National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for insulation storm windows

  1. R-5 Highly-Insulating Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-30

    Introduces DOE's Building Technologies fenestration RD&D program, and describes the highly insulated R-5 Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase solicitation.

  2. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storm Windows Storm Windows An energy upgrade on this daycare center included interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of ...

  3. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of Larry Kinney, Synergistic Building Technologies. An energy upgrade on this...

  4. Highly Insulating R-5 Windows Volume Purchase - How Utilities Can Participate Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    This fact sheet describes DOEs Windows Volume Purchase, the benefits of highly insulated R-5 windows and low-e storm windows, and the important role that utilities can play in expanding the market for these highly insulated windows.

  5. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    If you have old windows in your home, replacing them with new, energy-efficient windows ... In general, plastics are most economical for people with small budgets or who live in ...

  6. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with ...

  7. Vacuum Insulation for Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vacuum Insulation for Windows Vacuum Insulation for Windows Image of vacuum capsules in water (4 mg/ml) used for dip coating. Image of vacuum capsules in water (4 mg/ml) used for dip coating. Image of vacuum capsules deposited using dip coating, demonstrating virtually no visual degradation. Image of vacuum capsules deposited using dip coating, demonstrating virtually no visual degradation. Image of vacuum capsules in water (4 mg/ml) used for dip coating. Image of vacuum capsules deposited using

  8. Interior and Exterior Low-E Storm Window Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witters, Sarah

    2014-09-03

    Until recently, energy-efficient window retrofit options have largely been limited to repair or replacement; leaving the homeowner to decide between affordability and deeper energy savings. A new and improved low-e storm window boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement. A recent whole-home experiment performed by PNNL suggests that attaching low-e storm windows can result in as much energy savings replacing the windows.

  9. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments.

  10. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, R.A.

    1984-06-19

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in kit'' form. 11 figs.

  11. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in "kit" form.

  12. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  13. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  14. Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows June 20, 2016 - 12:53pm Addthis At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured) serves as a control and doesn’t get

  15. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

  16. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with integrated sensors, control logic and a motorized shade between glass panes. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 3 Residential Smart Window with integrated sensors, control logic and a motorized shade between glass panes. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3 of 3

  17. Low-E Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Low-E Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window ... compliance with residential and commercial national ... information about window coverings: http:...

  18. EERE Success Story-Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance EERE Success Story-Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance September 30, ...

  19. Thermal and Optical Properties of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Widder, Sarah H.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2015-07-17

    Installing low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows and panels over existing windows has been identified as a cost-effective new approach for improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings where window replacement is impractical or too expensive. As such, it is desirable to characterize the key energy performance properties of low-E storm windows and panels when installed over different types of existing primary windows. this paper presents the representative U-factors, solar heat gain coefficients (SGHCs) and visible transmittance properties of the combined assemblies of various storm windows and panel types installed over different primary windows.

  20. Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-12-23

    Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  1. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    while keeping your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. | Photo courtesy of Larson Manufacturing Company. Installing storm windows will lower your energy bill while...

  2. Evaluation of Interior Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Lab Homes; Storm; Windows; Low-e; ...

  3. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement, on Sept. 9, 2014.

  4. Thermally insulated window sash construction for a casement window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    A window sash member is described comprising: first and second generally parallel sidewalls; first and second spaced, generally parallel transverse walls connecting the first and second sidewalls, extending between and oriented generally perpendicular to the first and second sidewalls to define a first hollow chamber; a third transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally parallel to the first transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; a first interior wall extending from the third transverse wall to the first transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the first sidewall to define a second hollow chamber; a fourth transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally to the second transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; and a second interior wall extending from the fourth transverse wall to the second transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the second sidewall to define a third hollow chamber.

  5. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Christian Kohler, cjkohler@lbl.gov Steve Selkowitz, seselkowitz@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 4/1/2013 Planned end date: 3/31/2016 Key Milestones 1. Window designs meeting FOA targets 9/30/2013 2. Prototype window with integrated sensors, ENERGY STAR level performance 12/31/2013 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $783k (FY13-FY14)

  6. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

  7. Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-05-31

    This study examines the performance of exterior and interior low-e storm panels with a controlled whole home experimental design using PNNL's Lab Homes. Summing the estimated annual average heating and cooling savings, the installation of low-e storm panels resulted in approximately 10% annual energy savings. The results of the experiment will be used to determine and validate performance of low-e storm windows over double pane clear glass windows in a whole home setting.

  8. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Robert Hart, rghart@lbl.gov Stephen Selkowitz, seselkowitz@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kevin Gaul, GaulKJ@pella.com Pella Corporation Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 04/01/2013 Planned end date: 03/31/2016 Key Milestones 1. Measured thermal performance of static prototype windows is within 0.03 Btu/hr-ft2F (NFRC tolerance) of design specifications 09/30/2014

  9. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1979-12-07

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  10. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Paul R.; Shapira, Hanna B.

    1981-01-01

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  11. Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating) November 11, 2008 - 3:45pm Addthis John Lippert ... Alex is one of the world's experts on green building materials, so I'm always glad to see ...

  12. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Storm window Tape measure Screwdriver Putty knife Caulk Caulking gun STEP-BY-STEP ... Do not caulk the bottom sill. Hold the caulking gun at a 45-degree angle to the edge of ...

  13. Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  14. Low-e Storm Windows: Market Assessment and Pathways to Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-06-08

    Field studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have shown that the use of low-e storm windows can lead to significant heating and cooling energy savings in residential homes. This study examines the market for low-e storm windows based on market data, case studies, and recent experience with weatherization deployment programs. It uses information from interviews conducted with DOE researchers and industry partners involved in case studies and early deployment efforts related to low-e storm windows. In addition, this study examines potential barriers to market acceptance, assesses the market and energy savings potential, and identifies opportunities to transform the market for low-e storm windows and overcome market adoption barriers.

