Sample records for int cosmic ray

  1. Cosmic rays in astrospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Klaus; Bomans, Dominik; Ferreira, Stefan; Fichtner, Horst; Kleimann, Jens; Strauss, Dutoit; Weis, Kerstin; Wiengarten, Tobias; Wodzinski, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays passing through large astrospheres can be efficiently cooled inside these "cavities" in the interstellar medium. Moreover, the energy spectra of these energetic particles are already modulated in front of the astrospherical bow shocks. We study the cosmic ray flux in and around lambda Cephei as an example for an astrosphere. The large-scale plasma flow is modeled hydrodynamically with radiative cooling. We studied the cosmic ray flux in a stellar wind cavity using a transport model based on stochastic differential equations. The required parameters, most importantly, the elements of the diffusion tensor, are based on the heliospheric parameters. The magnetic field required for the diffusion coefficients is calculated kinematically. We discuss the transport in an astrospheric scenario with varying parameters for the transport coefficients. We show that large stellar wind cavities can act as sinks for the galactic cosmic ray flux and thus can give rise to small-scale anisotropies in the direction to...

  2. Frontiers in Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Anchordoqui; Charles D. Dermer; Andreas Ringwald

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This rapporteur review covers selected results presented in the Parallel Session HEA2 (High Energy Astrophysics 2) of the 10th Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2003. The subtopics are: ultra high energy cosmic ray anisotropies, the possible connection of these energetic particles with powerful gamma ray bursts, and new exciting scenarios with a strong neutrino-nucleon interaction in the atmosphere.

  3. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pasquale Blasi

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  4. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Aramo

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes methods used for the detection of cosmic rays with energies above 10^18 eV (UHECR, UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays). It had been anticipated there would be a cutoff in the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays around 3 10^19 eV induced by their interaction with the 2.7 K primordial photons. This has become known as the GZK cutoff. However, several showers have been detected with estimated primary energy exceeding this limit.

  5. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  6. Cosmic Rays at the Knee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several kinds of measurements are combined in an attempt to obtain a consistent estimate of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic radiation through the knee region. Assuming that the knee is a signal of the high-energy end of a galactic cosmic-ray population, I discuss possible signatures of a transition to an extra-galactic population and how they might be detected.

  7. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  8. Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

  9. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  10. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  11. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues and experimental data that brought the ultra high energy cosmic rays in the list of Nature's greatest puzzles. After many years of research we still do not know how astrophysical acceleration processes can reach energies exceeding 10$^{11}$ GeV. The main alternative {\\em top-down} mechanism postulates the existence of super massive $X$-particles that create a particle spectrum extending down to the observed energy through their decay channels. The propagation of nuclei and photons from their sources to us adds to the puzzle as all particles of these energies interact with the ambient photons, mostly of the microwave background. We also describe briefly the main observational results and give some information on the new experiments that are being built and designed now.

  12. SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Va'vra, J.

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC does not have a test beam for the HEP detector development at present. We have therefore created a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) facility, which is presently being used to test the FDIRC prototype. We have used it in the past to debug this prototype with the original SLAC electronics before going to the ESA test beam. Presently, it is used to test a new waveform digitizing electronics developed by the University of Hawaii, and we are also planning to incorporate the new Orsay TDC/ADC electronics. As a next step, we plan to put in a full size DIRC bar box with a new focusing optics, and test it together with a final SuberB electronics. The CRT is located in building 121 at SLAC. We anticipate more users to join in the future. This purpose of this note is to provide an introductory manual for newcomers.

  13. The 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 1 X-ray and Gamma-ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    The 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 1 X-ray and Gamma-ray Measurements Masaki Mori-ray and gamma-ray measurements, of the 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference. 1. Introduction Thick atmosphere of the earth forces direct observations of X-rays and gamma-rays on satellites in space

  14. High-Energy Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce neutrino astronomy from the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. We review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. Among these gamma ray bursts and active galaxies represent well-motivated speculations because these are also the sources of the highest energy gamma rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. We discuss why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing high-energy neutrino beams associated with the highest energy cosmic rays. Cosmic ray sources may produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest energy cosmic rays and gamma rays. The technology for commissioning such instruments exists.

  15. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT AND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermann, Peter L. [MPI for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Becker Tjus, Julia; Mandelartz, Matthias [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at {approx}10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

  16. Detecting cosmic rays of the highest energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Vannucci

    2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged cosmic rays have been measured up to macroscopic energies. Concerning neutrinos, the detection is still limited to terrestrial ones (apart from supernova production). A new way to search for extragalactic neutrinos is discussed.

  17. The highest-energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Cronin

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper begins with a pedagogical discussion of the propagation of cosmic rays and the showers produced when a cosmic ray primary hits the upper atmosphere. The paper focusses cosmic rays, with energy > 10^19 eV. Emphasis is placed on the shower properties that are relevant to the detection of cosmic rays by surface arrays and fluorescence telescopes. The two major experiments, AGASA and HiRes are described in some detail. Then the experimental results are reviewed. It is no surprise that more data will be needed. But it is also true that improved analysis and further data from HiRes can make significant improvements in the experimental situation.

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

  19. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramińana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivičre, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseńor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  20. INT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carterm

    Business Services Form: INT Updated: July 2008. Request for Scholarship, Award or Prize - International Student. Purdue University ...

  1. Monopole Annihilation and Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bhattacharjee; G. Sigl

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays with energies exceeding $10^{20}\\eV$ have been detected. The origin of these highest energy cosmic rays remains unknown. Established astrophysical acceleration mechanisms encounter severe difficulties in accelerating particles to these energies. Alternative scenarios where these particles are created by the decay of cosmic topological defects have been suggested in literature. In this paper we study the possibility of producing the highest energy cosmic rays through a process that involves formation of metastable magnetic monopole-antimonopole bound states and their subsequent collapse. The annihilation of the heavy monopole-antimonopole pairs constituting the monopolonia can produce energetic nucleons, gamma rays and neutrinos whose expected flux we estimate and discuss in relation to experimental data so far available. The monopoles we consider are the ones that could be produced in the early universe during a phase transition at the grand unification energy scale. We find that observable cosmic ray fluxes can be produced with monopole abundances compatible with present bounds.

  2. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  3. School Cosmic Ray Outreach Detector (SCROD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Anchordoqui; J. Cook; M. Gabour; N. Kirsch; J. MacLeod; T. P. McCauley; Y. Musienko; T. C. Paul; S. Reucroft; J. D. Swain; R. Terry

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our studies of applying novel detector technologies developed for LHC-era experiments to cosmic ray detection. In particular, we are investigating usage of scintillating tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers and avalanche photodiode readout as part of a robust, inexpensive cosmic air shower detector. In the near future, we are planning to deploy detector stations based on this technology at area high schools and colleges as part of an outreach and education effort, known as SCROD.

  4. Cosmic-ray diffusion in magnetized turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tautz, R C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of cosmic-ray scattering in the turbulent electromagnetic fields of the interstellar medium and the solar wind is of great importance due to the variety of applications of the resulting diffusion coefficients. Examples are diffusive shock acceleration, cosmic-ray observations, and, in the solar system, the propagation of coronal mass ejections. In recent years, it was found that the simple diffusive motion that had been assumed for decades is often in disagreement both with numerical and observational results. Here, an overview is given of the interaction processes of cosmic rays and turbulent electromagnetic fields. First, the formation of turbulent fields due to plasma instabilities is treated, where especially the non-linear behavior of the resulting unstable wave modes is discussed. Second, the analytical and the numerical side of high-energy particle propagation will be reviewed by presenting non-linear analytical theories and Monte-Carlo simulations. For the example of the solar wind, the im...

  5. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela V. Olinto

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The surprising lack of a high energy cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum at the highest energies together with an apparently isotropic distribution of arrival directions have strongly challenged most models proposed for the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Young neutron star winds may be able to explain the mystery. We discuss this recent proposal after summarizing the observational challenge and plausible acceleration sites. Young neutrons star winds differ from alternative models in the predictions for composition, spectrum, and angular distribution which will be tested in future experiments.

  6. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

  7. Cosmic Rays from Supernovae Proven to Hit Earth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new study confirms that cosmic rays are born in the violent aftermath of supernovas, exploding stars throughout the galaxy.

  8. Accelerator Data for Cosmic Ray Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Albrow

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I present selected examples of accelerator data, mainly from hadron colliders, that are relevant for understanding cosmic ray showers. I focus on the forward region, $x_{Feynman} > 0.05$, where high energy data are scarce, since the emphasis in collider physics became high-$p_T$ phenomena.

  9. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  10. Life Extinctions By Cosmic Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnon Dar; Ari Laor; Nir J. Shaviv

    1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy cosmic ray jets from nearby mergers or accretion induced collapse (AIC) of neutron stars (NS) that hit the atmosphere can produce lethal fluxes of atmospheric muons at ground level, underground and underwater, destroy the ozone layer and radioactivate the environment. They could have caused most of the massive life extinctions on planet Earth in the past 600 My. Biological mutations due to ionizing radiations could have caused the fast appearance of new species after the massive extinctions. An early warning of future extinctions due to NS mergers may be obtained by identifying, mapping and timing all the nearby binary neutron stars systems. A warning of an approaching cosmic ray burst from a nearby NS merger/AIC may be provided by a very intense gamma ray burst which preceeds it.

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonori Totani

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

  12. Reference Radiation for Cosmic Rays in RBE Research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Shaoyong

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    When astronauts travel in space, they are exposed to high energy cosmic radiations. The cosmic ray spectrum contains very high energy particles, generally up to several GeV per nucleon. Currently NASA is funding research on the effects...

  13. Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

  14. Muon Acceleration in Cosmic-ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Rune Mikkelsen; Julia K. Becker Tjus

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in Gamma-Ray Bursts magnetars, or other sources. These source models require very high accelerating gradients, $10^{13}$ keV/cm, with the minimum gradient set by the length of the source. At gradients above 1.6 keV/cm, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. We rule out many models of linear acceleration, setting strong constraints on plasma wakefield accelerators and on models for sources like Gamma Ray Bursts and magnetars.

  15. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  16. anomalous cosmic rays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (arXiv) Summary: We consider the propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the fractal interstellar medium. Steady state solution of the fractional diffusion equation,...

  17. anomalous cosmic ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (arXiv) Summary: We consider the propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the fractal interstellar medium. Steady state solution of the fractional diffusion equation,...

  18. Constraints on the Cosmic Rays in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnon Dar; Ari Laor; Abraham Loeb

    1993-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that recent $\\gamma$-ray observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud with EGRET rule out a universal cosmic ray flux only at energies below $\\approx 10$ GeV, while the observed diffuse X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray background radiations have already ruled out, by more than three orders of magnitude, a universal extragalactic cosmic ray flux identical to that observed in the local solar neighborhood at energies below $10^6$ GeV.

  19. 38th Int. Conf. on Vacuum UV and X-ray Physics - VUVX2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    38th Int. Conf. on Vacuum UV and X-ray Physics - VUVX2013 http:vuvx2013.ustc.edu.cndctpage1 12-18 July, 2013; Hefei, China...

  20. Cosmic-ray positrons from millisecond pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venter, C; Harding, A K; Gonthier, P L; Büsching, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of gamma-ray millisecond pulsar light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ~10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new millisecond pulsars, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic millisecond pulsars to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day millisecond pulsars. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow and redback systems. Since millisecond pulsars are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the p...

  1. Plasmoid impacts on neutron stars and highest energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Litwin; R. Rosner

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle acceleration by electrostatic polarization fields that arise in plasmas streaming across magnetic fields is discussed as a possible acceleration mechanism of highest-energy cosmic rays. Specifically, plasmoids arising in planetoid impacts onto neutron star magnetospheres are considered. We find that such impacts at plausible rates may account for the observed flux and energy spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  2. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE The TALE Tower Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE The TALE Tower Detector D. R. BERGMAN1 , FOR THE TA and extend the range of its energy coverage to lower energies. One of the TALE detectors is a "tower cosmic rays with energies between 1016.5 and 1018 eV. To achieve this low-energy sensitivity the tower

  3. Cosmic Ray Rejection by Linear Filtering of Single Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a convolution-based algorithm for finding cosmic rays in single well-sampled astronomical images. The spatial filter used is the point spread function (approximated by a Gaussian) minus a scaled delta function, and cosmic rays are identified by thresholding the filtered image. This filter searches for features with significant power at spatial frequencies too high for legitimate objects. Noise properties of the filtered image are readily calculated, which allows us to compute the probability of rejecting a pixel not contaminated by a cosmic ray (the false alarm probability). We demonstrate that the false alarm probability for a pixel containing object flux will never exceed the corresponding probability for a blank sky pixel, provided we choose the convolution kernel appropriately. This allows confident rejection of cosmic rays superposed on real objects. Identification of multiple-pixel cosmic ray hits can be enhanced by running the algorithm iteratively, replacing flagged pixels with the background level at each iteration.

  4. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4065 The Cosmic Ray Shadows of the Moon and the Sun De-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4065 The Cosmic Ray Shadows of the Moon and the Sun De of the data shows that the shadows of the sun and moon have each been detected with high significances of the sun is significantly weaker than that of the moon. As expected, the measured positions of the deficits

  5. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 2, 247250 Long-Term Modulation of the Cosmic Ray Fluctuation Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    energy-dependent difference in the solar cycle variation of cosmic ray fluctuations. 1. Introduction, there are indications that this relation may not be valid for lower energy cosmic rays of solar/interplanetary origin of Oulu, FIN-90014,Finland (c) Department of Physical Sciences, P.O.Box 3000, FIN-90014 University of Oulu

  6. Cosmic Ray Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Ostrowski

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical studies of cosmic ray particle acceleration in the first-order Fermi process at relativistic shocks are reviewed. At the beginning we discuss the acceleration processes acting at mildly relativistic shock waves. An essential role of oblique field configurations and field perturbations in forming the particle energy spectrum and changing the acceleration time scale is discussed. Then, we report on attempts to consider particle acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks, often yielding an asymptotic spectral index sigma = 2.2 at large shock Lorentz factors. We explain why this result is limited to the cases of highly turbulent conditions near shocks. We conclude that our present knowledge of the acceleration processes acting at relativistic shocks is insufficient to allow for realistic modelling of the real shocks. The present review is a modified, extended and updated version of Ostrowski (1999).

  7. The `excess' of primary cosmic ray electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang Li; Zhao-Qiang Shen; Bo-Qiang Lu; Tie-Kuang Dong; Yi-Zhong Fan; Lei Feng; Si-Ming Liu; Jin Chang

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    With the accurate cosmic ray (CR) electron and positron spectra (denoted as $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}$ and $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$, respectively) measured by AMS-02 collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., $\\Delta \\Phi=\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}-\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$), dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies $\\geq 30$ GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in $\\Delta \\Phi$ strongly suggests a significant `excess' of primary CR electrons and at energies of $100-400$ GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but `nearby' supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga) are favored sources for such an excess.

  8. Transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays is discussed. One of critical indications for transition is given by the Standard Model of Galactic cosmic rays, according to which the maximum energy of acceleration for iron nuclei is of order of $E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max} \\approx 1\\times 10^{17}$ eV. At $E > E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max}$ the spectrum is predicted to be very steep and thus the Standard Model favours the transition at energy not much higher than $E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max}$. As observations are concerned there are two signatures of transition: change of energy spectra and elongation rate (depth of shower maximum in the atmosphere $X_{\\rm max}$ as function of energy). Three models of transition are discussed: dip-based model, mixed composition model and ankle model. In the latter model the transition occurs at the observed spectral feature, ankle, which starts at $E_a \\approx 1\\times 10^{19}$ eV and is characterised by change of mass compostion from galactic iron to extragalactic protons. In the dip model the transition occures at the second knee observed at energy $(4 -8)\\times 10^{17}$ eV and is characterised by change of mass composition from galactic iron to extragalactic protons. The mixed composition model describes transition at $E \\sim 3\\times 10^{18}$ eV with mass composition changing from galactic iron to extragactic mixed composition of different nuclei. These models are confronted with observational data on spectra and elongation rates from different experiments, including Auger.

  9. Selected Results from Ground-Based Cosmic Ray and Gamma-Ray Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Magnussen

    1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected results from the HEGRA experiment on charged Cosmic Rays and on very high energy gamma-rays are presented. The MAGIC Telescope is presented as an outlook to the future of Gamma-Ray astronomy.

  10. Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate: What's up? The topic of possible relations between solar and cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Preface Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate: What's up? The topic of possible relations between solar and cosmic ray variability on one hand, and Earth's climate on the other hand, is quite in Space Research topical issue on Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate presents a collection

  11. Doctoral Thesis in Physics Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    of propagation models Juan Wu Particle and Astroparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Royal Institute such as dark matter. To understand cosmic ray accel- eration and propagation mechanisms, accurate measurements

  12. Cosmic ray lithium isotope measurement with AMS-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Feng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMS-01 detector measured charged cosmic rays during 10 days on the Space Shuttle Discovery in 1998 and collected 108 events. By identifying 8349 Lithium and 22709 Carbon nuclei from the raw data, this thesis presents ...

  13. A Quantum Phase Transition in the Cosmic Ray Energy Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We here argue that the "knee" of the cosmic ray energy distribution at $E_c \\sim 1$ PeV represents a second order phase transition of cosmic proportions. The discontinuity of the heat capacity per cosmic ray particle is given by $\\Delta c=0.450196\\ k_B$. However the idea of a deeper critical point singularity cannot be ruled out by present accuracy in neither theory nor experiment. The quantum phase transition consists of cosmic rays dominated by bosons for the low temperature phase E E_c$. The low temperature phase arises from those nuclei described by the usual and conventional collective boson models of nuclear physics. The high temperature phase is dominated by protons. The transition energy $E_c$ may be estimated in terms of the photo-disintegration of nuclei.

  14. Feedback Heating by Cosmic Rays in Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulai Guo; S. Peng OH

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations show that the cooling flows in the central regions of galaxy clusters are highly suppressed. Observed AGN-induced cavities/bubbles are a leading candidate for suppressing cooling, usually via some form of mechanical heating. At the same time, observed X-ray cavities and synchrotron emission point toward a significant non-thermal particle population. Previous studies have focused on the dynamical effects of cosmic-ray pressure support, but none have built successful models in which cosmic-ray heating is significant. Here we investigate a new model of AGN heating, in which the intracluster medium is efficiently heated by cosmic-rays, which are injected into the ICM through diffusion or the shredding of the bubbles by Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We include thermal conduction as well. Using numerical simulations, we show that the cooling catastrophe is efficiently suppressed. The cluster quickly relaxes to a quasi-equilibrium state with a highly reduced accretion rate and temperature and density profiles which match observations. Unlike the conduction-only case, no fine-tuning of the Spitzer conduction suppression factor f is needed. The cosmic ray pressure, P_c/P_g heating is a very attractive alternative to mechanical heating, and may become particularly compelling if GLAST detects the gamma-ray signature of cosmic-rays in clusters.

  15. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Solar modulation of cosmic rays since 1936: Neutron monitors and balloon-borne data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Solar modulation of cosmic rays since 1936¨a Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Finland 2 Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences used to parameterize the energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays, for the period from July 1936 through

  16. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts: Implications of the Recent Observational Results by Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayantara Gupta

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been speculated earlier that Gamma Ray Bursts are sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Recently, the search for high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts by Milagro group has put limits on the isotropic luminosity of these transient sources in very high energy photons. The implications of the results obtained by Milagro to our understanding of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum from these sources have been discussed in the present work.

  17. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  18. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Baerwald; Mauricio Bustamante; Walter Winter

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space -- unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  19. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Prompt TeV Gamma Rays from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Nayantara Gupta

    2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as one {\\it possible} class of sources of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events observed up to energies $\\gsim10^{20}\\ev$. The synchrotron radiation of the highest energy protons accelerated within the GRB source should produce gamma rays up to TeV energies. Here we briefly discuss the implications on the energetics of the GRB from the point of view of the detectability of the prompt TeV gamma rays of proton-synchrotron origin in GRBs in the up-coming ICECUBE muon detector in the south pole.

  20. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy - the cosmic-ray connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the models for origin of the highest energy cosmic rays also predict significant neutrino fluxes. A common factor of the models is that they must provide sufficient power to supply the observed energy in the extragalactic component of the cosmic radiation. The assumption that a comparable amount of energy goes into high-energy neutrinos allows a model-independent estimate of the neutrino signal that may be expected.

  1. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huege, T; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Huege, Tim; al, et

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  2. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Huege; the LOPES Collaboration

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Cosmic Rays from the Knee to the Ankle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haungs, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of the energy spectrum as well as the mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range of PeVto EeV are important for understanding both, the origin of the galactic and the extragalactic cosmic rays. Recently, three modern experimental installations (KASCADE-Grande, IceTop, Tunka-133), dedicated to investigate this primary energy range, have published new results on the all-particle energy spectrum. In this short review these results are presented and the similarities and differences discussed. In addition, the effects of using different hadronic interaction models for interpreting the measured air-shower data will be examined. Finally, a brief discussion on the question if the present results are in agreement or in contradiction with astrophysical models for the transition from galactic to 10 pagesextragalactic origin of cosmic rays completes this paper.

  4. Energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioana C. Maris; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is almost completed. Three independent measurements of the flux of the cosmic rays with energies larger than 1 EeV have been performed during the construction phase. The surface detector data collected until August 2007 have been used to establish a flux suppression at the highest energies with a 6 sigma significance. The observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less than 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

  5. The Antarctic climate anomaly and galactic cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensmark, H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed that galactic cosmic rays may influence the Earth's climate by affecting cloud formation. If changes in cloudiness play a part in climate change, their effect changes sign in Antarctica. Satellite data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are here used to calculate the changes in surface temperatures at all latitudes, due to small percentage changes in cloudiness. The results match the observed contrasts in temperature changes, globally and in Antarctica. Evidently clouds do not just respond passively to climate changes but take an active part in the forcing, in accordance with changes in the solar magnetic field that vary the cosmic-ray flux.

  6. Supernova remnants as cosmic ray accelerators. SNR IC 443

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hnatyk; O. Petruk

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the hypothesis that some supernova remnants (SNRs) may be responsible for some unidentified gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET instrument aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. If this is the case, gamma-rays are produced via pion production and decay from direct inelastic collisions of accelerated by SNR shock wave ultrarelativistic protons with target protons of the interstellar medium. We develop a 3-D hydrodynamical model of SNR IC 443 as a possible cosmic gamma-ray source 2EG J0618+2234. The derived parameters of IC 443: the explosion energy E_o=2.7*10^{50} erg, the initial hydrogen number density n(0)=0.21 cm^{-3}, the mean radius R=9.6 pc and the age t=4500 yr result in too low gamma-ray flux, mainly because of the low explosion energy. Therefore, we investigate in detail the hydrodynamics of IC 443 interaction with a nearby massive molecular cloud and show that the reverse shock wave considerably increases the cosmic ray density in the interaction region. Meantime, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of contact discontinuity between the SNR and the cloud provides an effective mixing of the containing cosmic ray plasma and the cloud material. We show that the resulting gamma-ray flux is consistent with the observational data.

  7. ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF LIGHT NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS: RESULTS FROM AMS-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, R.

    The variety of isotopes in cosmic rays allows us to study different aspects of the processes that cosmic rays undergo between the time they are produced and the time of their arrival in the heliosphere. In this paper, we ...

  8. On the Interaction Between Cosmic Rays and Dark Matter Molecular Clouds - II. The Age Distribution of Cosmic Ray Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Sciama

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore further the proposal in paper I of this series that the confinement time of cosmic ray nuclei in the Milky Way is determined by their interaction with dark matter molecular clouds rather than by their escape from the halo, as is assumed in conventional models of cosmic ray propagation. The same proposal can be made for cosmic ray electrons. This proposal leads to a specific age distribution for the electrons which is in agreement with Tang's (1984) observations of the electron spectrum at high energies but not with Nishimura et al's (1980) earlier data, which lead to a flatter spectrum. However, the simplest leaky box and diffusion models disagree with both sets of data so that our trapping model is supported if Tang's data are correct.

  9. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pisin Chen; Toshiki Tajima; Yoshiyuki Takahashi

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma, where the energy gain per distance of a test particle is Lorentz invariant. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f(e) 1/e^2. The environment suitable for such plasma wakefield acceleration can be cosmically abundant. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) through this mechanism in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. We show that the acceleration gradient can be as high as G ~ 10^16 eV/cm. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  10. In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice Aleksandr Nesterenok 2011 Available online 8 October 2011 Keywords: Cosmic rays Polar ice Radiocarbon In situ production a b s t r a c t We study interactions of cosmic ray particles with the Earth's atmosphere and polar ice

  11. Cosmological Cosmic Rays: Sharpening the Primordial Lithium Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tijana Prodanovic; Brian D. Fields

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic structure formation leads to large-scale shocked baryonic flows which are expected to produce a cosmological population of structure-formation cosmic rays (SFCRs). Interactions between SFCRs and ambient baryons will produce lithium isotopes via \\alpha+\\alpha \\to ^{6,7}Li. This pre-Galactic (but non-primordial) lithium should contribute to the primordial 7Li measured in halo stars and must be subtracted in order to arrive to the true observed primordial lithium abundance. In this paper we point out that the recent halo star 6Li measurements can be used to place a strong constraint to the level of such contamination, because the exclusive astrophysical production of 6Li is from cosmic-ray interactions. We find that the putative 6Li plateau, if due to pre-Galactic cosmic-ray interactions, implies that SFCR-produced lithium represents Li_{SFCR}/Li_{plateau}\\approx 15% of the observed elemental Li plateau. Taking the remaining plateau Li to be cosmological 7Li, we find a revised (and slightly worsened) discrepancy between the Li observations and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis predictions by a factor of ^7Li_{BBN}/^7Li_{plateau} \\approx 3.7. Moreover, SFCRs would also contribute to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) through neutral pion production. This gamma-ray production is tightly related to the amount of lithium produced by the same cosmic rays; the 6Li plateau limits the pre-Galactic (high-redshift) SFCR contribution to be at the level of I_{\\pi_{\\gamma}SFCR}/I_{EGRB} < 5% of the currently observed EGRB.

  12. Simulations of cosmic ray interactions: past, present, and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulations of cosmic ray interactions: past, present, and future S S Ostapchenko Forschungszentrum data, over many energy decades. #12;2 In past, it was customary to treat hadronic cascades" partonic processes whose role greatly increases with energy. Different ways to account for non- linear

  13. Reference Radiation for Cosmic Rays in RBE Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Shaoyong

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    effectiveness relative to a specific radiation is usually used. For low energy heavy ions and neutrons 250 keV photons are usually used for the reference radiation but their depth dose distribution is very different from that for cosmic rays. In this research...

  14. Cosmological Cosmic Rays: Sharpening the Primordial Lithium Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodanovic, Tijana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic structure formation leads to large-scale shocked baryonic flows which are expected to produce a cosmological population of structure-formation cosmic rays (SFCRs). Interactions between SFCRs and ambient baryons will produce lithium isotopes via \\alpha+\\alpha \\to ^{6,7}Li. This pre-Galactic (but non-primordial) lithium should contribute to the primordial 7Li measured in halo stars and must be subtracted in order to arrive to the true observed primordial lithium abundance. In this paper we point out that the recent halo star 6Li measurements can be used to place a strong constraint to the level of such contamination, because the exclusive astrophysical production of 6Li is from cosmic-ray interactions. We find that the putative 6Li plateau, if due to pre-Galactic cosmic-ray interactions, implies that SFCR-produced lithium represents Li_{SFCR}/Li_{plateau}\\approx 15% of the observed elemental Li plateau. Taking the remaining plateau Li to be cosmological 7Li, we find a revised (and slightly worsened) disc...

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations of Cosmic Rays Hadronic Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Orrell, John L.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the construction and results of the MaCoR software tool, developed to model the hadronic interactions of cosmic rays with different geometries of materials. The ubiquity of cosmic radiation in the environment results in the activation of stable isotopes, referred to as cosmogenic activities. The objective is to use this application in conjunction with a model of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR components, from extraction to deployment, to evaluate cosmogenic activation of such components before and after deployment. The cosmic ray showers include several types of particles with a wide range of energy (MeV to GeV). It is infeasible to compute an exact result with a deterministic algorithm for this problem; Monte Carlo simulations are a more suitable approach to model cosmic ray hadronic interactions. In order to validate the results generated by the application, a test comparing experimental muon flux measurements and those predicted by the application is presented. The experimental and simulated results have a deviation of 3%.

  16. Galactic Cosmic Ray Origin Sites: Supernova Remnants and Superbubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bykov, A M; Gladilin, P E; Osipov, S M; 10.1063/1.4772219

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss processes in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) acceleration sites - supernova remnants, compact associations of young massive stars, and superbubbles. Mechanisms of efficient conversion of the mechanical power of the outflows driven by supernova shocks and fast stellar winds of young stars into magnetic fields and relativistic particles are discussed. The high efficiency of particle acceleration in the sources implies the importance of nonlinear feedback effects in a symbiotic relationship where the magnetic turbulence required to accelerate the CRs is created by the accelerated CRs themselves. Non-thermal emission produced by relativistic particles (both those confined in and those that escape from the cosmic accelerators) can be used to constrain the basic physical models of the GCR sources. High resolution X-ray synchrotron imaging, combined with GeV-TeV gamma ray spectra, is a powerful tool to probe the maximum energies of accelerated particles. Future MeV regime spectroscopy will provide unique inform...

  17. CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

  18. CAN ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS COME FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS? COSMIC RAYS BELOW THE ANKLE AND GALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichler, David [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be'er-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Pohl, Martin [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum cosmic-ray energy achievable by acceleration by a relativistic blast wave is derived. It is shown that forward shocks from long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the interstellar medium accelerate protons to large enough energies, and have a sufficient energy budget, to produce the Galactic cosmic-ray component just below the ankle at 4 x 10{sup 18} eV, as per an earlier suggestion. It is further argued that, were extragalactic long GRBs responsible for the component above the ankle as well, the occasional Galactic GRB within the solar circle would contribute more than the observational limits on the outward flux from the solar circle, unless an avoidance scenario, such as intermittency and/or beaming, allows the present-day local flux to be less than 10{sup -3} of the average. Difficulties with these avoidance scenarios are noted.

  19. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabici, S; Morlino, G; Nava, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  20. A New Measurement of Cosmic Ray Composition at the Knee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Boothby; M. Chantell; K. D. Green; D. B. Kieda; J. Knapp; C . G. Larsen; S. P. Swordy

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual Imaging Cerenkov Experiment (DICE) was designed and operated for making elemental composition measurements of cosmic rays near the knee of the spectrum at several PeV. Here we present the first results using this experiment from the measurement of the average location of the depth of shower maximum, , in the atmosphere as a function of particle energy. The value of near the instrument threshold of ~0.1 PeV is consistent with expectations from previous direct measurements. At higher energies there is little change in composition up to ~5 PeV. Above this energy is deeper than expected for a constant elemental composition implying the overall elemental composition is becoming lighter above the knee region. These results disagree with the idea that cosmic rays should become on average heavier above the knee. Instead they suggest a transition to a qualitatively different population of particles above 5 PeV.

  1. Extragalactic Magnetic Field and the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangjin Lee; Angela Olinto; Guenter Sigl

    1995-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The strength and spectrum of the extragalactic magnetic field are still unknown. Its measurement would help answer the question of whether galactic fields are purely a primordial relic or were dynamically enhanced from a much smaller cosmological seed field. In this letter, we show that the composition, spectrum, and directional distribution of extragalactic ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with energies above $\\simeq 10^{18}\\ev$ can probe the large scale component of the extragalactic magnetic field below the present observational upper limit of $10^{-9}$ Gauss. Cosmic ray detectors under construction or currently in the proposal stage should be able to test the existence of the extragalactic magnetic fields on scales of a few to tens of Mpc and strengths in the range $\\simeq 10^{-10} - 10^{-9}$ Gauss.

  2. Radio Cherenkov signals from the Moon: neutrinos and cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Seon Jeong; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

    2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino production of radio Cherenkov signals in the Moon is the object of radio telescope observations. Depending on the energy range and detection parameters, the dominant contribution to the neutrino signal may come from interactions of the neutrino on the Moon facing the telescope, rather than neutrinos that have traversed a portion of the Moon. Using the approximate analytic expression of the effective lunar aperture from a recent paper by Gayley, Mutel and Jaeger, we evaluate the background from cosmic ray interactions in the lunar regolith. We also consider the modifications to the effective lunar aperture from generic non-standard model neutrino interactions. A background to neutrino signals are radio Cherenkov signals from cosmic ray interactions. For cosmogenic neutrino fluxes, neutrino signals will be difficult to observe because of low neutrino flux at the high energy end and large cosmic ray background in the lower energy range considered here. We show that lunar radio detection of neutrino interactions is best suited to constrain or measure neutrinos from astrophysical sources and probe non-standard neutrino-nucleon interactions such as microscopic black hole production.

  3. Cosmic Ray induced Neutron and Gamma-Ray bursts in a Lead Pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapline, G; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Snyderman, N J; Wurtz, R

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron background is created primarily by cosmic rays interactions. Of particular interest for SNM detection is an understanding of burst events that resemble fission chains. We have been studying the interaction of cosmic rays with a lead pile that is efficient at creating neutron bursts from cosmic ray interactions. The neutron burst size depends on the configuration of the lead. We have found that the largest bursts appear to have been created by primaries of energy over 100 GeV that have had a diffractive interaction with the atmosphere. The large events trigger muon coincidence paddles with very high efficiency, and the resulting interactions with the lead pile can create over 10, 000 neutrons in a burst.

  4. The Highest Energy Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and Neutrinos: Facts, Fancy and Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cosmic rays were discovered 90 years ago, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. There is compelling evidence that the highest energy cosmic rays are extra-galactic -- they cannot be contained by our galaxy's magnetic field anyway because their gyroradius exceeds its dimensions. Elementary elementary-particle physics dictates a universal upper limit on their energy of $5\\times10^{19}$ eV, the so-called Greisen-Kuzmin-Zatsepin cutoff; however, particles in excess of this energy have been observed, adding one more puzzle to the cosmic ray mystery. Mystery is nonetheless fertile ground for progress: we will review the facts and mention some very speculative interpretations. There is indeed a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be resolved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of $10^4$ km$^2$ area, arrays of air Cerenkov detectors and kilometer-scale neutrino observatories.

  5. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, and Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Although cosmic rays were discovered a century ago, we do not know where or how they are accelerated. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be solved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 10,000 kilometer-square area, arrays of air Cerenkov telescopes and kilometer- scale neutrino observatories. Their predecessors are producing science. We will review the highlights: - Cosmic rays: the highest energy particles and the GZK cutoff, the search for cosmic accelerators and the the Cygnus region, top-down mechanisms: photons versus protons? - TeV-energy gamma rays: blazars, how molecular clouds may have revealed proton beams, first hints of the diffuse infrared background? - Neutrinos: first results and proof of concept for technologies to construct kilometer-scale observatories.

  6. Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, & Neutrinos in the Starburst Nuclei of Arp 220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cores of Arp 220, the closest ultra-luminous infrared starburst galaxy, provide an opportunity to study interactions of cosmic rays under extreme conditions. In this paper, we model the populations of cosmic rays produced by supernovae in the central molecular zones of both starburst nuclei. We find that ~65 - 100% of cosmic rays are absorbed in these regions due to their huge molecular gas contents, and thus, the nuclei of Arp 220 nearly complete proton calorimeters. As the cosmic ray protons collide with the interstellar medium, they produce secondary electrons that are also contained within the system and radiate synchrotron emission. Using results from chi-squared tests between the model and the observed radio spectral energy distribution, we predict the emergent gamma-ray and high-energy neutrino spectra and find the magnetic field to be at milligauss levels. Because of the extremely intense far-infrared radiation fields, the gamma-ray spectrum steepens significantly at TeV energies due to gamma-gamm...

