices contain such technical information as: lists of energy-conserving design options, formulas to calculate solar radiation and soil temperatures, tools for climatic analysis, and techniques for precision planting for solar control and access.

McPherson, E.G. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hanford Tour Restrictions - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite PublicAboutAETour

409

Hanford Workers Compensation - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite

410

Closure Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean, EEREClosure Sites

411

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL Site Consumption million

412

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL Site Consumption

413

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL Site Consumption120 US

414

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL Site Consumption120 USESC

415

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL SiteMidAtl PANE

416

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL SiteMidAtl PANEWSC TX

417

Adrian, Michigan, Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r. aw wL2--\ AP

418

Fairfield, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATION REPORTFairfield, Ohio, Site.

419

Forensic Sites | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: Since theNationalSites Meetings, Conferences,

420

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's | HTML

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Site Map | DOE Data Explorer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |

422

NREL: Wind Research - Site Tours  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andField VerificationPossibleResearch StaffSite

423

Seymour, Connecticut, Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga SiteSepSeymour,

424

Amchitka, Alaska, Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_ ,'I-Amchitka, Alaska, Site.

425

Tank Integrity Reports - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWPCarbonTake

426

Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein Paul A. Sigala, Mark A for review February 5, 2009) Hydrogen bonds play major roles in biological structure and function. Nonetheless, hydrogen-bonded protons are not typically observed by X-ray crystallography, and most structural

Herschlag, Dan

427

Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Robert.Poole@nnsa.doe.gov Nevada Site Office Darby Dieterich Dieterich@nv.doe.gov Oak Ridge Site Office Lisa Carter Carterlb@oro.doe.gov Pacific Northwest Site Office Lance...

428

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

Grant Evenson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

One site`s junk is another site`s jewel (converting an RTR system to a DR system)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1994 the Savannah River Site became the {open_quotes}proud owners{close_quotes} of two real-time radiography (RTR) systems that had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for several years. one of the RTR systems was designed to evaluate the contents of transuranic (TRU) waste drums and the second was to examine boxed waste. The two RTR systems had been productively utilized at the Nevada Test Site from 1987 to 1990. For a variety of reasons the RTR systems were never operated at INEL. Westinghouse Savannah River Company engineers and Raytheon specialists have converted the drum inspection system from real-time radiography to lens-coupled digital radiography (DR). Rather innovative modifications were required in order to acquire digital radiograms on drum seal welds of a drum filled with moderator water; however, ultimately film quality radiographs are being produced to determine the condition of in-service drum seal welds. Additional applications of the Automated Digital Radiography Inspection System (ADRIS) include the evaluation of welds on recently purchased stainless steel drums in which tritiated moderator will be stored, and the evaluation of TRU waste drum contents. Considerable cost savings are expected to be realized by the Department of Energy through the application of ADRIS.

Poland, R.W.; Howard, B.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Meers, B.Z. III [Raytheon Engineers and Constructor, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2002 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2002, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2002. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2002, in decreasing air emission rates, the storm drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better.

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level...

434

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Clean Cities Web Sites and Web Tools  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Cities Web Sites and Web Tools Johanna Levene July 28, 2010 Innovation for Our Energy Future Fuel Economy fueleconomy.gov What vehicle? Clean Cities Web Site * Information...

436

Current DOE and OSHA VPP Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Need to know which sites are current DOE-VPP or OSHA VPP Sites? The link, below, will take you to a Voluntary Protection Programs Participant's Association web page where you may search for current...

437

NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY SITES ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airport Site and St. Louis Airport Site Vicinity Properties CY 2010 Remedial Actions.3.1 Latty Avenue Properties CY 2010 Remedial Actions...................................1-3 1.3.2 St. Louis

US Army Corps of Engineers

438

NORTH ST. LOUIS COUNTY SITES ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airport Site and St. Louis Airport Site Vicinity Properties CY 2012 Remedial Actions.3.1 Latty Avenue Properties CY 2012 Remedial Actions...................................1-3 1.3.2 St. Louis

US Army Corps of Engineers

439

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 26 4, the following should be considered when designa ng bicycle routes on roadways: Vehicular speed limits; SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 27 4.2 BIKE LANES Bike lanes

Duchowski, Andrew T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Site selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site.