  15. Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Rating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Marchesi Redouane Begag; Je Kyun Lee; Danny Ou; Jong Ho Sonn; George Gould; Wendell Rhine

    2004-10-15

    During the performance of contract DE-FC26-00-NT40998, entitled ''Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Value'', research was conducted at Aspen Aerogels, Inc. to develop new transparent aerogel materials suitable for window insulation applications. The project requirements were to develop a formulation or multiple formulations that have high transparency (85-90%) in the visible region, are hydrophobic (will not opacify with exposure to water vapor or liquid), and have at least 2% resiliency (interpreted as recoverable 2% strain and better than 5% strain to failure in compression). Results from an unrelated project showed that silica aerogels covalently bonded to organic polymers exhibit excellent mechanical properties. At the outset of this project, we believed that such a route is the best to improve mechanical properties. We have applied Design of Experiment (DOE) techniques to optimize formulations including both silica aerogels and organically modified silica aerogels (''Ormosils''). We used these DOE results to optimize formulations around the local/global optimization points. This report documents that we succeeded in developing a number of formulations that meet all of the stated criteria. We successfully developed formulations utilizing a two-step approach where the first step involves acid catalyzed hydrolysis and the second step involves base catalyzed condensation to make the gels. The gels were dried using supercritical CO{sub 2} and we were able to make 1 foot x 1 foot x 0.5 inch panels that met the criteria established.

  16. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-e Storms:  The Next “Big Thing” in Window RetrofitsOfficial Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014)

  17. Energy Savings of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels across US Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2015-10-01

    This report builds off of previous modeling work related to low-e storm windows used to create a "Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows." This work updates similar studies using new fuel costs and examining the separate contributions of reduced air leakage and reduced coefficients of overall heat transfer and solar heat gain. In this report we examine the energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates, excluding the impact from infiltration reductions, which tend to vary using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by climate zone.

  18. Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2014-09-04

    This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

  19. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  20. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA Partner: Pella Windows - Pella, IA

  1. EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed or couch with a stuffed toy in front of it. People aren't the only ones who must endure the discomfort of a drafty room. As a recent letter sent to Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) contractor Anthony Stonis from customer Stephanie Marder points out, even man's best friend can benefit from the increased comfort of an air-sealing upgrade.

  2. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These windows target significant reductions in residential heating as well as cooling energy. Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Karma Sawyer Performer: Steve Selkowitz, Lawrence ...

  3. EERE Success Story—Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  4. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  5. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly

  6. Demonstration of the Performance of Highly Insulating (R-5) Windows in a Matched Pair of Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-12-05

    Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a homes windows has the potential to significantly improve the homes overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high-quality installation will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the building envelope, decreasing infiltration and thus contributing to reduced heat transmission through building envelope. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. In addition to improvements in energy efficiency, highly insulating windows can have important impacts on occupant comfort by minimizing or eliminating the cold draft many homeowners experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably cooler than the room air temperature. Energy efficiency measures, such as highly insulating windows, also have the potential to decrease peak energy use in a home, which can lead to measurable peak load decreases for a utility service territory if implemented on a large scale. High-performance windows now feature triple-pane glass, double low-e coatings, and vinyl insulated frames to achieve U-factors as low as 0.2 , as compared to double-pane clear glass windows with a U-factor of 0.67, which are common in existing homes across the United States. The highly insulating windows (as they will be referred to in this document) are now available from several manufacturers and show promise to yield considerable energy savings and thermal comfort improvements in homes.

  7. Drafty Windows: Is it Better to Insulate or Replace Them?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I’ve lived in my condominium for several years, and though it naturally stays cooler in the summer (with all west-facing windows) I struggle to keep it warm in the winter without taking out a loan to pay utilities

  8. State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames - Research and Market Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Arasteh, Dariush; Kohler, Christian

    2007-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a market and research review related to state-of-the-art highly insulating window frames. The market review focuses on window frames that satisfy the Passivhaus requirements (window U-value less or equal to 0.8 W/m{sup 2}K ), while other examples are also given in order to show the variety of materials and solutions that may be used for constructing window frames with a low thermal transmittance (U-value). The market search shows that several combinations of materials are used in order to obtain window frames with a low U-value. The most common insulating material seems to be Polyurethane (PUR), which is used together with most of the common structural materials such as wood, aluminum, and PVC. The frame research review also shows examples of window frames developed in order to increase the energy efficiency of the frames and the glazings which the frames are to be used together with. The authors find that two main tracks are used in searching for better solutions. The first one is to minimize the heat losses through the frame itself. The result is that conductive materials are replaced by highly thermal insulating materials and air cavities. The other option is to reduce the window frame area to a minimum, which is done by focusing on the net energy gain by the entire window (frame, spacer and glazing). Literature shows that a window with a higher U-value may give a net energy gain to a building that is higher than a window with a smaller U-value. The net energy gain is calculated by subtracting the transmission losses through the window from the solar energy passing through the windows. The net energy gain depends on frame versus glazing area, solar factor, solar irradiance, calculation period and U-value. The frame research review also discusses heat transfer modeling issues related to window frames. Thermal performance increasing measures, surface modeling, and frame cavity modeling are among the topics discussed. The

  9. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  10. NON-INTRUSIVE SENSOR FOR GAS FILL VERIFICATION OF INSULATED GLASS WINDOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Freedman; Paul L. Kebabian; Richard R. Romano; James Woodroffe

    2003-10-01

    A sensor capable of measuring the amount of oxygen (an unwanted component that is only present because of improper filling or seal failure) within an argon-filled insulated glass window has been designed, built and successfully tested. It operates by using the optical absorption of oxygen in the atmospheric A-band centered at 762 nm. Light emitted by an argon-filled surface glow discharge lamp is Zeeman-tuned on and off an oxygen absorption line using an AC-modulated electromagnet. In the presence of oxygen, the change in the measured intensity of the lamp, obtained using standard demodulation techniques, is proportional to the oxygen column density. Measurements using an industry-standard insulated glass window indicate that the sensor can measure the amount of oxygen in a nominally argon-filled IG window (with a window gap of 10 mm) with a precision of 0.50% oxygen using a 16 second integration time. This level of precision is well within the limits required by the IG window manufacturing industry for proper monitoring of newly manufactured window units.

  11. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Until recently, energy-efficient window retrofit options have largely been limited to repair or replacement; leaving the homeowner to decide between affordability and deeper energy savings.  A new...