  7. Anomaly in the cosmic-ray energy spectrum at GeV-TeV energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of cosmic rays by various experiments have found that the energy spectrum of cosmic rays is harder in the TeV region than at GeV energies. The origin of the spectral hardening is not clearly understood. In this paper, we discuss the possibility that the spectral hardening might be due to the effect of re-acceleration of cosmic rays by weak shocks associated with old supernova remnants in the Galaxy.

  8. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from Decaying Superheavy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Decaying superheavy particles can be produced by Topological Defects or, in case they are quasi-stable, as relics from the early Universe. The decays of these particles can be the sources of observed Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays ($E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{12} GeV$). The Topological Defects as the UHE CR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopole-antiminopole pairs are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles are shown to be clustering in the halo and their decays produce UHE CR without GZK cutoff. The Lightest Supersymmetric Particles with Ultra High Energies are naturally produced in the cascades accompanying the decays of superheavy particles. These particles are discussed as UHE carriers in the Universe.

  9. Ultra high energy cosmic rays from cosmological relics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) can be a signal from very early (post-inflationary) Universe. At this cosmological epoch Topological Defects (TD) and long-lived suprheavy (SH) particles are expected to be naturally and effectively produced. Both of these relics can produce now the particles, such as protons and photons, with energies in a great excess of what is observed in UHECR, $E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{11} GeV$. The Topological Defects as the UHECR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopolonia are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles and monopolonia are shown to be clustering in the halo of our Galaxy and their decays produce UHECR without the GZK cutoff. The observational signature of both models are discussed.

  10. Diffuse Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Cosmic Ray Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo; Gaggero, Daniele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron diffuse radiation (SDR) emission is one of the major Galactic components, in the 100 MHz up to 100 GHz frequency range. Its spectrum and sky map provide valuable measure of the galactic cosmic ray electrons (GCRE) in the relevant energy range, as well as of the strength and structure of the Galactic magnetic fields (GMF), both regular and random ones. This emission is an astrophysical sky foreground for the study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and the extragalactic microwave measurements, and it needs to be modelled as better as possible. In this regard, in order to get an accurate description of the SDR in the Galaxy, we use - for the first time in this context - 3-dimensional GCRE models obtained by running the DRAGON code. This allows us to account for a realistic spiral arm pattern of the source distribution, demanded to get a self-consistent treatment of all relevant energy losses influencing the final synchrotron spectrum.

  11. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  12. Cosmic Ray production of Beryllium and Boron at high redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuel Rollinde; David Maurin; Elisabeth Vangioni; Keith A. Olive; Susumu Inoue

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, new observations of Li6 in Pop II stars of the galactic halo have shown a surprisingly high abundance of this isotope, about a thousand times higher than its predicted primordial value. In previous papers, a cosmological model for the cosmic ray-induced production of this isotope in the IGM has been developed to explain the observed abundance at low metallicity. In this paper, given this constraint on the Li6, we calculate the non-thermal evolution with redshift of D, Be, and B in the IGM. In addition to cosmological cosmic ray interactions in the IGM, we include additional processes driven by SN explosions: neutrino spallation and a low energy component in the structures ejected by outflows to the IGM. We take into account CNO CRs impinging on the intergalactic gas. Although subdominant in the galactic disk, this process is shown to produce the bulk of Be and B in the IGM, due to the differential metal enrichment between structures (where CRs originate) and the IGM. We also consider the resulting extragalactic gamma-ray background which we find to be well below existing data. The computation is performed in the framework of hierarchical structure formation considering several star formation histories including Pop III stars. We find that D production is negligible and that a potentially detectable Be and B plateau is produced by these processes at the time of the formation of the Galaxy (z ~ 3).

  13. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  14. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fornengo; L. Maccione; A. Vittino

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are significantly strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a "thermal" relic at about 50-90 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 4-5 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modeling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

  15. Cosmic Ray Spectral Deformation Caused by Energy Determination Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Carlson; Conny Wannemark

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra, falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the Maximum Detectable Rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  16. Statistical Tools for Analyzing the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Hague; B. R. Becker; M. S. Gold; J. A. J. Matthews

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper un-binned statistical tools for analyzing the cosmic ray energy spectrum are developed and illustrated with a simulated data set. The methods are designed to extract accurate and precise model parameter estimators in the presence of statistical and systematic energy errors. Two robust methods are used to test for the presence of flux suppression at the highest energies: the Tail-Power statistic and a likelihood ratio test. Both tests give evidence of flux suppression in the simulated data. The tools presented can be generalized for use on any astrophysical data set where the power-law assumption is relevant and can be used to aid observational design.

  17. Cosmic-Ray Hardenings in the Light of AMS-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent precise observations of cosmic rays (CRs) by AMS-02 experiment clearly show (1) harder spectra of helium and carbon compared to protons by $\\propto R^{0.08}$, and (2) concave breaks in proton and helium spectra at a rigidity $R \\sim 300$ GV. In particular the helium and carbon spectra are exactly similar, pointing to the same acceleration site. We examine possible interpretations of these features and identify a chemically enriched region, that is, superbubbles as the most probable origin of Galactic CRs. We further show that CRs originate primarily from the supernova ejecta in the superbubble core, mixed with negligible interstellar medium, and predict similar spectra for heavy nuclei.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Quantum Cosmic Censorship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Singh

    1998-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are believed to result from the coalescence of binary neutron stars. However, the standard proposals for conversion of the gravitational energy to thermal energy have difficulties. We show that if the merger of the two neutron stars results in a naked singularity, instead of a black hole, the ensuing quantum particle creation can provide the requisite thermal energy in a straightforward way. The back-reaction of the created particles can avoid the formation of the naked singularity predicted by the classical theory. Hence cosmic censorship holds in the quantum theory, even if it were to be violated in classical general relativity.

  19. Cosmic-ray strangelets in the Earth's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Monreal

    2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    If strange quark matter is stable in small lumps, we expect to find such lumps, called ``strangelets'', on Earth due to a steady flux in cosmic rays. Following recent astrophysical models, we predict the strangelet flux at the top of the atmosphere, and trace the strangelets' behavior in atmospheric chemistry and circulation. We show that several strangelet species may have large abundances in the atmosphere; that they should respond favorably to laboratory-scale preconcentration techniques; and that they present promising targets for mass spectroscopy experiments.

  20. A simple technique for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhilesh P. Nandan; Sharmili Rudra; Himangshu Neog; S. Biswas; S. Mahapatra; B. Mohanty; P. K. Samal

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and simple technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In these experiments only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and NIM scalers have been used. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators has been done using Co$^{60}$ and Cs$^{137}$ sources. The details experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results has been presented in this article.

  1. Spacetime noncommutativity and ultrahigh energy cosmic ray experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvat, Raul; Kekez, Dalibor; Trampetic, Josip [Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If new physics were capable of pushing the neutrino-nucleon inelastic cross section 3 orders of magnitude beyond the standard model prediction, then ultrahigh energy (UHE) neutrinos would have already been observed at neutrino observatories. We use such a constraint to reveal information on the scale of noncommutativity (NC) {Lambda}{sub NC} in noncommutative gauge field theories where neutrinos possess a tree-level coupling to photons in a generation-independent manner. In the energy range of interest (10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} GeV), the {theta} expansion (|{theta}|{approx}1/{Lambda}{sub NC}{sup 2}) and, therefore, the perturbative expansion, in terms of {Lambda}{sub NC}, retains no longer its meaningful character, forcing us to resort to those NC field theoretical frameworks involving the full {theta} resummation. Our numerical analysis of the contribution to the process coming from the photon exchange impeccably pins down a lower bound on {Lambda}{sub NC} to be as high as 900 (450) TeV, depending on the estimates for the cosmogenic neutrino flux. If, on the other hand, one considers a surprising recent result that occurred in Pierre Auger Observatory data, that UHE cosmic rays are mainly composed of highly ionized Fe nuclei, then our bounds get weaker, due to the diminished cosmic neutrino flux. Nevertheless, we show that, even for the very high fraction of heavy nuclei in primary UHE cosmic rays, our method may still yield remarkable bounds on {Lambda}{sub NC}, typically always above 200 TeV. Albeit, in this case, one encounters a maximal value for the Fe fraction, from which any useful information on {Lambda}{sub NC} can be drawn, delimiting thus the applicability of our method.

  2. On the Origin of Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sigl; D. N. Schramm; P. Bhattacharjee

    1994-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we show that the conventional diffusive shock acceleration mechanism for cosmic rays associated with relativistic astrophysical shocks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has severe difficulties to explain the highest energy cosmic ray events. We show that protons above around $2\\times10^{20}\\eV$ could have marginally been produced by this mechanism in an AGN or a rich galaxy cluster not further away than around $100\\Mpc$. However, for the highest energy Fly's Eye and Yakutsk events this is inconsistent with the observed arrival directions. Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields appear unable to alter the direction of such energetic particles by more than a few degrees. We also discuss some other options for these events associated with relativistic particles including pulsar acceleration of high $Z$ nuclei. At the present stage of knowledge the concept of topological defects left over from the early universe as the source for such events appears to be a promising option. Such sources are discussed and possible tests of this hypothesis are proposed.

  3. Acceleration and Particle Field Interactions of Cosmic Rays I: Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tawfik; A. Saleh; M. T. Ghoneim; A. A. Hady

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays is conjectured to occur through various interactions with the electromagnetic fields in different astrophysical objects, like magnetic matter clumps, besides the well-known shock and stochastic Fermi mechanisms. It is apparent that the latter are not depending on the particle's charge, quantitatively. Based on this model, a considerable portion of the dynamics, that derives a charged particle parallel to a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$ and under the influence of a force $\\mathbf{F}$, is assumed to be composed of an acceleration by a non-magnetic force $\\mathbf{F}_{\\parallel}$ and a gyromotion along $\\mathbf{B}$ direction, plus drifts in the direction of $\\mathbf{F}_{\\perp}$. The model and its formalism are introduced. Various examples for drift motions and accelerating forces are suggested. The formalism is given in a non-relativistic version. Obviously, the translation into the relativistic version is standard. In a forthcoming work, a quantitative estimation of the energy gained by charged cosmic rays in various astrophysical objects will be evaluated.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts: recent results and connections to very high energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Péter Mészáros; Katsuaki Asano; Péter Veres

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \\swift and \\fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.

  5. Roadmap for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics and Astronomy (whitepaper for Snowmass 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Krizmanic, John F; Matthews, Jim; Mitchell, John W; Olinto, Angela V; Paul, Thomas C; Sokolsky, Pierre; Thomson, Gordon B; Weiler, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the remarkable recent progress in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics and astronomy enabled by the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. We discuss the primary objectives for future measurements and describe the plans for near-term enhancements of existing experiments as well as the next generation of observatories.

  6. The Fly's Eye Extremely High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum D.J. Bird,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fly's Eye Extremely High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum D.J. Bird,1 S.C. Corbato,3 H.Y. Dai,3 B present our latest results on the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 1017 eV observed by Fly's Eye. Tracks detected by both eyes can be well reconstructed and therefore have very good energy resolution

  7. ENERGETIC PROCESSING OF INTERSTELLAR SILICATE GRAINS BY COSMIC RAYS E. M. Bringa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGETIC PROCESSING OF INTERSTELLAR SILICATE GRAINS BY COSMIC RAYS E. M. Bringa,1 S. O. Kucheyev,1 2007 February 16 ABSTRACT While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively ``low'' energy, heavy-ion cosmic rays

  8. Workshop on Physics at the End of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Spectrum, Aspen, Colorado, April 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Physics at the End of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Spectrum, Aspen, Colorado, April 2005 contributions to the Workshop on Physics at the End of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Spectrum, held at the Aspen Physics Institute, Aspen, Colorado in April 2005. Experimental talks presented during the five day

  9. On the relationship between cosmic rays, solar activity and powerful earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Kovalyov; Selena Kovalyov

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyze the correlation of cosmic rays intensity to increases in seismic activity. We also show that high-magnitude earthquakes appear in group. As a prequel, we discuss in \\S1 naive visualization of the solar-cosmic ray interplay.

  10. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 3901 Effective Energy of Neutron Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    in the course of the solar cycle. Here we present a new concept of the effective energy of cosmic rays measured above this effective energy, irrespective of the phase of the solar cycle. The new concept to the flux of cosmic rays with energy above this effective energy, irrespectively of the phase of solar cycle

  11. Galactic neutrino background from cosmic ray interaction with the ISM content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Donato, C; D'Olivo, J C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a diffusive model for the propagation of Galactic cosmic rays to estimate the charged pion production in interactions with protons of the interstellar medium. Cosmic ray nuclei from proton to iron are considered and the corresponding contribution to the neutrino secondary flux produced as a result of spallation is also estimated.

  12. Galactic neutrino background from cosmic ray interaction with the ISM content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. De Donato; G. A. Medina-Tanco; J. C. D'Olivo

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a diffusive model for the propagation of Galactic cosmic rays to estimate the charged pion production in interactions with protons of the interstellar medium. Cosmic ray nuclei from proton to iron are considered and the corresponding contribution to the neutrino secondary flux produced as a result of spallation is also estimated.

  13. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the lifetime of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowsik, Ramanath

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ~ 1-100 GeV by BESS, PAMELA and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ~ 2.5 +/-0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components like positrons and Boron, and conclude with general remarks about the origins and propagation of cosmic rays.

  14. Cloud a particle beam facility to investigate the influence of cosmic rays on clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for solar forcing of the climate during the Holocene and the last ice age, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. However recent observations suggest that cosmic rays may play a key role. Satellite data have revealed a surprising correlation between cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of the Earth covered by low clouds \\cite{svensmark97,marsh}. Since the cosmic ray intensity is modulated by the solar wind, this may be an important clue to the long-sought mechanism for solar-climate variability. In order to test whether cosmic rays and clouds are causally linked and, if so, to understand the microphysical mechanisms, a novel experiment known as CLOUD\\footnotemark\\ has been proposed \\cite{cloud_proposal}--\\cite{cloud_addendum_2}. CLOUD proposes to investigate ion-aerosol-cloud microphysics under controlled laboratory conditions using a beam from a particle accelerator, which provides a precisely adjustable and measurable artificial source of cosmic rays....

  15. Possible association of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray events with strong gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordehai Milgrom; Vladimir Usov

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that each of the error boxes of the two highest-energy cosmic-ray shower events known, overlaps with that of a strong gamma-ray burst (GRB). The GRBs precede the cosmic rays by 5.5, and 11 months respectively. In one case the strongest known cosmic ray is paired with the strongest gamma-ray burst in the BATSE catalogue. The probability of this to have occurred by chance seems rather small. Without building on post-factum statistics, we think the above is remarkable enough to suggest that the cosmic ray and gamma-ray burst were produced by the same outburst. A time delay (and a small positional disparity) is expected, since the trajectory of a charged cosmic-ray particle is wriggled by intervening magnetic fields. We estimate that the Galaxy's field alone may produce a delay of the order observed. We discuss some of the implications that follow if such an association is confirmed. For example, the upper limit on the distance to the cosmic-ray source, combined with a much-better-determined position of the gamma-ray burst source, narrows greatly the volume in which to look for an optical counterpart. There is also useful information in the time delay regarding, e.g., intergalactic magnetic fields.

  16. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE PoGOLite: a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    University of Tokyo, Japan. pearce@particle.kth.se Abstract: Polarized gamma-rays are expected from a wide30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE PoGOLite: a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter M-dominated active galaxies. Polariza- tion measurements provide a powerful probe of the gamma-ray emission mechanism

  17. The quest for cosmic ray protons in galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Pfrommer; Torsten A. Ensslin

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been many speculations about the presence of cosmic ray protons (CRps) in galaxy clusters over the past two decades. However, no direct evidence such as the characteristic gamma-ray signature of decaying pions has been found so far. These pions would be a direct tracer of hadronic CRp interactions with the ambient thermal gas also yielding observable synchrotron and inverse Compton emission by additionally produced secondary electrons. The obvious question concerns the type of galaxy clusters most likely to yield a signal: Particularly suited sites should be cluster cooling cores due to their high gas and magnetic energy densities. We studied a nearby sample of clusters evincing cooling cores in order to place stringent limits on the cluster CRp population by using non-detections of EGRET. In this context, we examined the possibility of a hadronic origin of Coma-sized radio halos as well as radio mini-halos. Especially for mini-halos, strong clues are provided by the very plausible small amount of required CRp energy density and a matching radio profile. Introducing the hadronic minimum energy criterion, we show that the energetically favored CRp energy density is constrained to 2% +/- 1% of the thermal energy density in Perseus. We also studied the CRp population within the cooling core region of Virgo using the TeV gamma-ray detection of M 87 by HEGRA. Both the expected radial gamma-ray profile and the required amount of CRp support this hadronic scenario.

  18. EMMA an underground cosmic-ray experiment T. Enqvista

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    of Oulu, Oulu, Finland g Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland A new cosmic

  19. Cosmic ray muon charge ratio in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beall, Erik B; /Minnesota U.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5.4 kiloton (5.2 kt steel plus 0.2 kt scintillator plus aluminum skin) magnetized tracking calorimeter located 710 meters underground in the Soudan mine in Northern Minnesota. MINOS is the first large, deep underground detector with a magnetic field and thus capable of making measurements of the momentum and charge of cosmic ray muons. Despite encountering unexpected anomalies in distributions of the charge ratio (N{sub {mu}{sup +}}/N{sub {mu}{sup -}}) of cosmic muons, a method of canceling systematic errors is proposed and demonstrated. The result is R{sub eff} = 1.346 {+-} 0.002 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) for the averaged charge ratio, and a result for a rising fit to slant depth of R(X) = 1.300 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) + (1.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5} x X, valid over the range of slant depths from 2000 < X < 6000 MWE. This slant depth range corresponds to minimum surface muon energies between 750 GeV and 5 TeV.

  20. Constraints from cosmic rays on non-systematic Lorentz violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayandeb Basu; David Mattingly

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we analyze the radiation loss from a high energy cosmic ray proton propagating in a spacetime with non-systematic Lorentz violation. From an effective field theory perspective we illuminate flaws in previous attempts that use threshold approaches to analyze this problem. We argue that in general such approaches are of rather limited use when dealing with non-systematic Lorentz violating scenarios. The main issues we raise are a) the limited applicability of threshold energy conservation rules when translation invariance is broken and b) the large amounts of proton particle production due to the time dependence of the fluctuations. Ignoring particle production, we derive a constraint on the magnitude of velocity fluctuation $|v_f|<10^{-6.5}$, much weaker than has been previously argued. However, we show that in fact particle production makes any such constraint completely unreliable.

  1. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, John R; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Siân; Shearer, Craig; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  2. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; John R. Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Siân Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  3. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

  4. Hard spectrum of cosmic rays in the Disks of Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neronov, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The slope of the locally measured spectrum of cosmic rays varies from 2.8 for protons with energies below 200 GeV down to 2.5 for heavy nuclei with energies in the TeV-PeV range. It is not clear if the locally measured slope values are representative for those of the overall population of Galactic cosmic rays and if the slope of the cosmic ray spectrum varies across the Galaxy. We use the data of Fermi Space gamma-ray Telescope to derive a measurement of the slope of the cosmic ray spectrum across the Galactic Disk and to compare it with that of the Large Magellanic Cloud cosmic rays. A special choice of the background estimation regions allows us to single out the neutral pion decay component of the gamma-ray flux in the energy range above 10 GeV and to separate it from (a) emission from the local interstellar medium around the Solar system and (b) from the inverse Compton emission produced by cosmic ray electrons. Results. The spectrum of the pion decay gamma-ray emission from the Galactic disk in the energ...

  5. Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts: propagation of cosmic rays in their host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are proposed as candidate sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We study the possibility that the PeV neutrinos recently observed by IceCube are produced by GRB cosmic rays interacting with the interstellar gas in the host galaxies. By studying the relation between the X-ray absorption column density N_H and the surface star-formation rate of GRB host galaxies, we find that N_H is a good indicator of the surface gas density of the host galaxies. Then we are able to calculate the neutrino production efficiency of CRs for GRBs with known N_H. We collect a sample of GRBs that have both measurements of N_H and accurate gamma-ray fluence, and attempt to calculate the accumulated neutrino flux based on the current knowledge about GRBs and their host galaxies. When the CR intensity produced by GRBs is normalized with the observed UHECR flux above $10^{19}{\\rm eV}$, the accumulated neutrino flux at PeV energies is estimated to be about $(0.3\\pm0.2)\\times10^{-8} \\rm{GeV\\ cm^{-2}\\ s...

  6. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  7. Ionization in atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and extrasolar planets IV. The Effect of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimmer, Paul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays provide an important source for free electrons in the Earth's atmosphere and also in dense interstellar regions where they produce a prevailing background ionization. We utilize a Monte Carlo cosmic ray transport model for particle energies of 1 MeV model for particle energies of 1 GeV model atmospheres of an example brown dwarf with effective temperature Teff = 1500 K, and two example giant gas planets (Teff = 1000 K, 1500 K). For the model brown dwarf atmosphere, the electron fraction is enhanced significantly by cosmic rays when the pressure pgas model atmosphere of the examp...

  8. A new method for imaging nuclear threats using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Rose, Evan; Watson, Scott; White, Tim [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Aberle, Derek; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Luki?, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Milner, Edward C. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States)] [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon tomography is a technique that uses cosmic ray muons to generate three dimensional images of volumes using information contained in the Coulomb scattering of the muons. Advantages of this technique are the ability of cosmic rays to penetrate significant overburden and the absence of any additional dose delivered to subjects under study above the natural cosmic ray flux. Disadvantages include the relatively long exposure times and poor position resolution and complex algorithms needed for reconstruction. Here we demonstrate a new method for obtaining improved position resolution and statistical precision for objects with spherical symmetry.

  9. Diffusion of Cosmic Rays in a Multiphase Interstellar Medium Swept-Up by a Supernova Remnant Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roh, Soonyoung; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are one of the most energetic astrophysical events and are thought to be the dominant source of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). A recent report on observations from the Fermi satellite has shown a signature of pion decay in the gamma-ray spectra of SNRs. This provides strong evidence that high-energy protons are accelerated in SNRs. The actual gamma-ray emission from pion decay should depend on the diffusion of CRs in the interstellar medium. In order to quantitatively analyse the diffusion of high-energy CRs from acceleration sites, we have performed test particle numerical simulations of CR protons using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of an interstellar medium swept-up by a blast wave. We analyse the diffusion of CRs at a length scale of order a few pc in our simulated SNR, and find the diffusion of CRs is precisely described by a Bohm diffusion, which is required for efficient acceleration at least for particles with energies above 30 TeV for a realistic int...

  10. Solar and Galactic Cosmic Rays observed by SOHO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curdt, Werner

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the Cosmic Ray Flux (CRF) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) have left an imprint on SOHO technical systems. While the solar array efficiency degraded irreversibly down to ~77% of its original level over roughly 1 1/2 solar cycles, Single Event Upsets (SEUs) in the solid state recorder (SSR) have been reversed by the memory protection mechanism. We compare the daily CRF observed by the Oulu station with the daily SOHO SEU rate and with the Degradation curve of the solar arrays. The Oulu CRF and the SOHO SSR SEU rate are both modulated by the solar cycle and are highly correlated, except for sharp spikes in the SEU rate, caused by isolated SEP events, which also show up as discontinuities in the otherwise slowly decreasing solar ray efficiency. This allows to discriminate between effects with solar and non-solar origin and to compare the relative strength of both. We find that during solar cycle 23 (1996 Apr 1 -- 2008 Aug 31) only 6% of the total number of SSR SEUs were caused by SEPs; the remaining 94%...

  11. Fundamental Physics from the Sky: Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and the Hunt for Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental nature of dark matter. I will discuss some of the recent puzzling findings in cosmic-ray electron-positron data and in gamma-ray observations that might be related to dark matter. I will argue that recent cosmic-ray data, most notably from the Pamela and Fermi satellites, indicate that previously unaccounted-for powerful sources in the Galaxy inject high-energy electrons and positrons. Interestingly, this new source class might be related to new fundamental particle physics, and specifically to pair-annihilation or decay of galactic dark matter. This exciting scenario is directly constrained by Fermi gamma-ray observations, which also inform us on astrophysical source counterparts that could also be responsible for the high-energy electron-positron excess. Observations of gamma-ra...

  12. Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Earth Planets Space, 62, 333­345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux of the shield prohibiting energetic particles of solar and cosmic origin directly hitting the Earth surface particles. 1. Introduction Planet Earth possesses a global magnetic field since at least 3.2 billion years

  13. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the BATSE 5B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the BATSE 5B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts K. Hurley Interplanetary Network (IPN) localization information for 343 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) mission, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts

  14. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BATSE CATALOGS OF UNTRIGGERED COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BATSE CATALOGS OF UNTRIGGERED COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed as untriggered events by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment to detect BATSE un- triggered bursts. Subject headinggs: catalogs -- gamma rays: bursts Online material

  15. COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN A SECTORED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE DISTANT HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florinski, V. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Alouani-Bibi, F.; Guo, X. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Kota, J. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Very high intensities of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 in the heliosheath appear to be incompatible with the presence of a modulation 'wall' near the heliopause produced by a pile up of the heliospheric magnetic field. We propose that the modulation wall is a structure permeable to cosmic rays as a result of a sectored magnetic field topology compressed by plasma slowdown on approach to the heliopause and stretched to high latitudes by latitudinal flows in the heliosheath. The tightly folded warped current sheet permits efficient cosmic-ray transport in the radial direction via a drift-like mechanism. We show that when stochastic variations in the sector widths are taken into account, particle transport becomes predominantly diffusive both along and across the magnetic sectors. Using a test-particle model for cosmic rays in the heliosheath we investigate the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the properties of the sector structure and on particle energy.

  16. average solar-cosmic-ray fluxes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    injection. D. Ruffolo; T. Khumlumlert 1995-06-28 3 Prospects for studies of high-energy solar cosmic rays with ATLAS HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: The ATLAS detector is...

  17. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4161 Light Flashes Observations On Board Mir And ISS With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    State Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow, Russia (7) Russian Space Corporation "Energia" Korolev of cosmic rays [14], to solar-terrestrial phenomena [8], to radiation environment in space and its effects

  18. Relative Composition and Energy Spectra of Light Nuclei in Cosmic Rays: Results from AMS-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, R.

    Measurement of the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays is essential for the precise understanding of their propagation in the galaxy. While the model parameters are mainly determined using the B/C ratio, the ...

  19. Search for microquasar features in cosmic ray spectra with AMS-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, Benjamin, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accreting x-ray binaries are sometimes observed to emit compact, relativistic jets of cool plasma; these objects are called "microquasars". It is possible that these jets are responsible for a large flux of galactic cosmic ...

  20. Neutrino, Neutron, and Cosmic Ray Production in the External Shock Model of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis that ultra-high energy (>~ 10^19 eV) cosmic rays (UHECRs) are accelerated by gamma-ray burst (GRB) blast waves is assumed to be correct. Implications of this assumption are then derived for the external shock model of gamma-ray bursts. The evolving synchrotron radiation spectrum in GRB blast waves provides target photons for the photomeson production of neutrinos and neutrons. Decay characteristics and radiative efficiencies of the neutral particles that escape from the blast wave are calculated. The diffuse high-energy GRB neutrino background and the distribution of high-energy GRB neutrino events are calculated for specific parameter sets, and a scaling relation for the photomeson production efficiency in surroundings with different densities is derived. GRBs provide an intense flux of high-energy neutrons, with neutron-production efficiencies exceeding ~ 1% of the total energy release. The radiative characteristics of the neutron beta-decay electrons from the GRB "neutron bomb" are solved in a special case. Galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by radiation halos of ~ 100 kpc extent from the outflowing neutrons, consisting of a nonthermal optical/X-ray synchrotron component and a high-energy gamma-ray component from Compton-scattered microwave background radiation. The luminosity of sources of GRBs and relativistic outflows in L* galaxies such as the Milky Way is at the level of ~10^40+-1 ergs/s. This is sufficient to account for UHECR generation by GRBs. We briefly speculate on the possibility that hadronic cosmic rays originate from the subset of supernovae that collapse to form relativistic outflows and GRBs. (abridged)

  1. Anisotropy of the primary cosmic-ray flux in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Oyama

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-ever 2-dimensional celestial map of primary cosmic-ray flux was obtained from 2.10x10^8 cosmic-ray muons accumulated in 1662.0 days of Super-Kamiokande. The celestial map indicates an (0.104 \\pm 0.020)% excess region in the constellation of Taurus and a -(0.094 \\pm 0.014)% deficit region toward Virgo. Interpretations of this anisotropy are discussed.

  2. Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons with PAMELA and studies of propagation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Wu

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the acceleration and propagation mechanisms of Galactic cosmic rays can provide information regarding astrophysical sources, the properties of our Galaxy, and possible exotic sources such as dark matter. To understand cosmic ray acceleration and propagation mechanisms, accurate measurements of different cosmic ray elements over a wide energy range are needed. The PAMELA experiment is a satellite-borne apparatus which allows different cosmic ray species to be identified over background. Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio from 1.5 GeV to 180 GeV are presented in this thesis. Compared to previous experiments, PAMELA extends the energy range of antiproton measurements and provides significantly higher statistics. The derived antiproton flux and antiproton-to-proton flux ratio are consistent with previous measurements and generally considered to be produced as secondary products when cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei interact with the interstellar medium. To constrain cosmic ray acceleration and propagation models, the antiproton data measured by PAMELA were further used together with the proton spectrum reported by PAMELA, as well as the B/C data provided by other experiments. Statistical tools were interfaced with the cosmic ray propagation package GALPROP to perform the constraining analyses. Diffusion models with a linear diffusion coefficient and modified diffusion models with a low energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient were studied in the $\\chi^{2}$ study. Uncertainties on the parameters and the goodness of fit of each model were given. Some models are further studied using the Bayesian inference. Posterior means and errors of the parameters base on our prior knowledge on them were obtained in the Bayesian framework. This method also allowed us to understand the correlation between parameters and compare models.

  3. RECORD-SETTING COSMIC-RAY INTENSITIES IN 2009 AND 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of record-setting intensities of cosmic-ray nuclei from C to Fe, made with the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer carried on the Advanced Composition Explorer in orbit about the inner Sun-Earth Lagrangian point. In the energy interval from {approx}70 to {approx}450 MeV nucleon{sup -1}, near the peak in the near-Earth cosmic-ray spectrum, the measured intensities of major species from C to Fe were each 20%-26% greater in late 2009 than in the 1997-1998 minimum and previous solar minima of the space age (1957-1997). The elevated intensities reported here and also at neutron monitor energies were undoubtedly due to several unusual aspects of the solar cycle 23/24 minimum, including record-low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensities, an extended period of reduced IMF turbulence, reduced solar-wind dynamic pressure, and extremely low solar activity during an extended solar minimum. The estimated parallel diffusion coefficient for cosmic-ray transport based on measured solar-wind properties was 44% greater in 2009 than in the 1997-1998 solar-minimum period. In addition, the weaker IMF should result in higher cosmic-ray drift velocities. Cosmic-ray intensity variations at 1 AU are found to lag IMF variations by 2-3 solar rotations, indicating that significant solar modulation occurs inside {approx}20 AU, consistent with earlier galactic cosmic-ray radial-gradient measurements. In 2010, the intensities suddenly decreased to 1997 levels following increases in solar activity and in the inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. We describe the conditions that gave cosmic rays greater access to the inner solar system and discuss some of their implications.

  4. UHECR ESCAPE MECHANISMS FOR PROTONS AND NEUTRONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND THE COSMIC-RAY-NEUTRINO CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter, E-mail: philipp.baerwald@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: mauricio.bustamante@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: winter@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The paradigm that gamma-ray burst fireballs are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being probed by neutrino observations. Very stringent bounds can be obtained from the cosmic-ray (proton)-neutrino connection, assuming that the UHECRs escape as neutrons. In this study, we identify three different regimes as a function of the fireball parameters: the standard ''one neutrino per cosmic ray'' case, the optically thick (to neutron escape) case, and the case where leakage of protons from the boundaries of the shells (direct escape) dominates. In the optically thick regime, the photomeson production is very efficient, and more neutrinos will be emitted per cosmic ray than in the standard case, whereas in the direct escape-dominated regime, more cosmic rays than neutrinos will be emitted. We demonstrate that, for efficient proton acceleration, which is required to describe the observed UHECR spectrum, the standard case only applies to a very narrow region of the fireball parameter space. We illustrate with several observed examples that conclusions on the cosmic-ray-neutrino connection will depend on the actual burst parameters. We also show that the definition of the pion production efficiency currently used by the IceCube collaboration underestimates the neutrino production in the optically thick case. Finally, we point out that the direct escape component leads to a spectral break in the cosmic-ray spectrum emitted from a single source. The resulting ''two-component model'' can be used to even more strongly pronounce the spectral features of the observed UHECR spectrum than the dip model.

  5. Temporal and energy behavior of cosmic ray fluxes in the periods of low solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazilevskaya, G A; Krainev, M B; Makhmutov, V S; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of galactic cosmic ray intensity is governed by several mechanisms including diffusion, convection, adiabatic energy losses and drift. Relative roles of these factors change in the course of an 11-year solar cycle. That can result in the changes in the energy dependence of the 11-year cosmic ray modulation. The minimum between the solar cycles 23 and 24 was extremely deep and long-lasting which led to the record high cosmic ray fluxes low-energy particles dominating. This was a signature of unusually soft energy spectrum of the cosmic rays. In this work we examine the energy dependence of the 11-year modulation during the last three solar cycles and argue that a soft energy spectrum was observed in the minimum of each cycle however only for particles below of energy around 10 GeV. From mid 1980s the energy dependence of cosmic rays became softer from minimum to minimum of solar activity. The work is based on the cosmic ray data of the spacecraft, balloon-borne and the ground-based observations.

  6. Commissioning of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger with Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Pauly

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system was designed to select potentially interesting events and reduce the incoming rate to 100-200 Hz. The first trigger level (LVL1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the second and third trigger levels are realized in software. Based on calorimeter information and hits in dedicated muon-trigger detectors, the LVL1 decision is made by the central-trigger processor yielding an output rate of less than 100 kHz. The allowed latency for the trigger decision at this stage is less than 2.5 microseconds. Installation of the final LVL1 trigger system at the ATLAS site is in full swing, to be completed later this year. We present a status report of the main components of the first-level trigger and the in-situ commissioning of the full trigger chain with cosmic-ray muons.

  7. THE EFFECT OF A COSMIC RAY PRECURSOR IN SN 1006?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cara E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7671, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Laming, J. Martin [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7674L, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hwang, Una [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P. [Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like many young supernova remnants, SN 1006 exhibits what appear to be clumps of ejecta close to or protruding beyond the main blast wave. In this Letter, we examine three such protrusions along the east rim. They are semi-aligned with ejecta fingers behind the shock-front and exhibit emission lines from O VII and O VIII. We first interpret them in the context of an upstream medium modified by the saturated non-resonant Bell instability which enhances the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities when advected post-shock. We discuss their apparent periodicity if the spacing is determined by properties of the remnant or by a preferred size scale in the cosmic ray precursor. We also briefly discuss the alternative that these structures have an origin in the ejecta structure of the explosion itself. In this case, the young evolutionary age of SN 1006 would imply density structure within the outermost layers of the explosion with potentially important implications for deflagration and detonation in thermonuclear supernova explosion models.