Bowers, J.A.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

Visible structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All architecture is the interplay between structure, surface and ornament. Traditionally, ornament adorned structure thereby giving it its meaning. A society with its intellectual foundations resting in faith or the abstract ...

Conway, Helene Marie

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Preproposal Conference & Site Tour | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preproposal Conference & Site Tour | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

445

Articles about Environmental Impacts and Siting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stories about environmental impacts and siting featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

446

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California Chapter 3 Site Environmental Report for 2008 Berkeley Lab continued operating

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. – A federal council recently recognized two EM sites for efforts to protect migratory birds.

448

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site- September 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project

449

A Web Site Navigation Engine Mark Levene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Web Site Navigation Engine Mark Levene Department of Computer Science Birkbeck College site-specific search engines is that they are not able to pick up the "scent of information" [5 is looking for. Moreover, Hearst [2] argues that next gener- ation site-specific search engines should

Levene, Mark

450

Engineering Reliability into Web Sites: Google SRE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Reliability into Web Sites: Google SRE Alex Perry alex.perry@google.com Santa Monica SRE, Google #12;Abstract This talk introduces Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) at Google, explaining team responsibilities by site Failures and instability consuming manpower Engineering being applied

Tomkins, Andrew

451

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN THE SITING PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN THE SITING PROCESS: PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE with understanding and participating in the Energy Commission's siting process. Therefore, the guide is informational in nature and does not discuss all situations, variations and exceptions in the siting processes

453

Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

1994-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effects on food intake following stimulation of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptors within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of dietary-obese and dietary-resistant rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-obesity) following intra-PVN injections of the adrenergic compounds norepinephrine (25 nmol), cirazoline (10, 20, and 30 nmol), and phenylpropanolamine (160 nmol) . Experiment 2 investigates food intake of DIO-prone and DR-prone rats (pre-obesity) following intra...

McMahon, Lance Richard

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Riccardo Ceccarelli, Carlos Canudas-de-Wit, Philippe Moulin and Antonio Sciarretta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli of diesel en- gine diagnosis by means of model-based adaptive observers. The problem is motivated Diesel engine testbed. I. INTRODUCTION Modern diesel engine has the potential of a significant reduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Riccardo Ceccarelli , Carlos Canudas-de-Wit, Philippe Moulin and Antonio Sciarretta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli of diesel en- gine diagnosis by means of model-based adaptive observers. The problem is motivated diesel engine professional simulator AMEsim. I. INTRODUCTION Modern diesel engine has the potential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

Selection of windmill and site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are various types of windmills: horizontal, vertical, shaft, hybrid and others. Their merits and demerits were investigated to provide information for the selection of windmills and their design. Multi-wing types are suited to drive pumps, and propeller types are suited for wind-power generation. Since the wind varies in time with respect to its speed and direction, a windmill of any type should be controlled in rotation speed and/or direction. To realize this, auxiliary blades or other wind speed or direction detectors are combined with controllers of the windmills. Propeller-type and Darrieus-type wind-power generator systems were designed (including adequate power generators, power-transmission mechanisms, towers and foundations). Various factors involved in the selection of the site are given in addition to geographical investigations. 5 references.

Takeuchi, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation (NOVs) from regulators. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made no facility inspections of SLAC during 2004. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions: 2004 was the eighth consecutive year the program operated without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. During 2004 the last 32 unauthorized discharge connections to the stormwater system were eliminated. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting the regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more active strategy in reducing its use of such materials. The cornerstone of this effort is the implementation of a chemical management system (CMS). (5) Environmental Radiological Program--In 2004, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. As detailed in Chapter 5, SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. (6) Groundwater Protection and Environmental Restoration--In general, environmental concerns at SLAC are limited in number, small in scale and are actively being managed or eliminated. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead in soil.