  12. Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

  13. Highly Insulating Windows for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reliability in Fenestration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David

    2010-11-30

    EverSealed Windows, Inc. (ESW) agreed in early 2006, prior to the contract award, to add three additional deliverables to the Project (new Milestones 30, 31 and 32), and have the results of these three deliverables form the basis of the go/no-go decision for proceeding from BP1 to BP2. ESW completed all three milestones and the DOE agreed in November 2006 to continue the Project. ESW subsequently initiated work on BP2 and its two milestones. These were to (1) Assemble and test glass-to-metal bonded coupons to test the strength of ESW's glass-to-metal bonds (ESW's Test Vehicle 1 or TV1), and (2) to assemble and test the hermeticity of glass and metal packages (ESW's Test Vehicle 2 or TV2). ESW completed both milestones of BP2 in late 2010, demonstrating that its bonds were both strong enough and hermetic enough that vacuum insulating glass units could be assembled and survive a 40+ year service life in any climate in North America. Based on the accomplishments in BP-1, the DOE held a go/no-go meeting in Washington, DC in mid-November 2006 and moved the Project into Budget Period 2 (BP-2). During this go/no-go meeting, the DOE expressed a concern that ESW did not have a back-up plan or process should ESW be unable to make its diffusion bonding process more than adequate for the necessary bond strength and hermeticity of the seal. ESW suggested and volunteered to investigate using a glass frit (i.e., solder glass) as a back-up to its diffusion bonding of glass to oxidized metal.

  14. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Bergh, Sofie Van Den; Hart, Robert; Jelle, Bjrn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild

    2013-01-31

    Insulating glass (IG) units typically consist of multiple glass panes that are sealed and held together structurally along their perimeters. This report describes a study of edge seals in IG units. First, we summarize the components, requirements, and desired properties of edge construction in IG units, based on a survey of the available literature. Second, we review commercially available window edge seals and describe their properties, to provide an easily accessible reference for research and commercial purposes. Finally, based on the literature survey and review of current commercial edge seal systems, we identify research opportunities for future edge seal improvements and solutions.

  15. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while

  16. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    storm windows, caulking and weatherstripping, and using window treatments or coverings. ... Window treatments or coverings can reduce heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the ...

  17. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by adding storm windows, caulking and weatherstripping, and using window treatments or coverings. ... Links ENERGY STAR Residential Windows, Doors and Skylights Product Ratings - ...

  18. Vacuum Insulation for Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - New construc;on - 90.1---2004 - Post---1980 construc;on (90.1---1989) - Pre---1980 ... Minneapolis, MN 14 6B Helena, MT Helena, MT 15 7 Duluth, MN Duluth, MN 16 8 Fairbanks, AK ...

  19. Vacuum Insulation for Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and value propositions 19 Acknowledgements (Many People Providing Expertise) * Michele Olsen and Phil Parilla: Thermal Conductivity Measurements * Chaiwat Engtrakul and Robert ...

  20. Carpe Diem: Install Insulated Roman Shades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As I mentioned in yesterday's blog, I had insulated window quilts installed on most of my home's windows.

  1. Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... SHGC U Residential Energy Use (MBTUyr) vs Window Thermal Properties (U, SHGC) Specific windows plotted on ... between the window and added coverings such as storms (interior and ...

  2. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Types Window Types A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance

  3. Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows! | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows April 26, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis Caulking is an easy way to reduce air ...

  4. Growth window and effect of substrate symmetry in hybrid molecular beam epitaxy of a Mott insulating rare earth titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Zhang, Jack Y.; Raghavan, Santosh; Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-07-15

    The conditions for the growth of stoichiometric GdTiO{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated. It is shown that relatively high growth temperatures (>750 Degree-Sign C) are required to obtain an MBE growth window in which only the stoichiometric film grows for a range of cation flux ratios. This growth window narrows with increasing film thickness. It is also shown that single-domain films are obtained by the growth on a symmetry-matched substrate. The influence of lattice mismatch strain on the electrical and magnetic characteristics of the GdTiO{sub 3} thin film is investigated.

  5. Window shopping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.

    1990-03-01

    The author addresses the energy efficiency of windows and describes changes and new products available in this consumer information article. Experiments currently being done by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Bonneville Power Authority and the Washington State Energy Office show that some of these superwindows collect more energy from the sun than they let escape from inside the home. One type of window in current production is the low-E (low-emissivity) and the IGUs (insulated glass units). Low-E techniques include glazing of the glass with various materials including polyester and metallic coatings. Other measures include filling the airspace in double pane windows with argon, aerogel or by creating a vacuum in the airspace. Another factor the author considers is ultraviolet light protection.

  6. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits ... to show compliance for residential and commercial buildings. ... Also there is information on the efficient window coverings ...

  7. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... selective coatings filter out 40% to 70% of the heat normally transmitted through insulated window glass or glazing, while allowing the full amount of light to be transmitted. ...

  8. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Choose high-performance windows that have at least two panes of glass and a low-e coating. Choose a low U-factor for better insulation in colder climates; the U-factor is the...

  9. Promising Technology: R-5 Window Replacements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A significant amount of the energy used to heat and cool commercial buildings is lost through inefficient windows. Incorporating windows into a building that are resistant to heat transfer can significantly reduce the amount of energy that is lost through windows. R-values are an indication of how resistant a window is to heat transfer, and a larger R-value indicates a more insulating window. An R-5 window represents an efficient window, and has a larger R-value than what is required to qualify for ENERGY STAR.

  10. Winter Storms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Winter Storms Winter has set its sights upon us, just in time to make the holidays bright. Remembering the joy winter brought us when we were children might help us cope with the hazards and inconvenience of the season, but we can't avoid the coping. The basic mechanisms that support summer storms also occur in winter storms. These mechanisms include low-pressure centers, warm fronts, and cold fronts. As winter approaches, the northern branch of the jet stream dips to the south, bringing cold

  11. How Have You Improved the Efficiency of Your Windows? | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Have You Improved the Efficiency of Your Windows? How Have You Improved the Efficiency of Your Windows? March 18, 2010 - 7:57pm Addthis This week, John told you about his experience with window shades that improve the energy efficiency of his windows. There are several things you can do to improve the efficiency of existing windows, including adding storm windows, caulking or weatherstripping, or using window treatments. How have you improved the efficiency of your windows? Each

  12. Window Attachments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... shades Surface applied film Cellular shade Window quilt Seasonal film kit Louvered blinds Roller shades Solar screens Cellular shades Surface applied films Exterior attachments ...