  8. Transitional solar dynamics, cosmic rays and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity is studied using a cluster analysis of the time-fluctuations of the sunspot number. It is shown that in an Historic period the high activity components of the solar cycles exhibit strong clustering, whereas in a Modern period (last seven solar cycles: 1933-2007) they exhibit a white-noise (non-)clustering behavior. Using this observation it is shown that in the Historic period, emergence of the sunspots in the solar photosphere was strongly dominated by turbulent photospheric convection. In the Modern period, this domination was broken by a new more active dynamics of the inner layers of the convection zone. Then, it is shown that the dramatic change of the sun dynamics at the transitional period (between the Historic and Modern periods, solar cycle 1933-1944yy) had a clear detectable impact on Earth climate. A scenario of a chain of transitions in the solar convective zone is suggested in order to explain the observations, and a forecast for the global warming is suggested on the basis of this scenario. A relation between the recent transitions and solar long-period chaotic dynamics has been found. Contribution of the galactic turbulence (due to galactic cosmic rays) has been discussed. These results are also considered in a content of chaotic climate dynamics at millennial timescales.

  9. COSMOCR: A Numerical Code for Cosmic Ray Studies in Computational Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Miniati

    2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present COSMOCR, a numerical code for the investigation of cosmic ray related studies in computational cosmology. The code follows the diffusive shock acceleration, the mechanical and radiative energy losses and the spatial transport of the supra-thermal particles in cosmic environment. Primary cosmic ray electrons and ions are injected at shocks according to the thermal leakage prescription. Secondary electrons are continuously injected as a results of p-p inelastic collisions of primary cosmic ray ions and thermal background nuclei. The code consists of a conservative, finite volume method with a power-law sub-grid model in momentum space. Two slightly different schemes are implemented depending on the stiffness of the cooling terms. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solution for a number of tests of direct interest show remarkable performance of the present code.

  10. Production of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays via one-shot acceleration of galactic cosmic rays by jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above $10^{18}$eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub "espresso" acceleration: "seed" galactic CRs with energies $\\lesssim 10^{17}$eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a "one-shot" boost of a factor of $\\sim\\Gamma^2$ in energy, where $\\Gamma$ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few per cent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with $\\Gamma\\gtrsim 30$ may accelerate UHECRs up to more than $10^{20}$eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by the one at the Galactic CR knee, and is expected to be proton-dominated at $10^{18}$eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  11. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutron-Decay Halos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments concerning power and acceleration efficiency show that ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRS) with energies >~ 10^{19} eV could originate from GRBs. Neutrons formed through photo-pion production processes in GRB blast waves leave the acceleration site and travel through intergalactic space, where they decay and inject a very energetic proton and electron component into intergalactic space. The neutron-decay protons form a component of the UHECRs, whereas the neutron-decay electrons produce optical/X-ray synchrotron and gamma radiation from Compton-scattered background radiation. A significant fraction of galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by neutron-decay halos of characteristic size ~ 100 kpc.

  12. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Numerical model of cosmic ray induced ionization in the atmosphere CRAC:CRII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mironova, Irina A.

    ¨a Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Finland 2 Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St provided the energy spectrum of incoming cosmic rays is known. It computes the background ionization due this a new model we evaluate the ionization effects in the atmosphere caused by several major solar energetic

  13. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Peter Gorham

    2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR will be capable of detecting air-shower radio emission from >2*10^14 eV to ~10^20 eV. The technique could be easily extended to include air shower arrays consisting of particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger), thus providing crucial additional information for obtaining energy and chemical composition of cosmic rays. It also has the potential to extend the cosmic ray search well beyond an energy of 10^21 eV if isotropic radio signatures can be found. Other issues that LOFAR can address are to determine the neutral component of the cosmic ray spectrum, possibly look for neutron bursts, and do actual cosmic ray astronomy.

  14. UHE Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos Showering on Planet Edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; P. Oliva; O. Lanciano

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Energy (UHE) Cosmic Rays, UHECR, may graze high altitude atmosphere leading to horizontal upward air-showers. Also PeVs electron antineutrino hitting electron in atmosphere may air-shower at W boson resonant mass. On the other side ultra high energy muon and electron neutrinos may also lead, by UHE neutrinos mass state mixing, to the rise of a corresponding UHE Tau neutrino flavor; the consequent UHE tau neutrinos, via charge current interactions in matter, may create UHE taus at horizons (Earth skimming neutrinos or Hor-taus) whose escape in atmosphere and whose consequent decay in flight, may be later amplified by upward showering on terrestrial, planetary atmospheres. Indeed because of the finite terrestrial radius, its thin atmosphere size its dense crust, the UHE tau cannot extend much more than 360 kilometers in air, corresponding to an energy of about 7.2 EeV, near but below GZK cut-off ones; on the contrary Jupiter (or even Saturn) may offer a wider, less dense and thicker gaseous layer at the horizons where Tau may loose little energy, travel longer before decay and rise and shower at 4-6 10^{19} eV or ZeV extreme energy. Titan atmosphere may open a rare window of opportunity for Up-ward Taus at PeVs. Also solar atmosphere may play a role, but unfortunately tau-showers secondaries maybe are too noisy to be disentangled, while Jupiter atmosphere, or better, Saturn one, may offer a clearer imprint for GZK (and higher Z-Burst) Tau showering, well below the horizons edges.

  15. Probing the Cosmic Ray Population of the Giant Elliptical Galaxy M 87 with Observed TeV Gamma-Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Pfrommer; Torsten A. Ensslin

    2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the cosmic ray proton (CRp) population within the giant elliptical galaxy M 87 using the TeV gamma-ray detection of the HEGRA collaboration. In our scenario, the gamma-rays are produced by decaying pions which result from hadronic CRp interactions with thermal gas of the interstellar medium of M 87. By comparing the gamma-ray emission to upper limits of EGRET, we constrain the spectral index of the CRp population to alpha(GeV,TeV) radial gamma-ray profile and the required amount of CRp support this hadronic scenario. The accompanying radio mini-halo of hadronically originating cosmic ray electrons is outshone by the synchrotron emission of the relativistic jet of M 87 by one order of magnitude. According to our predictions, the future GLAST mission should allow us to test this hadronic scenario.

  16. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  17. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelling, M.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Hashim, N.O.; /Kenyatta U. Coll.; Grupen, C.; /Siegen U.; Luitz, S.; /SLAC; Maciuc, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Mailov, A.; /Siegen U.; Muller, A.-S.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Sander, H.-G.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Schmeling, S.; /CERN; Tcaciuc, R.; /Siegen U.; Wachsmuth, H.; /CERN; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  18. Prompt TeV Emission from Cosmic Rays Accelerated by Gamma Ray Bursts Interacting with Surrounding Stellar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebur Razzaque; Olga Mena; Charles D. Dermer

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Protons accelerated in the internal shocks of a long duration gamma ray burst can escape the fireball as cosmic rays by converting to neutrons. Hadronic interactions of these neutrons inside a stellar wind bubble created by the progenitor star will produce TeV gamma rays via neutral meson decay and synchrotron radiation by charged pion-decay electrons in the wind magnetic field. Such gamma rays should be observable from nearby gamma ray bursts by currently running and upcoming ground-based detectors.

  19. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  20. Neutrino and cosmic-ray release from gamma-ray bursts: Time-dependent simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, Katsuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Mészáros, Peter, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nnp@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) production from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with time-dependent simulations for the proton-induced cascades. This method can generate self-consistent photon, neutrino, and escaped neutron spectra. To obtain the integrated background spectra, we take into account the distributions of the burst luminosity and pulse duration timescale. A benchmark case with standard GRB luminosity function, a bulk Lorentz factor ? = 300, and a proton to gamma-ray luminosity fraction f{sub p} = 10 is consistent with both the neutrino upper limits and the observed UHECR intensity at ?10{sup 20} eV, while requiring a different type of UHECR source at the ankle. For the benchmark case, the GRBs in the bright end of the luminosity function, which contribute most of the neutrinos, have their photon spectrum substantially distorted by secondary photons. Such bright GRBs are few in number, and reducing their f{sub p} eliminates the distortion and reduces the neutrino production. Even if we neglect the contribution of the brightest GRBs, the UHECR production rate at energies corresponding to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin limit is almost unchanged. These nominal GRB models, especially with L {sub iso} ? 10{sup 53} erg s{sup –1}, appear to meet the current constraints as far as being candidate UHECR sources above the ankle energy.

  1. Observation of Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-Borne Radio Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, S.; Belov, K.; Vieregg, A. G.; Saltzberg, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Nam, J. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Miki, C.; Miocinovic, P.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Varner, G. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Grashorn, E.; Beatty, J. J.; Mercurio, B. C.; Palladino, K. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of 16 cosmic ray events with a mean energy of 1.5x10{sup 19} eV via radio pulses originating from the interaction of the cosmic ray air shower with the Antarctic geomagnetic field, a process known as geosynchrotron emission. We present measurements in the 300-900 MHz range, which are the first self-triggered, first ultrawide band, first far-field, and the highest energy sample of cosmic ray events collected with the radio technique. Their properties are inconsistent with current ground-based geosynchrotron models. The emission is 100% polarized in the plane perpendicular to the projected geomagnetic field. Fourteen events are seen to have a phase inversion due to reflection of the radio beam off the ice surface, and two additional events are seen directly from above the horizon. Based on a likelihood analysis, we estimate angular pointing precision of order 2 deg. for the event arrival directions.

  2. Radio emission of highly inclined cosmic ray air showers measured with LOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelena Petrovic LOPES collaboration

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    LOPES-10 (the first phase of LOPES, consisting of 10 antennas) detected a significant number of cosmic ray air showers with a zenith angle larger than 50$^{\\circ}$, and many of these have very high radio field strengths. The most inclined event that has been detected with LOPES-10 has a zenith angle of almost 80$^{\\circ}$. This is proof that the new technique is also applicable for cosmic ray air showers with high inclinations, which in the case that they are initiated close to the ground, can be a signature of neutrino events.Our results indicate that arrays of simple radio antennas can be used for the detection of highly inclined air showers, which might be triggered by neutrinos. In addition, we found that the radio pulse height (normalized with the muon number) for highly inclined events increases with the geomagnetic angle, which confirms the geomagnetic origin of radio emission in cosmic ray air showers.

  3. Cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aplin, K L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays produce charged molecular clusters by ionisation as they pass through the lower atmosphere. Neutral molecular clusters such as dimers and complexes are expected to make a small contribution to the radiative balance, but atmospheric absorption by charged clusters has not hitherto been observed. In an atmospheric experiment, a filter radiometer tuned to the 9.15 um absorption band associated with infra-red absorption of charged molecular clusters was used to monitor changes immediately following events identified by a cosmic ray telescope sensitive to high energy (>400MeV) particles, principally muons. The change in longwave radiation in this absorption band due to charged molecular clusters is 7 mW^m-2. The integrated atmospheric energy change for each event is 2J, representing an amplification factor of 10^10 compared to the 2GeV energy of a typical tropospheric cosmic ray. This absorption is expected to occur continuously and globally.

  4. Indications of Negative Evolution for the Sources of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Andrew M; Hooper, Dan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using recent measurements of the spectrum and chemical composition of the highest energy cosmic rays, we consider the sources of these particles. We find that the data strongly prefers models in which the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays inject predominantly intermediate mass nuclei, with comparatively few protons or heavy nuclei, such as iron or silicon. If the number density of sources per comoving volume does not evolve with redshift, the injected spectrum must be very hard ($\\alpha\\simeq 1$) in order to fit the spectrum observed at Earth. Such a hard spectral index would be surprising and difficult to accommodate theoretically. In contrast, much softer spectral indices, consistent with the predictions of Fermi acceleration ($\\alpha\\simeq 2$), are favored in models with negative source evolution. With this theoretical bias, these observations thus favor models in which the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays are preferentially located within the low-redshift universe.

  5. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and the Production of Cosmogenic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated version of the {\\it SimProp} Monte Carlo code to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays in astrophysical backgrounds computing the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on earth. The study of secondary neutrinos provides a powerful tool to constrain the source models of these extremely energetic particles. We will show how the newly detected IceCube neutrino events at PeV energies together with the the latest experimental results of the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment are almost at the level of excluding several hypothesis on the astrophysical sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Results presented here can be also used to evaluate the discovery capabilities of future high energy cosmic rays and neutrino detectors.

  6. Theoretical uncertainties in extracting cosmic-ray diffusion parameters: the boron-to-carbon ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genolini, Y; Salati, P; Serpico, P D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic-ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron-to-carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions obtained crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as from some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependencies. We compare different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy. We test for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its f...

  7. On the Observation of the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy below 10$^{15}$ eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Di Sciascio; R. Iuppa

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays is complementary to the study of their energy spectrum and chemical composition to understand their origin and propagation. It is also a tool to probe the structure of the magnetic fields through which cosmic rays travel. As cosmic rays are mostly charged nuclei, their trajectories are deflected by the action of galactic magnetic field they propagate through before reaching the Earth atmosphere, so that their detection carries directional information only up to distances as large as their gyro-radius. If cosmic rays below $10^{15}{\\rm\\,eV}$ are considered and the local galactic magnetic field ($\\sim3{\\rm\\,\\mu G}$) is accounted for, gyro-radii are so short that isotropy is expected. At most, a weak di-polar distribution may exist, reflecting the contribution of the closest CR sources. However, a number of experiments observed an energy-dependent \\emph{"large scale"} anisotropy in the sidereal time frame with an amplitude of about 10$^{-4}$ - 10$^{-3}$, revealing the existence of two distinct broad regions: an excess distributed around 40$^{\\circ}$ to 90$^{\\circ}$ in Right Ascension (commonly referred to as "tail.in" excess) and a deficit (the "loss cone") around 150$^{\\circ}$ to 240$^{\\circ}$ in Right Ascension. In recent years the Milagro and ARGO-YBJ collaborations reported the of a "medium" scale anisotropy inside the tail-in region. The observation of such small features has been recently claimed by the IceCube experiment also in the Southern hemisphere. So far, no theory of cosmic rays in the Galaxy exists which is able to explain the origin of these different anisotropies leaving the standard model of cosmic rays and that of the galactic magnetic field unchanged at the same time.

  8. Comparison of cosmic ray flux at sqrt(s) > 14 TeV with LHC luminosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Taylor

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy cosmic ray flux impinging on the sun and earth for 4 Gyr is compared to the operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at design energy and luminosity. It is shown by two different calculations that both the integrated luminosity and the total hadronic interaction rate from the cosmic ray flux of comparable energy are many orders of magnitude larger than that of the LHC operated for 10 years. This study indicates that it is extremely unlikely that pernicious exotic particles, such as mini-black holes, would be produced by the LHC that would destroy the earth.

  9. Consequences of parton's saturation and string's percolation on the developments of cosmic ray showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Pajares; D. Sousa; R. A. Vázquez

    2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At high gluon or string densities, gluons' saturation or the strong interaction among strings, either forming colour ropes or giving rise to string's percolation, induces a strong suppression in the particle multiplicities produced at high energy. This suppression implies important modifications on cosmic ray shower development. In particular, it is shown that it affects the depth of maximum, the elongation rate, and the behaviour of the number of muons at energies around 10^{17}-10^{18} eV. The existing cosmic ray data point out in the same direction.

  10. Cosmic ray spectrum by energy scattered by EAS particles in the atmosphere and galactic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Knurenko; A. A. Ivanov; A. V. Sabourov

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential energy spectrum of cosmic rays from Cherenkov radiation measurements in EAS in the energy range of 10^15-10^20eV has been compared with an anomalous diffusion model for the particles in interstellar space having fractal properties (Lagutin et al, 2001). The close association between experimental data and calculated "all particle" spectra in form at E(0) (10^15-10^18)eV is found. In this case, the average mass composition of cosmic rays calculated by five components does not contradict the average mass composition from experimental data which was obtained by several of EAS characteristics in that energy region.

  11. Contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Johnson

    1994-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution to the local cosmic-ray flux from the Geminga supernova is calculated assuming shock acceleration to 10^14 eV in a remnant which was formed several 10^5 years ago along with the Geminga pulsar. The particles are propagated to Earth using a simple diffusion model. In the region below the knee in the spectrum, it is found the supernova may contribute 10% of the local cosmic-ray flux, assuming plausible explosion parameters. The contribution to the amplitude of the anisotropy is not in conflict with the data in this energy region.

  12. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 17911796 Cosmic ray-induced ionization in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 66 (2004) 1791­1796 Cosmic ray, Finland b Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St.Petersburg, Russia Received 5 November 2003 are presented using a physical model. Using the differential energy spectrum of cosmic rays obtained from

  13. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

  14. Signatures of a two million year old supernova in the spectra of cosmic ray protons, antiprotons and positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachelriess, M; Semikoz, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above $\\sim 20$ GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active $\\sim 2$ Myr ago and has injected $(1-2)\\times 10^{50}$ erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited $^{60}$Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust.

  15. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Esquivel; D. Page

    2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficiency of acceleration is estimated to be about $\\eta \\sim 10^{-2.5}$. Due to their age, low mass X-ray binary systems can be located in regions of low interstellar medium density as, e.g., globular clusters or even intergalactic medium in case of high proper motion systems, and cosmic ray energy losses due to proton collisions with photons at the decelerating region are avoided, thus opening the possibility for particles to exploit the full voltage available, well beyond that currently observed.

  16. Measurement of electron production from cosmic rays in the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Jana

    The special topology of cosmic events traversing all subdetectors offers the unique opportunity to investigate the combined performance of the ATLAS detector in identifying and reconstructing particles before first proton collisions at the LHC. Through interaction with the inner detector material or through decays high-energy electrons can be produced from the traversing cosmic muons. A sample of 3.5 million cosmic ray events with a high-level trigger track candidate in the central part of the inner detector is used as a basis to extract the electrons from the different processes. To separate the electrons from the large background of muon bremsstrahlung among the about 10000 candidates, the characteristic properties of electrons in the detector are exploited accounting for the special nature of cosmic events. The resulting extraction of about 34 electrons mainly originating from ionisations enables an observation and investigation of real electrons in

  17. A Gamma-Ray Burst/Pulsar for Cosmic-Ray Positrons with a Dark Matter-like Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihito Ioka

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that a nearby gamma-ray burst (GRB) or GRB-like (old, single and short-lived) pulsar/supernova remnant/microquasar about 10^{5-6} years ago may be responsible for the excesses of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons recently observed by the PAMELA, ATIC/PPB-BETS, Fermi and HESS experiments. We can reproduce the smooth Fermi/HESS spectra as well as the spiky ATIC/PPB-BETS spectra. The spectra have a sharp cutoff that is similar to the dark matter predictions, sometimes together with a line (not similar), since higher energy cosmic-rays cool faster where the cutoff/line energy marks the source age. A GRB-like astrophysical source is expected to have a small but finite spread in the cutoff/line as well as anisotropy in the cosmic-ray and diffuse gamma-ray flux, providing a method for the Fermi and future CALET experiments to discriminate between dark matter and astrophysical origins.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF THE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS WITH ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K., E-mail: rasha.abbasi@icecube.wisc.ed, E-mail: paolo.desiati@icecube.wisc.ed [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of an anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays with energies in the multi-TeV region in the Southern sky using data from the IceCube detector. Between 2007 June and 2008 March, the partially deployed IceCube detector was operated in a configuration with 1320 digital optical sensors distributed over 22 strings at depths between 1450 and 2450 m inside the Antarctic ice. IceCube is a neutrino detector, but the data are dominated by a large background of cosmic-ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the southern sky. The data include 4.3 billion muons produced by downward-going cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere; these events were reconstructed with a median angular resolution of 3{sup 0} and a median energy of {approx}20 TeV. Their arrival direction distribution exhibits an anisotropy in right ascension with a first-harmonic amplitude of (6.4 {+-} 0.2 stat. {+-} 0.8 syst.) x 10{sup -4}.

  19. QuarkNet Cosmic Ray Detector Assembly Instructions for Series 6000 Version: 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    1 QuarkNet Cosmic Ray Detector Assembly Instructions for Series 6000 Version: 2.2 Date: 31 Aug 2007 Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for optical couplant. · Seat all plugs completely: Improperly seated plugs can." Signal Extension Cables for PMTs (4) 50 ft. cables with male BNC connectors on each end Power Extension

  20. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 On neutrino oscillations searches with ANTARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 On neutrino oscillations searches guillard@in2p3.fr Abstract: Although the first evidence for neutrino oscillations came from measurements on atmospheric neutrinos in underground experiments, neutrino oscillations have yet to be demonstrated in high

  1. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Calibration of TA Surface Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -8582,Japan 2 Graduate School of Science,Osaka City University ,3-3-138 Sugimoto Sumiyoshiku Osaka, 558,USA. The detector consists of two layers of plastic scintillators of 3m2 area with wave length shifter fiber energy cosmic ray particle. In the energy spec- trum measured by the AGASA[1] and HiRes[2] experiments

  2. Calibration of the Milagro Cosmic Ray telescope. Lazar Fleysher 1 for the Milagro Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    OG.4.4.03 Calibration of the Milagro Cosmic Ray telescope. Lazar Fleysher 1 for the Milagro to improve the time resolution. The calibration system to provide these consists of a pulsed laser driving 30 diffusing light sources deployed in the pond to allow cross­calibration of the PMTs. The system is capable

  3. Detection of high energy cosmic rays with the resonant gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS and EXPLORER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Bonifazi; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; G. Giordano; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; R. Terenzi; M. Visco

    2008-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The cryogenic resonant gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER, made of an aluminum alloy bar, can detect cosmic ray showers. At temperatures above 1 K, when the material is in the normal conducting state, the measured signals are in good agreement with the values expected based on the cosmic rays data and on the thermo-acoustic model. When NAUTILUS was operated at the temperature of 0.14 K, in superconductive state, large signals produced by cosmic ray interactions, more energetic than expected, were recorded. The NAUTILUS data in this case are in agreement with the measurements done by a dedicated experiment on a particle beam. The biggest recorded event was in EXPLORER and excited the first longitudinal mode to a vibrational energy of about 670 K, corresponding to about 360 TeV absorbed in the bar. Cosmic rays can be an important background in future acoustic detectors of improved sensitivity. At present, they represent a useful tool to verify the gravitational wave antenna performance.

  4. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays A. A. Abdo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , California, USA 7 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA 8 George Mason University, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F., Mexico 11 Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, Virginia a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4:6, and it is consistent

  5. Cosmic Rays from the Knee to the Ankle - Status and Prospects -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl-Heinz Kampert

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in cosmic ray physics covering the energy range from about 10^{14} eV to 10^{19} eV is reviewed. The most prominent features of the energy spectrum are the so called `knee' at E ~ 3 * 10^{15} eV and the `ankle' at few 10^{18} eV. Generally, the origin of the knee is understood as marking the limiting energy of galactic accelerators and/or the onset of increasing outflow of particles from the galaxy while the ankle is considered to mark the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. Alternative theories do exist and shall be sketched. A key observable to answer the still open questions about the cosmic ray origin and to discriminate between various models is given by measuring the chemical composition or - more directly - by measuring energy spectra of individual cosmic ray mass groups. The status of present analyses is critically discussed and new experimental endeavors carried out in order to improve both the statistics and the quality of data particularly at energies above the knee will be summarized.

  6. General Solution of a Fractional Diffusion-Advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Rocca; A. R. Plastino; A. Plastino; A. L. De Paoli

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this effort we exactly solve the fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport proposed in \\cite{LE2014} and give its {\\it general solution} in terms of hypergeometric distributions. Also, we regain all the results and approximations given in \\cite{LE2014} as {\\it particular cases} of our general solution.

  7. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)] [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  8. Solar and galactic cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere I. Usoskin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    with the location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Two main components are important for CRII: (1) high energy modulation and (2) sporadic solar energetic particles of lower energy but high peak flux. The effect of bothSolar and galactic cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere I. Usoskin1 , L. Desorgher2 , P. Velinov3

  9. Solar Physics (2004) 224: 335343 C Springer 2005 RAPID COSMIC RAY FLUCTUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Solar Physics (2004) 224: 335­343 C Springer 2005 RAPID COSMIC RAY FLUCTUATIONS: EVIDENCE Observatory (Oulu unit), P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, Finland (e-mail: ilya.usoskin@oulu.fi) 3Department of Physical Sciences, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, Finland (Received 10

  10. Forecast of the arrival of interplanetary shocks by measuring cosmic ray fluctuations in the interplanetary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    interplanetary shocks, for which a large flux of low-energy particles (10 keV - 10 MeV) of solar. of Physics, University of Oulu, Finland E-mail: ilya.usoskin@oulu.fi Abstract. Here we present a method cosmic ray fluctuations and solar wind parameters measured onboard the ACE spacecraft. The method

  11. 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy 5005, Australia 2 Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Mart´in Norte 304, (5613) Malarg¨ue, Mendoza design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes

  12. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 4245 Relative Nuclear Abundances Measurements Inside Mir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    ) Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow, Russia (7) Russian Space Corporation "Energia parameters: 1. from the cosmic ray flux, depending on long and short term solar phenomena such as solar cycle and Solar Particle Events respectively; 2. from the construction (hull shielding) and orbit

  13. Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano with cosmic ray muon radiography"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Yosuke

    Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano with cosmic ray.1029/2011JB008256. [1] In the paper "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano. Aoki, R. Nishiyama, D. Shoji, and H. Tsuiji (2011), Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial

  14. A Lookup Table to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry changes. We have created a table that, with the use of the NGSFC code can be used to simulate the effects of high energy cosmic rays (10 GeV to 1 PeV) ionizing the atmosphere. By interpolation, the table can be used to generate values for other...

  15. The sensitivity of the next generation of lunar Cherenkov observations to UHE neutrinos and cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. James; R. J. Protheroe

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present simulation results for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino interactions in the Moon by radio-telescopes. We simulate the expected radio signal at Earth from such interactions, expanding on previous work to include interactions in the sub-regolith layer for single dish and multiple telescope systems. For previous experiments at Parkes, Goldstone, and Kalyazin we recalculate the sensitivity to an isotropic flux of UHE neutrinos. Our predicted sensitivity for future experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) indicate these instruments will be able to detect the more optimistic UHE neutrino flux predictions, while the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will also be sensitive to all bar one prediction of a diffuse `cosmogenic', or `GZK', neutrino flux. Current uncertainties concerning the structure and roughness of the lunar surface prevents an accurate calculation of the sensitivity of the lunar Cherenkov technique for UHE cosmic ray astronomy at high frequencies. However, below 200 MHz we find that the proposed SKA low-frequency aperture array should be able to detect events above 56 EeV at a rate about 30 times that of the current Pierre Auger Observatory. This would allow directional analysis of UHE cosmic rays, and investigation of correlations with putative cosmic ray source populations, to be conducted with very high statistics.

  16. The cosmic ray primary composition at the knee region from lateral distributions of atmospheric C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -8530, Japan g Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz 8635, Bolivia h in the energy range from 1014.5 to 1016 eV, so called knee region. The atmospheric C erenkov photon detectors. Introduction The energy spectrum of cosmic rays is expressed by power law in the wide energy range from 1010

  17. High Latitude, Translucent Molecular Clouds as Probes of Local Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, R D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the gamma-ray emission from 9 high latitude, translucent molecular clouds taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) between 250 MeV and 10 GeV. Observations of gamma-rays allow us to probe the density and spectrum of cosmic rays in the solar neighborhood. The clouds studied lie within $\\sim\\!$270 pc from the Sun and are selected from the Planck all-sky CO map. Gamma-rays in this energy range mostly result from cosmic ray interactions with the interstellar medium, which is traced with three components: HI, CO, and dark gas. Every cloud is detected and shows significant, extended gamma-ray emission from molecular gas. The gamma-ray emission is dominated by the CO-emitting gas in some clouds, but by the CO-dark gas in others. The average emissivity and gamma-ray power law index from HI above 1 GeV shows no evidence of a systematic variation. The CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor shows no variation between clouds over this small spatial range, but shows significant variations within each cloud. The a...

  18. Method to extract the primary cosmic ray spectrum from very high energy gamma-ray data and its application to SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Villante; F. Vissani

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova remnants are likely to be the accelerators of the galactic cosmic rays. Assuming the correctness of this hypothesis, we develop a method to extract the parent cosmic ray spectrum from the VHE gamma ray flux emitted by supernova remnants (and other gamma transparent sources). Namely, we calculate semi-analytically the (inverse) operator which relates an arbitrary gamma ray flux to the parent cosmic ray spectrum, without relying on any theoretical assumption about the shape of the cosmic ray and/or photon spectrum. We illustrate the use of this technique by applying it to the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 which has been observed by H.E.S.S. experiment during the last three years. Specific implementations of the method permit to use as an input either the parameterized VHE gamma ray flux or directly the raw data. The possibility to detect features in the cosmic rays spectrum and the error in the determination of the parent cosmic ray spectrum are also discussed.

  19. Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramińana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Leó, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Riviére, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Velasco, E; Ryan, J; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseńor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on $4.9\\times 10^{10}$ events recorded between June 2013 and February 2014 shows anisotropy at the $10^{-4}$ level on angular scales of about $10^\\circ$. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to $\\ell=15$ contribute significantly to the excesses.

  20. High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Signatures of Superconducting Cosmic Strings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Cheng; Yun-Wei Yu; T. Harko

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRBs 080913 and 090423, challenge the conventional GRB progenitor models by their short durations, typical for short GRBs, and their high energy releases, typical for long GRBs. Meanwhile, the GRB rate inferred from high-redshift GRBs also remarkably exceeds the prediction of the collapsar model, with an ordinary star formation history. We show that all these contradictions could be eliminated naturally, if we ascribe some high-redshift GRBs to electromagnetic bursts of superconducting cosmic strings. High-redshift GRBs could become a reasonable way to test the superconducting cosmic string model, because the event rate of cosmic string bursts increases rapidly with increasing redshifts, whereas the collapsar rate decreases.

  1. Update on the correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, IST

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory through 31 August 2007 showed evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin energy threshold, 6 x 10{sup 19} eV. The anisotropy was measured by the fraction of arrival directions that are less than 3.1{sup o} from the position of an active galactic nucleus within 75 Mpc (using the Veron-Cetty and Veron 12th catalog). An updated measurement of this fraction is reported here using the arrival directions of cosmic rays recorded above the same energy threshold through 31 December 2009. The number of arrival directions has increased from 27 to 69, allowing a more precise measurement. The correlating fraction is (38{sub -6}{sup +7})%, compared with 21% expected for isotropic cosmic rays. This is down from the early estimate of (69{sub -13}{sup +11})%. The enlarged set of arrival directions is examined also in relation to other populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2 Microns All Sky Survey and active galactic nuclei detected in hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. A celestial region around the position of the radiogalaxy Cen A has the largest excess of arrival directions relative to isotropic expectations. The 2-point autocorrelation function is shown for the enlarged set of arrival directions and compared to the isotropic expectation.

  2. X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lehmer, B.; Tzanavaris, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tremmel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Belczynski, K. [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland)] [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Kalogera, V., E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High-redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). In this paper, we present results from a large-scale population synthesis study that models the XRB populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II cosmological simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from XRB populations with properties such as SFR and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from XRBs in our universe today is dominated by low-mass XRBs, and it is only at z {approx}> 2.5 that high-mass XRBs become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of {approx}1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 2.1) and the peak of SFR density (at z {approx} 3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 3.9) happens {approx}0.8 Gyr before the peak of the SFR density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the universe.

  3. Cosmic Ray Test of Mini-drift Thick Gas Electron Multiplier Chamber for Transition Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Yang; S. Das; B. Buck; C. Li; T. Ljubicic; R. Majka; M. Shao; N. Smirnov; G. Visser; Z. Xu; Y. Zhou

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) chamber with an effective readout area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^{2}$ and a 11.3 mm ionization gap has been tested along with two regular gas electron multiplier (GEM) chambers in a cosmic ray test system. The thick ionization gap makes the THGEM chamber a mini-drift chamber. This kind mini-drift THGEM chamber is proposed as part of a transition radiation detector (TRD) for identifying electrons at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) experiment. Through this cosmic ray test, an efficiency larger than 94$\\%$ and a spatial resolution $\\sim$220 $\\mu$m are achieved for the THGEM chamber at -3.65 kV. Thanks to its outstanding spatial resolution and thick ionization gap, the THGEM chamber shows excellent track reconstruction capability. The gain uniformity and stability of the THGEM chamber are also presented.

  4. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; et al

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe themore »design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.« less

  5. Effects of Turbulence on Cosmic Ray Propagation in Protostars and Young Star/Disk Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatuzzo, Marco

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic fields associated with young stellar objects are expected to have an hour-glass geometry, i.e., the magnetic field lines are pinched as they thread the equatorial plane surrounding the forming star but merge smoothly onto a background field at large distances. With this field configuration, incoming cosmic rays experience both a funneling effect that acts to enhance the flux impinging on the circumstellar disk and a magnetic mirroring effect that acts to reduce that flux. To leading order, these effects nearly cancel out for simple underlying magnetic field structures. However, the environments surrounding young stellar objects are expected to be highly turbulent. This paper shows how the presence of magnetic field fluctuations affects the process of magnetic mirroring, and thereby changes the flux of cosmic rays striking circumstellar disks. Turbulence has two principle effects: 1) The (single) location of the magnetic mirror point found in the absence of turbulence is replaced with a wide distr...

  6. Saturation Physics in Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Heavy Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Goncalves; M. V. T. Machado

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the heavy quark production in the interaction of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere, considering that the primary cosmic ray is a proton or a photon. At these energies the saturation momentum Q_{sat}^2 stays above the hard scale \\mu_c^2=4m_c^2, implying charm production probing the saturation regime. In particular, we show that the ep HERA data presents a scaling on \\tau_c = (Q^2+\\mu_c^2)/Q_{sat}^2. We derive our results considering the dipole picture and the Color Glass Condensate formalism, which one shows to be able to describe the heavy quark production in photon-proton and proton-proton collisions. Nuclear effects are considered in computation of cross sections for scattering on air nuclei. Implications on the flux of prompt leptons at the earth are analyzed and a large suppression is predicted.

  7. Implementing the De-thinning Method for High Energy Cosmic Rays Extensive Air Shower Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estupińán, A; Núńez, L A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth atmosphere requires highly complex computational resources and several statistical techniques have been developed to simplify those calculations. It is common to implement the thinning algorithms to reduce the number of secondary particles by assigning weights to representative particles in the evolution of the cascade. However, since this is a compression method with information loss, it is required to recover the original flux of secondary particles without introduce artificial biases. In this work we present the preliminary results of our version of the de-thinning algorithm for the reconstruction of thinned simulations of extensive air showers initiated by cosmic rays and photons in the energy range $10^{15} < E/\\mathrm{eV} < 10^{17}$.

  8. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Allen, C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Beard, L. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Belz, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Besson, D. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Moscow Engineering and Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); Byrne, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Abou Bakr Othman, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Farhang-Boroujeny, B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gardner, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gillman, W.H. [Gillman and Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanlon, W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanson, J. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Jayanthmurthy, C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kunwar, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Larson, S. L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Myers, I. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Prohira, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Ratzlaff, K. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Sokolsky, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thomson, G. B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Von Maluski, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  9. Recommendations for a Static Cosmic Ray Shield for Enriched Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Orrell, John L.; Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed study of cost and materials that could be used to shield the detector material of the international Tonne-scale germanium neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment from hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at the Earth's surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during storage; in particular, when the detector material is being worked on at the detector manufacturer's facility. This work considers two options for shielding the detector material from cosmic ray particles. One option is to use a pre-existing structure already located near the detector manufacturer, such as Canberra Industries in Meriden, Connecticut. The other option is to build a shield onsite at a detector manufacturer's site. This paper presents a cost and efficiency analysis of such construction.