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology Contact Institute

462

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology Contact

463

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology ContactTest

464

Structural Health Monitoring Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology ContactTestHealth

465

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural

466

WIPP 2004 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to safely and permanently dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States (U.S.). In 2004, 8,839 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were emplaced at WIPP. From the first receipt of waste in March 1999 through the end of 2004, 25,809 m3 of TRU waste had been emplaced at WIPP. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of WIPP environmental resources. DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes environmental data from 2004 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with applicable federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2004 (DOE, 2005). The order and the guidance require that DOE facilities submit an annual SER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) further requires that the SER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

TWRS privatization phase 1 master site plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-RL is pursuing a new business strategy of hiring private contractors for treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. This strategy is called `privatization` and includes design, permitting, construction, operation and deactivation of facilities for tank waste treatment. The TWRS Privatization Infrastructure Project consists of several sub-projects which will provide key services needed to support the privatization mission. This master site plan presently describes all pertinent aspects of the site and identifies all planned provisions for site development, utilities and other site services. It is a baseline document which will be revised as privatization proceeds through design, construction and start-up.

Parazin, R.J.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets were established for 2008. For each objective and target, a work plan, or Environmental Management Program (EMP) was completed and progress reports were routinely provided to SLAC senior management and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO). During 2008, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during the year. The following are amongst SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2008: a composting program at SLAC's onsite cafeteria was initiated, greater than 800 cubic feet of legacy radioactive waste were packaged and shipped from SLAC, a chemical redistribution program was developed, SLAC reduced the number of General Services Administration leased vehicles from 221 to 164, recycling of municipal waste was increased by approximately 140 tons during 2008, and site-wide releases of sulfur hexafluoride were reduced by 50 percent. In 2008, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. Specifically, the Radiation Protection Radiological Waste Management Group developed a training course to certify Radioactive Waste Generators, conducted a training pilot, and developed a list of potential radioactive waste generators to train. Twenty eight generators were trained in 2008. As a best management practice, SLAC also reduced its tritium inventory by at least 95 percent by draining one of its accelerator cooling water systems; with the cooperation of the South Bayside System Authority, the West Bay Sanitary District and the DOE, SLAC discharged the cooling water to the sanitary sewer according to federal regulations and replenished the system with clean water. In 2008, the SLAC Envi

Sabba, D.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

469

National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES&H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES&H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B.

Dun, C

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Technical guidance for siting criteria development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

U-073: Bugzilla Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Several vulnerabilities were reported in Bugzilla. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

473

Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Double tracks test site characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Determination of ecologically vital groundwaters at selected sites in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is classifying groundwaters at sites in its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Of particular concern is the potential presence of groundwaters that are highly vulnerable to contamination and that are either (1) irreplaceable sources of drinking water or (2) ecologically vital. Conditions at nine FUSRAP sites were evaluated to determine if ecologically vital groundwaters are present. The sites evaluated were Wayne Interim Storage Site, Maywood Interim Storage Site, and Middlesex Sampling Plant in New Jersey; Ashland 2 Site, Seaway Industrial Park, Colonie Interim storage Site, and Niagara Falls Storage Site in New York; and the St. Louis Airport Site and Hazelwood Interim Storage Site in Missouri. The analyses indicated that groundwaters are vulnerable to contamination at all but two of the sites -- the Ashland 2 and Seaway Industrial Park sites in New York. Groundwater discharge points were identified within a 2-mile radius (i.e., the classification review area) of all of the sites. No ecologically vital groundwater areas exist in the vicinities of any of the nine FUSRAP sites evaluated. 35 refs., 17 figs.

Vinikour, W.S.; Yin, S.C.L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Three site Higgsless model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the spectrum and properties of a highly deconstructed Higgsless model with only three sites. Such a model contains sufficient complexity to incorporate interesting physics issues related to fermion masses and electroweak observables, yet remains simple enough that it could be encoded in a Matrix Element Generator program for use with Monte Carlo simulations. The gauge sector of this model is equivalent to that of the Breaking Electroweak Symmetry Strongly (BESS) model; the new physics of interest here lies in the fermion sector. We analyze the form of the fermion Yukawa couplings required to produce the ideal fermion delocalization that causes tree-level precision electroweak corrections to vanish. We discuss the size of one-loop corrections to b{yields}s{gamma}, the weak-isospin violating parameter {alpha}T and the decay Z{yields}bb. We find that the new fermiophobic vector states (the analogs of the gauge-boson Kaluza-Klein modes in a continuum model) can be reasonably light, with a mass as low as 380 GeV, while the extra (approximately vectorial) quark and lepton states (the analogs of the fermion Kaluza-Klein modes) must be heavier than 1.8 TeV.

Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Chiara, Stefano Di; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Center for High Energy Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, Tohoku University Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

D. J. Hansen

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Perturbing the folding energy landscape of the bacterial immunity protein Im7 by site-specific N-linked glycosylation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N-linked glycosylation modulates protein folding and stability through a variety of mechanisms. As such there is considerable interest in the development of general rules to predict the structural consequences of site-specific ...

Chen, Mark

479

Post-remedial action report for the Water Boiler Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project decontaminated and decommissioned the Water Boiler Reactor, TA-2-1-122, at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to provide reusable space at the TA-2 site and to eliminate the hazard of accidental intrusion into a contaminated structure. This report documents the radiological condition of the site after the decommissioning and decontamination between June 1989 and April 1990. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Montoya, G.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Chromosomal fragile sites in deer mice: distribution, variation, and potential role in chromosomal evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for characterizing fragile sites in a naturally occurring organism for two reasons. First, P. manicnlatus ranges throughout North America, occupies a wide variety of habitats, and is composed of numerous subspecies (HALL 1981). This geographic distribution.... Characterizing fragile sites in these two different population structures will provide data regarding the populational forces acting on these genetic loci. The second reason to study P. manicularus pertains to the vast amount of chromosomal evolution which...

McAllister, Bryant Fulton

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intake structure site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Site-site memory equation approach in study of density/pressure dependence of translational diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time of polar molecular solutions: acetonitrile in water, methanol in water, and methanol in acetonitrile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of theoretical study and numerical calculation of the dynamics of molecular liquids based on combination of the memory equation formalism and the reference interaction site model - RISM. Memory equations for the site-site intermediate scattering functions are studied in the mode-coupling approximation for the first order memory kernels, while equilibrium properties such as site-site static structure factors are deduced from RISM. The results include the temperature-density(pressure) dependence of translational diffusion coefficients D and orientational relaxation times t for acetonitrile in water, methanol in water and methanol in acetonitrile, all in the limit of infinite dilution. Calculations are performed over the range of temperatures and densities employing the SPC/E model for water and optimized site-site potentials for acetonitrile and methanol. The theory is able to reproduce qualitatively all main features of temperature and density dependences of D and t observed in real and comp...

Kobryn, A E; Hirata, F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

General Counsel`s Office FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan: WBS 6.10.5. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the General Counsel`s Office site support program plan for the US DOE Hanford site. The topics addressed in the program plan include a mission statement, description of activities, program objectives, planning assumptions, program constraints, work breakdown structure, milestone list, milestone description sheets, and activity detail.

Moreno, S.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department...

484

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S....

485

Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASER) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASER) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASER) Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) are required by DOE O 231.1B. The ASERs provide...

486

Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

218: Develop a Fact Sheet on Site Transition at On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy...

487

DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National...

488

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site...

489

EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site...

490

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site - June 2011...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site - June 2011 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site - June 2011 June 2011 Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention...

491

Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Worker Eligibility Tool Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool May 16, 2013 Presenter: Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center Topics Covered: The Hanford Site...

492

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site, Vol III - August 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site, Vol III - August 2001 August 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site This report...

493

apurinic sites design: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ons. Posi oning of site furniture shall not hinder Duchowski, Andrew T. 2 Instructional Web Site Design 1 running head: INSTRUCTIONAL WEB SITE DESIGN Computer Technologies and...

494

Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

GERBER, M S

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' was prepared by Bechtel Nevada (BN) to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2004''. It was produced this year to provide a more cost-effective and wider distribution of a hardcopy summary of the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' to interested DOE stakeholders.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Development of EPA radiation site cleanup regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the EPA program to develop radiation site cleanup and identifies many of the issues related to that effort. The material is drawn from portions of the Agency`s Issues Paper on Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations (EPA 402-R-93-084). The site cleanup regulations will be designed to protect human health and the environment and to facilitate the cleanup of sites. EPA believes that developing specific cleanup standards for radionuclides will ensure consistent, protective, and cost-effective site remediation. They will apply to all Federal facilities such as those operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DoD), and sites licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Agreement States.

Burnett, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

499

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

500

Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z