  13. Window Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with glazing materials for your climate, you can customize your home's windows and reduce your energy bills.

  14. CAVE WINDOW

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Residential Storm Window and Door Shipments, by Frame Type (Million Units) Type 1990 2000 2005 2008 1990 2000 2005 2008 1990 2000 2005 2008 Aluminum 10 8 7 NA 2 4 4 3 12 12 11 ...

  16. Wall Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-01

    This fact sheet provides information on advanced wall framing, including insulating walls, airtight construction, and moisture control.

  17. High Performance Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but they ... to model wide range of window coverings * Performed window coverings ...

  18. Blue Ridge Mountain Electric Membership Corporation - Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Insulation: 200 Air Sealing: 200 Windows: 500 (25window) Duct Repair: 200 Heat Pump Water Heater: 200unit Storm Window Additions: 250 (12.50window) Exterior Door...

  19. UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information on customer power outages and other impacts on the energy sector as Tropical Storm Isaac develops.

  20. Slab Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to insulate slab-on-grade floors and control moisture, air leakage, termites, and radon.

  1. Insulator-to-Metal Transition of Vanadium Dioxide | U.S. DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as smart windows and ultrafast field effect transistors, exhibits an insulator to ... vanadium dioxide driven by large phonon entropy," Nature 515, 535-539, 2014. DOI: ...

  2. Installing Windows with Foam Sheathing on a Wood-Frame Wall: January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-05-01

    In most wall assemblies, connection details around windows have been the source of problems with water penetration into the building. This report describes how to install a window into a wall with insulating sheathing as an integrated drainage plane.

  3. Window Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2000-04-01

    The Window Industry Technology Roadmap looks at the trends in window design and installation in 2000 and projects trends for the future.

  4. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation Insulation Where to Insulate Where to Insulate Learn where to insulate in a home to save money and improve comfort. Read more Insulation Insulation Get the facts about how insulation works. Read more Moisture Control Moisture Control Learn how to control moisture in your home to improve the effectiveness of your insulation and air sealing strategies. Read more You can reduce your home's heating and cooling costs through proper insulation and air sealing techniques. These techniques

  5. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of ...

  6. Windows, Doors, and Skylights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficient windows, doors, and skylights can reduce energy bills and improve the comfort of your home.

  7. ARM - Word Seek: Storms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storms Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Word Seek: Storms

  8. Solar optical materials for innovative window design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M.

    1982-08-01

    New and innovative optical materials and coatings can greatly improve the efficiency of window energy systems. These potential materials and coatings increase energy efficiency by reducing radiative losses in the infrared, or reducing visible reflection losses or controlling overheating due to solar gain. Current progress in heat mirror coatings for glass and polymeric substrates is presented. Highly doped semiconducting oxides and metal/dielectric interference coatings are reviewed. Physical and optical properties are outlined for antireflection films and transparent aerogel insulation media. The potential for optical switching films as window elements includes discussions of electrochromic, photochromic and other physical switching processes.

  9. Thor's Hammer/Red Storm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Camp & Jim Tomkins The Design Specification and Initial Implementation of the Red Storm ... technologies Computing domains at Sandia Red Storm is targeting the highest-end market ...

  10. Vacuum window glazings for energy-efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Smith, L.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Potter, T.; Christensen, C. ); Soule, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The technical feasibility of a patented, laser-welded, evacuated insulating window was studied. The window has two edge-sealed sheets of glass separated by 0.5-mm glass spheres spaced 30 mm apart in a regular array. A highly insulating frame is required and several designs were analyzed. The vacuum window's combination of high solar transmittance and low thermal conductance makes it superior to many other windows in cold climates. In the US Pacific Northwest, the vacuum window could save about 6 MJ of heating energy annually per square meter of window in comparison to conventional, double-glazed windows. A large, vacuum laser-welding facility was designed and installed to conduct glass welding experiments and to fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. Experiments confirmed the feasibility of laser-sealing glass in vacuum but identified two difficulties. Under some circumstances, bubbles of dissolved gases form during welding and weaken the seal. Glass also vaporizes and contaminates the laser beam steering mirror. A novel moving metal foil mirror was developed to circumvent the contamination problem, but it has not yet been used to complete welding experiments and fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. 63 refs., 53 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Includes information about the installed base of residential windows and window coverings, and the operation of window coverings by households. residentialwindowscoverings.pdf ...

  12. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, NM The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated ...

  13. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, NM The Individual Permit authorizes...

  14. Energy Savings from Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of window combinations with window attachments in typical residential buildings and in varied ... The most common and widely used types of attachments are window coverings ...

  15. Thermal insulation for buildings. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherize » Insulation Insulation Spray foam insulation fills the nooks and crannies in the walls of this energy-efficient Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Spray foam insulation fills the nooks and crannies in the walls of this energy-efficient Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Foam core structural insulated panels are built in a factory, shipped to the jobsite, and assembled. | Photo courtesy of Michael Baechler. Foam core structural insulated panels are built in a

  17. Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ANL-1520 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Argonne National Laboratory FY 2015 ...... Peter L. Lynch Water Pollution Control Specialist FMS - ...

  18. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  19. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  20. Windows technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

  1. Plasma window characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Gleizer, S.; Gurovich, V.; Kronhaus, I.; Hershcovitch, A.; Nozar, P.; Taliani, C.

    2007-03-01

    Parameters of an arc Ar plasma discharge used as a plasma window with a discharge current of {approx}50 A and a voltage of {approx}58 V are presented. It is shown that this arc discharge allows one to decrease the pressure at the low pressure end of the plasma window almost 380 times using relatively low pumping at the low pressure end of the plasma window. Calculations of the plasma parameters and their spatial distribution using a simple wall-stabilized arc model showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimentally obtained data. It is shown that a significant decrease in gas flow through the plasma window occurs due to the increase in plasma viscosity. An improvement of the plasma window ignition and some of its design aspects are described as well.

  2. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Design Storm for "Total Retention" under Individual Permit, Poster, Individual ... International. Environmental Programs Design Storm for "Total Retention" under ...

  3. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  4. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  5. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  6. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  7. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior SEPTEMBER 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy ...