  10. COSMIC-RAY-MEDIATED FORMATION OF BENZENE ON THE SURFACE OF SATURN'S MOON TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Li; Zheng Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Landera, Alexander; Mebel, Alexander M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Liang, Mao-Chang [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aromatic benzene molecule (C{sub 6}H{sub 6})-a central building block of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules-is of crucial importance for the understanding of the organic chemistry of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Here, we show via laboratory experiments and electronic structure calculations that the benzene molecule can be formed on Titan's surface in situ via non-equilibrium chemistry by cosmic-ray processing of low-temperature acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ices. The actual yield of benzene depends strongly on the surface coverage. We suggest that the cosmic-ray-mediated chemistry on Titan's surface could be the dominant source of benzene, i.e., a factor of at least two orders of magnitude higher compared to previously modeled precipitation rates, in those regions of the surface which have a high surface coverage of acetylene.

  11. Generation of Mesoscale Magnetic Fields and the Dynamics of Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. H. Diamond; M. A. Malkov

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the cosmic ray origin is discussed in connection with their acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is reviewed and its potential to accelerate particles to the maximum energy of (presumably) galactic cosmic rays ($10^{18}eV $) is considered. It is argued that to reach such energies, a strong magnetic field at scales larger than the particle gyroradius must be created as a result of the acceleration process, itself. One specific mechanism suggested here is based on the generation of Alfven wave at the gyroradius scale with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven waves.

  12. Search for fingerprints of disoriented chiral condensates in cosmic ray showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. M. de Almeida; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; E. S. Fraga; E. M. Santos

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the generation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCCs), where the order parameter for chiral symmetry breaking is misaligned with respect to the vacuum direction in isospin state, is quite natural in the theory of strong interactions, they have so far eluded experiments in accelerators and cosmic rays. If DCCs are formed in high-energy nuclear collisions, the relevant outcome are very large event-by-event fluctuations in the neutral-to-charged pion fraction. In this note we search for fingerprints of DCC formation in observables of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers. We present simulation results for the depth of the maximum ($X_{max}$) and number of muons on the ground, evaluating their sensitivity to the neutral-to-charged pion fraction asymmetry produced in the primary interaction.

  13. A Cosmic Ray Test Platform Based on the High Time Resolution MRPC Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianxiang Chen; Cheng Li; Yongjie Sun; Hongfang Chen; Ming Shao; Zebo Tang; Rongxing Yang; Yi Zhou; Yifei Zhang

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to test the performance of detector/prototype in environment of laboratory, we design and build a larger area ($90\\times52$ $cm^2$) test platform of cosmic ray based on well-designed Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) with an excellent time resolution and a high detection efficiency for the minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The time resolution of the MRPC module used is tested to be ~80 ps, and the position resolution along the strip is ~5 mm, while the position resolution perpendicular to the strip is ~12.7 mm. The platform constructed by four MRPC modules can be functional for tracking the cosmic rays with a spatial resolution ~6.3 mm, and provide a reference time ~40 ps.

  14. A new multiparametric topological method for determining the primary cosmic ray mass composition in the knee energy region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ambrosio; C. Aramo; D. D'Urso; A. D. Erlykin; F. Guarino; A. Insolia

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the primary cosmic ray mass composition from the characteristics of extensive air showers (EAS), obtained at an observation level in the lower half of the atmosphere, is still an open problem. In this work we propose a new method of the Multiparametric Topological Analysis and show its applicability for the determination of the mass composition of the primary cosmic rays at the PeV energy region.

  15. A magnetic spectrometer measurement of the charge ratio of energetic cosmic ray muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Benjamin Jefferson

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MAGNETIC SPECTROIIETER MEASUREPIENT OF THE CHARGE PATIO OF ENEIFGFTIC COSMIC RAY MUONS A Thesis BENJAMIN JEF1'EIHSON BATFIKN, JR. Submdtted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in Daltial full'Ills, 'ent of the requirellents... magnet ~ 2 Schematic representation of the magnets, counters and spark chambers to form a spectrometer-telescope. A typical muon trajectory is shown. . . . . . . . ~ 3 End view of the eighteen-lamina magnet. 4 The winding process 5 The complete...

  16. Air Fluorescence Relevant for Cosmic-Ray Detection - Review of Pioneering Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando Arqueros; Joerg R. Hoerandel; Bianca Keilhauer

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays with energies exceeding $10^{17}$ eV are frequently registered by measurements of the fluorescence light emitted by extensive air showers. The main uncertainty for the absolute energy scale of the measured air showers is coming from the fluorescence light yield of electrons in air. The fluorescence light yield has been studied in laboratory experiments. Pioneering measurements between 1954 and 2000 are reviewed.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum with ARGO-YBJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Di Sciascio; for the ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARGO-YBJ detector, located at high altitude in the Cosmic Ray Observatory of Yangbajing in Tibet (4300 m asl, about 600 g/cm2 of atmospheric depth) provides the opportunity to study, with unprecedented resolution, the cosmic ray physics in the primary energy region between 10^{12} and 10^{16} eV. The preliminary results of the measurement of all-particle and light-component (i.e. protons and helium) energy spectra between approximately 5 TeV and 5 PeV are reported and discussed. The study of such energy region is particularly interesting because not only it allows a better understanding of the so called 'knee' of the energy spectrum and of its origin, but also provides a powerful cross-check among very different experimental techniques. The comparison between direct measurements by balloons/satellites and the results by surface detectors, implying the knowledge of shower development in the atmosphere, also allows to test the hadronic interaction models currently used for understanding particle and cosmic ray physics up the highest energies.

  18. Missing cosmic metals revealed by X-ray absorption towards distant sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campana, S; Ferrara, A; Pallottini, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The census of heavy elements (metals) produced by all stars through cosmic times up to present-day is limited to ~50%; of these only half are still found within their parent galaxy. The majority of metals is expelled from galaxies into the circumgalactic (or even more distant, intergalactic) space by powerful galactic winds, leaving unpleasant uncertainty on the amount, thermal properties and distribution of these key chemical species. These dispersed metals unavoidably absorb soft X-ray photons from distant sources. We show that their integrated contribution can be detected in the form of increasing X-ray absorption with distance, for all kinds of high-energy cosmic sources. Based on extensive cosmological simulations, we assess that $\\sim$ 10\\% of all cosmic metals reside in the intergalactic medium. Most of the X-ray absorption arises instead from a few discrete structures along the line of sight. These extended structures, possibly pin-pointing galaxy groups, contain million degree, metal-enriched gas, 10...

  19. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, H; Falcke, Heino; Gorham, Peter

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR...

  20. OBSERVATION OF COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY WITH THE ICETOP AIR SHOWER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aartsen, M. G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 Australia (Australia)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 Australia (Australia); Abbasi, R.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A. [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland)] [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Altmann, D. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)] [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Tjus, J. Becker [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)] [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10{sup -3} level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30 Degree-Sign and an amplitude of (- 1.58 {+-} 0.46{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (- 3.11 {+-} 0.38{sub stat} {+-} 0.96{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}.

  1. Entropy and the Cosmic Ray Particle Energy Distribution Power Law Exponent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the hypothesis that cosmic rays are emitted from the surfaces of neutron stars by a process of evaporation from an internal nuclear liquid to a dilute external gas which constitutes the "vacuum". On this basis, we find an inverse power in the energy distribution with a power law exponent of 2.701178 in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 2.7. The heat of nuclear matter evaporation via the entropy allows for the computation of the exponent. The evaporation model employed is based on the entropy considerations of Landau and Fermi that have been applied to the liquid drop model of evaporation in a heavy nucleus excited by a collision. This model provides a new means of obtaining power law distributions for cosmic ray energy distributions and, remarkably, an actual value for the exponent which is in agreement with experiment and explains the otherwise puzzling smoothness of the cosmic ray energy distribution over a wide range of energies without discontinuities due to contributions from different sources required by current models.

  2. Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

  3. Study of the Shadows of the Moon and the Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Milagrito, a prototype for the Milagro detector, operated for 15 months in 1997-8 and collected 8.9 billion events. It was the first extensive air shower (EAS) array sensitive to showers intiated by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used to study systematic pointing shifts and measure the angular resolution of EAS arrays. Below a few TeV, the paths of cosmic rays coming toward the earth are bent by the helio- and geo-magnetic fields. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from the nominal (undeflected) position, has been observed with high statistical significance in Milagrito. This can be used to establish energy calibrations, as well as to search for the anti-matter content of the VHE cosmic ray flux. The shadow of the sun has also been observed with high significance.

  4. Experimental constraints on the astrophysical interpretation of the cosmic ray Galactic-extragalactic transition region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. De Donato; G. A. Medina-Tanco

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy region spanning from $\\sim 10^{17}$ to $\\lesssim 10^{19}$ eV is critical for understanding both, the Galactic and the extragalactic cosmic ray fluxes. This is the region where the propagation regime of nuclei inside the Galactic magnetic environment changes from diffusive to ballistic, as well as the region where, very likely, the most powerful Galactic accelerators reach their maximum output energies. In this work, a diffusion Galactic model is used to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. In particular, we study the conditions that must be met, from the spectral and composition points of view, by the Galactic and the extragalactic fluxes in order to reproduce simultaneously the total spectrum and elongation rate measured over the transition region by HiRes and Auger. Our analysis favors a mixed extragalactic spectrum in combination with a Galactic spectrum enhanced by additional high energy components, i.e., extending beyond the maximum energies expected from regular supernova remnants. The two additional components have mixed composition, with the lowest energy one heavier than the highest energy one. The potential impact on the astrophysical analysis of the assumed hadronic interaction model is also assessed in detail.

  5. Experimental constraints on the astrophysical interpretation of the cosmic ray Galactic-extragalactic transition region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Donato, C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy region spanning from $\\sim 10^{17}$ to $\\lesssim 10^{19}$ eV is critical for understanding both, the Galactic and the extragalactic cosmic ray fluxes. This is the region where the propagation regime of nuclei inside the Galactic magnetic environment changes from diffusive to ballistic, as well as the region where, very likely, the most powerful Galactic accelerators reach their maximum output energies. In this work, a diffusion Galactic model is used to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. In particular, we study the conditions that must be met, from the spectral and composition points of view, by the Galactic and the extragalactic fluxes in order to reproduce simultaneously the total spectrum and elongation rate measured over the transition region by HiRes and Auger. Our analysis favors a mixed extragalactic spectrum in combination with a Galactic spectrum enhanced by additional high energy components, i.e., extending beyond the...

  6. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gonzales, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission at a level of 11 sigma. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  7. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzales; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission with high confidence. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  8. Tests of cosmic ray radiography for power industry applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durham, J M; Morris, C L; Bacon, J; Fabritius, J; Fellows, S; Plaud-Ramos, K; Poulson, D; Renshaw, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we assess muon multiple scattering tomography as a non-destructive inspection technique in several typical areas of interest to the nuclear power industry, including monitoring concrete degradation, gate valve conditions, and pipe wall thickness. This work is motivated by the need for radiographic methods that do not require the licensing, training, and safety controls of x-rays, and by the need to be able to penetrate considerable overburden to examine internal details of components that are otherwise inaccessible, with minimum impact on industrial operations. In some scenarios, we find that muon tomography may be an attractive alternative to more typical measurements.

  9. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cosmic-Ray Induced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced {gamma}-ray emission of Earth's atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The LAT has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth-limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded {approx} 6.4 x 10{sup 6} photons with energies > 100 MeV and {approx} 250 hours total livetime for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission - often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission - has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index {Lambda} = 2.79 {+-} 0.06.

  10. The IceCube Collaboration: contributions to the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The IceCube Collaboration

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper bundles 40 contributions by the IceCube collaboration that were submitted to the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference ICRC 2007. The articles cover studies on cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrinos, searches for non-localized, extraterrestrial electron, muon and tau neutrino signals, scans for steady and intermittent neutrino point sources, searches for dark matter candidates, magnetic monopoles and other exotic particles, improvements in analysis techniques, as well as future detector extensions. The IceCube observatory will be finalized in 2011 to form a cubic-kilometer ice-Cherenkov detector at the location of the geographic South Pole. At the present state of construction, IceCube consists of 52 paired IceTop surface tanks and 22 IceCube strings with a total of 1426 Digital Optical Modules deployed at depths up to 2350 m. The observatory also integrates the 19 string AMANDA subdetector, that was completed in 2000 and extends IceCube's reach to lower energies. Before the deployment of IceTop, cosmic air showers were registered with the 30 station SPASE-2 surface array. IceCube's low noise Digital Optical Modules are very reliable, show a uniform response and record waveforms of arriving photons that are resolvable with nanosecond precision over a large dynamic range. Data acquisition, reconstruction and simulation software are running in production mode and the analyses, profiting from the improved data quality and increased overall sensitivity, are well under way.

  11. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Search for 1-100 GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using one hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2 spectra of gamma-ray bursts peak around a few hundred keV, EGRET has ob- served photons in the GeV energy

  12. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Measuring TeV Gamma-Ray Diffuse Emission from the Galactic Plane with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    mechanisms such as the annihilation of dark matter particles [5]. At TeV energies, Milagro has previously@lanl.gov Abstract: Diffuse gamma radiation produced in the interaction of cosmic-ray particles with matter and long observation time the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory ­ a water Cherenkov detector in New Mexico, USA

  13. Propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the presence of self-generated turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloisio, Roberto; Blasi, Pasquale, E-mail: aloisio@arcetri.astro.it, E-mail: blasi@arcetri.astro.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5 - 50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays propagating in the Galaxy may excite a streaming instability when their motion is super-alfvenic, thereby producing the conditions for their own diffusion. In this paper we present the results of a self-consistent solution of the transport equation where diffusion occurs because of the self-generated turbulence together with a pre-existing turbulence injected, for instance, by supernova explosions and cascading to smaller scales. All chemicals are included in our calculations, so that we are able to show the secondary to primary ratios in addition to the spectra of the individual elements. All predictions appear to be in good agreement with observations. The fact that data are explained with no need for artificial breaks in the injection spectrum and/or in the diffusion coefficient as functions of momentum can be interpreted as a strong indication that the phenomenon proposed here is in fact being observed in Nature. We also show that there is very good agreement between the calculated proton spectrum and the cosmic ray spectrum inferred from observations of the gamma ray emission from clouds in the Gould's belt.

  14. OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS AT 400 TeV WITH ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} muon events with a median angular resolution of {approx}3 Degree-Sign . A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3{sigma}. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  15. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Heesen; R. -J. Dettmar; M. Krause; R. Beck

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radio polarimetry we study the connection between the transport of cosmic rays (CR's), the three-dimensional magnetic field structure, and features of other ISM phases in the halo of NGC 253. We present a new sensitive radio continuum map of NGC 253 obtained from combined VLA and Effelsberg observations at lambda 6.2 cm. We find a prominent radio halo with a scaleheight of the thick radio disk of 1.7 kpc. The linear dependence between the local scaleheight of the vertical continuum emission and the cosmic ray electron (CRE) lifetime requires a vertical CR bulk speed of 270 km s^-1. The magnetic field structure of NGC 253 resembles an ``X''-shaped configuration where the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field is plane-parallel only in the inner regions of the disk and at small distances from the galactic midplane. At larger galactocentric radii and further away from the midplane the vertical component becomes important. This is most clearly visible at the location of the ``radio spur'' southeast of the nucleus, where the magnetic field orientation is almost vertical. We made a simple model for the dominant toroidal (r,phi) magnetic field component using a spiral magnetic field with prescribed inclination and pitch angle. The residual poloidal (r,phi,z) magnetic field component which was revealed by subtracting the model from the observations shows a distinct ``X''-shaped magnetic field orientation centered on the nucleus. The orientation angle of the poloidal magnetic field is consistent with a magnetic field transport described by the superposition of the vertical CR bulk speed and the rotation velocity. Hence, we propose a disk wind which transports cosmic rays, magnetic field, and (partially) ionized gas from the disk into the halo.

  16. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Department of Physics and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  17. The Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics cosmic ray veto system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Ramberg, E.; Kiper, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photomultiplier (PMT) readout system has been designed for use by the cosmic ray veto systems of two warm liquid bubble chambers built at Fermilab by the Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics (COUPP) collaboration. The systems are designed to minimize the infrastructure necessary for installation. Up to five PMTs can be daisy-chained on a single data link using standard Category 5 network cable. The cables is also serve distribute to low voltage power. High voltage is generated locally on each PMT base. Analog and digital signal processing is also performed locally. The PMT base and system controller design and performance measurements are presented.

  18. Track fitting by Kalman Filter method for a prototype cosmic ray muon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapasi Ghosh; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a track fitting procedure based on Kalman Filter technique for an Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) prototype detector when the detector is flushed with single muon tracks. The relevant track parameters i.e., momentum, direction and charge are reconstructed and analyzed. This paper discusses the design of the prototype detector, its geometry simulation by Geant4, and the detector response with the cosmic ray muons. Finally we show the resolution of reconstructed momenta and also the charge identification efficiency of $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ events in the magnetized ICAL.

  19. Solar panels as air Cherenkov detectors for extremely high energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cecchini; I. D'Antone; L. Degli Esposti; G. Giacomelli; M. Guerra; I. Lax; G. Mandrioli; A. Parretta; A. Sarno; R. Schioppo; M. Sorel; M. Spurio

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing interest towards the observation of the highest energy cosmic rays has motivated the development of new detection techniques. The properties of the Cherenkov photon pulse emitted in the atmosphere by these very rare particles indicate low-cost semiconductor detectors as good candidates for their optical read-out. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the viability of solar panels for this purpose. The experimental framework resulting from measurements performed with suitably-designed solar cells and large conventional photovoltaic areas is presented. A discussion on the obtained and achievable sensitivities follows.

  20. OBSERVATION OF COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY WITH THE ICETOP AIR SHOWER ARRAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M. G.; Besson, David Zeke

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for any particular model, they lend support to scenarios where the large-scale anisotropy is a superposition of the flux from a few nearby sources. The sparse spatial distribution and the different ages of nearby supernova remnants are expected to lead... shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10?3 level can, for the first time...

  1. Cherenkov light Extrapolation at Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in Extensive Air Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Al-Rubaiee

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simulation of Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) from particles of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) with ultra high energy cosmic rays (E>=10^16 eV) was simulated for primary protons by the computer code CORSIKA. The parameterization, that constructed on the basis of this simulation have allowed us to reconstruct the events, that is, to reconstruct the type and energy of the particle that generated EAS from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov light registered with the Tunka-25 facility. The extrapolation of the Cherenkov light LDF approximation at the energy range (10^16-2.10^18 eV) was taken into account.

  2. Cosmic Ray Radiography of the Damaged Cores of the Fukushima Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Borozdin; Steven Greene; Zarija Luki?; Edward Cas Milner; Haruo Miyadera; Christopher Morris; John Perry

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei. The interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The interaction with nuclei leads to angle diffusion. Two muon imaging methods that use flux attenuation and multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons are being studied as tools for diagnosing the damaged cores of the Fukushima reactors. Here we compare these two methods. We conclude that the scattering method can provide detailed information about the core. Attenuation has low contrast and little sensitivity to the core.

  3. Cosmic Ray Radiography of the Damaged Cores of the Fukushima Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borozdin, Konstantin; Luki?, Zarija; Milner, Edward Cas; Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher; Perry, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei. The interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The interaction with nuclei leads to angle diffusion. Two muon imaging methods that use flux attenuation and multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons are being studied as tools for diagnosing the damaged cores of the Fukushima reactors. Here we compare these two methods. We conclude that the scattering method can provide detailed information about the core. Attenuation has low contrast and little sensitivity to the core.

  4. Vibrational excitation induced by electron beam and cosmic rays in normal and superconductive aluminum bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bassan; B. Buonomo; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; L. G. Foggetta; C. Ligi; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; G. Modestino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; F. Ronga; P. Valente; S. M. Vinko

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new measurements of the acoustic excitation of an Al5056 superconductive bar when hit by an electron beam, in a previously unexplored temperature range, down to 0.35 K. These data, analyzed together with previous results of the RAP experiment obtained for T > 0.54 K, show a vibrational response enhanced by a factor 4.9 with respect to that measured in the normal state. This enhancement explains the anomalous large signals due to cosmic rays previously detected in the NAUTILUS gravitational wave detector.

  5. SHOCK SPEED, COSMIC RAY PRESSURE, AND GAS TEMPERATURE IN THE CYGNUS LOOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvesen, Greg; Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: salvesen@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: edgar@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: salvesen@umich.edu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper limits on the shock speeds in supernova remnants can be combined with post-shock temperatures to obtain upper limits on the ratio of cosmic ray to gas pressure (P {sub CR}/P{sub G} ) behind the shocks. We constrain shock speeds from proper motions and distance estimates, and we derive temperatures from X-ray spectra. The shock waves are observed as faint H{alpha} filaments stretching around the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in two epochs of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) separated by 39.1 years. We measured proper motions of 18 nonradiative filaments and derived shock velocity limits based on a limit to the Cygnus Loop distance of 576 {+-} 61 pc given by Blair et al. for a background star. The Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) instrument on-board ROSAT observed the X-ray emission of the post-shock gas along the perimeter of the Cygnus Loop, and we measure post-shock electron temperature from spectral fits. Proper motions range from 2.''7 to 5.''4 over the POSS epochs and post-shock temperatures range from kT {approx} 100-200 eV. Our analysis suggests a cosmic ray to post-shock gas pressure consistent with zero, and in some positions P {sub CR} is formally smaller than zero. We conclude that the distance to the Cygnus Loop is close to the upper limit given by the distance to the background star and that either the electron temperatures are lower than those measured from ROSAT PSPC X-ray spectral fits or an additional heat input for the electrons, possibly due to thermal conduction, is required.

  6. DETECTION OF THE COSMIC {gamma}-RAY HORIZON FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, A.; Siana, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Finke, J. D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Prada, F. [Campus of International Excellence UAM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Primack, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kitaura, F. S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Paneque, D., E-mail: albertod@ucr.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The first statistically significant detection of the cosmic {gamma}-ray horizon (CGRH) that is independent of any extragalactic background light (EBL) model is presented. The CGRH is a fundamental quantity in cosmology. It gives an estimate of the opacity of the universe to very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray photons due to photon-photon pair production with the EBL. The only estimations of the CGRH to date are predictions from EBL models and lower limits from {gamma}-ray observations of cosmological blazars and {gamma}-ray bursts. Here, we present homogeneous synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models of the spectral energy distributions of 15 blazars based on (almost) simultaneous observations from radio up to the highest energy {gamma}-rays taken with the Fermi satellite. These synchrotron/SSC models predict the unattenuated VHE fluxes, which are compared with the observations by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. This comparison provides an estimate of the optical depth of the EBL, which allows us a derivation of the CGRH through a maximum likelihood analysis that is EBL-model independent. We find that the observed CGRH is compatible with the current knowledge of the EBL.

  7. Detection of the Cosmic ?-Ray Horizon From Multiwavelength Observations of Blazars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dominguez, A.; Finke, J. D.; Prada, F.; Primack, J. R.; Kitaura, F. S.; Siana, B.; Paneque, D.

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first statistically significant detection of the cosmic ?-ray horizon (CGRH) that is independent of any extragalactic background light (EBL) model is presented. The CGRH is a fundamental quantity in cosmology. It gives an estimate of the opacity of the Universe to very high energy (VHE) ?-ray photons due to photon-photon pair production with the EBL. The only estimations of the CGRH to date are predictions from EBL models and lower limits from ?-ray observations of cosmological blazars and ?-ray bursts. Here, we present homogeneous synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models of the spectral energy distributions of 15 blazars based on (almost) simultaneous observations from radio up to the highest energy ?-rays taken with the Fermi satellite. These synchrotron/SSC models predict the unattenuated VHE fluxes, which are compared with the observations by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. This comparison provides an estimate of the optical depth of the EBL, which allows a derivation of the CGRH through a maximum likelihood analysis that is EBL-model independent. We find that the observed CGRH is compatible with the current knowledge of the EBL.

  8. Gamma-Ray Bursts as a Cosmic Window for Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. F. Mirabel; D. B. Sanders; E. Le Floc'h

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Present knowledge indicates that gamma-ray bursts are linked with massive stars. They will become invaluable probes of the early universe and galaxy formation. In the future, it will be possible to use gamma-ray bursts for two purposes: 1) to probe the history of massive star formation in the Universe by the rate of occurence of gamma-ray bursts, and 2) for the study of galaxy evolution at all lookback times by determining the nature of the galaxy hosts. Because gamma-rays are not attenuated by intervening dust and gas, the selection of the cosmic sites of massive star formation by this method is less affected by the biases associated with optical-uv surveys (e.g. UV-dropout techniques). Infrared and sub-millimeter follow up studies of the hosts of gamma-ray bursts may: 1) reveal a putative population of reddened ($R-K \\geq 4$) galaxies at high redshifts, and 2) detect very massive stars (population III) formed at $z \\geq$ 5.

  9. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heesen, V; Krause, M; Beck, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radio polarimetry we study the connection between the transport of cosmic rays (CR's), the three-dimensional magnetic field structure, and features of other ISM phases in the halo of NGC 253. We present a new sensitive radio continuum map of NGC 253 obtained from combined VLA and Effelsberg observations at lambda 6.2 cm. We find a prominent radio halo with a scaleheight of the thick radio disk of 1.7 kpc. The linear dependence between the local scaleheight of the vertical continuum emission and the cosmic ray electron (CRE) lifetime requires a vertical CR bulk speed of 270 km s^-1. The magnetic field structure of NGC 253 resembles an ``X''-shaped configuration where the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field is plane-parallel only in the inner regions of the disk and at small distances from the galactic midplane. At larger galactocentric radii and further away from the midplane the vertical component becomes important. This is most clearly visible at the location of the ``radio spur'' southeast o...

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SOURCE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS USING ANISOTROPY VERSUS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Taylor, Andrew M. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Waxman, Eli, E-mail: lemoine@iap.fr [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 7600 (Israel)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The joint analysis of anisotropy signals and chemical composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays offers strong potential for shedding light on the sources of these particles. Following up on an earlier idea, this paper studies the anisotropies produced by protons of energy >E/Z, assuming that anisotropies at energy >E have been produced by nuclei of charge Z, which share the same magnetic rigidity. We calculate the number of secondary protons produced through photodisintegration of the primary heavy nuclei. Making the extreme assumption that the source does not inject any proton, we find that the source(s) responsible for anisotropies such as reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory should lie closer than ?20-30, 80-100, and 180-200 Mpc if the anisotropy signal is mainly composed of oxygen, silicon, and iron nuclei, respectively. A violation of this constraint would otherwise result in the secondary protons forming a more significant anisotropy signal at lower energies. Even if the source were located closer than this distance, it would require an extraordinary metallicity ?> 120, 1600, and 1100 times solar metallicity in the acceleration zone of the source, for oxygen, silicon, and iron, respectively, to ensure that the concomitantly injected protons do not produce a more significant low-energy anisotropy. This offers interesting prospects for constraining the nature and the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with the increase in statistics expected from next-generation detectors.

  11. The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hopper, B; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy projections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (-2.85 +/- 0.06 stat. +/- 0.08 syst.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole with a range in declination of -10 to 45 degrees and 150 to 225 degrees in right ascension. We observe a steady increase ...

  12. The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. T. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; B. Hopper; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy pro jections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events, the largest such data set in existence. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (2.49 +/- 0.02 stat. +/- 0.09 sys.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole centered at 189 degrees right ascension. We observe a steady increase in the magnitude of the signal over seven years.

  13. Processing of formic acid-containing ice by heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergantini, A; Rothard, H; Boduch, P; Andrade, D P P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formic acid (HCOOH) has been extensively detected in space environments, including interstellar medium (gas and grains), comets and meteorites. Such environments are often subjected to the action of ionizing agents, which may cause changes in the molecular structure, thus leading to formation of new species. Formic acid is a possible precursor of pre-biotic species, such as Glycine (NH2CH2COOH). This work investigates experimentally the physicochemical effects resulting from interaction of heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues (46MeV 58Ni11+) in H2O:HCOOH (1:1) ice, at 15 K, in ultrahigh vacuum regime, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-600 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 microns). After the bombardment, the sample was slowly heated to room temperature. The results show the dissociation cross-section for the formic acid of 2.4x10^-13 cm2, and half-life due to galactic cosmic rays of 8x10^7 yr. The IR spectra show intense formation of CO and CO2, and small production of more com...

  14. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin Observ. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN AND HELIUM NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS WITH THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Naples ''Federico II'', I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A. [Department of Physics, University of Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Borisov, S.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P. [INFN, Sezione di Rome ''Tor Vergata'', I-00133 Rome (Italy); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Danilchenko, I. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, RU-115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); De Santis, C. [Department of Physics, University of Rome ''Tor Vergata'', I-00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make new measurements of cosmic ray H and He isotopes. The isotopic composition was measured between 100 and 600 MeV/n for hydrogen and between 100 and 900 MeV/n for helium isotopes over the 23rd solar minimum from 2006 July to 2007 December. The energy spectrum of these components carries fundamental information regarding the propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy which are competitive with those obtained from other secondary to primary measurements such as B/C.

  16. Highest-energy cosmic rays from Fermi-degenerate relic neutrinos consistent with Super-Kamiokande results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graciela Gelmini; Alexander Kusenko

    1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Relic neutrinos with mass 0.07 (+0.02/-0.04) eV, in the range consistent with Super-Kamiokande data, can explain the cosmic rays with energies in excess of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff. The spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays produced in this fashion has some distinctive features that may help identify their origin. Our mechanism does not require but is consistent with a neutrino density high enough to be a new kind of hot dark matter.

  17. The cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background from dark matter annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala, Jesus; Slatyer, Tracy R; Loeb, Abraham; Springel, Volker

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) The extragalactic background light (EBL) observed at multiple wavelengths is a promising tool to probe the nature of dark matter since it might contain a significant contribution from gamma-rays produced promptly by dark matter annihilation. Additionally, the electrons and positrons produced in the annihilation give energy to the CMB photons to populate the EBL with X-rays and gamma-rays. We here create full-sky maps of the radiation from both of these contributions using the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation. We use upper limits on the contributions of unknown sources to the EBL to constrain the intrinsic properties of dark matter using a model-independent approach that can be employed as a template to test different particle physics models (including those with a Sommerfeld enhancement). These upper limits are based on observations spanning eight orders of magnitude in energy (from soft X-rays measured by CHANDRA to gamma-rays measured by Fermi), and on expectations for the contributions f...

  18. OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS AT MULTIPLE ANGULAR SCALES WITH IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2009 May and 2010 May, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mil anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 15{sup 0} and 30{sup 0}. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of five weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. The most significant structure, an excess localized at (right ascension {alpha} = 122.{sup 0}4 and declination {delta} = -47.{sup 0}4), extends over at least 20{sup 0} in right ascension and has a post-trials significance of 5.3{sigma}. The origin of this anisotropy is still unknown.

  19. Physics from the Very-High Energy Cosmic-Ray Shadows of the Moon and Sun with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics from the Very-High Energy Cosmic-Ray Shadows of the Moon and Sun with Milagro by Grant E stringent upper limit at TeV energies. iv #12;The Milagro-measured solar shadow probes the Sun's magnetic the Milagro-measured Moon shadow to perform the first energy scale calibration of an air shower array

  20. Fractions of proton, helium, middle and heavy nuclei in primary cosmic rays at energy 10**16eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maia Kalmakhelidze; Nina Roinishvili; Manana Svanidze

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Classification of gamma-hadron families, registered by the Pamir collaboration, on four groups of nuclei (P, He, middle and heavy), responsible for their generation, is made, and fractions of families in each of the groups are estimated. Results show, that below the knee of the energy spectrum the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays remains close to the normal one.

  1. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 3791 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Odd and even cycles in cosmic rays and solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    in cosmic rays and solar activity I.G. Usoskin1,3 , K. Mursula2 , and G.A. Kovaltsov3 1 Sodankyl¨a Geophysical Observatory (Oulu unit), FIN-90014 University of Oulu, Finland 2 Department of Physical Sciences, FIN-90014 University of Oulu, Finland 3 Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St

  2. Measurement of the Flux of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Monocular Observations by the High Resolution Fly's Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Physics and Nevis Laboratory, New York, New York, USA 6) University of New Mexico, Department of PhysicsMeasurement of the Flux of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Monocular Observations by the High of Utah, Department of Physics and High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA 2

  3. Energy dependence of Ti/Fe ratio in the Galactic cosmic rays measured by the ATIC-2 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zatsepin, V I; Sokolskaya, N V; Adams, J H Jr; Ahn, H S; Bashindzhagian, G L; Chang, J; Christl, M; Fazely, A R; Guzik, T G; Isbert, J B; Kim, K C; Kouznetsov, E N; Panasyuk, M I; Seo, E S; Watts, J; Wefel, J P; Wu, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium is a rare, secondary nucleus among Galactic cosmic rays. Using the Silicon matrix in the ATIC experiment, Titanium has been separated. The energy dependence of the Ti to Fe flux ratio in the energy region from 5 GeV per nucleon to about 500 GeV per nucleon is presented.

  4. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Ulrich J.

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. ...

  5. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE A Fast and Accurate Monte Carlo EAS Simulation Scheme in the GZK Energy Re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a full and quasi-full MC simulation with energy threshold of particles of 500 keV for primary energy by the user). Apart from thinning, a number of papers treats about techniques to simulate ultra high energy30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE A Fast and Accurate Monte Carlo EAS Simulation Scheme

  6. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101-104 Search for Very High Energy Gamma-Rays from Active Galactic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101-104 Search for Very High Energy Gamma, Australia (f) Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia (g-0394, Japan (l) Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano, Nagano 480-8553, Japan (m) Solar

  7. ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION IN THE JET OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Mitsuru [Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory, Institute for Global Science, Mie (Japan)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the achievable maximum energy of nuclei diffusively accelerated by shock wave in the jet of Cen A, based on an updated model involving the stochastic magnetic fields that are responsible for recent synchrotron X-ray measurements. For the maximum energy analysis, conceivable energy constraints from spatiotemporal scales are systematically considered for the jet-wide including discrete X-ray knots. We find that in the inner region within approx1 arcmin from galactic core, which includes knots AX and BX, proton and iron nucleus can be accelerated to 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} and 10{sup 21} eV (10-100 EeV and ZeV) ranges, respectively. The upper cutoff energy of the very energetic neutrinos produced via photopion interaction is also provided. These are essential for identifying the acceleration site of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory, which signifies the arrival from nearby galaxies including Cen A.

  8. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  9. Assessing the Feasibility of Interrogating Nuclear Waste Storage Silos using Cosmic-ray Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosino, F; Cimmino, L; D'Alessandro, R; Ireland, D G; Kaiser, R; Mahon, D F; Mori, N; Noli, P; Saracino, G; Shearer, C; Viliani, L; Yang, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muons to interrogate waste silos within the UK Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detector systems are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete...

  10. A comprehensive comparison for simulations of cosmic-ray muons underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villano, A. N.; Cushman, P.; Kennedy, A. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455 (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455 (United States); Empl, A.; Lindsay, S. [University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock AR 72204 (United States)] [University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock AR 72204 (United States)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The two leading simulation frameworks used for the simulation of cosmic-ray muons underground are FLUKA and Geant4. There have been in the past various questions raised as to the equivalence of these codes regarding cosmogenically produced neutrons and radioactivity in an underground environment. Many experiments choose one of these frameworks, and because they typically have different geometries or locations, the issues relating to code comparison are compounded. We report on an effort to compare the results of each of these codes in simulations which have simple geometry that is consistent between the two codes. It is seen that in terms of integrated neutron flux and neturon capture statistics the codes agree well in a broad sense. There are, however, differences that will be subject of further study. Comparisons of the simulations to available data are considered and the difficulties of such comparisons are pointed out.

