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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department@triad.rr.com Radiation Fields and Sources ................................................ . Radiation Field Variables........................................................... .. Direction and Solid Angle Conventions ......................................... .. Radiation Fluence

Shultis, J. Kenneth

7

Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY J. Kenneth Shultis and Richard E. Faw* Abstract Physics Society INTRODUCTION THIS IS a review of the technology of shielding against the effects to the review. The first treats the evolution of radiation-shielding technology from the beginning of the 20th

Shultis, J. Kenneth

8

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M. (Greenbelt, MD); Krill, Stephen J. (Arlington, VA); Murray, Alexander P. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives.

Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radiation Shielding for Electronic Devices OperatingRadiation Shielding for Electronic Devices Operating in XFEL Environment: Monte Carlo Simulations andin XFEL Environment: Monte Carlo Simulations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Shielding for Electronic Devices OperatingRadiation Shielding for Electronic Devices undergroundund tunnel. All LLRF Electronic Devices, made of radiation sensitivetunnel. All LLRF Electronic principle of the dedicated radiationtion shielding for the electronic devices to be operating in XFEL

14

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections. 10 figs.

Cookson, A.H.; Dale, S.J.; Bolin, P.C.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

Ingersoll, D.T. (comp.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Ingersoll, J.K. (comp.) (Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields.

D. Y Stewart; P. F. Harrison; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprising many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

Kotora, Jr., James (LaGrange Park, IL); Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprises many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

Kotora, J. Jr.; Groh, E.F.; Kann, W.J.; Burelbach, J.P.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield research and development, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield R and D, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

Schreiber, Roger B. (Penn Twp., PA); Fero, Arnold H. (New Kensington, PA); Sejvar, James (Murrysville, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

25

Polyethylene as a Radiation Shielding Standard in Simulated Cosmic-Ray Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation ofnucleon Iron-56 in Polyethylene. II. , Comparisons betweenPolyethylene as a Radiation Shielding Standard in Simulated

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

27

Early Test Facilities and Analytic Methods for Radiation Shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting held in Chicago, Illinois on November 15 20,1992. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction, which occurred, not coincidentally, in Chicago. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting.

Ingersoll, D.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the ZonalGEF Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the Zonal­GEF Method Walter to analyze radiative heat transfer in high porosity insulation materials which have a large scattering for LI900, a material used in the insulation tile for the space shuttle. Comparisons are presented

Yuen, Walter W.

31

Radiation shielding of high-energy neutrons in SAD P. Seltborg1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation shielding of high-energy neutrons in SAD P. Seltborg1 , A. Polanski2 , S. Petrochenkov2 101 000, PB78, Moscow, Russia Abstract The radiation fields and the effective dose at the SubSv/h. This value meets the dose limits according to Russian radiation protection regulations, provided that access

32

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, Hugh L. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Guide to verification and validation of the SCALE-4 radiation shielding software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whenever a decision is made to newly install the SCALE radiation shielding software on a computer system, the user should run a set of verification and validation (V&V) test cases to demonstrate that the software is properly installed and functioning correctly. This report is intended to serve as a guide for this V&V in that it specifies test cases to run and gives expected results. The report describes the V&V that has been performed for the radiation shielding software in a version of SCALE-4. This report provides documentation of sample problems which are recommended for use in the V&V of the SCALE-4 system for all releases. The results reported in this document are from the SCALE-4.2P version which was run on an IBM RS/6000 work-station. These results verify that the SCALE-4 radiation shielding software has been correctly installed and is functioning properly. A set of problems for use by other shielding codes (e.g., MCNP, TWOTRAN, MORSE) performing similar V&V are discussed. A validation has been performed for XSDRNPM and MORSE-SGC6 utilizing SASI and SAS4 shielding sequences and the SCALE 27-18 group (27N-18COUPLE) cross-section library for typical nuclear reactor spent fuel sources and a variety of transport package geometries. The experimental models used for the validation were taken from two previous applications of the SASI and SAS4 methods.

Broadhead, B.L.; Emmett, M.B.; Tang, J.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optimized optomechanical crystal cavity with acoustic radiation shield Jasper Chan, Amir H. Safavi-Naeini, Jeff T. Hill, Sen Meenehan, and Oskar Painter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimized optomechanical crystal cavity with acoustic radiation shield Jasper Chan, Amir H. Safavi://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Optimized optomechanical crystal cavity with acoustic radiation shield Jasper Chan, Amir H. Safavi

Painter, Oskar

35

Subcutaneous and cutaneous melanins in Rhabdomys: complementary ultraviolet radiation shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the pigmented tissue layer covering the skull of Rhabdomys pumilio and test the hypotheses that it is melanin and that it functions in absorption of ultraviolet solar radiation. The parietals were covered by a dark tissue layer...