  8. The Gathering Storm:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gathering Storm: The Coming Crisis in the Internet R. Kevin Oberman Senior Engineer oberman@es.net, www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science ESCC/Internet2 Joint Techs Workshop January 21, 2008 2 Overview: The Clouds Gather * IPv4 address space exhaustion * Continued growth in the DFZ * Hardware limitations - DFZ FIB approaching capacity of many popular routers - RIB size now often exceeds router capacity - Routing table

  9. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  11. Air Sealing Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-14

    This information sheet addresses windows and may also be applied to doors and other pre-assembled elements installed in building enclosures that also perform an air barrier function.

  12. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  13. Windows, Doors, & Skylights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows, doors and skylights affect home aesthetics as well as energy use. Learn how to choose products that allow you to use natural light without raising your heating and cooling costs.

  14. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  15. Windows Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lead Performer: Window Covering Manufacturing Association - New York, NY Core Research ... National Laboratory (LBNL) - Berkeley, CA Core Research Support for BTO WindowsEnvelope ...

  16. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Windows provide views, daylighting, ventilation, and heat from the sun in the winter. ... Install ENERGY STAR-qualified windows and use curtains and shade to give your air ...

  17. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft 1ft prototype panels for the worlds first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicrons patented e-Tint technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power

  18. Thermal insulation for Buildings. September 1982-September 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 244 citations, 92 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  19. User to net eleven-month payback on window film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, K.

    1985-08-12

    Solar window insulation manufactured by Solar Master Film Corp. will save a Labor Department building $82,000 annually in electricity costs for air conditioning and $58,000 in steam costs. There could be an additional savings of about $1800 after one year because of lower demand charges for electricity. Solar film decreases the U-value of glass, thus lowering the conduction losses of cool air in the summertime and of warm air in the winter. The quality of Solar Master's two-ply insulation and the experience of the firm and bid price were criteria that helped Solar Master get the contract.

  20. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the

  1. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of

  2. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Other less common materials such as cementitious and phenolic foams and vermiculite and perlite are also available. Learn More Where to insulate in a home Insulation for new home ...

  3. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter; Fontana, Jack J.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Nonresidential Window Stock and Sales, by Glass Type Existing U.S. Stock Vision Area of New Windows (Million Square Feet) Type (% of buildings) 1995 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Single Pane 56 57 48 56 60 48 Insulating Glass (1) 294 415 373 407 476 389 Total 350 472 421 463 536 437 Clear 36% 49% 43% 44% 38% 33% Tinted 40% 24% 17% 15% 11% 10% Reflective 7% 8% 6% 4% 3% 3% Low-e 17% 19% 34% 37% 48% 54% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): (2) 1) Includes double- and

  5. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  6. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  7. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Curcija, Charlie; Kohler, Christian

    2008-09-11

    While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows that incorporate very low-conductance glazing. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames. We conclude that the near-term priorities for improving the modeling of heat transfer through low-conductance frames are: (1) Add 2D view-factor radiation to standard modeling and examine the current practice of averaging surface emissivity based on area weighting and the process of making an equivalent rectangular frame cavity. (2) Asses 3D radiation effects in frame cavities and develop recommendation for inclusion into the design fenestration tools. (3) Assess existing correlations for convection in vertical cavities using CFD. (4) Study 2D and 3D natural convection heat transfer in frame cavities for cavities that are proven to be deficient from item 3 above. Recommend improved correlations or full CFD modeling into ISO standards and design fenestration tools, if appropriate. (5) Study 3D hardware short-circuits and propose methods to ensure that these effects are incorporated into ratings. (6) Study the heat transfer effects of ventilated frame cavities and propose updated correlations.

  8. Insulated solar storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldighidy, S.M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental investigation of an insulated parallelepiped, outdoor solar, water-filled storage tank of size 1 m {times} 0.5 m {times} 0.3 m, that is made from galvanized iron. The absorption coefficient of the insulating material has been determined. The effects of plastic covers and insulation thickness on the water temperature and the energy gained or lost by water are investigated. Moreover, the effects of insulation thickness on the temperature profiles of the insulating material are discussed. The results show that the absorption coefficient decreases as the insulation thickness increases. Also, it is found that the glass wool insulation of 2.5 cm thickness has the best results compared with the other thicknesses (5 cm, 7.5 cm, and 10 cm) as far as the water temperature and the energy gained by water are concerned.

  9. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Includes information about the installed base of residential windows and window coverings, and the operation of window coverings by households.

  10. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LBNL’s has three facilities specifically dedicated to windows: the Optical Properties Laboratory, the Infrared Thermography Laboratory, and the Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility (MoWiTT). These...

  11. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy funds these three test national lab test facilities to do window and building envelope research.

  12. Performance of a multifunctional PV/T hybrid solar window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidsson, Henrik; Perers, Bengt; Karlsson, Bjoern

    2010-03-15

    A building-integrated multifunctional PV/T solar window has been developed and evaluated. It is constructed of PV cells laminated on solar absorbers placed in a window behind the glazing. To reduce the cost of the solar electricity, tiltable reflectors have been introduced in the construction to focus radiation onto the solar cells. The reflectors render the possibility of controlling the amount of radiation transmitted into the building. The insulated reflectors also reduce the thermal losses through the window. A model for simulation of the electric and hot water production was developed. The model can perform yearly energy simulations where different features such as shading of the cells or effects of the glazing can be included or excluded. The simulation can be run with the reflectors in an active, up right, position or in a passive, horizontal, position. The simulation program was calibrated against measurements on a prototype solar window placed in Lund in the south of Sweden and against a solar window built into a single family house, Solgaarden, in Aelvkarleoe in the central part of Sweden. The results from the simulation shows that the solar window annually produces about 35% more electric energy per unit cell area compared to a vertical flat PV module. (author)

  13. storm | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    storm Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Hurricane Sandy...

  14. Windows and Building Envelope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 27, 2014 Research and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope November 26, 2013 Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base ...

  15. Low heat transfer, high strength window materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlad, Abraham L.; Salzano, Francis J.; Batey, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A multi-pane window with improved insulating qualities; comprising a plurality of transparent or translucent panes held in an essentially parallel, spaced-apart relationship by a frame. Between at least one pair of panes is a convection defeating means comprising an array of parallel slats or cells so designed as to prevent convection currents from developing in the space between the two panes. The convection defeating structures may have reflective surfaces so as to improve the collection and transmittance of the incident radiant energy. These same means may be used to control (increase or decrease) the transmittance of solar energy as well as to decouple the radiative transfer between the interior surfaces of the transparent panes.