  11. Extra-galactic magnetic fields and the second knee in the cosmic-ray spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Lemoine

    2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work suggests that the cosmic ray spectrum may be dominated by Galactic sources up to ~10^{17.5} eV, and by an extra-Galactic component beyond, provided this latter cuts off below the transition energy. Here it is shown that this cut-off could be interpreted in this framework as a signature of extra-galactic magnetic fields with equivalent average strength B and coherence length l_c such that B\\sqrt{l_c} ~ 2-3.10^{-10} G.Mpc^{1/2}, assuming l_c flux is suppressed below 10^{17} eV as the diffusive propagation time from the source to the detector becomes larger than the age of the Universe.

  12. Extra-galactic magnetic fields and the second knee in the cosmic-ray spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemoine, M

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work suggests that the cosmic ray spectrum may be dominated by Galactic sources up to ~10^{17.5} eV, and by an extra-Galactic component beyond, provided this latter cuts off below the transition energy. Here it is shown that this cut-off could be interpreted as a signature of extra-galactic magnetic fields with equivalent average strength B and coherence length l_c such that B\\sqrt{l_c}~2.10^{-10} G.Mpc^{1/2}, assuming l_c flux is suppressed below 10^{17} eV as the diffusive propagation time from the source to the detector becomes larger than the age of the Universe.

  13. Recent Results from RHIC&Some Lessons for Cosmic-RayPhysicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) studies nuclear matter under a variety of conditions. Cold nuclear matter is probed with deuteron-gold collisions, while hot nuclear matter (possibly a quark-gluon plasma (QGP)) is created in heavy-ion collisions. The distribution of spin in polarized nucleons is measured with polarized proton collisions, and photoproduction is studied using the photons that accompany heavy nuclei. The deuteron-gold data shows less forward particle production than would be expected from a superposition of pp collisions, as expected due to saturation/shadowing. Particle production in AA collisions is well described by a model of an expanding fireball in thermal equilibrium. Strong hydrodynamic flow and jet quenching shows that the produced matter interacts very strongly. These phenomena are consistent with new non-perturbative interactions near the transition temperature to the QGP. This report discusses these results, and their implications for cosmic-ray physicists.

  14. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum using hybrid events of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariangela Settimo; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays above 10$^{18}$ eV is measured using the hybrid events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory between November 2005 and September 2010. The large exposure of the Observatory allows the measurement of the main features of the energy spectrum with high statistics. Full Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air showers (based on the CORSIKA code) and of the hybrid detector response are adopted here as an independent cross check of the standard analysis (Phys. Lett. B 685, 239 (2010)). The dependence on mass composition and other systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail and, in the full Monte Carlo approach, a region of confidence for flux measurements is defined when all the uncertainties are taken into account. An update is also reported of the energy spectrum obtained by combining the hybrid spectrum and that measured using the surface detector array.

  15. Performances of linseed oil-free bakelite RPC prototypes with cosmic ray muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Biswas; S. Bhattacharya; S. Bose; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Saha; M. K. Sharan; Y. P. Viyogi

    2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study has been performed on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) made of two different grades of bakelite paper laminates, produced and commercially available in India. The chambers, operated in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio, are tested for the efficiency and the stability with cosmic rays. A particular grade of bakelite (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions, was found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of > 96% continuously for more than 130 days. A thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite RPC is found to be necessary for operation of the detector.

  16. Detection of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers with a single-pixel fluorescence telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujii, T; Bertaina, M; Casolino, M; Dawson, B; Horvath, P; Hrabovsky, M; Jiang, J; Mandat, D; Matalon, A; Matthews, J N; Motloch, P; Palatka, M; Pech, M; Privitera, P; Schovanek, P; Takizawa, Y; Thomas, S B; Travnicek, P; Yamazaki, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Tele- scopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report first results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photomultiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment. The FAST prototype took data for 19 nights, demonstrating remarkable operational stability. We detected laser shots at distances of several kilometres as well as 16 highly significant UHECR shower candidates.

  17. Proton-air cross section measurement with the ARGO-YBJ cosmic ray experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton-air cross section in the energy range 1-100 TeV has been measured by the ARGO-YBJ cosmic ray experiment. The analysis is based on the flux attenuation for different atmospheric depths (i.e. zenith angles) and exploits the detector capabilities of selecting the shower development stage by means of hit multiplicity, density and lateral profile measurements at ground. The effects of shower fluctuations, the contribution of heavier primaries and the uncertainties of the hadronic interaction models, have been taken into account. The results have been used to estimate the total proton-proton cross section at center of mass energies between 70 and 500 GeV, where no accelerator data are currently available.

  18. High energy cosmic rays experiments inspired by noncommutative quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josip Trampetic

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenological analysis of the covariant theta-exact noncommutative (NC) gauge field theory (GFT), inspired by high energy cosmic rays experiments, is performed in the framework of the inelastic neutrino-nucleon scatterings, plasmon and $Z$-boson decays into neutrino pair, the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the Reheating Phase After Inflation (RPAI), respectively. Next we have have found neutrino two-point function and shows a closed form decoupling of the hard ultraviolet (UV) divergent term from softened ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing term and from the finite terms as well. For a certain choice of the noncommutative parameter theta which preserves unitarity, problematic UV divergent and UV/IR mixing terms vanish. Non-perturbative modifications of the neutrino dispersion relations are assymptotically independent of the scale of noncommutativity in both the low and high energy limits and may allow superluminal propagation.

  19. Cosmic ray exposure histories of Apollo 14, Apollo 15, and Apollo 16 rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugster, O.; Eberhardt, P.

    1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith exposure history of six rocks returned by the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions is studied based on the cosmogenic noble gas isotopes. For each sample, the complete set of all stable noble gas isotopes and the radiaoctive isotope Kr-81 were measured. Kr-81-Kr exposure ages are calculated for rocks for which a single-stage exposure can be demonstrated. A two-stage model exposure history is derived for multistage-exposure basalt 14310 based on the amounts and isotopic ratios of the cosmogenic noble gases. The apparent Kr-81-Kr age, the depth-sensitive isostopic ratios, and fission Xe-136 results lead to the conclusion that this sample was preexposed 1.75 AE ago to cosmic rays for a duration of 350 m.y. Basalt 15058 and anorthosite 15415 also reveal multistage exposures. 44 references.

  20. Cosmic Ray-Dominated AGN Jets and the Formation of X-ray Cavities in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Fulai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely accepted that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) plays a key role in the evolution of gas in groups and clusters of galaxies. Unequivocal evidence comes from quasi-spherical X-ray cavities observed near cluster centers having sizes ranging from a few to tens of kpc, some containing non-thermal radio emission. Cavities apparently evolve from the interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium (ICM). However, in numerical simulations it has been difficult to create such fat cavities from narrow jets. Ultra-hot thermal jets dominated by kinetic energy typically penetrate deep into the ICM, forming radially elongated cavities at large radii unlike those observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of low-density jets dominated by relativistic cosmic rays (CRs) on kpc scales. We find that, when the thermal gas density in a CR-dominated jet is sufficiently low, the jet has a correspondingly low inertia, and thus decelerates quickly in the ICM. Furthermore, CR pressure causes the jet to exp...

  1. WIDESPREAD METHANOL EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE ROLE OF COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Royster, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cotton, W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower St. London, WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Wardle, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4{sub -1} to 3{sub 0} E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66' Multiplication-Sign 18' (160 Multiplication-Sign 43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of 16.6 km s{sup -1} taken from 41 channels of a Very Large Array continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2-1) and CH{sub 3}OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km s{sup -1} clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25 + 0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H{sub 2}. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH{sub 3}OH abundance of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7} on a chemical timescale of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. The average methanol abundance produced by the release of methanol from grain surfaces is consistent with the available data.

  2. The influence of cosmic rays on the size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alvarez Madrigal; J. Perez Peraza; V. M. Velasco

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Antarctic region in which severe ozone depletion has taken place is known as the ozone hole. This region has two basic indicators: the area, where the ozone abundance is low (size), and the quantity of ozone mass deficit (depth). The energetic particles that penetrate deeply into the atmosphere and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) modify the ozone abundance in the stratosphere. With this research project, we are looking for evidence of a connection between variations in the cosmic ray flux and variations in the size of the ozone hole. In addition, we are looking for signs of the kind of processes that physically connect GCR fluxes with variations in the stratospheric ozone hole size (OHS) in the Antarctic region. With this goal in mind, we also analyze here the atmospheric temperature (AT) anomalies, which have often been linked with such variations. Using Morlet's wavelet spectral analysis to compute the coherence between two time series, we found that during the analyzed period (1982-2005), there existed a common signal of around 3 and 5 years between the OHS and GCR time series, during September and November, respectively. In both cases, the relationship showed a time-dependent anti-correlation between the two series. On the other hand, for October the analysis showed a time-dependent correlation that occurs around 1.7 years. These results seem to indicate that there exist at least two kinds of modulation processes of GCR fluxes on the OHS that work simultaneously but that change their relative relevance along the timeline.

  3. The wavefront of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. D. Apel; J. C. Arteaga-Velázquez; L. Bähren; K. Bekk; M. Bertaina; P. L. Biermann; J. Blümer; H. Bozdog; I. M. Brancus; E. Cantoni; A. Chiavassa; K. Daumiller; V. de Souza; F. Di Pierro; P. Doll; R. Engel; H. Falcke; B. Fuchs; H. Gemmeke; C. Grupen; A. Haungs; D. Heck; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; D. Huber; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; K. -H. Kampert; D. Kang; O. Krömer; J. Kuijpers; K. Link; P. Luczak; M. Ludwig; H. J. Mathes; M. Melissas; C. Morello; J. Oehlschläger; N. Palmieri; T. Pierog; J. Rautenberg; H. Rebel; M. Roth; C. Rühle; A. Saftoiu; H. Schieler; A. Schmidt; S. Schoo; F. G. Schröder; O. Sima; G. Toma; G. C. Trinchero; A. Weindl; J. Wochele; J. Zabierowski; J. A. Zensus

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing measurements of the LOPES antenna array together with corresponding CoREAS simulations for more than 300 measured events with energy above $10^{17}\\,$eV and zenith angles smaller than $45^\\circ$, we find that the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers is of approximately hyperbolic shape. The simulations predict a slightly steeper wavefront towards East than towards West, but this asymmetry is negligible against the measurement uncertainties of LOPES. At axis distances $\\gtrsim 50\\,$m, the wavefront can be approximated by a simple cone. According to the simulations, the cone angle is clearly correlated with the shower maximum. Thus, we confirm earlier predictions that arrival time measurements can be used to study the longitudinal shower development, but now using a realistic wavefront. Moreover, we show that the hyperbolic wavefront is compatible with our measurement, and we present several experimental indications that the cone angle is indeed sensitive to the shower development. Consequently, the wavefront can be used to statistically study the primary composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. At LOPES, the experimentally achieved precision for the shower maximum is limited by measurement uncertainties to approximately $140\\,$g/cm$^2$. But the simulations indicate that under better conditions this method might yield an accuracy for the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, $X_\\mathrm{max}$, better than $30\\,$g/cm$^2$. This would be competitive with the established air-fluorescence and air-Cherenkov techniques, where the radio technique offers the advantage of a significantly higher duty-cycle. Finally, the hyperbolic wavefront can be used to reconstruct the shower geometry more accurately, which potentially allows a better reconstruction of all other shower parameters, too.

  4. An Optimization of the FPGA Based Wavelet Trigger in Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbigniew Szadkowski for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that observe coherent radio emission from extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays are designed for a detailed study of the development of the electromagnetic part of air showers. Radio detectors can operate with 100% up time as e.g. surface detectors based on water-Cherenkov tanks. They are being developed for ground-based experiments (e.g. the Pierre Auger Observatory) as another type of air shower detector in addition to the fluorescence detectors, which operate with only ~10% of duty in dark nights. The radio signals from air showers are caused by the coherent emission due to geomagnetic radiation and charge excess processes. Currently used self-triggers in radio detectors often generate a dense stream of data, which is analyzed afterwards. Huge amounts of registered data requires a significant man-power for the off-line analysis. An improvement of the trigger efficiency becomes a relevant factor. In this work, Morlet wavelets with various scaling factors were used for an analysis of real data from the Auger Engineering Radio Array and for an optimization of the utilization of the resources in an FPGA. The wavelet analysis showed that the power of events is concentrated mostly in a limited range of the frequency spectrum (consistent with a range imposed by the input analog band-pass filter). However, we found several events with suspicious spectral characteristics, where the signal power is spread over the full band-width sampled by a 200 MHz digitizer with significant contribution of very high and very low frequencies. These events may not origin from cosmic ray showers but can be human-made contaminations. The engine of the wavelet analysis can be implemented into the modern powerful FPGA and can remove suspicious events on-line to reduce the trigger rate.

  5. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Bourret, Steven C. (Los Alamos, NM); Krick, Merlyn S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  6. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION INDUCED BY ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY PHOTONS AS A PROBE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATORS EMBEDDED IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murase, Kohta [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photomeson production in ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) accelerators such as {gamma}-ray bursts and active galaxies may lead to ultra-high-energy (UHE) {gamma}-ray emission. We show that the generation of UHE pairs in magnetized structured regions where the sources are embedded is inevitable, and accompanying {approx}> 0.1 TeV synchrotron emission provides an important probe of UHECR acceleration. It would especially be relevant for powerful transient sources, and synchrotron pair echoes may be detected by future CTA via coordinated search for transients of duration {approx}0.1-1 yr for the structured regions of {approx}Mpc. Detections will be useful for knowing structured extragalactic magnetic fields as well as properties of the sources.

  7. Local H~{\\sc i} emissivity measured with the {\\it Fermi}-LAT and implications for cosmic-ray spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casandjian, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and nuclei interact with the Galactic interstellar gas and produce high-energy $\\gamma$ rays. The $\\gamma$-ray emission rate per hydrogen atom, called emissivity, provides a unique indirect probe of the CR flux. We present the measurement and the interpretation of the emissivity in the solar neighborhood for $\\gamma$-ray energy from 50~MeV to 50~GeV. We analyzed a subset of 4 years of observations from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the {\\it Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} ({\\it Fermi}) restricted to absolute latitudes $10^oconversion factor $X_{CO}=(0.902\\pm0.007) \\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K km s$^{-1}$)$^{-1}$ and the dust-to-gas ratio $X_{DUST}=(41.4\\pm0.3) \\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ mag$^{-1}$. Moreover we detected for the first time $\\gamma$-ray emission from i...

  8. Study of high energy cosmic ray acceleration in Tycho SNR with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Nahee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are broadly accepted as the main accelerators of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) with energies up to the knee region. Recent measurements of pion bumps in IC 443 and W 44 by Fermi-LAT show indirect evidence of the acceleration of hadronic particles in SNRs. But, whether SNRs are the powerhouses for GCR acceleration all the way up to the knee region still remains an unsolved question. Tycho is a promising target for this study because it has been widely studied in multi-wavelength observations from IR to TeV and it is a young type Ia SNR located in a relatively clean environment. Though recently developed models generally agree on the likely hadronic origin of the gamma-ray emission from Tycho, the details of the models vary considerably because the current data in the GeV-TeV range are weakly constraining. Since the initial detection, VERITAS has increased its data size by more than 40%. We also recently upgraded the telescope cameras and the analysis packages, which will allow us to ext...

  9. The origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background in the MeV range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Hartmann, Dieter; Ajello, Marco; Canal, Ramon; Röpke, Friedrich K; Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much debate about the origin of the diffuse gamma--ray background in the energy range from a few hundred keV to 10 MeV. At lower energies, AGNs and Seyfert galaxies can explain the background, but their contribution cuts off above $\\simeq$ 0.3 MeV. In the MeV range, the spectrum drops sharply for increasing energies. It flattens beyond $\\sim$ 10 MeV, and blazars appear to account for the fluxes observed there. That leaves an unexplained window for which different candidate sources have been proposed, including annihilations of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPS). One candidate are Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Previous estimates of SNe Ia to the cosmic gamma--ray background were based on a restricted number of SN Ia explosion models and, on very limited measurements of the SN Ia rates as a function of redshift $z$. In the present work, we use a wide variety of explosion models and the most recent measurements of the SN Ia rates, which now cover a wide redshift interval. If we adopt the ...

  10. On the relationship of the 27-day variations of the solar wind velocity and galactic cosmic ray intensity in minimum epoch of solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relationship of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic ray intensity with similar changes of the solar wind velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field based on the experimental data for the Bartels rotation period 2379 of 23 November 2007-19 December 2007. We develop a three dimensional (3-D) model of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity based on the heliolongitudinally dependent solar wind velocity. A consistent, divergence-free interplanetary magnetic field is derived by solving Maxwells equations with a heliolongitudinally dependent 27-day variation of the solar wind velocity reproducing in situ observations. We consider two types of 3-D models of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity - (1) with a plane heliospheric neutral sheet, and (2)- with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The theoretical calculation shows that the sector structure does not influence significantly on the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity as...

  11. Observation in the MINOS far detector of the shadowing of cosmic rays by the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; /Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C.; /Rutherford /Athens U.; Ayres, D.S.; /Argonne; Backhouse, C.; /Oxford U.; Barr, G.; /Oxford U.; Barrett, W.L.; /Western Washington U.; Bishai, M.; /Brookhaven; Blake, A.; /Cambridge U.; Bock, B.; /Minnesota U., Duluth; Bock, G.J.; /Fermilab; Boehnlein, D.J.; /Fermilab /Fermilab

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shadowing of cosmic ray primaries by the the moon and sun was observed by the MINOS far detector at a depth of 2070 mwe using 83.54 million cosmic ray muons accumulated over 1857.91 live-days. The shadow of the moon was detected at the 5.6 {sigma} level and the shadow of the sun at the 3.8 {sigma} level using a log-likelihood search in celestial coordinates. The moon shadow was used to quantify the absolute astrophysical pointing of the detector to be 0.17 {+-} 0.12{sup o}. Hints of Interplanetary Magnetic Field effects were observed in both the sun and moon shadow.

  12. A new approach to inferring the mass composition of cosmic rays at energies above 10^18 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ave; J. A. Hinton; R. A. Vazquez; A. A. Watson; E. Zas

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new approach to establishing the mass composition at high energies. Based on measuring both the vertical and inclined shower rates, it has the potential to distinguish heavy nuclei from light nuclei. We apply the method to Haverah Park data above 10^18 eV to show that, under the assumption that the Quark Gluon String Jet Model correctly describes the high energy interactions, the inclined shower measurements favour a light composition at energies above 10^19 eV. The same conclusion is obtained using a variety of assumptions about the cosmic ray spectrum. To the extent that precise spectral measurements will be possible by forthcoming experiments such as the Auger observatories, the method will further constrain data on composition of the ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  13. Cosmic X-ray Surveys of Distant Active Galaxies: The Demographics, Physics, and Ecology of Growing Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, W N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review results from cosmic X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the past ~ 15 yr that have dramatically improved our understanding of growing supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the distant universe. First, we discuss the utility of such surveys for AGN investigations and the capabilities of the missions making these surveys, emphasizing Chandra, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR. Second, we briefly describe the main cosmic X-ray surveys, the essential roles of complementary multiwavelength data, and how AGNs are selected from these surveys. We then review key results from these surveys on the AGN population and its evolution ("demographics"), the physical processes operating in AGNs ("physics"), and the interactions between AGNs and their environments ("ecology"). We conclude by describing some significant unresolved questions and prospects for advancing the field.

  14. A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; ,

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Veron-Cetty Veron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20, 30, ..., 110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 51 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

  15. Validation of Kalman Filter alignment algorithm with cosmic-ray data using a CMS silicon strip tracker endcap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Sprenger; M. Weber; R. Adolphi; R. Brauer; L. Feld; K. Klein; A. Ostaptchuk; S. Schael; B. Wittmer

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kalman Filter alignment algorithm has been applied to cosmic-ray data. We discuss the alignment algorithm and an experiment-independent implementation including outlier rejection and treatment of weakly determined parameters. Using this implementation, the algorithm has been applied to data recorded with one CMS silicon tracker endcap. Results are compared to both photogrammetry measurements and data obtained from a dedicated hardware alignment system, and good agreement is observed.

  16. Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

  17. COSMIC-RAY CURRENT-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND MEAN-FIELD DYNAMO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Brandenburg, Axel [NORDITA, Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Eichler, David [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that an {alpha} effect is driven by the cosmic-ray (CR) Bell instability exciting left-right asymmetric turbulence. Alfven waves of a preferred polarization have maximally helical motion, because the transverse motion of each mode is parallel to its curl. We show how large-scale Alfven modes, when rendered unstable by CR streaming, can create new net flux over any finite region, in the direction of the original large-scale field. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a magnetohydrodynamic fluid with a forced CR current and use the test-field method to determine the {alpha} effect and the turbulent magnetic diffusivity. As follows from DNS, the dynamics of the instability has the following stages: (1) in the early stage, the small-scale Bell instability that results in the production of small-scale turbulence is excited; (2) in the intermediate stage, there is formation of larger-scale magnetic structures; (3) finally, quasi-stationary large-scale turbulence is formed at a growth rate that is comparable to that expected from the dynamo instability, but its amplitude over much longer timescales remains unclear. The results of DNS are in good agreement with the theoretical estimates. It is suggested that this dynamo is what gives weakly magnetized relativistic shocks such as those from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) a macroscopic correlation length. It may also be important for large-scale magnetic field amplification associated with CR production and diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) and blast waves from GRBs. Magnetic field amplification by Bell turbulence in SNRs is found to be significant, but it is limited owing to the finite time available to the super-Alfvenicly expanding remnant. The effectiveness of the mechanisms is shown to be dependent on the shock velocity. Limits on magnetic field growth in longer-lived systems, such as the Galaxy and unconfined intergalactic CRs, are also discussed.

  18. Radius of influence for a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe : theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desilets, Darin

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral footprint of a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe was determined using diffusion theory and neutron transport simulations. The footprint is radial and can be described by a single parameter, an e-folding length that is closely related to the slowing down length in air. In our work the slowing down length is defined as the crow-flight distance traveled by a neutron from nuclear emission as a fast neutron to detection at a lower energy threshold defined by the detector. Here the footprint is defined as the area encompassed by two e-fold distances, i.e. the area from which 86% of the recorded neutrons originate. The slowing down length is approximately 150 m at sea level for neutrons detected over a wide range of energies - from 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 5} eV. Both theory and simulations indicate that the slowing down length is inversely proportional to air density and linearly proportional to the height of the sensor above the ground for heights up to 100 m. Simulations suggest that the radius of influence for neutrons >1 eV is only slightly influenced by soil moisture content, and depends weakly on the energy sensitivity of the neutron detector. Good agreement between the theoretical slowing down length in air and the simulated slowing down length near the air/ground interface support the conclusion that the footprint is determined mainly by the neutron scattering properties of air.

  19. Cosmic ray velocity and electric charge measurements with the AMS/RICH detector: prototype results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luísa Arruda; Fernando Barăo; Patrícia Gonçalves; Rui Pereira

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will measure charged cosmic ray spectra of elements up to iron, in the rigidity range from 1 GV to 1 TV, for at least three years. AMS is a large angular spectrometer composed of different subdetectors, including a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. This will be equipped with a mixed radiator made of aerogel and sodium fluoride (NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers coupled to light guides. The RICH detector allows measurements of particle's electric charge up to iron, and particle's velocity. Two possible methods for reconstructing the Cherenkov angle and the electric charge with the RICH will be discussed. A RICH prototype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultipliers, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated using ion beam data. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the NaF radiator. In addition, the reflectivity of the mirror was evaluated. The data analysis confirms the design goals.

  20. Cosmic Ray Confinement and Transport Models for Probing their Putative Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malkov, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent efforts in cosmic ray (CR) confinement and transport theory are discussed. Three problems are addressed as being crucial for understanding the present day observations and their possible telltale signs of the CR origin. The first problem concerns CR behavior right after their release from a source, such as a supernova remnant (SNR). At this phase the CRs are confined near the source by self-emitted Alfven waves. The second is the problem of diffusive propagation of CRs through the turbulent ISM. This is a seemingly straightforward and long-resolved problem, but it remains controversial and reveals paradoxes. A resolution based on the Chapman-Enskog asymptotic CR transport analysis, that also includes magnetic focusing, is suggested. The third problem is about a puzzling sharp ($\\sim10^{\\circ}$) anisotropies in the CR arrival directions that might bear on important clues of their transport between the source and observer. The overarching goal is to improve our understanding of all aspects of the CR's so...

  1. Pecularities of cosmic ray modulation in the solar minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study changes of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for the ending period of the solar cycle 23 and the beginning of the solar cycle 24 using neutron monitors experimental data. We show that an increase of the GCR intensity in 2009 is generally related with decrease of the solar wind velocity U, the strength B of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and the drift in negative (Aneg) polarity epoch. We present that temporal changes of rigidity dependence of the GCR intensity variation before reaching maximum level in 2009 and after it, do not noticeably differ from each other. The rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations calculated based on neutron monitors data (for rigidities greaten than 10 GV) is hard in the minimum and near minimum epoch. We do not recognize any non-ordinary changes in the physical mechanism of modulation of the GCR intensity in the rigidity range of GCR particles to which neutron monitors respond. We compose 2-D non stationary model of transport equation to describe v...

  2. On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

  3. The isotropy problem of sub-ankle ultra high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be'er-Sheba 84105 (Israel)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the time dependent propagation of sub-ankle ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) originating from point-like Galactic sources. We show that drift in the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) may play an important role in the propagation of UHECRs and their measured anisotropy, particularly when the transport is anisotropic. To fully account for the discreteness of UHECR sources in space and time, a Monte Carlo method is used to randomly place sources in the Galaxy. The low anisotropy measured by Auger is not generally characteristic of the theoretical models, given that the sources are distributed in proportion to the star formation rate, but it can possibly be understood as (1) intermittency effects due to the discrete nature of the sources or, with extreme parameters, (2) a cancellation of drift current along a current sheet with outward radial diffusive flux. We conclude that it is possible to interpret the Galactic sub-ankle CR flux as being due entirely to intermittent discrete Galactic sources distributed in proportion to star formation, but only with a probability of roughly 35%, of which the spectrum is in accord with observations about 30% of the time. An alternative explanation for the low anisotropy may be that they are mostly extragalactic and/or heavy.

  4. Large-scale anisotropy of TeV-band cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David [Phyiscs Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be'er-Sheba 84105 (Israel)

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected anisotropy in the 1 to 10{sup 4} TeV energy range is calculated for Galactic cosmic rays with both anisotropy in the diffusion tensor and source discreteness taken into account. We find that if the sources are distributed radially (but with azimuthal symmetry) in proportion to Galactic pulsars, the expected anisotropy almost always exceeds the observational limits by one order of magnitude in the case of isotropic diffusion. If the radial diffusion is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the azimuthal diffusion rate, the radial gradient of the sources can be accommodated about 5% of the time. If the sources are concentrated in the spiral arms, then the anisotropy depends on our location between them, but in some spatial window, roughly equidistant from adjacent spiral arms, the observational constraints on anisotropy are obeyed roughly 20%-30% of the time for extremely anisotropic diffusion. The solar system is in that window less than 10% of the time, but it may be there now. Under the assumption of isotropic diffusion, nearby supernovae are found to produce a discreteness anisotropy that is nearly two orders of magnitude in excess of the observational limit if all supernovae are assumed to contribute equally with a source rate 1 in every 100 years.

  5. Energy reconstruction of hadron-initiated showers of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ros, G; Supanitsky, A D; del Peral, L; Rodríguez-Frías, M D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current methods to determine the primary energy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are different when dealing with hadron or photon primaries. The current experiments combine two different techniques, an array of surface detectors and fluorescence telescopes. The latter allow an almost calorimetric measurement of the primary energy. Thus, hadron-initiated showers detected by both type of detectors are used to calibrate the energy estimator from the surface array (usually the interpolated signal at a certain distance from the shower core S(r0)) with the primary energy. On the other hand, this calibration is not feasible when searching for photon primaries since no high energy photon has been unambiguously detected so far. Therefore, pure Monte Carlo parametrizations are used instead. In this work, we present a new method to determine the primary energy of hadron-induced showers in a hybrid experiment based on a technique previously developed for photon primaries. It consists on a set of calibration ...

  6. Rigidity-dependent cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region obtained with the GAMMA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Garyaka; R. M. Martirosov; S. V. Ter-Antonyan; N. Nikolskaya; Y. A. Gallant; L. Jones; J. Procureur

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the extensive air shower (EAS) data obtained by the GAMMA experiment, the energy spectra and elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays are derived in the 1-100 PeV energy range. The reconstruction of the primary energy spectra is carried out using an EAS inverse approach in the framework of the SIBYLL2.1 and QGSJET01 interaction models and the hypothesis of power-law primary energy spectra with rigidity-dependent knees. The energy spectra of primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei obtained with the SIBYLL interaction model agree with corresponding extrapolations of the balloon and satellite data to ~1 PeV energies. The energy spectra obtained from the QGSJET model show a predominantly proton composition in the knee region. The rigidity-dependent knee feature of the primary energy spectra for each interaction model is displayed at the following rigidities: ~2.5+/-0.2 PV (SIBYLL) and ~3.1-4.2 PV (QGSJET). All the results presented are derived taking into account the detector response, the reconstruction uncertainties of the EAS parameters, and fluctuations in the EAS development.

  7. Rigidity-dependent cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region obtained with the GAMMA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garyaka, A P; Ter-Antonian, S V; Nikolskaya, N; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L; Procureur, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the extensive air shower (EAS) data obtained by the GAMMA experiment, the energy spectra and elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays are derived in the 1-100 PeV energy range. The reconstruction of the primary energy spectra is carried out using an EAS inverse approach in the framework of the SIBYLL2.1 and QGSJET01 interaction models and the hypothesis of power-law primary energy spectra with rigidity-dependent knees. The energy spectra of primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei obtained with the SIBYLL interaction model agree with corresponding extrapolations of the balloon and satellite data to ~1 PeV energies. The energy spectra obtained from the QGSJET model show a predominantly proton composition in the knee region. The rigidity-dependent knee feature of the primary energy spectra for each interaction model is displayed at the following rigidities: ~2.5+/-0.2 PV (SIBYLL) and ~3.1-4.2 PV (QGSJET). All the results presented are derived taking into account the detector response, th...

  8. Energy Spectra of Elemental Groups of Cosmic Rays: Update on the KASCADE Unfolding Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KASCADE Collaboration; W. D. Apel

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The KASCADE experiment measures extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays in the energy range around the so-called knee. The data of KASCADE have been used in a composition analysis showing the knee at 3-5 PeV to be caused by a steepening in the light-element spectra. Since the applied unfolding analysis depends crucially on simulations of air showers, different high energy hadronic interaction models (QGSJet and SIBYLL) were used. The results have shown a strong dependence of the relative abundance of the individual mass groups on the underlying model. In this update of the analysis we apply the unfolding method with a different low energy interaction model (FLUKA instead of GHEISHA) in the simulations. While the resulting individual mass group spectra do not change significantly, the overall description of the measured data improves by using the FLUKA model. In addition data in a larger range of zenith angle are analysed. The new results are completely consistent, i.e. there is no hint to any severe problem in applying the unfolding analysis method to KASCADE data.

  9. Effective destruction of CO by cosmic rays: implications for tracing H$_2$ gas in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisbas, Thomas G; Viti, Serena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the effects of cosmic rays (CRs) on the abundance of CO in $\\rm H_2$ clouds under conditions typical for star-forming galaxies in the Universe. We discover that this most important molecule for tracing H$_2$ gas is very effectively destroyed in ISM environments with CR energy densities $\\rm U_{CR}\\sim(50-10^{3})\\times U_{CR,Gal}$, a range expected in numerous star-forming systems throughout the Universe. This density-dependent effect operates volumetrically rather than only on molecular cloud surfaces (i.e. unlike FUV radiation that also destroys CO), and is facilitated by: a) the direct destruction of CO by CRs, and b) a reaction channel activated by CR-produced He$^{+}$. The effect we uncover is strong enough to render Milky-Way type Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) very CO-poor (and thus CO-untraceable), even in ISM environments with rather modestly enhanced average CR energy densities of $\\rm U_{CR}\\sim(10-50)\\times\\rm U_{CR,Gal}$. We conclude that the CR-induced destruction of CO in molecular c...

  10. Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

  11. The IceCube Collaboration:contributions to the 30 th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2007),

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Ackermann, M.

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper bundles 40 contributions by the IceCube collaboration that were submitted to the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference ICRC 2007. The articles cover studies on cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrinos, searches for non-localized, extraterrestrial {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}} signals, scans for steady and intermittent neutrino point sources, searches for dark matter candidates, magnetic monopoles and other exotic particles, improvements in analysis techniques, as well as future detector extensions. The IceCube observatory will be finalized in 2011 to form a cubic-kilometer ice-Cherenkov detector at the location of the geographic South Pole. At the present state of construction, IceCube consists of 52 paired IceTop surface tanks and 22 IceCube strings with a total of 1426 Digital Optical Modules deployed at depths up to 2350 m. The observatory also integrates the 19 string AMANDA subdetector, that was completed in 2000 and extends IceCube's reach to lower energies. Before the deployment of IceTop, cosmic air showers were registered with the 30 station SPASE-2 surface array. IceCube's low noise Digital Optical Modules are very reliable, show a uniform response and record waveforms of arriving photons that are resolvable with nanosecond precision over a large dynamic range. Data acquisition, reconstruction and simulation software are running in production mode and the analyses, profiting from the improved data quality and increased overall sensitivity, are well under way.

  12. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  13. Magnetic lensing of extremely high energy cosmic rays in a galactic wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Harari; Silvia Mollerach; Esteban Roulet

    2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in the model of Galactic magnetic wind recently proposed to explain the extremely high energy (EHE) cosmic rays so far observed as originating from a single source (M87 in the Virgo cluster), the magnetic field strongly magnifies the fluxes and produces multiple images of the source. The apparent position on Earth of the principal image moves, for decreasing energies, towards the galactic south. It is typically amplified by an order of magnitude at $E/Z\\sim 2\\times 10^{20}$ eV, but becomes strongly demagnified below $10^{20}$ eV. At energies below $E/Z\\sim 1.3\\times 10^{20}$ eV, all events in the northern galactic hemisphere are due to secondary images, which have huge amplifications ($>10^2$). This model would imply strong asymmetries between the north and south galactic hemispheres, such as a (latitude dependent) upper cut-off value below $2\\times 10^{20}$ eV for CR protons arriving to the south and lower fluxes in the south than in the north above $10^{20}$ eV. The large resulting magnifications reduce the power requirements on the source, but the model needs a significant tunning between the direction to the source and the symmetry axis of the wind. If more modest magnetic field strengths were assumed, a scenario in which the observed EHE events are heavier nuclei whose flux is strongly lensed becomes also plausible and would predict that a transition from a light composition to a heavier one could take place at the highest energies.

  14. COSMIC RAYS CAN DRIVE STRONG OUTFLOWS FROM GAS-RICH HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wólta?ski, D. [Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Grudziadzka 5, PL-87100 Toru? (Poland)] [Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Grudziadzka 5, PL-87100 Toru? (Poland); Lesch, H. [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany)] [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Naab, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Gawryszczak, A., E-mail: mhanasz@astri.uni.torun.pl [Pozna? Supercomputing and Networking Centre, ul. Noskowskiego 10, PL-61-704 Pozna? (Poland)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star-forming (40 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (?{sub gas} ? 100 M {sub ?} pc{sup –2}) similar to observed star-forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10% of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays (CRs) and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}), we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low-density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid, the wind speed can exceed 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e., the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate, becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated in supernova remnants alone provide a natural and efficient mechanism to trigger winds similar to observed mass-loaded galactic winds in high-redshift galaxies. These winds also help in explaining the low efficiencies for the conversion of gas into stars in galaxies, as well as the early enrichment of the intergalactic medium with metals. This mechanism may be at least of similar importance to the traditionally considered momentum feedback from massive stars and thermal and kinetic feedback from supernova explosions.