Timm, Robert M.; Kermott, L. Henry

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

APS Radiation Safety Shielding Committee for Design Reviews  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Name Role P. Fernandez AES - Chair L. Emery ASD D. Haeffner PSC C. Kurtz XSD B. Micklich PHY M. Ramanathan PSC J. Vacca ESQ 3. Method The Committee will: Evaluate the radiation...

37

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Conduction Effect of Thermal Radiation in a Metal Shield Pipe in a Cryostat for a Cryogenic Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large heat load caused by thermal radiation through a metal shield pipe was observed in a cooling test of a cryostat for a prototype of a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector. The heat load was approximately 1000 times larger than the value calculated by the Stefan-Boltzmann law. We studied this phenomenon by simulation and experiment and found that it was caused by the conduction of thermal radiation in a metal shield pipe.

Takayuki Tomaru; Masao Tokunari; Kazuaki Kuroda; Takashi Uchiyama; Akira Okutomi; Masatake Ohashi; Hiroyuki Kirihara; Nobuhiro Kimura; Yoshio Saito; Nobuaki Sato; Takakazu Shintomi; Toshikazu Suzuki; Tomiyoshi Haruyama; Shinji Miyoki; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Akira Yamamoto

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

MicroShield analysis to calculate external radiation dose rates for several spent fuel casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this MicroShield analysis is to calculate the external radiation, primarily gamma, dose rate for spent fuel casks. The reason for making this calculation is that currently all analyses of transportation risk assume that this external dose rate is the maximum allowed by regulation, 10 mrem/hr at 2 m from the casks, and the risks of incident-free transportation are thus always overestimated to an unknown extent. In order to do this, the program by Grove Software, MicroShield 7.01, was used to model three Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved casks: HI-STAR 100, GA-4, and NAC-STC, loaded with specific source material. Dimensions were obtained from NUREG/CR-6672 and the Certificates of Compliance for each respective cask. Detectors were placed at the axial point at 1 m and 2 m from the outer gamma shielding of the casks. In the April 8, 2004 publication of the Federal Register, a notice of intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1) was published by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in order to consider design, construction, operation, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the Yucca Mountain repository [1]. These more accurate estimates of the external dose rates could be used in order to provide a more risk-informed analysis. (authors)

Marincel, M.K. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Weiner, R.F.; Osborn, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Design of the radiation shielding for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiation shielding has been designed to reduce scattered neutrons and background gamma-rays for the new double-ring Time Of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics (TOFED). The shielding was designed based on simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Dedicated model of the EAST tokamak has been developed together with the emission neutron source profile and spectrum; the latter were simulated with the Nubeam and GENESIS codes. Significant reduction of background radiation at the detector can be achieved and this satisfies the requirement of TOFED. The intensities of the scattered and direct neutrons in the line of sight of the TOFED neutron spectrometer at EAST are studied for future data interpretation.

Du, T. F.; Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Xie, X. F.; Ge, L. J.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S., E-mail: tsfan@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics, State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Gorini, G.; Nocente, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisicadel Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisicadel Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei (China)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermocouple shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Clearance for Radiation Shielding Procedure: 7.90 Created: 11/5/2013 Version: 1.0 Revised  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual radioactive contamination. B. Applicability/scope This policy applies to all facilities whose and pigs D. Procedures 1. Shielding used in a radiation work station may be contaminated with radioactive is considered to be free of contamination, and can be disposed of without regards to radioactive contamination

Jia, Songtao

43

An Evaluation of Shadow Shielding for Lunar System Waste Heat Rejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

force the radiator to expand in size and mass to compensate. On the Moon, there are three types: surface infrared, solar insulation, and albedo. This thesis tests shadow shielding geometry and its effect on the radiator and nuclear reactor in a reactor...

Worn, Cheyn

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Computer Simulations of Radiation Shielding Materials for Use in the Space Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their time spent in reading about this research and attending the defense. #12;iv Table of Contents Section by the general population has continued to fuel the design of other manned projects such as the Space Shuttle associated with manned space flight. Among these, radiation damage is a very major concern (1). The space

Shepherd, Simon

45

Proceedings of the ninth IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several IEA workshops have been held over the past few years to discuss the growing number of experimental studies on the intriguing phenomenon of radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED). In the past year, several new RIED irradiation experiments have been performed which have a significant impact on the understanding of the RIED phenomenon. These experiments include a HFIR neutron irradiation experiment on 12 different grades of single- and poly-crystal alumina (450 C, {approximately}3 dpa, 200 V/mm) and several additional neutron, electron and light ion irradiation experiments. The primary objective of the IEA workshop was to review the available RIED studies on ceramic insulators. Some discussion of recent work in other areas such as loss tangent measurements, mechanical strength, etc. occurred on the final afternoon of the workshop. The IEA workshop was held in conjunction with a US-Japan JUPITER program experimenter`s workshop on dynamic radiation effects in ceramic insulators.