  16. Sales Tax Incentives for Energy-Efficient Manufactured Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    storm or double-pane glass windows, insulated or storm doors; and a minimum thermal resistance (R) rating of the insulation of R-11 for walls, R-19 for floors and R-30 for...

  17. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual

  18. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  19. Predicting window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.

    1995-07-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining window U-factors, there has been little work to date on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is, perhaps, of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a preliminary step to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and inferior indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building materials, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products, as part of its mandate from the Department of Energy. A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing, to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This article outlines the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products, and describes the status of the development of these methods. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products. Much of the technical discussion in this article can be found in ASHRAE Transactions.

  20. Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Pederson, Bjorn O. (Chelmsford, MA)

    1984-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

  1. Windows on the axion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the THETA vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10/sup /minus/12/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup 6/ eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producing detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10/sup /minus/6/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup /minus/3/ eV and 1 eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 5 eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve ''heavenly axions,'' are being planned or are underway. 58 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Thermal insulation for buildings. September 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-May 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 299 citations, 55 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  3. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Insulation Materials Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass

  4. Tips: Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    blown into walls, on attic surfaces, or under floors to insulate and reduce air leakage. ... Consequently, the levels may differ from current local building codes. How Much Insulation ...

  5. Turning windows into solar generators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turning windows into solar generators Turning windows into solar generators A simple filtration process helped Rice University researchers create flexible, wafer-scale films of highly aligned and closely packed carbon nanotubes. August 8, 2016 Turning windows into solar generators UbiQD founder and President Hunter McDaniel shows quantum dots dissolved in a liquid solution that absorbs ultraviolet light and converts the energy into emitted light of different colors. CREDIT: Courtesy of UbiQD

  6. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tints Heat-absorbing window glazing contains special tints that change the color of the glass. Tinted glass absorbs a large fraction of the incoming solar radiation...

  7. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    attractive features. Windows provide views, daylighting, ventilation, and heat from the sun in the winter. Unfortunately, they can also account for 10% to 25% of your heating bill...

  8. Dielectric insulating polyolefin compounds and conductor products insulated therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Jr., Burton T.; Prober, Maurice; Kiersztyn, Stanley E.

    1979-01-01

    Polyolefin compounds containing nitrile polysiloxane fluid which have improved electrical properties, and electrical conductors insulated therewith.

  9. Insulation fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

  10. Establishment of a Rating Program for Pre- and Post-Fabricated Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Shah, B.; Bloyd, Cary N.

    2011-08-01

    This document was prepared to support the Smart Buildings-Material Testing and Rating Centres (SB-2) activity of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Energy Smart Communities Initiative (ESCI). The ESCI was put forward by APEC Leaders at the 2010 meeting in Japan. APEC is the premier forum for facilitating economic growth, cooperation, trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region. This document addresses the testing and certification of building products and equipment to support building energy codes, focusing specifically on energy-efficient factory-built windows. It sets forth a proposed structure for an APEC economy to establish a testing, rating, certification, and labeling program for efficient factory-built windows. In the context of this document, efficient windows would be windows made with insulating glass (IG) and an efficient frame assembly. The minimum efficiency metric (or thermal performance) for these windows is not quantified in this document and would generally be established by a governmental agency.

  11. Method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window for providing optical access through an aperture in the package. The package is made of a multilayered insulating material, e.g., a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC). The window is inserted in-between personalized layers of ceramic green tape during stackup and registration. Then, during baking and firing, the integral window is simultaneously bonded to the sintered ceramic layers of the densified package. Next, the microelectronic device is flip-chip bonded to cofired thick-film metallized traces on the package, where the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. Finally, a cover lid is attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, flip-chip bonded, hermetically-sealed package having an integral window.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Examination of the Thermal Transmittance of High Performance Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen Ph.D., Arild; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Arasteh P.E., Dariush; Uvslokk, Sivert; Talev, Goce; Petter Jelle Ph.D., Bjorn

    2010-06-17

    While window frames typically represent 20-30percent of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. The Passivhaus Institute in Germany states that windows (glazing and frames, combined) should have U-values not exceeding 0.80 W/(m??K). This has created a niche market for highly insulating frames, with frame U-values typically around 0.7-1.0 W/(m2 cdot K). The U-values reported are often based on numerical simulations according to international simulation standards. It is prudent to check the accuracy of these calculation standards, especially for high performance products before more manufacturers begin to use them to improve other product offerings. In this paper the thermal transmittance of five highly insulating window frames (three wooden frames, one aluminum frame and one PVC frame), found from numerical simulations and experiments, are compared. Hot box calorimeter results are compared with numerical simulations according to ISO 10077-2 and ISO 15099. In addition CFD simulations have been carried out, in order to use the most accurate tool available to investigate the convection and radiation effects inside the frame cavities. Our results show that available tools commonly used to evaluate window performance, based on ISO standards, give good overall agreement, but specific areas need improvement.

  13. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Valles

    2010-01-08

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  14. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  15. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  16. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  17. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  18. Vacuum foil insulation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, John P.; Sabolcik, Rudolph E.; Svedberg, Robert C.

    1976-11-16

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly.

  19. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  20. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  1. Evacuated Window Glazing Research and Development: A Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    1984-12-01

    This document summarizes progress during a nine-month period of an ongoing, exploratory research talk. The objective of the research is to evaluate the technical feasibility of a highly insulating, evacuated glazing for windows and other building apertures. Research includes engineering design and analysis of the glazing structure, materials development for its components, and the development of fabrication processes that could be used in the practical, mass production of such a glazing system. The targeted design performance goals are 70 percent solar weighted transmittance with less than 0.5 W/m2 K conductance (insulating R value greater than 12 F ft2 h/Btu) with an acceptable view quality.

  2. Aerogel: a transparent insulator for solar applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.J.; Russo, R.E.; Tewari, P.H.; Lofftus, K.D.