  15. Cosmic Rays to Acoustics: Non-intrusive Monitoring for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, S.J.; Scully, P. [Nexia Solutions, H260 Hinton House, Risley, Warrington, WA6 3AS (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive nature of the material handled during nuclear reprocessing or fuel manufacture often makes both process monitoring and process diagnostics most challenging. Fox example, quantifying material inside a radiation shielded storage vessel, locating sediment layers and the associated interfaces represents a difficult challenge. Alternatively, measuring the extent of sludge re-suspension and quantifying the amounts of sludge transferred during a sludge movement campaign also represents a re-occurring problem. Remote non-invasive process monitoring and imaging techniques are most applicable in the nuclear sector as they provide a means to monitor or image the given process, container or vessel allowing a remote interrogation whilst reducing operator dosage uptake. A number of currently used types of non-intrusive process monitoring and imaging techniques are discussed in this paper, each with their associated applications. Firstly, the use of (very) high energy naturally occurring cosmic ray muons for imaging the internal contents of large or radiation shielded vessels is discussed. Secondly, the use of non-invasive acoustic monitoring techniques to detect the presence of a gas-core inside a stirred vessel as well as the detection of flowing solids is described. Finally, the use of electrical resistance tomography for imaging the ease of sludge re-suspension in a storage vessel is also discussed. Within the UK Nuclear Sector, the use of non-invasive imaging and process monitoring techniques in recent years has shown a marked increase. Being able to 'see inside' the process represents a powerful tool allowing the quantification, location and characterisation of material whilst increasing the overall understanding of the given process providing significant safety, economical and operational benefits. (authors)

  16. Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos from the Decay of Long-Lived Particle and the Recent IceCube Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ema, Yohei; Moroi, Takeo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the recent IceCube result, we study high energy cosmic-ray neutrino flux from the decay of a long-lived particle. Because neutrinos are so transparent, high energy neutrinos produced in the past may also contribute to the present neutrino flux. We point out that the PeV neutrino events observed by IceCube may originate in the decay of a particle much heavier than PeV if its lifetime is shorter than the present cosmic time. It is shown that the mass of the particle responsible for the IceCube event can be as large as $\\sim 10^{10}\\ {\\rm GeV}$. We also discuss several possibilities to acquire information about the lifetime of the long-lived particle.

  17. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101106 A Search for Short Duration VHE Emission from GRBs with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    produced by gamma rays with primary energies of approximately 100 GeV and higher. The wide field of view for different GRB parameters (such as redshift and isotropic energy distributions) are used to constrain the VHE Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mex- ico, and is capable of detecting air showers induced by cosmic rays

  18. Introduction This project used cosmic rays to test a prototype Minimum Bias Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -GE-ES-0001, CERN, 2004. Fig. 2. Elevation view of the cosmic telescope. Fig. 3. Flow chart of the MBTS. Monte Carlo prediction of the energy deposited in the MBTS counter. Signal 8X Linear Amplifier 5X

  19. Cosmic ray H and He spectra from 2 to 800 TeV/nucleon from the JACEE experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, B. S.; Cherry, M. L.; Sengupta, K.; Wefel, J. P. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Asakimori, K. [Kobe Women's Junior College, Kobe (Japan); Burnett, T. H.; Iwai, J.; Lord, J.; Olson, E. D.; Strausz, S. C.; Wilkes, R. J.; Zager, E. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Chevli, K.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J.; Shiina, T.; Takahashi, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)] (and others)

    1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the cosmic ray hydrogen and helium spectra up to 800 TeV, near the 'knee' region, are presented. There is no sign of a break in either the hydrogen or helium spectra. The differential power law slopes are 2.80{+-}0.04 for hydrogen and 2.68{+-}0.06 for helium. With these new H and He measurements, together with earlier reported results for the heavier elements, the sum of the spectra give an all-particle spectrum that is in good agreement with the all-particle spectrum measured using extensive air showers.

  20. Deep shower interpretation of the cosmic ray events observed in excess of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron S. Chou

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray flux has a small component of exotic particles which create showers much deeper in the atmosphere than ordinary hadronic primaries. It is shown that applying the conventional AGASA/HiRes/Auger data analysis procedures to such exotic events results in large systematic biases in the energy spectrum measurement. SubGZK exotic showers may be mis-reconstructed with much higher energies and mimick superGZK events. Alternatively, superGZK exotic showers may elude detection by conventional fluorescence analysis techniques.

  1. A Measurement of the Flux of Cosmic Ray Iron at 5 x 10^13 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Clem; W. Droege; P. A. Evenson; H. Fischer; G. Green; D. Huber; H. Kunow; D. Seckel

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the initial flight of our Balloon Air CHerenkov (BACH) payload. BACH detects air Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray nuclei as coincident flashes in two optical modules. The flight (dubbed PDQ BACH) took place on April 22, 1998 from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. During an exposure of 2.75 hours, with a typical threshold energy for iron nuclei of 2.2$\\times10^{13}$ eV, we observed several events cleanly identifiable as iron group nuclei. Analysis of the data yields a new flux measurement that is fully consistent with that reported by other investigations.

  2. The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  3. Origin of Cosmic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I give a brief overview of cosmic ray physics, highlighting some key questions and how they will be addressed by new experiments.

  4. LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [IFGW, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  6. The star-forming galaxy contribution to the cosmic MeV and GeV gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacki, Brian C. [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Horiuchi, Shunsaku [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Beacom, John F., E-mail: brianlacki@ias.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star-forming galaxies could be major contributors to the cosmic GeV ?-ray background, and they are expected to be MeV-dim because of the 'pion bump' falling off below ?100 MeV. However, there are very few observations of galaxies in the MeV range and other emission processes could be present. We investigate the MeV background from star-forming galaxies by running one-zone models of cosmic ray populations, including inverse Compton and bremsstrahlung, as well as nuclear lines (including {sup 26}Al), emission from core-collapse supernovae, and positron annihilation emission, in addition to the pionic emission. We use the Milky Way and M82 as templates of normal and starburst galaxies and compare our models to radio and GeV-TeV ?-ray data. We find that (1) higher gas densities in high-z normal galaxies lead to a strong pion bump, (2) starbursts may have significant MeV emission if their magnetic field strengths are low, and (3) cascades can contribute to the MeV emission of starbursts if they emit mainly hadronic ?-rays. Our fiducial model predicts that most of the unresolved GeV background is from star-forming galaxies, but this prediction is uncertain by an order of magnitude. About ?2% of the claimed 1 MeV background is diffuse emission from star-forming galaxies; we place a firm upper limit of ? 10% based on the spectral shape of the background. The star formation contribution is constrained to be small because its spectrum is peaked, while the observed background is steeply falling with energy through the MeV-GeV range.

  7. The effects of coronal mass ejection on galactic cosmic rays in the high latitude heliosphere: Observations from Ulysses` first orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bothmer, V.; Heber, B.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Wibberenz, G. [Univ. of Kiel (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik; Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Balogh, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Raviart, A. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d`Astrophysique; Paizis, C. [Univ. di Milano (Italy). Istituto di Fisica Cosmica CNR

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During its first solar orbit the Ulysses spacecraft detected several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at high heliographic latitudes. The authors present first observations on the effects of these high latitude CMEs on galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using measurements from the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) which is part of the Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Investigation (COSPIN) experiment, the Los Alamos SWOOPS (Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun) experiment and the magnetic field experiments. They find the passage of these CMEs over the spacecraft to be associated with short term decreases of GCR intensities The relatively weak shocks in these events, driven by the CMEs` over-expansion, had no strong influence on the GCRs. The intensity minimums of GCRs occurred on closed magnetic field lines inside the CMEs themselves as indicated by bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons. Short episodes of intensity increases of GCRs inside CMEs at times when the bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons disappeared, can be interpreted as evidence that GCRs can easily access the interior of those CMEs in which open magnetic field lines are embedded.

  8. Study of Dispersion of Mass Distribution of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays using a Surface Array of Muon and Electromagnetic Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vícha, Jakub; Nosek, Dalibor; Ebr, Jan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a hypothetical observatory of ultra-high energy cosmic rays consisting of two surface detector arrays that measure independently electromagnetic and muon signals induced by air showers. Using the constant intensity cut method, sets of events ordered according to each of both signal sizes are compared giving the number of matched events. Based on its dependence on the zenith angle, a parameter sensitive to the dispersion of the distribution of the logarithmic mass of cosmic rays is introduced. The results obtained using two post-LHC models of hadronic interactions are very similar and indicate a weak dependence on details of these interactions.

  9. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2269 Preliminary Evidence for TeV Gamma Ray Emission from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the Galactic Plane using the Milagro Detector Roman Fleysher 1 for Milagro Collaboration (1) New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA Abstract The majority of galactic gamma rays are produced by interaction and is sensitive to gamma rays with energies below 1 TeV. The combination of a large duty factor and a large field

  10. Cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    identified by a cosmic ray telescope sensitive to high-energy (>400 MeV) particles, principally muons experiment, a narrowband thermopile filter radiometer centred on 9.15 µm, an absorption band previously. The integrated atmospheric energy density for each event is 2 Jm-2, representing an amplification factor of 1012

  11. On the possibility of cosmic ray-induced ionizing radiation-powered life in subsurface environments in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthesis is a highly efficient mechanism developed by terrestrial life to utilize the energy from photons of solar origin for biological use. Subsurface regions are isolated from the photosphere, and consequently are incapable of utilizing this energy. This opens up the opportunity for life to cultivate alternative mechanisms in order to take advantage of other available energy sources. Studies have shown that in subsurface environments, life can use energy generated from geochemical and geothermal processes to sustain a minimal metabolism. Another mechanism is radiolysis, in which particles emitted by radioactive substances are indirectly utilized for metabolism. One such example is the bacterium fueled by radiation, found 2 miles deep in a South African mine, which consumes hydrogen formed from particles emitted by radioactive U, Th and K present in rock. An additional source of radiation in the subsurface environments is secondary particles, such as muons generated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). It ...

  12. Reconstructing the Cosmic Expansion History up to Redshift z=6.29 with the Calibrated Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Wei; Shuang Nan Zhang

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) were proposed to be a complementary cosmological probe to type Ia supernovae (SNIa). GRBs have been advocated to be standard candles since several empirical GRB luminosity relations were proposed as distance indicators. However, there is a so-called circularity problem in the direct use of GRBs. Recently, a new idea to calibrate GRBs in a completely cosmology independent manner has been proposed, and the circularity problem can be solved. In the present work, following the method proposed by Liang {\\it et al.}, we calibrate 70 GRBs with the Amati relation using 307 SNIa. Then, following the method proposed by Shafieloo {\\it et al.}, we smoothly reconstruct the cosmic expansion history up to redshift $z=6.29$ with the calibrated GRBs. We find some new features in the reconstructed results.

  13. CRPropa 3.0 - a Public Framework for Propagating UHE Cosmic Rays through Galactic and Extragalactic Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Evoli, Carmelo; Kampert, Karl-Heinz; Kuempel, Daniel; Müller, Gero; Schiffer, Peter; Sigl, Guenter; van Vliet, Arjen; Walz, David; Winchen, Tobias

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interpretation of experimental data of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 10^17 eV is still under controversial debate. The development and improvement of numerical tools to propagate UHECRs in galactic and extragalactic space is a crucial ingredient to interpret data and to draw conclusions on astrophysical parameters. In this contribution the next major release of the publicly available code CRPropa (3.0) is presented. It reflects a complete redesign of the code structure to facilitate high performance computing and comprises new physical features such as an interface for galactic propagation using lensing techniques and inclusion of cosmological effects in a three-dimensional environment. The performance is benchmarked and first applications are presented.

  14. Azimuthal modulation of cosmic ray flux as an effect of geomagnetic field in the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardini, P; He, H H; Mancarella, G; Perrone, L; Surdo, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomagnetic field causes not only the East-West effect on the primary cosmic rays but also affects the trajectories of the secondary charged particles in the shower, causing their lateral distribution to be stretched along certain directions. Thus both the density of the secondaries near the shower axis and the trigger efficiency of a detector array decrease. The effect depends on the age and on the direction of the showers, thus involving the measured azimuthal distribution. Here the non-uniformity of the azimuthal distribution of the reconstructed events in the ARGO-YBJ experiment is deeply investigated for different zenith angles on the light of this effect. The influence of the geomagnetic field as well as geometric effects are studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. North-south asymmetry for high-energy cosmic-ray electrons measured with the PAMELA experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karelin, A. V., E-mail: karelin@hotbox.ru ['MEPhI' National Research Nuclear University (Russian Federation); Adriani, O. [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Structure of Naples and Physics Department of University of Naples, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Naples and Physics Department of University of Naples, INFN (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R. [Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, INFN (Italy); Boezio, M. [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M. [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy); Bottai, S. [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy); Bruno, A. [Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Bari and Physics Department of University of Bari, INFN (Italy); Vacchi, A. [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Trieste and Physics Department of University of Trieste, INFN (Italy); Vannuccini, E. [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Florence and Physics Department of University of Florence, INFN (Italy); Vasilyev, G. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Voronov, S. A.; Galper, A. M.; Danilchenko, I. A. ['MEPhI' National Research Nuclear University (Russian Federation)] ['MEPhI' National Research Nuclear University (Russian Federation); Donato, C. De; Santis, C. De [Structure of Rome Tor Vergata and Physics Department of University of Rome Tor Vergata, INFN (Italy)] [Structure of Rome Tor Vergata and Physics Department of University of Rome Tor Vergata, INFN (Italy); and others

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The north-south asymmetry for cosmic-ray particles was measured with one instrument of the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment in the period June 2006-May 2009. The analysis has been performed by two independent methods: by comparing the count rates in regions with identical geomagnetic conditions and by comparing the experimental distribution of particle directions with the simulated distribution that would be in the case of an isotropic particle flux. The dependences of the asymmetry on energy release in the PAMELA calorimeter and on time have been constructed. The asymmetry (N{sub n} - N{sub s})/(N{sub n} + N{sub s}) is 0.06 {+-} 0.004 at the threshold energy release in the calorimeter and gradually decreases with increasing energy release. The observed effect is shown to be produced by electrons in the energy range 10-100 GeV.

  16. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. D. Apel; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; L. Bähren; K. Bekk; M. Bertaina; P. L. Biermann; J. Blümer; H. Bozdog; I. M. Brancus; E. Cantoni; A. Chiavassa; K. Daumiller; V. de Souza; F. Di Pierro; P. Doll; R. Engel; H. Falcke; B. Fuchs; D. Fuhrmann; H. Gemmeke; C. Grupen; A. Haungs; D. Heck; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; D. Huber; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; K. -H. Kampert; D. Kang; O. Krömer; J. Kuijpers; K. Link; P. ?uczak; M. Ludwig; H. J. Mathes; M. Melissas; C. Morello; J. Oehlschläger; N. Palmieri; T. Pierog; J. Rautenberg; H. Rebel; M. Roth; C. Rühle; A. Saftoiu; H. Schieler; A. Schmidt; F. G. Schröder; O. Sima; G. Toma; G. C. Trinchero; A. Weindl; J. Wochele; J. Zabierowski; J. A. Zensus

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  17. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez Castillo, J; Alvarez-Muniz, J; et al

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore »values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  18. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  19. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiok...

  20. Air Fluorescence Relevant for Cosmic-Ray Detection - Summary of the 5th Fluorescence Workshop, El Escorial 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando Arqueros; Joerg R. Hoerandel; Bianca Keilhauer

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy cosmic rays with energies exceeding $10^{17}$ eV are frequently observed by measurements of the fluorescence light induced by air showers. A major contribution to the systematic uncertainties of the absolute energy scale of such experiments is the insufficient knowledge of the fluorescence light yield of electrons in air. The aim of the 5th Fluorescence Workshop was to bring together experimental and theoretical expertise to discuss the latest progress on the investigations of the fluorescence light yield. The results of the workshop will be reviewed as well as the present status of knowledge in this field. Emphasis is given to the fluorescence light yield important for air shower observations and its dependence on atmospheric parameters, like pressure, temperature, and humidity. The effects of the latest results on the light observed from air showers will be discussed.

  1. What Can GLAST Say About the Origin of Cosmic Rays in Other Galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    MeV- 300 GeV) gamma-ray astronomy mission. It is part of the strategic plan of NASA's Office of SpaceV). ADVANCES WITH GLAST The only external galaxy that EGRET detected in the light of its interstellar gamma-ray Space Research Organization,e Stanford University Abstract. Gamma rays in the band from 20 MeV to 300 Ge

  2. What are Being Discovered by the Forefront Cosmic X-ray Observations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    ) The launch of Suzaku by the Mu-5 rocket on 2005 July 10, from the JAXA's Uchi- noura Space Center. (right knowledge on the X-ray Universe had to wait the detection of Solar X-rays in 1949 using V-2 rockets [18 MAXI (Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image) [9] which was transported in 2009 July by Space Shuttle onto

  3. SciTech Connect: Effects of heavy cosmic ray particles on corn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ray primary particles. Nothing unpredicted was observed. (auth) Authors: Curtis, H. J.; Smith, H. H. Publication Date: 1962-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 4129398 Report Number(s):...

  4. Cosmic Ray e +/(e- + e+), p-bar/p Ratios Explained by an Injection Model Based on 2 Gamma-ray Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Lee, S.-H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Giordano, F.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Grondin, M.-H.; /Bordeaux U.; Latronico, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; /Bordeaux U.; Sgro, C.; /INFN, Pisa; Tanaka, T.; Uchiyama, Y.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of cosmic ray (CR) injection into the Galactic space based on recent {gamma}-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi) and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs). Steady-state (SS) injection of nuclear particles and electrons (e{sup -}) from the Galactic ensemble of SNRs, and electrons and positrons (e{sup +}) from the Galactic ensemble of PWNe are assumed, with their spectra deduced from {gamma}-ray observations and recent evolution models. The ensembles of SNRs and PWNe are assumed to share the same spatial distributions and the secondary CR production in dense molecular clouds interacting with SNRs is incorporated in the model. Propagation of CRs to Earth is calculated using GALPROP with 2 source distributions and 2 Galaxy halo sizes. We show that this observation-based model reproduces the positron fraction e{sup +}/(e{sup -} + e{sup +}) and antiproton-to-proton ratio ({bar p}/p) reported by PAMELA reasonably well without calling for new sources. Significant discrepancy is found, however, between our model and the e{sup -} + e{sup +} spectrum measured by Fermi below {approx} 20 GeV. Important quantities for Galactic CRs, including their energy injection, average lifetime, and mean gas density along their typical propagation path are also presented.

  5. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Joseph D.

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and ?-ray observations of this object, ...

  6. Solar panels as air Cherenkov detectors for extremely high energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecchini, S; Esposti, L D; Giacomelli, G; Guerra, M; Lax, I; Mandrioli, G; Parretta, A; Sarno, A; Schioppo, R; Sorel, M; Spurio, M

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing interest towards the observation of the highest energy cosmic rayshas motivated the development of new detection techniques. The properties ofthe Cherenkov photon pulse emitted in the atmosphere by these very rareparticles indicate low-cost semiconductor detectors as good candidates fortheir optical read-out. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the viability of solar panels for thispurpose. The experimental framework resulting from measurements performed withsuitably-designed solar cells and large conventional photovoltaic areas ispresented. A discussion on the obtained and achievable sensitivities follows.

  7. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  8. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  9. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: (1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; (2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; (3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON COSMIC RAYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND DARK MATTER FROM GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES WITH VERITAS AND FERMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Federici, S., E-mail: pohlmadq@gmail.com, E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); and others

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99% confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons m {sup -2} s {sup -1} (VERITAS, >220 GeV) and {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} photons m {sup -2} s {sup -1} (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be <16% from VERITAS data and <1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be <50%. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of {approx}(2-5.5) {mu}G, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark matter (DM) dominated, the VERITAS upper limits have been used to place constraints on the thermally averaged product of the total self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the DM particles, ({sigma}v).

  11. 24. Cosmic rays 1 24. COSMIC RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fraction of these particles may be primary is a question of current interest. Apart from particles are affected by the geomagnetic field, which they must penetrate to reach the top of the atmosphere. Thus measure a quantity that is related to total energy per particle. The units of differential intensity I

  12. 26. Cosmic rays 1 26. COSMIC RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fraction of these particles may be primary is a question of current interest. Apart from particles are affected by the geomagnetic field, which they must penetrate to reach the top of the atmosphere. Thus measure a quantity that is related to total energy per particle. The units of differential intensity I

  13. The acceleration of cosmic-ray protons in the supernova remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    , which is intended to detect very high energy g-rays, is located near Woomera, South Australia. The 3.8-m-8510, Japan { Mt Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, ACT 2611, Australia, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano, Nagano 380-8553, Japan Solar

  14. Detection of cosmic -rays using a heliostat field: the case of F. Arqueros1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisicas. Universidad Complutense. E-28040 Madrid. Spain 2 CIEMAT-Departamento de Energias renovables. Plataforma Solar de Almeria. E-04080 Almeria. Spain 3 Max-Planck Institute f¨ur Physik. D-80805 M¨unchen. Germany Abstract. Gamma-Ray telescopes based on a solar plant are able to accurately measure the spatial

  15. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4#27; level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7#27;). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4#27; and 2.6#27;, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity #28;(E, z) #24; 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  16. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4#27; level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7#27;). A correlation between 10-500 GeVmore »flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4#27; and 2.6#27;, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity #28;(E, z) #24; 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Composition from 10^{17} to 10^{18.3} eV Using a Hybrid Fluorescence Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abu-Zayyad; K. Belov; D. J. Bird; J. Boyer; Z. Cao; M. Catanese; G. F. Chen; R. W. Clay; C. E. Covault; H. Y. Dai; B. R. Dawson; J. W. Elbert; B. E. Fick; L. F. Fortson; J. W. Fowler; K. G. Gibbs; M. A. K. Glasmacher; K. D. Green; Y. Ho; A. Huang; C. C. Jui; M. J. Kidd; D. B. Kieda; B. C. Knapp; S. Ko; C. G. Larsen; W. Lee; E. C. Loh; E. J. Mannel; J. Matthews; J. N. Matthews; B. J. Newport; D. F. Nitz; R. A. Ong; K. M. Simpson; J. D. Smith; D. Sinclair; P. Sokolsky; P. Sommers; C. Song; J. K. K. Tang; S. B. Thomas; J. .van der Velde; L. R. Wiencke; C. R. Wilkinson; S. Yoshida; X. Z. Zhang

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectrum and average mass composition of cosmic rays with primary energies between 10^{17} eV and 10^{18} eV using a hybrid detector consisting of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) prototype and the MIA muon array. Measurements have been made of the change in the depth of shower maximum as a function of energy. A complete Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response and comparisons with shower simulations leads to the conclusion that the cosmic ray intensity is changing f rom a heavier to a lighter composition in this energy range. The spectrum is consistent with earlier Fly's Eye measurements and supports the previously found steepening near 4 \\times 10^{17} eV .

  18. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; ,

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  19. Measurement of the Shadowing of High-Energy Cosmic Rays by the Moon: A Search for TeV-Energy Antiprotons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L3 Collaboration; P. Achard

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The shadowing of high-energy cosmic rays by the Moon has been observed with a significance of 9.4 standard deviations with the L3+C muon spectrometer at CERN. A significant effect of the Earth magnetic field is observed. Since no event deficit on the east side of the Moon has been observed, an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the antiproton to proton ratio of 0.11 is obtained for primary energies around 1 TeV.

  20. Super-Kamiokande 0.07 eV Neutrinos in Cosmology: Hot Dark Matter and the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graciela B. Gelmini

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Relic neutrinos with mass in the range indicated by Super-Kamiokande results if neutrino masses are hierarchial (about 0.07 eV) are many times deemed too light to be cosmologically relevant. Here we remark that these neutrinos may significantly contribute to the dark matter of the Universe (with a large lepton asymmetry $L$) and that their existence might be revealed by the spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays (maybe even in the absence of a large $L$).

  1. Biomarker Response to Galactic Cosmic Ray-Induced NOx and the Methane Greenhouse Effect in the Atmosphere of an Earthlike Planet Orbiting an M-Dwarf Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenfell, J L; Patzer, B; Rauer, H; Segura, A; Stadelmann, A; Stracke, B; Titz, R; Von Paris, P; Grenfell, John Lee; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Patzer, Beate; Rauer, Heike; Segura, Antigona; Stadelmann, Anja; Stracke, Barbara; Titz, Ruth; Paris, Philip von

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planets orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of M-Dwarf stars are subject to high levels of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which produce nitrogen oxides in earthlike atmospheres. We investigate to what extent this NOx may modify biomarker compounds such as ozone (O3) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as related compounds such as water (H2O) (essential for life) and methane (CH4) (which has both abiotic and biotic sources) . Our model results suggest that such signals are robust, changing in the M-star world atmospheric column by up to 20% due to the GCR NOx effects compared to an M-star run without GCR effects and can therefore survive at least the effects of galactic cosmic rays. We have not however investigated stellar cosmic rays here. CH4 levels are about 10 times higher than on the Earth related to a lowering in hydroxyl (OH) in response to changes in UV. The increase is less than reported in previous studies. This difference arose partly because we used different biogenic input. For example, we employed 23% ...

  2. The cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum measured by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in the energy range 3-300 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Bernardini, P; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; D'Amone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Settanta, G; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full-coverage air shower detector located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, People's Republic of China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The high altitude, combined with the full-coverage technique, allows the detection of extensive air showers in a wide energy range and offer the possibility of measuring the cosmic ray proton plus helium spectrum down to the TeV region, where direct balloon/space-borne measurements are available. The detector has been in stable data taking in its full configuration from November 2007 to February 2013. In this paper the measurement of the cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum is presented in the region 3-300 TeV by analyzing the full collected data sample. The resulting spectral index is $\\gamma = -2.64 \\pm 0.01$. These results demonstrate the possibility of performing an accurate measurement of the spectrum of light elements with a ground based air shower detector.

  3. The cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum measured by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in the energy range 3-300 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; :; B. Bartoli; P. Bernardini; X. J. Bi; Z. Cao; S. Catalanotti; S. Z. Chen; T. L. Chen; S. W. Cui; B. Z. Dai; A. D'Amone; Danzengluobu; I. De Mitri; B. D'Ettorre Piazzoli; T. Di Girolamo; G. Di Sciascio; C. F. Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Zhenyong Feng; Q. B. Gou; Y. Q. Guo; H. H. He; Haibing Hu; Hongbo Hu; M. Iacovacci; R. Iuppa; H. Y. Jia; Labaciren; H. J. Li; C. Liu; J. Liu; M. Y. Liu; H. Lu; L. L. Ma; X. H. Ma; G. Mancarella; S. M. Mari; G. Marsella; S. Mastroianni; P. Montini; C. C. Ning; L. Perrone; P. Pistilli; P. Salvini; R. Santonico; G. Settanta; P. R. Shen; X. D. Sheng; F. Shi; A. Surdo; Y. H. Tan; P. Vallania; S. Vernetto; C. Vigorito; H. Wang; C. Y. Wu; H. R. Wu; L. Xue; Q. Y. Yang; X. C. Yang; Z. G. Yao; A. F. Yuan; M. Zha; H. M. Zhang; L. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; J. Zhao; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; X. X. Zhou; F. R. Zhu; Q. Q. Zhu

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full-coverage air shower detector located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, People's Republic of China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The high altitude, combined with the full-coverage technique, allows the detection of extensive air showers in a wide energy range and offer the possibility of measuring the cosmic ray proton plus helium spectrum down to the TeV region, where direct balloon/space-borne measurements are available. The detector has been in stable data taking in its full configuration from November 2007 to February 2013. In this paper the measurement of the cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum is presented in the region 3-300 TeV by analyzing the full collected data sample. The resulting spectral index is $\\gamma = -2.64 \\pm 0.01$. These results demonstrate the possibility of performing an accurate measurement of the spectrum of light elements with a ground based air shower detector.

  4. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  5. Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and Gamma-Ray Constraints on Cosmic Strings with a large Higgs condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. F. Santana Mota; Mark Hindmarsh

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider constraints on cosmic strings from their emission of Higgs particles, in the case that the strings have a Higgs condensate with amplitude of order the string mass scale, assuming that a fraction of the energy of condensate can be turned into radiation near cusps. The injection of energy by the decaying Higgs particles affects the light element abundances predicted by standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), and also contributes to the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background (DGRB) in the universe today. We examine the two main string scenarios (Nambu-Goto and field theory), and find that the primordial Helium abundance strongly constrains the string tension and the efficiency of the emission process in the NG scenario, while the strongest BBN constraint in the FT scenario comes from the Deuterium abundance. The Fermi-LAT measurement of the DGRB constrains the field theory scenario even more strongly than previously estimated from EGRET data, requiring that the product of the string tension {\\mu} and Newton's constant G is bounded by G{\\mu} < 2.7x10^{-11}{\\beta}_{ft}^{-2}, where {\\beta}_{ft}^2 is the fraction of the strings' energy going into Higgs particles.

  6. The Connection Between the Positron Fraction Anomaly and the Spectral Features in Galactic Cosmic-Ray Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomassetti, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) leptons and hadrons gave rise to two exciting problems: on the lepton side, the origin of the rise of the CR positron fraction e+/(e- + e+) at ~10 - 300 GeV of energy; on the hadron side, the nature of the spectral hardening observed in CR protons and nuclei at ~TeV energies. The lepton anomaly indicates the existence of a nearby e+/- source. It has been proposed that high-energy positrons can be produced inside nearby supernova remnants (SNRs) via interactions of CR hadrons with the ambient medium. A distinctive prediction of this mechanism is a high-energy rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, which has not been observed. It also requires old SNRs at work (with ineffective magnetic field amplification and slow shock speed), that cannot account for the CR hadronic spectra observed up to the knee energies (~5 PeV). We propose a new picture where, in addition to such a nearby CR accelerator, the high-energy spectrum of CR hadrons is provided by the large-scale population of...

  7. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiokande measurements of the total background to within a factor of 2, which is good given that the isotope yields vary by orders of magnitude and that some details of the experiment are unknown to us at this level. Our results break aggregate data into component isotopes, reveal their separate production mechanisms, and preserve correlations between them. We outline how to implement more effective background rejection techniques using this information. Reducing backgrounds in solar and DSNB studies by even a factor of a few could help lead to important new discoveries.

  8. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  9. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; /Hawaii U. /UC, Riverside; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; /SLAC; Roberts, D.; /Maryland U.; Ruckman, L.; /Hawaii U.; Shtol, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Varner, G.S.; /Hawaii U.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC; ,

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  10. Cosmic rays: the spectrum and chemical composition from $10^{10}$ to $10^{20}$ eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peixoto, C J Todero; Biermann, Peter L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of energetic particles in the universe remains one of the great mysteries of modern science. The mechanisms of acceleration in astrophysical sources and the details about the propagation through the galactic and extragalactic media are still to be defined. In recent years, the cosmic ray flux has been measured with high precision in the energy range from \\energy{10} to \\energyEV{20.5} by several experiments using different techniques. In some energy ranges, it has been possible to determine the flux of individual elements (hydrogen to iron nuclei). This paper explores an astrophysical scenario in which only our Galaxy and the radio galaxy Cen A produce all particles measured on Earth in the energy range from \\energy{10} to \\energyEV{20.5}. Data from AMS-02, CREAM, KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande and the Pierre Auger Observatories are considered. The model developed here is able to describe the total and individual particle flux of all experiments considered. It is shown that the theory used here is abl...

  11. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, C. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  12. A Model for Most Luminous and Long Duration Cosmic Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhas Mitra

    1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We exploit the fact that General Theory of Relativity (GTR) predicts the existence of compact objects having surface gravitational redshift z_s burst rises dramatically with the value of z_c and can saturate to ~40%. This may explain a gamma ray burst of energy as high as ~5. 10**53 erg. By using the already existing detailed (Newtonian) calculations, it follows that the neutrino heating driven mass loss should be negligible, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the initial fireball could be ~1000. Most of the existing supernova calculations also show that it is extremely difficult to simulate the direct neutrino driven mass loss, and, the shock is not launched if the gravitational field becomes stronger. Since the gravitation potential well of the more compact NS is indded very deep, we do not expect additional baryonic mass ejection. So, without invoking any exotic physics (like strange stars) or overstretching any theory, we may explain most of the luminous GRBs in this simple model.

  13. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the BATSE Catalogs of Untriggered Cosmic Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hurley; B. Stern; J. Kommers; T. Cline; E. Mazets; S. Golenetskii; J. Trombka; T. McClanahan; J. Goldsten; M. Feroci; F. Frontera; C. Guidorzi; E. Montanari; W. Lewin; C. Meegan; G. Fishman; C. Kouveliotou; S. Sinha; S. Seetha

    2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) detection and localization information for 211 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed as untriggered events by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), and published in catalogs by Kommers et al. (2001) and Stern et al. (2001). IPN confirmations have been obtained by analyzing the data from 11 experiments. For any given burst observed by BATSE and one other distant spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or ``triangulation'') results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 14 arcseconds and 5.6 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in a reduction of the area of up to a factor of ~650. When three widely separated spacecraft observed a burst, the result is an error box whose area is as much as 30000 times smaller than that of the BATSE error circle. Because the IPN instruments are considerably less sensitive than BATSE, they generally did not detect the weakest untriggered bursts, but did detect the more intense ones which failed to trigger BATSE when the trigger was disabled. In a few cases, we have been able to identify the probable origin of bursts as soft gamma repeaters. The vast majority of the IPN-detected events, however, are GRBs, and the confirmation of them validates many of the procedures utilized to detect BATSE untriggered bursts.

  14. Connecting Far-Infrared and Radio Morphologies of Disk Galaxies: Cosmic-Ray Electron Diffusion After Star Formation Episodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Murphy; G. Helou; J. D. P. Kenney; L. Armus; R. Braun

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of 29 galaxies based on a comparison of {\\it Spitzer} far-infrared and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio continuum imagery. Of these 29 galaxies, 18 are close enough to resolve at $\\la$1 kpc scales at 70 $\\micron$ and 22 cm. We extend the \\citet{ejm06a,ejm06b} approach of smoothing infrared images to approximate cosmic-ray (CR) electron spreading and thus largely reproduce the appearance of radio images. Using a wavelet analysis we decompose each 70 $\\micron$ image into one component containing the star-forming {\\it structures} and a second one for the diffuse {\\it disk}. The components are smoothed separately, and their combination compared to a free-free corrected 22 cm radio image; the scale-lengths are then varied to best match the radio and smoothed infrared images. We find that late-type spirals having high amounts of ongoing star formation benefit most from the two-component method. We also find that the disk component dominates for galaxies having low star formation activity, whereas the structure component dominates at high star formation activity. We propose that this result arises from an age effect rather than from differences in CR electron diffusion due to varying ISM parameters. The bulk of the CR electron population in actively star-forming galaxies is significantly younger than that in less active galaxies due to recent episodes of enhanced star formation; these galaxies are observed within $\\sim10^{8}$ yr since the onset of the most recent star formation episode. The sample irregulars have anomalously low best-fit scale-lengths for their surface brightnesses compared to the rest of the sample spirals which we attribute to enhanced CR electron escape.