    1985-06-01

    Aerogel is a transparent, low density, insulating material suitable for a variety of solar applications. Significant energy savings can be realized by using aerogel for a window glazing material. Other possible applications include solar collector covers, transparent insulating jackets for direct gain passive solar devices, and situations that require both transparency and good insulation. Because silica aerogel has a low density (2 to 10% solid), it has a thermal conductivity as low as 0.014 W/m/sup 0/K without evacuation, and if evacuated, lower than 0.006 W/m/sup 0/K. It provides a clear view with only slight coloring due to its weak and nearly isotropic scattering of light. This paper describes significant progress made in the past year at our laboratory in the development of aerogel. We have improved the transparency, developed new preparation methods using less toxic materials, and initiated successful experiments in drying alcogels at near ambient temperature. Optical transmission, light scattering, and electron microscopy data show that CO/sub 2/ supercritical drying of alcogels produces aerogels similar in quality to those produced by high temperature supercritical drying. These advances make the commercial production of aerogel much more feasible.

  3. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  4. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  5. X-Windows Acceleration via NX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Windows Acceleration via NX X-Windows Acceleration via NX May 12, 2011 by Francesca Verdier NX is a computer program that handles remote X-Windows connections. It can greatly...

  6. Window-closing safety system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only an inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window. 5 figs.

  7. Window-closing safety system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only and inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window.

  8. Individual Permit for Storm Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laws » Individual Permit Individual Permit The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL from specified solid waste management units and areas of concern, collectively referred to as Sites. Canada del Buey Gage station in Mortandad Canyon Pajarito Canyon Sandia Canyon Willows planted for bank stabilization in Pueblo Canyon Willows planted for bank stabilization in Pueblo Canyon What's New Documents submitted to EPRR in

  9. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    which saves money. Structural Insulated Panels Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated insulated structural elements for use in building walls, ceilings, floors,...

  10. Black Mountain Insulation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain Insulation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Mountain Insulation Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product: UK-based manufacturer of sheeps wool insulation which...

  11. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Insulating Concrete Forms Insulating concrete forms (ICFs) are basically forms for poured ... Unfaced boards can then be finished with reinforced insulating cement, canvas, or ...

  12. A window on urban sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stigt, Rien van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Spit, Tejo J.M.

    2013-09-15

    Sustainable urban development requires the integration of environmental interests in urban planning. Although various methods of environmental assessment have been developed, plan outcomes are often disappointing due to the complex nature of decision-making in urban planning, which takes place in multiple arenas within multiple policy networks involving diverse stakeholders. We argue that the concept of ‘decision windows’ can structure this seemingly chaotic chain of interrelated decisions. First, explicitly considering the dynamics of the decision-making process, we further conceptualized decision windows as moments in an intricate web of substantively connected deliberative processes where issues are reframed within a decision-making arena, and interests may be linked within and across arenas. Adopting this perspective in two case studies, we then explored how decision windows arise, which factors determine their effectiveness and how their occurrence can be influenced so as to arrive at more sustainable solutions. We conclude that the integration of environmental interests in urban planning is highly dependent on the ability of the professionals involved to recognize and manipulate decision windows. Finally, we explore how decision windows may be opened. -- Highlights: • Decision-making about sustainable urban development occurs in networks. • The concept of ‘decision windows’ was further elaborated. • Decision windows help understand how environmental interests enter decision-making. • Decision windows can, to some extent, be influenced.

  13. Physical properties of residential insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Research to evaluate properties, test methods and operating environments for thermal insulations used in residences is an important part of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Insulating Materials (BTESIM) program sponsored by the US DOE. Three projects were carried out under the Insulating Materials part of BTESIM. The areas discussed are: (1) the thermal performance of mineral fiber insulating batts, (2) the design density for loose-fill insulations, and (3) the operatio of recesses light fixtures covered by loose-fill cellulosic insulation.

  14. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. You are accessing a document ...

  15. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. It is well known that the spectrum ...

  16. Do You Have Windows That Need Replacing?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Do you have windows that need replacing, too? Do you have any plans to replace them with newer, more efficient windows?

  17. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in your home involves design, selection, and installation. Design Before selecting new windows for your home, determine what types of windows will work best and where to...

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications NREL senior scientist, Robert Tenent, Ph.D., with equipment for low cost processing (deposition) of window coatings materials. Dynamic Windows ...

  19. Energy Efficient Window Treatments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    You can choose window treatments or coverings not only for decoration but also for saving energy. ... Federal incentives are available for efficient residential windows, doors, or ...

  20. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  1. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} with a growth window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-07-20

    Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO{sub 3} films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO{sub 3} films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    insulation, and 250 for qualified energy property, windows and storm doors. The total tax credit may not exceed 500 for any combination of qualified energ... Eligibility:...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with electric heat or electric hot water heating, thermal improvements, duct sealing and infiltration control insulation, storm doors, and Energy Star windows. Interest rates can...

  5. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  6. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  7. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  8. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adcock, J.L.; Pace, M.O.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    A resinous body is placed in gas-insulated electrical apparatus to remove particulate material from the insulating gas.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  11. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  13. EERE Success Story-Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Partners Birch Point Consulting Bonneville Power Administration Efficiency Solutions Larson Manufacturing Company Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Northwest Energy Efficiency ...

  14. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  15. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  16. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  17. UPDES Storm Water Permits: General Construction Website | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Storm Water Permits: General Construction Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: UPDES Storm Water Permits: General Construction...

  18. Washington Construction Storm Water General Permit | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Construction Storm Water General Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington Construction Storm Water General...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Solid and Dissolved Phase Aluminum in Storm Water Runoff on the Pajarito Plateau, Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): ...

  20. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  1. Windows come to the workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upton, M.

    1984-04-11

    Those making major buying decisions about software packages face a difficult process. The author looks at specific features, including windows and integrated packages. Everyone aspiring to be anyone in the packaged software business is touting an integrated system. Integrated software means a lot of things to a lot of people, but three hierarchical levels seem to stand out: the data integration level, the command structure level, and the modeless (or seamless) level.

  2. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGEs production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.0261015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  3. 13 EER Window Air Conditioner

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 EER Window Air Conditioner 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Broadway Apartment Building with WACs in NYC Pradeep Bansal, bansalpk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Key Partners: Start date: October 1, 2011 Planned end date: September 30, 2015 Key Milestones: 1. Complete preliminary simulations to predict design point performance; March 31, 2012 2. Testing of Lab Breadboard; September 30 2013 3. Design production ready unit; March 31 2014 Budget:

  4. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  5. Rolling, Rolling, Rolling: Roller Window Shades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There's a lot of talk these days about installing new energy-efficient windows. Thanks to a Federal tax credit of up to $1,500, window advertisements, both print and radio and TV broadcasting, are aplenty.

  6. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Insulation and Energy Efficiency Information: Home Energy: The Magazine of Residential Energy Conservation Addthis Related Articles In existing homes, cellulose (here) or other...

  7. Thermal insulations using vacuum panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Burke, Melissa S.

    1991-07-16

    Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

  8. Making Smart Windows Smarter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Windows Smarter Making Smart Windows Smarter April 5, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis "Smart Windows" seen at light and dark settings. | Photo Courtesy of SAGE Electrochromics, Inc., by Susan Fleck Photography "Smart Windows" seen at light and dark settings. | Photo Courtesy of SAGE Electrochromics, Inc., by Susan Fleck Photography Roland Risser Roland Risser Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Power (Acting) What does this project do? Pleotint, LLC has developed a

  9. Shading, Films and Window Attachments Market Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shading, Films and Window Attachments (SFWA) Market Report, March 13, 2016, from the Consortium for Building Energy Innovation.

  10. Storm Water Permits at LANL.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Storm Water Permit? Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): Veenis, Steven J. Intended for: Public Purpose: This poster was prepared for the May 2011 Individual Permit for Storm Water (IP) public meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to update the public on implementation of the permit as required under Part 1.I (7) of the IP (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit No. NM0030759). The poster will be available on Los Alamos National

  11. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  14. Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Doors, and Skylights ENERGY STAR Learn how to save energy by sealing your home and choosing ENERGY STAR windows, doors, and skylights. Window Selection Tool Efficient Windows...

  15. High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a window air ...

  16. New Window Technology Saves Energy and the View | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Window Technology Saves Energy and the View New Window Technology Saves Energy and the ... Laboratory are developing innovative new window technology that helps improve ...

  17. StormVEx_2009ARM_poster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StormVEx will create a correlative data set equivalent to 200-300 aircraft flights in ... the algorithm results. 2. The data set will be collected in a region of complex ter- rain. ...

  18. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  19. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  20. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  1. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anatasia; Baker, Richard; Prahl, Duncan

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  2. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, A.; Baker, R.; Prahl, D.

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  3. Rigid thin windows for vacuum applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Glenn Allyn; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Myers, Booth Richard; Chen, Hao-Lin; Wakalopulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A thin window that stands off atmospheric pressure is fabricated using photolithographic and wet chemical etching techniques and comprises at least two layers: an etch stop layer and a protective barrier layer. The window structure also comprises a series of support ribs running the width of the window. The windows are typically made of boron-doped silicon and silicon nitride and are useful in instruments such as electron beam guns and x-ray detectors. In an electron beam gun, the window does not impede the electrons and has demonstrated outstanding gun performance and survivability during the gun tube manufacturing process.

  4. Purged window apparatus utilizing heated purge gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballard, Evan O.

    1984-01-01

    A purged window apparatus utilizing tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows, and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube. Use of this apparatus prevents backstreaming of gases under investigation which are flowing past the mouth of the mounting tube which would otherwise deposit on the windows. Lengthy spectroscopic investigations and analyses can thereby be performed without the necessity of interrupting the procedures in order to clean or replace contaminated windows.

  5. 'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra 'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra September 14, 2011 - 6:14am Addthis Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Former Deputy Secretary of Energy Editorial Note: This article also appears in USA Today. The International Energy Agency projects that solar power will grow steadily, producing nearly a quarter of the world's electricity within four decades. Conservatively, that means more than $3 trillion worth of solar panels will need to be manufactured - a vast economic and

  6. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  7. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of ...

  8. Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The interior bulk of a topological insulator is an insulator, but electrons (grey spheres) move swiftly on the surface as if through a metal. They are spin polarized,...

  9. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Uribe, Francisco A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  10. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  11. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  12. Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems

  13. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result inmore » flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less

  14. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  15. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  16. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  17. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  18. Advances in window technology: 1973-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arasteh, D.

    1994-12-31

    Until the 1970s, the thermal performance of windows and other fenestration technologies was rarely of interest to manufacturers, designers, and scientists. Since then, however, a significant research and industry effort has focused on better understanding window thermal and optical behavior, how windows influence building energy patterns, and on the development of advanced products. This chapter explains how fenestration technologies can make a positive impact on building energy flows, what physical phenomena govern window heat and light transfer, what new products have been developed, and what new products are currently the subject of international research efforts. 44 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Energy Efficient Window Treatments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... They offer several advantages: Weather protection Added security No use of interior space No thermal shock to windows if left closed. Exterior shutters must be integrated into your ...

  20. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fraction of incoming solar radiation through a window, reflective coatings reduce the transmission of solar radiation, and spectrally selective coatings filter out 40% to 70%...

  1. Window Daylighting Demo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems High Performance Window Attachments Figure 1: Measurement of performance of ceiling ...

  2. Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: A Window into Electromechanical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Behavior at the Nanoscale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: A Window into Electromechanical Behavior at the Nanoscale Authors: Bonnell, ...

  3. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  4. Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The guides are available in the Building America Solution Center, an online resource of home construction how-to's. Search for "retrofit windows" and filter for "Guides" under ...

  5. Transparency: it's not just for windows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparency: it's not just for windows Los Alamos National Laboratory's database of environmental monitoring data is now directly viewable by the public. March 20, 2012...

  6. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  7. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... These pellets can be poured into place or mixed with cement to create a lightweight, less heat-conductive concrete. Urea-Formaldehyde Foam Insulation Material Urea-formaldehyde ...

  8. Measure Guideline. Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and to be a practical resource for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  9. Storm water modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veis, Christopher

    1996-05-01

    Storm water modeling is important to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for compliance with regulations that govern water discharge at large industrial facilities. Modeling is also done to study trend in contaminants and storm sewer infrastructure. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was used to simulate rainfall events at LLNL. SWMM is a comprehensive computer model for simulation of urban runoff quantity and quality in storm and combined sewer systems. Due to time constraints and ongoing research, no modeling was completed at LLNL. With proper information about the storm sewers, a SWMM simulation of a rainfall event on site would be beneficial to storm sewer analyst.

  10. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.