  15. Probing the cosmic gamma-ray burst rate with trigger simulations of the swift burst alert telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, Amy; Cannizzo, John K. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sakamoto, Takanori [Department of Physics and Mathematics, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Palmer, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, B244, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Graziani, Carlo [Astronomy Department, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae, and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and an additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest that bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid overproducing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568{sub ?1429}{sup +825} GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  16. Biomarker Response to Galactic Cosmic Ray-Induced NOx and the Methane Greenhouse Effect in the Atmosphere of an Earthlike Planet Orbiting an M-Dwarf Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Lee Grenfell; Jean-Mathias Griessmeier; Beate Patzer; Heike Rauer; Antigona Segura; Anja Stadelmann; Barbara Stracke; Ruth Titz; Philip von Paris

    2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Planets orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of M-Dwarf stars are subject to high levels of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which produce nitrogen oxides in earthlike atmospheres. We investigate to what extent this NOx may modify biomarker compounds such as ozone (O3) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as related compounds such as water (H2O) (essential for life) and methane (CH4) (which has both abiotic and biotic sources) . Our model results suggest that such signals are robust, changing in the M-star world atmospheric column by up to 20% due to the GCR NOx effects compared to an M-star run without GCR effects and can therefore survive at least the effects of galactic cosmic rays. We have not however investigated stellar cosmic rays here. CH4 levels are about 10 times higher than on the Earth related to a lowering in hydroxyl (OH) in response to changes in UV. The increase is less than reported in previous studies. This difference arose partly because we used different biogenic input. For example, we employed 23% lower CH4 fluxes compared to those studies. Unlike on the Earth, relatively modest changes in these fluxes can lead to larger changes in the concentrations of biomarker and related species on the M-star world. We calculate a CH4 greenhouse heating effect of up to 4K. O3 photochemistry in terms of the smog mechanism and the catalytic loss cycles on the M-star world differs considerably compared with the Earth.

  17. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana; ,

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  18. The IceCube Collaboration:contributions to the 30 th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2007),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackermann, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variety of sources (gamma-ray bursts, active galac- ticgalactic nuclei or gamma-ray bursts [1, 2]. Instead ofnuclei (AGN) and gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are potential

  19. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la premičre fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole ŕ Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  20. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Satellite-detected Gamma- ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. SAZ PARKINSON & B. L. DINGUS ˇ FOR THE MILAGRO@scipp.ucsc.edu; dingus@lanl.gov Abstract: Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted of the Swift bursts. Introduction Almost 40 years after the detection of the first gamma-ray burst (GRB), many

  1. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, M.

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is ...

  2. Precision Measurement of the (e[superscript +] + e[superscript ?) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, M.

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e[superscript +] + e[superscript -]) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e[superscript +] + e[superscript -]) events collected by AMS. The ...

  3. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Ulrich J.

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy ...

  4. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–350 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basil, A.

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×10[superscript 6] positron ...

  5. GEANT4 Simulation of a Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, Russell; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Sian; Shearer, Craig; Staines, Cassie; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-ray muons are highly penetrative charged particles that are observed at sea level with a flux of approximately one per square centimetre per minute. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering, which is exploited in the field of muon tomography to image shielded objects in a wide range of applications. In this paper, simulation studies are presented that assess the feasibility of a scintillating-fibre tracker system for use in the identification and characterisation of nuclear materials stored within industrial legacy waste containers. A system consisting of a pair of tracking modules above and a pair below the volume to be assayed is simulated within the GEANT4 framework using a range of potential fibre pitches and module separations. Each module comprises two orthogonal planes of fibres that allow the reconstruction of the initial and Coulomb-scattered muon trajectories. A likelihood-based image reconstruction algorithm has been developed that allows the container content to be det...

  6. The Design and Performance of a Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, Russell; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Sian; Shearer, Craig; Staines, Cassie; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons are increasingly being exploited for the non-destructive assay of shielded containers in a wide range of applications. One such application is the characterisation of legacy nuclear waste materials stored within industrial containers. The design, assembly and performance of a prototype muon tomography system developed for this purpose are detailed in this work. This muon tracker comprises four detection modules, each containing orthogonal layers of Saint-Gobain BCF-10 2mm-pitch plastic scintillating fibres. Identification of the two struck fibres per module allows the reconstruction of the incoming and Coulomb-scattered muon trajectories. These allow the container content, with respect to the atomic number Z of the scattering material, to be determined through reconstruction of the scattering location and magnitude. On each detection layer, the light emitted by the fibre is detected by a single Hamamatsu H8500 MAPMT with two fibre...

  7. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) with high detection threshold to search for rare events in cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dey; D. Gupta; A. Maulik; Sibaji Raha; Swapan K. Saha; D. Syam; J. Pakarinen; D. Voulot; F. Wenander

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a commercially available polymer for its suitability as a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). We identified that polymer to be polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and found that it has a higher detection threshold compared to many other widely used SSNTDs which makes this detector particularly suitable for rare event search in cosmic rays as it eliminates the dominant low Z background. Systematic studies were carried out to determine its charge response which is essential before any new material can be used as an SSNTD. In this paper we describe the charge response of PET to 129Xe, 78Kr and 49Ti ions from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN, present the calibration curve for PET and characterize it as a nuclear track detector.

  8. Modeling and experimental study of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic-ray intensity for a solar-wind velocity depending on heliolongitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a three dimensional (3-D) model of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity with a spatial variation of the solar wind velocity. A consistent, divergence-free interplanetary magnetic field is derived by solving the corresponding Maxwell equations with a variable solar wind speed, which reproduces in situ observed experimental data for the time interval to be analyzed (24 August 2007-28 February 2008). We perform model calculations for the GCR intensity using the variable solar wind and the corresponding magnetic field. Results are compatible with experimental data; the correlation coefficient between our model predictions and observed 27-day GCR variation is 0.80 0.05.

  9. Reply to 'Influence of cosmic ray variability on the monsoon rainfall and temperature': a false-positive in the field of solar-terrestrial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laken, Benjamin A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A litany of research has been published claiming strong solar influences on the Earth's weather and climate. Much of this work includes documented errors and false-positives, yet is still frequently used to substantiate arguments of global warming denial. This manuscript reports on a recent study by Badruddin & Aslam (2014), hereafter BA14, which claimed a highly significant ($p=1.4\\times10^{-5}$) relationship between extremes in the intensity of the Indian monsoon and the cosmic ray flux. They further speculated that the relationship they observed may apply across the entire tropical and sub-tropical belt, and be of global importance. However, their statistical analysis---and consequently their conclusions---were wrong. Specifically, their error resulted from an assumption that their data's underlying distribution was Gaussian. But, as demonstrated in this work, their data closely follow an ergodic chaotic distribution biased towards extreme values. From a probability density function, calculated using a...

  10. Color Glass Condensate in Brane Models or Don't Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Probe $10^{15}eV$ Scale ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houri Ziaeepour

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous work hep-ph/0203165 we have studied propagation of relativistic particles in the bulk for some of most popular brane models. Constraints have been put on the parameter space of these models by calculating the time delay due to propagation in the bulk of particles created during the interaction of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with protons in the terrestrial atmosphere. The question was however raised that probability of hard processes in which bulk modes can be produced is small and consequently, the tiny flux of UHECRs can not constrain brane models. Here we use Color Glass Condensate (CGC) model to show that effects of extra dimensions are visible not only in hard processes when the incoming particle hits a massive Kaluza-Klein mode but also through the modification of soft/semi-hard parton distribution. At classical level, for an observer in the CM frame of UHECR and atmospheric hadrons, color charge sources are contracted to a thin sheet with a width inversely proportional to the energy of the ultra energetic cosmic ray hadron and consequently they can see an extra dimension with comparable size. Due to QCD interaction a short life swarm of partons is produced in front of the sheet and its partons can penetrate to the extra-dimension bulk. This reduces the effective density of partons on the brane or in a classical view creates a delay in the arrival of the most energetic particles if they are reflected back due to the warping of the bulk. In CGC approximation the density of swarm at different distance from the classical sheet can be related and therefore it is possible (at least formally) to determine the relative fraction of partons in the bulk and on the brane at different scales. Results of this work are also relevant to the test of brane models in hadron colliders like LHC.

  11. Constraining Cosmic Magnetic Fields by a Measurement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 7 Energy-Energy-Correlations 51 7.1 Definition of Energy-EnergyConstraining Cosmic Magnetic Fields by a Measurement of Energy-Energy-Correlations with the Pierre Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays 3 2.1 Cosmic Rays with Energies below 4 Ee

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, Bennett

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olson. “Observations of gamma-ray bursts of cosmic origin. ”E. Lingenfelter. “Gamma-ray bursts. ” Annual Review of652-654. Waxman, Eli. “Gamma-ray-burst afterglow: supporting

  13. SOLAR CYCLE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF 0.6 TeV COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY OBSERVED WITH THE MATSUSHIRO UNDERGROUND MUON DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munakata, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Mori, S. [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Takita, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Kota, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.j [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. We find an anisotropy component in the solar diurnal anisotropy superimposed on the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The phase of this additional anisotropy is almost constant at {approx}15:00 local solar time corresponding to the direction perpendicular to the average interplanetary magnetic field at Earth's orbit, while the amplitude varies between a maximum (0.043% +- 0.002%) and minimum ({approx}0.008% +- 0.002%) in a clear correlation with the solar activity. We find a significant time lag between the temporal variations of the amplitude and the sunspot number (SSN) and obtain the best correlation coefficient of +0.74 with the SSN delayed for 26 months. We suggest that this anisotropy might be interpreted in terms of the energy change due to the solar-wind-induced electric field expected for galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) crossing the wavy neutral sheet. The average amplitude of the sidereal diurnal variation over the entire period is 0.034% +- 0.003%, which is roughly one-third of the amplitude reported from air shower and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only a weak positive correlation between the sidereal diurnal anisotropy and the solar activity cycle in which the amplitude in the 'active' solar activity epoch is about twice the amplitude in the 'quiet' solar activity epoch. This implies that only one-fourth of the total attenuation varies in correlation with the solar activity cycle and/or the solar magnetic cycle. We finally examine the temporal variation of the 'single-band valley depth' (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, in contrast with recent Milagro's report, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a seven-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore, that the steady increase of the SBVD reported by the Milagro experiment is not caused by the decreasing solar modulation in the declining phase of the 23rd solar activity cycle.

  14. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonura, M. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L., E-mail: clruiz@sandia.gov; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87111 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF’s) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  15. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  16. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; Alexander Aab; Pedro Abreu; Marco Aglietta; Eun-Joo Ahn; Imen Al Samarai; Ivone Albuquerque; Ingomar Allekotte; Patrick Allison; Alejandro Almela; Jesus Alvarez Castillo; Jaime Alvarez-Muńiz; Rafael Alves Batista; Michelangelo Ambrosio; Amin Aminaei; Luis Anchordoqui; Sofia Andringa; Carla Aramo; Victor Manuel Aranda; Fernando Arqueros; Nicusor Arsene; Hernán Gonzalo Asorey; Pedro Assis; Julien Aublin; Maximo Ave; Michel Avenier; Gualberto Avila; Nafiun Awal; Alina Mihaela Badescu; Kerri B Barber; Julia Bäuml; Colin Baus; Jim Beatty; Karl Heinz Becker; Jose A Bellido; Corinne Berat; Mario Edoardo Bertaina; Xavier Bertou; Peter Biermann; Pierre Billoir; Simon G Blaess; Alberto Blanco; Miguel Blanco; Carla Bleve; Hans Blümer; Martina Bohá?ová; Denise Boncioli; Carla Bonifazi; Nataliia Borodai; Jeffrey Brack; Iliana Brancus; Ariel Bridgeman; Pedro Brogueira; William C Brown; Peter Buchholz; Antonio Bueno; Stijn Buitink; Mario Buscemi; Karen S Caballero-Mora; Barbara Caccianiga; Lorenzo Caccianiga; Marina Candusso; Laurentiu Caramete; Rossella Caruso; Antonella Castellina; Gabriella Cataldi; Lorenzo Cazon; Rosanna Cester; Alan G Chavez; Andrea Chiavassa; Jose Augusto Chinellato; Jiri Chudoba; Marco Cilmo; Roger W Clay; Giuseppe Cocciolo; Roberta Colalillo; Alan Coleman; Laura Collica; Maria Rita Coluccia; Ruben Conceiçăo; Fernando Contreras; Mathew J Cooper; Alain Cordier; Stephane Coutu; Corbin Covault; James Cronin; Richard Dallier; Bruno Daniel; Sergio Dasso; Kai Daumiller; Bruce R Dawson; Rogerio M de Almeida; Sijbrand J de Jong; Giuseppe De Mauro; Joao de Mello Neto; Ivan De Mitri; Jaime de Oliveira; Vitor de Souza; Luis del Peral; Olivier Deligny; Hans Dembinski; Niraj Dhital; Claudio Di Giulio; Armando Di Matteo; Johana Chirinos Diaz; Mary Lucia Díaz Castro; Francisco Diogo; Carola Dobrigkeit; Wendy Docters; Juan Carlos D'Olivo; Alexei Dorofeev; Qader Dorosti Hasankiadeh; Maria Teresa Dova; Jan Ebr; Ralph Engel; Martin Erdmann; Mona Erfani; Carlos O Escobar; Joao Espadanal; Alberto Etchegoyen; Heino Falcke; Ke Fang; Glennys Farrar; Anderson Fauth; Norberto Fazzini; Andrew P Ferguson; Mateus Fernandes; Brian Fick; Juan Manuel Figueira; Alberto Filevich; Andrej Filip?i?; Brendan Fox; Octavian Fratu; Martín Miguel Freire; Benjamin Fuchs; Toshihiro Fujii; Beatriz García; Diego Garcia-Pinto; Florian Gate; Hartmut Gemmeke; Alexandru Gherghel-Lascu; Piera Luisa Ghia; Ugo Giaccari; Marco Giammarchi; Maria Giller; Dariusz G?as; Christian Glaser; Henry Glass; Geraldina Golup; Mariano Gómez Berisso; Primo F Gómez Vitale; Nicolás González; Ben Gookin; Jacob Gordon; Alessio Gorgi; Peter Gorham; Philippe Gouffon; Nathan Griffith; Aurelio Grillo; Trent D Grubb; Fausto Guarino; Germano Guedes; Matías Rolf Hampel; Patricia Hansen; Diego Harari; Thomas A Harrison; Sebastian Hartmann; John Harton; Andreas Haungs; Thomas Hebbeker; Dieter Heck; Philipp Heimann; Alexander E Herve; Gary C Hill; Carlos Hojvat; Nicholas Hollon; Ewa Holt; Piotr Homola; Jörg Hörandel; Pavel Horvath; Miroslav Hrabovský; Daniel Huber; Tim Huege; Antonio Insolia; Paula Gina Isar; Ingolf Jandt; Stefan Jansen; Cecilia Jarne; Jeffrey A Johnsen; Mariela Josebachuili; Alex Kääpä; Olga Kambeitz; Karl Heinz Kampert; Peter Kasper; Igor Katkov; Balazs Kégl; Bianca Keilhauer; Azadeh Keivani; Ernesto Kemp; Roger Kieckhafer; Hans Klages; Matthias Kleifges; Jonny Kleinfeller; Raphael Krause; Nicole Krohm; Oliver Krömer; Daniel Kuempel; Norbert Kunka; Danielle LaHurd; Luca Latronico; Robert Lauer; Markus Lauscher; Pascal Lautridou; Sandra Le Coz; Didier Lebrun; Paul Lebrun; Marcelo Augusto Leigui de Oliveira; Antoine Letessier-Selvon; Isabelle Lhenry-Yvon; Katrin Link; Luis Lopes; Rebeca López; Aida López Casado; Karim Louedec; Lu Lu; Agustin Lucero; Max Malacari; Simone Maldera; Manuela Mallamaci; Jennifer Maller; Dusan Mandat; Paul Mantsch; Analisa Mariazzi; Vincent Marin; Ioana Mari?; Giovanni Marsella; Daniele Martello; Lilian Martin; Humberto Martinez; Oscar Martínez Bravo; Diane Martraire; Jimmy Masías Meza; Hermann-Josef Mathes; Sebastian Mathys; James Matthews; John Matthews; Giorgio Matthiae; Detlef Maurel; Daniela Maurizio; Eric Mayotte; Peter Mazur; Carlos Medina; Gustavo Medina-Tanco; Rebecca Meissner; Victor Mello; Diego Melo; Alexander Menshikov; Stefano Messina; Rishi Meyhandan; Maria Isabel Micheletti; Lukas Middendorf; Ignacio A Minaya; Lino Miramonti; Bogdan Mitrica; Laura Molina-Bueno; Silvia Mollerach; François Montanet; Carlo Morello; Miguel Mostafá; Celio A Moura; Marcio Aparecido Muller; Gero Müller; Sarah Müller

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.1\\,\\text{(sys)}$ followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy ($E_\\text{s}$) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find $E_\\text{s}=(5.12\\pm0.25\\,\\text{(stat)}^{+1.0}_{-1.2}\\,\\text{(sys)}){\\times}10^{19}$ eV.

  17. GEANT4 Simulation of a Scintillating-Fibre Tracker for the Cosmic-ray Muon Tomography of Legacy Nuclear Waste Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; Russell Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Sian Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Cassie Staines; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-ray muons are highly penetrative charged particles that are observed at sea level with a flux of approximately one per square centimetre per minute. They interact with matter primarily through Coulomb scattering, which is exploited in the field of muon tomography to image shielded objects in a wide range of applications. In this paper, simulation studies are presented that assess the feasibility of a scintillating-fibre tracker system for use in the identification and characterisation of nuclear materials stored within industrial legacy waste containers. A system consisting of a pair of tracking modules above and a pair below the volume to be assayed is simulated within the GEANT4 framework using a range of potential fibre pitches and module separations. Each module comprises two orthogonal planes of fibres that allow the reconstruction of the initial and Coulomb-scattered muon trajectories. A likelihood-based image reconstruction algorithm has been developed that allows the container content to be determined with respect to the atomic number Z of the scattering material. Images reconstructed from this simulation are presented for a range of anticipated scenarios that highlight the expected image resolution and the potential of this system for the identification of high-Z materials within a shielded, concrete-filled container. First results from a constructed prototype system are presented in comparison with those from a detailed simulation. Excellent agreement between experimental data and simulation is observed showing clear discrimination between the different materials assayed throughout.

  18. Primary cosmic ray chemical composition in the energy region around 10**16 eV investigated by means of gamma-hadron families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maia Kalmakhelidze; Nina Roinishvili; Manana Svanidze

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary Cosmic Ray Chemical Composition is investigated in energy region close to 10**16 eV. Studies are based on comparisons of gamma-hadron families observed by Pamir and Pamir-Chacaltaya Collaboration, with families generated by means of quasi-scaling model MC0. It is shown, that all characteristics of observed families, including their intensity, are in a very good agreement with simulated event properties at the normal chemical composition and are in disagreement at heavy dominant compositions. Code CORSICA with VENUS and DPM models also contradicts with experimental data of families. One- and multi-dimensional methods of recognition of Fe-like families is worked up and approved. They are based on family characteristics sensitive to atomic number of induced nuclei and are not correlated between each others. It is shown that the fraction of Fe-like families is consistent with the normal chemical composition and strongly contradicts to heavy dominant ones. The success of MC0 model, in description of families properties, is due to large inelasticity coefficient of soft interactions at superhigh energies.

  19. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.1\\,\\text{(sys)}$ followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy ($E_\\text{s}$) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find $E_\\text{s}=(5.12\\pm0.25\\,\\text{(stat)}^{+1.0}_{-1.2}\\,\\text{(sys)}){\\times}10^{19}$ eV.

  20. Observation of the Anisotropy of 10 TeV Primary Cosmic Ray Nuclei Flux with the Super-Kamiokande-I Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillian, G; Ishihara, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Namba, T; Obayashi, Y; Ogawa, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Yamada, S; Higuchi, I; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Mitsuka, G; Nakayama, S; Nishino, H; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Saji, C; Takenaga, Y; Desai, S; Kearns, E; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Griskevich, J; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Messier, M D; Hayato, Y; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Totsuka, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Sato, H; Yamamoto, S; Yokoyama, M; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Blaufuss, E; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Sakuda, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Kobayashi, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Yanagisawa, C; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Nishijima, K; Ishino, H; Watanabe, Y; Koshiba, M; Kielczewska, D; Berns, H G; Gran, R; Shiraishi, K K; Stachyra, A L; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J; Munakata, K; Guillian, Gene

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative sidereal variation in the arrival direction of primary cosmic ray nuclei of median energy 10 TeV was measured using downward, through-going muons detected with the Super-Kamiokande-I detector. The anisotropy map projected onto the right ascension axis has a first harmonic amplitude of $(6.64 \\pm 0.98 {stat.} \\pm 0.55 {syst.}) \\times 10^{-4}$, with the phase at maximum occurring at $(33.2^o \\pm 8.2^o {stat.} \\pm 5.1^o {syst.})$ right ascension. A sky map in equatorial coordinates indicates an excess region in the constellation of Taurus and a deficit region toward Virgo. The excess region is centered at $(\\alpha_T, \\delta_T) = (75^o \\pm 7^o, -5^o \\pm 9^o)$ with half opening angle $\\chi_T = (39 \\pm 7)^o$; the excess flux is ($0.104 \\pm 0.020$)% above the isotropic expectation. The corresponding parameters for the deficit region are: $(\\alpha_V, \\delta_V) = (205^o \\pm 7^o, 5^o \\pm 10^o)$, $\\chi_V = (54 \\pm 7)^o$, and $(-0.094 \\pm 0.014)$%.

  1. Computational modeling of the class I low-mass protostar Elias 29 applying optical constants of ices processed by high energy cosmic ray analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, W R M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the study of the effects of high energy cosmic rays (CRs) over the astrophysical ices, observed toward the embedded class I protostar Elias 29, by using computational modeling and laboratory data. Its spectrum was observed with {\\it Infrared Space Observatory - ISO}, covering 2.3 - 190 $\\mu$m. The modeling employed the three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RADMC-3D (Dullemond et al. 2012) and laboratory data of bombarded ice grains by CRs analogs, and unprocessed ices (not bombarded). We are assuming that Elias 29 has a self-irradiated disk with inclination $i =$ 60$^{\\circ}$, surrounded by an envelope with bipolar cavity. The results show that absorption features toward Elias 29, are better reproduced by assuming a combination between unprocessed astrophysical ices at low temperature (H$_2$O, CO, CO$_2$) and bombarded ices (H$_2$O:CO$_2$) by high energy CRs. Evidences of the ice processing around Elias 29 can be observed by the good fitting around 5.5-8.0 $\\mu$m, by polar and apola...

  2. A deeper X-ray study of the core of the Perseus galaxy cluster: the power of sound waves and the distribution of metals and cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Sanders; A. C. Fabian

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a further study of the very deep Chandra observation of the X-ray brightest galaxy cluster, A426 in Perseus. We examine the radial distribution of energy flux inferred by the quasi-concentric ripples in surface brightness, assuming they are due to sound waves, and show that it is a significant fraction of the energy lost by radiative cooling within the inner 75-100 kpc, where the cooling time is 4-5 Gyr, respectively. The wave flux decreases outward with radius, consistent with energy being dissipated. Some newly discovered large ripples beyond 100 kpc, and a possible intact bubble at 170 kpc radius, may indicate a larger level of activity by the nucleus a few 100 Myr ago. The distribution of metals in the intracluster gas peaks at a radius of about 40 kpc and is significantly clumpy on scales of 5 kpc. The temperature distribution of the soft X-ray filaments and the hard X-ray emission component found within the inner 50 kpc are analysed in detail. The pressure due to the nonthermal electrons, responsible for a spectral component interpreted as inverse Compton emission, is high within 40 kpc of the centre and boosts the power in sound waves there; it drops steeply beyond 40 kpc. We find no thermal emission from the radio bubbles; in order for any thermal gas to have a filling factor within the bubbles exceeding 50 per cent, the temperature of that gas has to exceed 50 keV.

  3. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Waxman

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-high-energy, >10^19 eV, cosmic-ray and high energy, ~10^14 eV, neutrino production in GRBs is discussed in the light of recent GRB and cosmic-ray observations. Emphasis is put on model predictions that can be tested with operating and planned cosmic-ray and neutrino detectors, and on the prospects of testing for neutrino properties.

  4. NERSC Helps Discover Cosmic Transients - NERSC Science News June...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab) to expose relatively rare and fleeting cosmic events, like supernovae and gamma ray bursts. In fact, during the commissioning phase alone, the survey has already uncovered...

  5. Approximation of lateral distribution of atmospheric Cherenkov light at different observation levels for different primary particles. Applications for cosmic ray studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Mishev; Strashimir Mavrodiev; Jordan Stamenov

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work summarizes the results presented at 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Pune India. Generally the aim of this work is to obtain the lateral distribution of the atmospheric Cherenkov light in extensive air showers produced by different primary particles in wide energy range and at several observation levels and to fit the obtained lateral distributions. Using one large detector and partially modified CORSIKA code version are obtained the lateral distributions of Cherenkov light flux densities at several observation levels for different particle primaries precisely at 536 g/cm2 Chacaltaya, 700 g/cm2 Moussala and 875 g/cm2 Kartalska field observation levels for hadronic primaries and gamma quanta in the energy range 1011 eV-1016 eV. On the basis of the solution of over-determined inverse problem the approximation of these distributions is obtained. The same model function for all the primaries is used and for the different observation levels. The different model parameters for the different primaries and levels are obtained. The approximations are compared with polynomial approximation obtained with different method. Both approximations are used for detector efficiency estimation for the different experiments in preparation and estimation of the accuracy of the reconstruction techniques. At the same time inclined showers up to 30 degrees zenith angle are studied at Chacaltaya observation level. The obtained lateral distributions of vertical showers are compared with vertical showers model and the previously obtained approximation. This permits to adjust the reconstruction strategy and to study the model parameters behavior.

  6. Learning about the Recent Star Formation History of Galaxy Disks by Comparing their Far-Infrared and Radio Morphologies: Cosmic-Ray Electron Diffusion after Star Formation Episodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Murphy; G. Helou; J. D. P. Kenney; L. Armus; R. Braun

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of 29 galaxies based on a comparison of {\\it Spitzer} far-infrared and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio continuum imagery. Of these 29 galaxies, 18 are close enough to resolve at $\\la$1 kpc scales at 70 $\\micron$ and 22 cm. We extend the \\citet{ejm06a,ejm06b} approach of smoothing infrared images to approximate cosmic-ray (CR) electron spreading and thus largely reproduce the appearance of radio images. Using a wavelet analysis we decompose each 70 $\\micron$ image into one component containing the star-forming {\\it structures} and a second one for the diffuse {\\it disk}. The components are smoothed separately, and their combination compared to a free-free corrected 22 cm radio image; the scale-lengths are then varied to best match the radio and smoothed infrared images. We find that late-type spirals having high amounts of ongoing star formation benefit most from the two-component method. We also find that the disk component dominates for galaxies having low star formation activity, whereas the structure component dominates at high star formation activity. We propose that this result arises from an age effect rather than from differences in CR electron diffusion due to varying ISM parameters. The bulk of the CR electron population in actively star-forming galaxies is significantly younger than that in less active galaxies due to recent episodes of enhanced star formation; these galaxies are observed within $\\sim10^{8}$ yr since the onset of the most recent star formation episode. The sample irregulars have anomalously low best-fit scale-lengths for their surface brightnesses compared to the rest of the sample spirals which we attribute to enhanced CR electron escape.

  7. Compton Recoil Electron Tracking With the TIGRE Gamma-Ray Balloon Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamiya, Kaoru

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGNs), pulsars, gamma-ray bursts, cosmic ray interactionssensitive to cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the energy range ofGalactic center, a single gamma-ray burst which occurred 10

  8. Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 1 Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, David

    Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 1 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 2 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 3 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 4 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 5 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181-208 6 #12;Int J Computer Vision 3 (1989) 181

  9. Cosmic rays & Neutrinos Historical development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    with Marlene Dietrich | First model of a cyclotron | Clyde Tombaugh discovers planet Pluto |Airship on rails

  10. A cosmic ray hodoscope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Wallace Gene

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    give information about interplanetary fields and plasmas. Two of the very early radiation detectors, the photographic emul- sion and the cloud chamber, can be used to determine the direction of travel or the path of a particle. More recently...

  11. A Comparison of Radial Intensity Profiles of Termination Shock Particles and Anomalous Cosmic Rays in the Outer North-South Heliosheaths Using CRS data from V1 and V2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Voyager 1 and 2 CRS telescopes available on the web through the end of 2014 we have studied the intensity variations of termination shock H nuclei and anomalous cosmic ray H and He nuclei as a function of radial distance. In contrast to the inner part of the heliosheath where the intensity vs. radius profiles in the North and South heliosheaths are much different, these intensity vs. radius profiles, as well as the intensities themselves, are more similar in the outer North and South heliosheaths as measured by V1 and V2 respectively. In the N heliosheath, taken to be 27.6 AU thick beyond the HTS crossing distance of 94 AU, the intensities of termination shock particles and anomalous cosmic rays reach a maximum at between 110-112 AU or at a location ~halfway between the termination shock and the heliopause. They then decrease more or less continuously to an intensity ~2/3 of the maximum for each component just before the final dropout at ~121 AU, just inside the heliopause. This intensity-...

  12. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  13. Cosmic Particle Acceleration: Basic Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Jones

    2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-rays are ubiquitous, but their origins are surprisingly difficult to understand. A review is presented of some of the basic issues common to cosmic particle accelerators and arguments leading to the likely importance of diffusive shock acceleration as a general explanation. The basic theory of diffusive shock acceleration is outlined, followed by a discussion of some of the key issues that still prevent us from a full understanding of its outcomes. Some recent insights are mentioned at the end that may help direct ultimate resolution of our uncertainties.

  14. Observation of the Crab Nebula in Soft Gamma Rays with the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandstra, Mark ShenYu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.268] G. J. Fishman. The gamma-ray burst capabilities of BATSEOlson. Observations of Gamma- Ray Bursts of Cosmic Origin.

  15. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Gregg W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstrong, Hirotatsu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clem, John [University of Delaware, BRI; Goldhagen, Paul [DHS, National Urban Security Technology Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  16. A Fit to the Galactic Cosmic Ray Hydrogen and Helium Spectra at Voyager 1 at Low Energies and Earth Based Measurements at Much Higher Energies with Identical Rigidity Independent Source Spectra for the Hydrogen and Helium Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voyager 1 data from beyond the heliopause provide the first direct measurements of the interstellar cosmic ray spectra below 1 GeVnuc. In this paper we combine these Voyager measurements of H and He nuclei from 3-600 MeVnuc with higher energy measurements at 1 AU from the BESS and PAMELA experiments up to 100 GeVnuc. Using a Weighted Leaky Box Model for propagation in the galaxy, we obtain an excellent fit to these new Voyager observations and the much higher energy spectra up to 100 GeVnuc by using source spectra which are P-2.28, with the exponent independent of rigidity from low to high rigidities; along with a rigidity dependence of the diffusion path length which is P-0.5 at rigidities 1.00 GV, and possibly changing to P1.0 at lower rigidities.

  17. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasper Kirkby

    2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual effect on global temperatures of the burning of fossil fuels, an issue of profound importance to society. Furthermore, light radio-isotope records indicate a correlation has existed between global climate and the cosmic ray flux extending back over the present inter-glacial and perhaps earlier. This suggests it may eventually become possible to make long-term (10-1,000 year) predictions of changes in the Earth's climate, provided a deeper understanding can be achieved of the ``geomagnetic climate'' of the Sun and Earth that modulates the cosmic-ray flux.

  18. Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Measured with Radio Ray induced Air Showers 3 2.1 Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Energy Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Composition

  19. And the remaining 22 photons: The development of gamma ray and gamma ray burst astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goblins and cosmic gamma ray bursts. Astrophysics and Spacelinear alignments of gamma-ray burst sources. Journal of theE.E. (eds. ), 1992. Gamma Ray Bursts. Cambridge, Cambridge

  20. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101106 Studies of Signal Waveforms From the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    develop higher and have more muons than showers started by primary protons of the same total energy. Gamma-rays the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory P.S. Allison, H. Bui-Duc, J. Chye, S. Dagoret The ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors

  1. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101104 Multi-resolution analysis of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Survey Sources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radian of the Galactic Plane was scanned by the H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) telescopes for the detection and mapping of extended VHE gamma-ray sources (e.g., SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 [2]). A survey, pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae (PWN), micro-quasars and also possible new classes of sources. Eight new

  2. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101-104 The Forbush Decreases of October-November 2003 as Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , a ground-level TeV gamma-ray telescope, is sensitive to solar energetic particles and Forbush decreases of Milagro. The Milagro instrument detects muons generated by solar and galactic protons with two layers in Fig. 4. The upper panel and the lower panel show the rates in the outrigger Çerenkov detectors

  3. 2Cosmic Bar Graphs Galaxy Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the cluster are spirals? Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray bursts happen about once each day. The bar graph to the right there are 160 total galaxies, the fraction of spirals is 137/160 = 0.86, or equivalently 86%. Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray2Cosmic Bar Graphs 0 20 40 60 80 100 S E SB I Galaxy Type Number 0 200 400 600 800 1000 FB SB Burst

  4. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 19 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 MAY 2000 Evidence for Changing of Cosmic Ray Composition between 1017 and 1018 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Gibbs,2 M. A. K. Glasmacher,7 K. D. Green,2 Y. Ho,10 A. Huang,1 C. C. Jui,1 M. J. Kidd,6 D. B. Kieda,1 B. Wilkinson,5 S. Yoshida,1 and X. Z. Zhang10 1 High Energy Astrophysics Institute, University of Utah, Salt of cosmic rays with primary energies between 1017 and 1018 eV has been studied using a hybrid detector

  5. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e+ plus e- Spectrum from 20 GeV to 1 TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2 m{sup 2}sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply-falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E{sup -3.0} and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

  6. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, Roland [Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Excellence Cluster Origin and Evolution of the Universe', D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ?My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  7. The energy production rate density of cosmic rays in the local universe is $\\sim10^{44-45}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ at all particle energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Boaz; Thompson, Todd; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy output (per logarithmic interval of particle energies) of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with energies $10{\\rm GeV}\\lesssim\\varepsilon_p\\lesssim100{\\rm GeV}$ is $\\sim 10^{47}\\rm erg$ per solar mass of star$-$formation, based on the CR production rate in the Milky Way and in starburst galaxies, implying a generation rate of $\\varepsilon_p^2Q\\sim 10^{45}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ in the local universe. It is only $\\sim 10$ times larger than the output, $\\varepsilon_p^2 Q=0.5\\pm0.2\\times 10^{44}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$, of Ultra High Energy CRs (UHECRs) at energies $10^{10.5}{\\rm GeV}<\\varepsilon_p<10^{12}\\rm GeV$ (obtained assuming they are mostly protons), which in turn is comparable to the lower limit of $\\varepsilon_p^2 Q\\ge 0.5\\times 10^{44}\\rm erg~Mpc^{-3}~yr^{-1}$ of high energy CRs with $10^6{\\rm GeV}\\lesssim\\varepsilon_p\\lesssim 10^{8}\\rm GeV$ implied by the saturation of the Waxman-Bahcall bound by the neutrino excess recently discovered by IceCube. These similarities are consistent with a flat pro...

  8. Sustainable buildings itu.int/ITU-T/climatechange/ess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable buildings itu.int/ITU-T/climatechange/ess #12;Acknowledgements This document is part at: www.itu.int/ITU- T/climatechange/ess/index.html If you would like to provide any additional

  9. Simulations of Cosmic Chemical Enrichment with Hypernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Kobayashi

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate cosmic chemical enrichment with a hydrodynamical model including supernova and hypernova feedback. We find that the majority of stars in present-day massive galaxies formed in much smaller galaxies at high redshifts, despite their late assembly times. The hypernova feedback drives galactic outflows efficiently in low mass galaxies, and these winds eject heavy elements into the intergalactic medium. The ejected baryon fraction is larger for less massive galaxies, correlates well with stellar metallicity. The observed mass-metallicity relation is well reproduced as a result of the mass-dependent galactic winds. We also predict the cosmic supernova and gamma-ray burst rate histories.

  10. Production of Neutrinos and Secondary Electrons in Cosmic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -Y. Huang; M. Pohl

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the individual contribution to secondary lepton production in hadronic interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) including resonances and heavier secondaries. For this purpose we use the same ethodology discussed earlier \\cite{Huang07}, namely the Monte Carlo particle collision code DPMJET3.04 to determine the multiplicity spectra of various secondary particles with leptons as the final decay states, that result from inelastic collisions of cosmic-ray protons and Helium nuclei with the interstellar medium of standard composition. By combining the simulation results with parametric models for secondary particle (with resonances included) for incident cosmic-ray energies below a few GeV, where DPMJET appears unreliable, we thus derive production matrices for all stable secondary particles in cosmic-ray interactions with energies up to about 10 PeV. We apply the production matrices to calculate the radio synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons in a young shell-type SNR, RX J1713.7-3946, which is a measure of the age, the spectral index of hadronic cosmic rays, and most importantly the magnetic field strength. We find that the multi-mG fields recently invoked to explain the X-ray flux variations are unlikely to extend over a large fraction of the radio-emitting region, otherwise the spectrum of hadronic cosmic rays in the energy window 0.1-100 GeV must be unusually hard. We also use the production matrices to calculate the muon event rate in an IceCube-like detector that are induced by muon neutrinos from high-energy $\\gamma$-ray sources such as RX J1713.7-3946, Vela Jr. and MGRO J2019+37. At muon energies of a few TeV, or in other word, about 10 TeV neutrino energy, an accumulation of data over about five to ten years would allow testing the hadronic origin of TeV $\\gamma$-rays.

  11. Acceleration of ULtra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Cosmic Zevatrons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Jones

    2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture I outline some of the underlying physics issues associated with accelerators plausibly capable of explaining the UHECRs up to ZeV energies. I concentrate on the concentrate on mechanisms and their constraints, but provide a brief background on on observations and the constraints they supply, as well.

  12. A population of massive, luminous galaxies hosting heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts: Implications for the use of GRBs as tracers of cosmic star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Morgan, A. N. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fruchter, A.; Kalirai, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Prochaska, J. X. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Silverman, J. M., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations and analysis of the host galaxies of 23 heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite during the years 2005-2009, representing all GRBs with an unambiguous host-frame extinction of A{sub V} > 1 mag from this period. Deep observations with Keck, Gemini, Very Large Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer successfully detect the host galaxies and establish spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for all 23 events, enabling us to provide measurements of the intrinsic host star formation rates, stellar masses, and mean extinctions. Compared to the hosts of unobscured GRBs at similar redshifts, we find that the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs are (on average) more massive by about an order of magnitude and also more rapidly star forming and dust obscured. While this demonstrates that GRBs populate all types of star-forming galaxies, including the most massive, luminous systems at z ? 2, at redshifts below 1.5 the overall GRB population continues to show a highly significant aversion to massive galaxies and a preference for low-mass systems relative to what would be expected given a purely star-formation-rate-selected galaxy sample. This supports the notion that the GRB rate is strongly dependent on metallicity, and may suggest that the most massive galaxies in the universe underwent a transition in their chemical properties ?9 Gyr ago. We also conclude that, based on the absence of unobscured GRBs in massive galaxies and the absence of obscured GRBs in low-mass galaxies, the dust distributions of the lowest-mass and the highest-mass galaxies are relatively homogeneous, while intermediate-mass galaxies (?10{sup 9} M {sub ?}) have diverse internal properties.

  13. Observing Air Showers from Cosmic Superluminal Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Gonzalez-Mestres

    1997-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Poincar\\'e relativity principle has been tested at low energy with great accuracy, but its extrapolation to very high-energy phenomena is much less well established. Lorentz symmetry can be broken at Planck scale due to the renormalization of gravity or to some deeper structure of matter: we expect such a breaking to be a very high energy and very short distance phenomenon. If textbook special relativity is only an approximate property of the equations describing a sector of matter above some critical distance scale, an absolute local frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related to new degrees of freedom not yet discovered experimentally. The new superluminal particles ("superbradyons", i.e. bradyons with superluminal critical speed) would have positive mass and energy, and behave kinematically like "ordinary" particles (those with critical speed in vacuum equal to c, the speed of light) apart from the difference in critical speed (c_i >> c where c_i is the critical speed of a superluminal sector). They may be the ultimate building blocks of matter At speed v > c, they are expected to release "Cherenkov" radiation ("ordinary" particles) in vacuum. Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss: a) the possible relevance of superluminal matter to the composition, sources and spectra of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signatures and experiments allowing to possibly explore such effects. Very large volume and unprecedented background rejection ability are crucial requirements for any detector devoted to the search for cosmic superbradyons. Future cosmic-ray experiments using air-shower detectors (especially from space) naturally fulfil both requirements.

  14. Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rourke, Colin

    Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

  15. The Cosmic Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Smoot; Douglas Scott

    1997-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarise the current status of cosmic microwave background spectrum and anisotropy measurements, and their theoretical interpretation. This is the update of the mini-review for the 1997 web-version of the Review of Particle Properties.

  16. Measurements of Cosmic Ray Antiprotons with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    .4769 Mean y 2.102 RMS x 0.4213 RMS y 2.328 Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden, 2010 #12;#12;Licentiate

  17. Calibration of the Milagro Cosmic Ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro detector is an air shower array which uses the water Cherenkov technique and is capable of continuously monitoring the sky at energies near 1 TeV. The detector consists of 20000 metric tons of pure water instrumented with 723 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are arranged in a two-layer structure on a lattice of 3 m spacing covering 5000 $m^2$ area. The direction of the shower is determined from the relative timing of the PMT signals, necessitating a common time reference and amplitude slewing corrections to improve the time resolution. The calibration system to provide these consists of a pulsed laser driving 30 diffusing light sources deployed in the pond to allow cross-calibration of the PMTs. The system is capable of calibrating times and the pulse-heights from the PMTs using the time-over-threshold technique. The absolute energy scale is provided using single muons passing through the detector. The description of the calibration system of the Milagro detector and its prototype Milagrito...

  18. Calibration of the Milagro Cosmic Ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro detector is an air shower array which uses the water Cherenkov technique and is capable of continuously monitoring the sky at energies near 1 TeV. The detector consists of 20000 metric tons of pure water instrumented with 723 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are arranged in a two-layer structure on a lattice of 3 m spacing covering 5000 $m^2$ area. The direction of the shower is determined from the relative timing of the PMT signals, necessitating a common time reference and amplitude slewing corrections to improve the time resolution. The calibration system to provide these consists of a pulsed laser driving 30 diffusing light sources deployed in the pond to allow cross-calibration of the PMTs. The system is capable of calibrating times and the pulse-heights from the PMTs using the time-over-threshold technique. The absolute energy scale is provided using single muons passing through the detector. The description of the calibration system of the Milagro detector and its prototype Milagrito will be presented.

  19. Lunar/Solar effects on Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . #12;Works Cited "Determining Degrees in Observing." Suite101.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Aug. 2012. , California." Moon Phase Calendar for Santa Cruz, California. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Aug. 2012. /Azimuth Table. N.p., n. d. Web. 02 Aug. 2012. .

  20. A spark chamber for cosmic ray research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelinek, Al Vincent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are Elkonite 10W$ high-conductivity hard tungsten-copper alloy. They were chosen for the spark gap because they resist surface erosion in heavy electrical discharges. Six 20-KV, 500-picofarad "door knob capacitors" form the discharge capacitor bank. Figure... formed by the incident particle in each gap (typically 60 ion pairs) are sufficient to initiate a spark. This critical value + of the clearing is 45-5volts for the Geiger detection system and a pure argon gas filling. D. The Time Delay The total time...

  1. A spark chamber for cosmic ray research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelinek, Al Vincent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chambez *re r- -e evenis, anc to obtain good sta- s s ical data with the prese. . i sysiezz wou'8 require t! e exarina- iion o" severs' '. '. ous" no. pictures. ne effic ency zoz two simu ianeous particles in argon oius alcohol vspour is e timasec.... to be 75I15~ji. The effic ency of the . con-he' ium and the helium-alcohol vapour zillings are 1 igner about 85- 5(i. 3. Spurious Sparking Spurious sparks in the chamber can be attributed to a num- ber of factors. The most probable cause is ions left...

  2. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  3. Gamma-ray bursts: a Centauro's cry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. K. Silagadze

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new candidate for the gamma-ray bursts central engine is proposed: if in some energetic cosmic event a macroscopic amount of bubbles of the disoriented chiral condensate can be formed, then their subsequent decays will produce a relativistic fireball without the baryon loading problem. The neutron star to strange star transition is considered as a candidate example of such cosmic event.

  4. The Cosmic Organism Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-Yu Chung; Volodymyr Krasnoholovets

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the cosmic organism theory in which all visible and invisible matter has different cosmic genetic expressions. The cosmic gene includes codes for the object structure and the space structure. The cosmic digital code for the object structure consists of full object (1, 2, and 3 for particle, string, and membrane, respectively) and empty object (0) as anti de Sitter space (AdS). The tessellation lattice of empty objects is tessellattice. The decomposition of a full object in tessellattice results in the AdS/CFT (conformal field theory) duality. The digital code for the object structure accounts for the AdS/CFT duality, the dS/bulk duality, and gravity. The digital code for the space structure consists of 1 and 0 for attachment space and detachment space, respectively. Attachment space attaches to object permanently at zero speed or reversibly at the speed of light. Detachment space detaches from the object irreversibly at the speed of light. The combination of attachment space and detachment space results in miscible space, binary lattice space or binary partition space. Miscible space represents special relativity. Binary lattice space consists of multiple quantized units of attachment space separated from one another by detachment space. Binary lattice space corresponds to the nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) by Diaz and Rowlands. The gauge force fields and wavefunction are in binary lattice space. With tessellattice and binary lattice space, 11D brane is reducing to 4D particle surrounded by gravity and the gauge force fields. The cosmic dimension varies due to different speeds of light in different dimensional space-times and the increase of mass.

  5. PILOT and cosmic shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Saunders

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic shear offers a remarkbly clean way to measure the equation of state of the Universe and its evolution. Resolution over a wide field is paramount, and Antarctica offers unique possibilities in this respect. There is an order of magnitude gain in speed over temperate sites, or a factor three in surface density. This means that PILOT outperforms much larger telescopes elsewhere, and can compete with the proposed DUNE space mission. Keywords: Antarctic astronomy, Surveys, Adaptive optics, Weak lensing

  6. Production of neutrinos and secondary electrons in cosmic sources C.-Y. Huang *, M. Pohl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    -type SNR, RX J1713.7-3946, which is a measure of the age, the spectral index of hadronic cosmic rays to explain the X-ray flux variations are unlikely to extend over a large fraction of the radio hard. We also use the production matrices to calculate the muon event rate in an IceCube-like detector

  7. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 486 (2002) 623638 Simulation of the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gamma-ray imaging detector performance: Part II Veronica Coccoa,d, *, Francesco Longob,d , Marco Tavanic state physics instruments for cosmic gamma-ray detection in space will sub- stantially improve Detector (GRID) is devoted to optimal detection and imaging of cosmic gamma-rays. It is *Corresponding

  8. SH 3.2.39 1 Study of the Shadow of the Moon and Sun with VHE Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SH 3.2.39 1 Study of the Shadow of the Moon and Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays M.O. Wascko 1 1 Department by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from

  9. Gamma-Ray, Neutrino & Gravitational Wave Detection: OG 2.5,2.6,2.7 Rapporteur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rowell

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is based on a rapporteur talk presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference held in Merida, Mexico (July 2007), and covers three of the OG sessions devoted to neutrino, gravitational wave, and gamma-ray detection.

  10. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE HETE-2 GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderspek, Roland K.

    Between 2000 November and 2006 May, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network (IPN) detected 226 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the French Gamma-Ray Telescope experiment on board the High ...

  11. Extreme Cosmic String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the geometry of supermassive cosmic strings. We have used an approach that enforces the spacetime of cosmic strings to also satisfy the conservation laws of a cylindric gravitational topological defect, that is a spacetime kink. In the simplest case of kink number unity, the entire energy range of supermassive strings becomes then quantized so that only cylindrical defects with linear energy density $G\\mu=1/4$ (critical string) and $G\\mu=1/2$ (extreme string) are allowed to occur in this range. It has been seen that the internal spherical coordinate $\\theta$ of the string metric embedded in an Euclidean three-space also evolves on imaginary values, leading to the creation of a covering shell of broken phase that protects the core with trapped energy, even for $G\\mu=1/2$. Then the conical singularity becomes a removable horizaon singularity. We re-express the extreme string metric in the Finkelstein- McCollum standard form and remove the geodesic incompleteness by using the Kruskal technique. The z=const. sections of the resulting metric are the same as the hemispherical section of the metric of a De Sitter kink. Some physical consequences from these results, including the possibility that the extreme string drives inflation and thermal effects in its core, are also discussed.

  12. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray?induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 ?s) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux from man-made sources like 252Cf or Am-Be was removed.

  13. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Mannheim

    2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector, (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies, and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

  14. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  15. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Bartlett

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is our richest source of cosmological information; the standard cosmological model was largely established thanks to study of the temperature anisotropies. By the end of the decade, the Planck satellite will close this important chapter and move us deeper into the new frontier of polarization measurements. Numerous ground--based and balloon--borne experiments are already forging into this new territory. Besides providing new and independent information on the primordial density perturbations and cosmological parameters, polarization measurements offer the potential to detect primordial gravity waves, constrain dark energy and measure the neutrino mass scale. A vigorous experimental program is underway worldwide and heading towards a new satellite mission dedicated to CMB polarization.

  16. aerial gamma ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerial gamma ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say...

  17. A Gamma-Ray Burst Bibliography, 1973-1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hurley

    1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    On the average, one new publication on cosmic gamma-ray bursts enters the literature every day. The total number now exceeds 4100. I present here a complete bibliography which can be made available electronically to interested parties.

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts as Possible High Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are known to be sources of high-energy gamma rays, and are likely to be sources of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Following a short review of observations of GRBs at multi-MeV energies and above, the physics of leptonic and hadronic models of GRBs is summarized. Evidence for two components in BATSE and EGRET/TASC data suggest that GRBs are sources of high-energy cosmic rays. GLAST observations will reveal the high-energy gamma-ray power and energy releases from GRBs, and will provide detailed knowledge of anomalous high-energy emission components, but confirmation of cosmic ray acceleration must await 100 TeV -- PeV neutrino detection from GRBs.

  19. Module title Business Based Dissertation Module code INT3601

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    Module title Business Based Dissertation Module code INT3601 Academic year(s) 2013/4 Credits 30 for assignment and dissertation writing. The dissertation itself brings together all the skills and knowledge material for study 2. demonstrate skills in data collection and research for writing a dissertation #12

  20. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. (2013) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/joc.3664 Remote influence of South Asian black carbon ABSTRACT: The remote impact of South Asian black carbon (SABC) aerosol on East Asian summer monsoon (EASM

  1. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. 34: 3648 (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. 34: 36­48 (2014) Published online 11 February 2013 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/joc.3664 Remote influence Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan ABSTRACT: The remote impact of South Asian black carbon (SABC) aerosol

  2. Integrand and Performance Analysis with ParInt/ParVis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    , USA E-mail: felise,rrzanny,kkaugars,lcucosg@cs.wmich.edu Abstract We present a survey of the contents://www.cs.wmich.edu/parint. This paper presents integrand analysis results obtained with ParInt1.1 and ParVis. It gives a survey ACR-0000442, EIA-0130857, ACI-0203776 Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 11 October 2002 #12

  3. High-energy cosmic neutrinos from spine-sheath BL Lac jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavecchio, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently proposed that structured (spine-sheath) jets associated to BL Lac objects offer a suitable environment for the production of the extragalactic high-energy ($E>100$ TeV) neutrino recently revealed by IceCube. Our previous analysis was limited to low-power BL Lac objects. We extend our preliminary study to the entire BL Lac population. We assume that the power of cosmic rays as well as the radiative luminosity of the sheath depend linearly on the the jet power. In turn, we assume that the latter is well traced by the $\\gamma$-ray luminosity. We exploit the BL Lac $\\gamma$-ray luminosity function and its cosmic evolution as recently inferred from Fermi-LAT data to derive the expected neutrino cumulative intensity from the entire BL Lac population. When considering only the low-power BL Lacs, a large cosmic ray power for each source is required to account for the neutrino flux. Instead, if BL Lacs of all powers produce neutrinos, the power demand decreases, and the required cosmic ray power becomes of...

  4. Measurement of the Charge Ratio of Cosmic Muons using CMS Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aldaya; P. Garcia-Abia

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed the measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio, as a function of the muon momentum, using data collected by the CMS experiment, exploiting the capabilities of the muon barrel drift tube (DT) chambers. The cosmic muon charge ratio is defined as the ratio of the number of positive- to negative-charge muons. Cosmic ray muons result from the interaction of high-energy cosmic-ray particles (mainly protons and nuclei), entering the upper layers of the atmosphere, with air nuclei. Since these collisions favour positive meson production, there is an asymmetry in the charge composition and more positive muons are expected. The data samples were collected at the \\textit{Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge} (MTCC). While the MTCC itself was a crucial milestone in the CMS detector construction, not having physics studies among its primary goals, it provided the first opportunity to obtain physics results and test the full analysis chain using real data in CMS before the LHC startup, together with a complementary check of the detector performance.

  5. Measuring the cosmic shear in Fourier space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the Cosmic Shear in Fourier Space Bernardeau F. ,the Cosmic Shear in Fourier Space Jun Zhang ? Department ofshould be carried out in Fourier space, in which the point

  6. Constraining invisible neutrino decays with the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision measurements of the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background indicate that neutrinos must be freely streaming at the photon decoupling epoch when T{approx_equal}0.3 eV. This requirement implies restrictive limits on 'secret neutrino interactions', notably on neutrino Yukawa couplings with hypothetical low-mass (pseudo)scalars {phi}. For diagonal couplings in the neutrino mass basis we find g < or approx. 1x10{sup -7}, comparable to limits from supernova 1987A. For the off-diagonal couplings and assuming hierarchical neutrino masses we find g < or approx. 1x10{sup -11}(0.05 eV/m){sup 2} where m is the heavier mass of a given neutrino pair connected by g. This stringent limit excludes that the flavor content of high-energy neutrinos from cosmic-ray sources is modified by {nu}{yields}{nu}{sup '}+{phi} decays on their way to Earth.

  7. [On the jet contribution to the AGN cosmic energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cattaneo; P. N. Best

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes release energy via the production of photons in their accretion discs but also via the acceleration of jets. We investigate the relative importance of these two paths over cosmic time by determining the mechanical luminosity function (LF) of radio sources and by comparing it to a previous determination of the bolometric LF of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from X-ray, optical and infrared observations. The mechanical LF of radio sources is computed in two steps: the determination of the mechanical luminosity as a function of the radio luminosity and its convolution with the radio LF of radio sources. Even with the large uncertainty deriving from the former, we can conclude that the contribution of jets is unlikely to be much larger than 10% of the AGN energy budget at any cosmic epoch.

  8. Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rien van de Weygaert

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the intimate relationship between the filamentary features and the rare dense compact cluster nodes in this network, via the large scale tidal field going along with them, following the cosmic web theory developed Bond et al. The Megaparsec scale tidal shear pattern is responsible for the contraction of matter into filaments, and its link with the cluster locations can be understood through the implied quadrupolar mass distribution in which the clusters are to be found at the sites of the overdense patches. We present a new technique for tracing the cosmic web, identifying planar walls, elongated filaments and cluster nodes in the galaxy distribution. This will allow the practical exploitation of the concept of the cosmic web towards identifying and tracing the locations of the gaseous WHIM. These methods, the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and the Morphology Multiscale Filter (MMF) find their basis in computational geometry and visualization.

  9. Quadratic superconducting cosmic strings revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustapha Azreg-Aďnou

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that 5-dimensional general relativity action extended by appropriate quadratic terms admits a singular superconducting cosmic string solution. We search for cosmic strings endowed with similar and extended physical properties by directly integrating the non-linear matrix field equations thus avoiding the perturbative approach by which we constructed the above-mentioned \\textsl{exact} solution. The most general superconducting cosmic string, subject to some constraints, will be derived and shown to be mathematically \\textsl{unique} up to linear coordinate transformations mixing its Killing vectors. The most general solution, however, is not globally equivalent to the old one due to the existence of Killing vectors with closed orbits.

  10. Cosmic axion background propagation in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Francesca V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include axions or axion-like particles (ALPs). Here we study ALP to photon conversion in the magnetic field of the Milky Way and starburst galaxies. By modelling the effects of the coherent and random magnetic fields, the warm ionized medium and the warm neutral medium on the conversion process, we simulate maps of the conversion probability across the sky for a range of ALP energies. In particular, we consider a diffuse cosmic ALP background (CAB) analogous to the CMB, whose existence is suggested by string models of inflation. ALP-photon conversion of a CAB in the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters has been proposed as an explanation of the cluster soft X-ray excess. We therefore study the phenomenology and expected photon signal of CAB propagation in the Milky Way. We find that, for the CAB parameters required to explain the cluster soft X-ray excess, the photon flux from ALP-photon conversion in the Milky Way would be unobservably small. The ALP-photon conversion prob...

  11. On the Determination of the Mean Cosmic Matter Density and the Amplitude of Density Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Reiprich

    2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological implications from a new estimate of the local X-ray galaxy cluster abundance are summarized. The results are then compared to independent observations. It is suggested that `low' values for the mean cosmic matter density and the amplitude of mass density fluctuations currently do not appear unreasonable observationally.

  12. Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

  13. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramińana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivičre, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseńor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  14. Multipole analysis in cosmic topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Kramer

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Low multipole amplitudes in the Cosmic Microwave Background CMB radiation can be explained by selection rules from the underlying multiply-connected homotopy. We apply a multipole analysis to the harmonic bases and introduce point symmetry.We give explicit results for two cubic 3-spherical manifolds and lowest polynomial degrees, and derive three new spherical 3-manifolds.

  15. Reheating and Cosmic String Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xian Gao; Miao Li; Wei Song; Yushu Song

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the string production rate at the end of inflation, using the string spectrum obtained in \\lss in a near-de Sitter space. Our result shows that highly excited strings are hardly produced, thus the simple slow-roll inflation alone does not offer a cosmic string production mechanism.

  16. 62 Int. J. Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2012 Copyright 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Jose M.

    62 Int. J. Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2012 Copyright © 2012 Inderscience yard cranes at seaport terminals to support planning and real-time decision making', Int. J. Six Sigma

  17. Int. J. Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2012 41 Copyright 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Jose M.

    Int. J. Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2012 41 Copyright © 2012 Inderscience and improvement of yard crane rehandling strategies for improving port drayage operations', Int. J. Six Sigma

  18. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright © 2008 Inderscience using neural networks', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, pp.65­80. Biographical

  19. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright © 2014 Inderscience fields in Saudi Arabia', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.115­131. Biographical

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Gendre

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are violent events occurring randomly in the sky. In this review, I will present the fireball model, proposed to explain the phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts. This model has important consequences for the production and observation at Earth of gravitational waves, high energy neutrinos, cosmic rays and high energy photons, and the second part of this review will be focused on these aspects. A last section will briefly discuss the topic of the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard candles and possible cosmological studies.

  1. Discovery of TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Cygnus Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; Allen, B.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Casanova, S.; Chen, C.; Coyne, D.G.; Delay, R.S.; Dingus, B.L.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Fleysher, L.; Fleysher, R.; Gonzalez,; Goodman, J.A.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kolterman, B.E.; Kelley, L.A.; Lansdell, C.P.; Linnemann, J.T.; McEnery, J.E.

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffuse gamma radiation arising from the interaction of cosmic ray particles with matter and radiation in the Galaxy is one of the few probes available to study the origin of the cosmic rays. Milagro is a water Cherenkov detector that continuously views the entire overhead sky. The large field-of-view combined with the long observation time makes Milagro the most sensitive instrument available for the study of large, low surface brightness sources such as the diffuse gamma radiation arising from interactions of cosmic radiation with interstellar matter. In this paper we present spatial and flux measurements of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Cygnus Region. The TeV image shows at least one new source MGRO J2019+37 as well as correlations with the matter density in the region as would be expected from cosmic-ray proton interactions. However, the TeV gamma-ray flux as measured at {approx}12 TeV from the Cygnus region (after excluding MGRO J2019+37) exceeds that predicted from a conventional model of cosmic ray production and propagation. This observation indicates the existence of either hard-spectrum cosmic-ray sources and/or other sources of TeV gamma rays in the region.

  2. Discovery of TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Cygnus Region of the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; B. E. Kolterman; L. A. Kelley; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; I. V. Moskalenko; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; M. Schneider; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; A. W. Strong; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffuse gamma radiation arising from the interaction of cosmic ray particles with matter and radiation in the Galaxy is one of the few probes available to study the origin of the cosmic rays. Milagro is a water Cherenkov detector that continuously views the entire overhead sky. The large field-of-view combined with the long observation time makes Milagro the most sensitive instrument available for the study of large, low surface brightness sources such as the diffuse gamma radiation arising from interactions of cosmic radiation with interstellar matter. In this paper we present spatial and flux measurements of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Cygnus Region. The TeV image shows at least one new source MGRO J2019+37 as well as correlations with the matter density in the region as would be expected from cosmic-ray proton interactions. However, the TeV gamma-ray flux as measured at ~12 TeV from the Cygnus region (after excluding MGRO J2019+37) exceeds that predicted from a conventional model of cosmic ray production and propagation. This observation indicates the existence of either hard-spectrum cosmic-ray sources and/or other sources of TeV gamma rays in the region.

  3. Hybrid model of GeV-TeV gamma ray emission from Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Qing Guo; Qiang Yuan; Cheng Liu; Ai-Feng Li

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The observations of high energy $\\gamma$-ray emission from the Galactic center (GC) by HESS, and recently by Fermi, suggest the cosmic ray acceleration in the GC and possibly around the supermassive black hole. In this work we propose a lepton-hadron hybrid model to explain simultaneously the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission. Both electrons and hadronic cosmic rays were accelerated during the past activity of the GC. Then these particles would diffuse outwards and interact with the interstellar gas and background radiation field. The collisions between hadronic cosmic rays with gas is responsible to the TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission detected by HESS. With fast cooling in the strong radiation field, the electrons would cool down and radiate GeV photons through inverse Compton scattering off the soft background photons. This scenario provides a natural explanation of the observed GeV-TeV spectral shape of $\\gamma$-rays.

  4. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Background Rejection in the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    in the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory C. Sinnis for the Milagro Collaboration Los Alamos National Laboratory Abstract. Recent advances in TeV gamma ray astronomy are a result of the ability to differentiate between extensive air showers generated by gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays. Air Cherenkov telescopes have

  5. Int. J. Web Based Communities, Vol. x, No. x, xxxx 1 Characterizing and Modeling Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Mieghem, Piet

    Int. J. Web Based Communities, Vol. x, No. x, xxxx 1 Characterizing and Modeling Social Networks networks, as a large portion of social networks, consist of cooperative individuals: Two individuals and Modeling Social Networks with Overlapping Communities', Int. J. Web Based Commu- nities, Vol. x, No. x, pp

  6. INT David Kaplan -Schladming Winter School 2007 Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    for Nuclear Theory Seattle,WA - USA 1 #12;INT David Kaplan - Schladming Winter School 2007 Part 1: RelevanceINT David Kaplan - Schladming Winter School 2007 Supersymmetry on the Lattice I. Symmetries Winter School 2007 · Irrelevant: less important in the IR · Relevant: more important in the IR · Marginal

  7. Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2004 431 Copyright 2004 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2004 431 Copyright © 2004 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd) `Nanobelt and nanosaw structures of II-VI semiconductors', Int. J. Nanotechnology, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp.431 Fellow, and a Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Fellow (2003­2004). Currently, his research interests

  8. Estimation of Cosmic Induced Contamination in Ultra-low Background Detector Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Greene, Austen T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary This document presents the result of investigating a way to reliably determine cosmic induced backgrounds for ultra-low background materials. In particular, it focuses on those radioisotopes produced by the interactions with cosmic ray particles in the detector materials that act as a background for experiments looking for neutrinoless double beta decay. This investigation is motivated by the desire to determine background contributions from cosmic ray activation of the electroformed copper that is being used in the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The most important radioisotope produced in copper that contributes to the background budget is 60Co, which has the potential to deposit energy in the region of interest of this experiment. Cobalt-60 is produced via cosmic ray neutron collisions in the copper. This investigation aims to provide a method for determining whether or not the copper has been exposed to cosmic radiation beyond the threshold which the Majorana Project has established as the maximum exposure. This threshold is set by the Project as the expected contribution of this source of background to the overall background budget. One way to estimate cosmic ray neutron exposure of materials on the surface of the Earth is to relate it to the cosmic ray muon exposure. Muons are minimum-ionizing particles and the available technologies to detect muons are easier to implement than those to detect neutrons. We present the results of using a portable, ruggedized muon detector, the µ-Witness made by our research group, for determination of muon exposure of materials for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. From the muon flux measurement, this report presents a method to estimate equivalent sea-level exposure, and then infer the neutron exposure of the tracked material and thus the cosmogenic activation of the copper. This report combines measurements of the muon flux taken by the µ-Witness detector with Geant4 simulations in order to assure our understanding of the µ-Witness prototype. As a proof of concept, we present the results of using this detector with electroformed copper during its transport from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where the copper is grown, to the underground lab in Lead, South Dakota, where the experiment is being deployed. The development of a code to be used with the Majorana parts tracking database, designed to aid in estimating the cosmogenic activation, is also presented.

  9. Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction [2] Brief (typically bursts of gamma rays with mean energies of 2 MeV originating from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), have been observed by the Burst et al., 2010; Briggs et al., 2010]. With spectra typically harder than cosmic gamma ray bursts

  10. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderspek, Roland K.

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments ...

  11. Determining the jet opening-angle of gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEvoy, Erica Lynn, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing scientific agreement that at least some cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) coincide with the deaths of rapidly rotating massive stars - dubbed "hyper-novae." In 1987, a supernova (SN 1987A) was detected in the ...

  12. Numerical Simulations Unravel the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -A. Faucher-Giguere; A. Lidz; L. Hernquist

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe is permeated by a network of filaments, sheets, and knots collectively forming a "cosmic web.'' The discovery of the cosmic web, especially through its signature of absorption of light from distant sources by neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium, exemplifies the interplay between theory and experiment that drives science, and is one of the great examples in which numerical simulations have played a key and decisive role. We recount the milestones in our understanding of cosmic structure, summarize its impact on astronomy, cosmology, and physics, and look ahead by outlining the challenges faced as we prepare to probe the cosmic web at new wavelengths.

  13. Collection: High-Energy Cosmic Ray Event Data from the Pierre Auger Cosmic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies A! CJ

  14. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alvarez; D. D'Armiento; G. Agnetta; A. Alberdi; A. Antonelli; A. Argan; P. Assis; E. A. Baltz; C. Bambi; G. Barbiellini; H. Bartko; M. Basset; D. Bastieri; P. Belli; G. Benford; L. Bergstrom; R. Bernabei; G. Bertone; A. Biland; B. Biondo; F. Bocchino; E. Branchini; M. Brigida; T. Bringmann; P. Brogueira; A. Bulgarelli; J. A. Caballero; G. A. Caliandro; P. Camarri; F. Cappella; P. Caraveo; R. Carbone; M. Carvajal; S. Casanova; A. J. Castro-Tirado; O. Catalano; R. Catena; F. Celi; A. Celotti; R. Cerulli; A. Chen; R. Clay; V. Cocco; J. Conrad; E. Costa; A. Cuoco; G. Cusumano; C. J. Dai; B. Dawson; B. De Lotto; G. De Paris; A. de Ugarte Postigo; E. Del Monte; C. Delgado; A. Di Ciaccio; G. Di Cocco; S. Di Falco; G. Di Persio; B. L. Dingus; A. Dominguez; F. Donato; I. Donnarumma; M. Doro; J. Edsjo; J. M. Espino Navas; M. C. Espirito Santo; Y. Evangelista; C. Evoli; D. Fargion; C. Favuzzi; M. Feroci; M. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; N. Fornengo; T. Froysland; M. Frutti; F. Fuschino; J. L. Gomez; M. Gomez; D. Gaggero; N. Galante; M. I. Gallardo; M. Galli; J. E. Garcia; M. Garczarczyk; F. Gargano; M. Gaug; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; P. Giommi; F. Giordano; A. Giuliani; J. Glicenstein; P. Goncalves; D. Grasso; M. Guerriero; H. L. He; A. Incicchitti; J. Kirk; H. H. Kuang; A. La Barbera; G. La Rosa; C. Labanti; G. Lamanna; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; S. Liberati; F. Liello; P. Lipari; F. Longo; F. Loparco; M. Lozano; P. G. Lucentini De Sanctis; J. M. Ma; M. C. Maccarone; L. Maccione; V. Malvezzi; A. Mangano; M. Mariotti; M. Marisaldi; I. Martel; A. Masiero; E. Massaro; M. Mastropietro; E. Mattaini; F. Mauri; M. N. Mazziotta; S. Mereghetti; T. Mineo; S. Mizobuchi; A. Moiseev; M. Moles; C. Monte; F. Montecchia; E. Morelli; A. Morselli; I. Moskalenko; F. Nozzoli; J. F. Ormes; M. A. Peres-Torres; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perez-Bernal; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; L. Pieri; M. Pietroni; M. Pimenta; A. Pina; C. Pittori; C. Pontoni; G. Porrovecchio; F. Prada; M. Prest; D. Prosperi; R. Protheroe; G. Pucella; J. M. Quesada; J. M. Quintana; J. R. Quintero; S. Raino; M. Rapisarda; M. Rissi; J. Rodriguez; E. Rossi; G. Rowell; A. Rubini; F. Russo; M. Sanchez-Conde; B. Sacco; V. Scapin; M. Schelke; A. Segreto; A. Sellerholm; X. D. Sheng; A. Smith; P. Soffitta; R. Sparvoli; P. Spinelli; V. Stamatescu; L. S. Stark; M. Tavani; G. Thornton; L. G. Titarchuk; B. Tome; A. Traci; M. Trifoglio; A. Trois; P. Vallania; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; S. Vernetto; V. Vitale; N. Wild; Z. P. Ye; A. Zambra; F. Zandanel; D. Zanello

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  15. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  16. Cosmic Ray Pitch Angle Scattering Through 90 o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anisotropy and the amplitude of hydro­magnetic waves gener­ ated by this streaming instability is limited rise to the dominant form of wave dissipation). We also account for ion­cyclotron damping of small wave the quasi­linear scattering with the adiabatic mir­ roring in a small boundary layer in momentum space close

  17. EMMA a new underground cosmic-ray experiment T. Enqvista

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    and Nuclear Safety Authority ­ STUK, Helsinki, Finland d Centre for Underground Physics at Pyh¨asalmi (CUPP

  18. Underground cosmic-ray experiment EMMA T. Enqvista

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Authority ­ STUK, Helsinki, Finland d Centre for Underground Physics at Pyh¨asalmi (CUPP), University

  19. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  20. The Composition of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Through Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nuclei originating outside the Solar System "Ultra High Energy" E > 1017eV First discovered by interact high in the Earth's atmosphere EASs result in billions of secondary particles Fluorescence) Image produced by 16x16 PMT "Cluster Box" 3.3 m diameter mirrors collect light and focus