Zinkle, S.J.; Burn, G.L. [comps.; Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Design and construction of a radiation resistant quadrupole using metal oxide insulated CICC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of a engineering test model of a radiation resistant quadrupole is described. The cold-iron quadrupole uses coils fabricated from metal-oixide (synthetic spinel) insulated Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC). The superconductor is NbTi in a copper matrix. The quadrupole is designed to produce a pole-tip field of 2 T with an operating current of 7,000 A.

Albert F. Zeller

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Characterization of the Radiation Shielding Properties of US andRussian EVA Suits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported herein are results from the Eril Research, Inc.(ERI) participationin the NASA Johnson Space Center sponsored studycharacterizing the radiation shielding properties of the two types ofspace suit that astronauts are wearing during the EVA on-orbit assemblyof the International Space Station (ISS). Measurements using passivedetectors were carried out to assess the shielding properties of the USEMU Suit and the Russian Orlan-M suit during irradiations of the suitsand a tissue equivalent phantom to monoenergetic proton and electronbeams at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Duringirradiations of 6 MeV electrons and 60 MeV protons, absorbed dose as afunction of depth was measured using TLDs exposed behind swatches of thetwo suit materials and inside the two EVA helmets. Considerable reductionin electron dosewas measured behind all suit materials in exposures to 6MeV electrons. Slowing of the proton beam in the suit materials led to anincrease in dose measured in exposures to 60 MeV protons. During 232 MeVproton irradiations, measurements were made with TLDs and CR-39 PNTDs atfive organ locations inside a tissue equivalent phantom, exposed bothwith and without the two EVA suits. The EVA helmets produce a 13 to 27percent reduction in total dose and a 0 to 25 percent reduction in doseequivalent when compared to measurements made in the phantom head alone.Differences in dose and dose equivalent between the suit and non-suitirradiations forthe lower portions of the two EVA suits tended to besmaller. Proton-induced target fragmentation was found to be asignificant source of increased dose equivalent, especially within thetwo EVA helmets, and average quality factor inside the EMU and Orlan-Mhelmets was 2 to 14 percent greater than that measured in the barephantom head.

Benton, E.R.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

The susceptibility of silicon-ion implanted gate insulators to x-ray radiation-induced defect generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the x-ray susceptibility of silicon-ion implanted gate insulators of insulated gate-field effect transistors (IGFETs). It is found that silicon-ion implanted gate insulators appear to be much more susceptible to x-ray radiation induced defect generation than unimplanted devices. The residual defect density in silicon-implanted devices, following x-ray radiation, and subsequent postmetal annealing for up to 60 min is found to be greater than that in unimplanted devices. The results with silicon ions indicate that if the insulator is damaged by such a species during processing, as might occur due to knock-on from the gate electrode during source/drain formation, unannealable defects will form which would also tend to make the device structure more susceptible to radiation damage in a hostile environment, or to large hot- electron drift in conventional use.

Reisman, A.; Sune, C.T.; Williams, C.K. (MCNC, Research Triangle Park, NC (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Calculation of shielding door thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities using the ITS Monte Carlo program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shielding calculations for door thicknesses for megavoltage radiotherapy facilities with mazes are generally straightforward. To simplify the calculations, the standard formalism adopts several approximations relating to the average beam path, scattering coefficients, and the mean energy of the spectrum of scattered radiation. To test the accuracy of these calculations, the Monte Carlo program, ITS, was applied to this problem by determining the dose and energy spectrum of the radiation at the door for 4- and 10-MV bremsstrahlung beams incident on a phantom at isocenter. This was performed for mazes, one termed 'standard' and the other a shorter maze where the primary beam is incident on the wall adjacent to the door. The peak of the photon-energy spectrum at the door was found to be the same for both types of maze, independent of primary beam energy, and also, in the case of the conventional maze, of the primary beam orientation. The spectrum was harder for the short maze and for 10 MV vs. 4 MV. The thickness of the lead door for a short maze configuration was 1.5 cm for 10 MV and 1.2 cm for 4 MV vs. approximately less than 1 mm for a conventional maze. For the conventional maze, the Monte Carlo calculation predicts the dose at the door to be lower than given by NCRP 49 and NCRP 51 by about a factor of 2 at 4 MV but to be the same at 10 MV. For the short maze, the Monte Carlo predicts the dose to be a factor of 3 lower for 4 MV and about a factor of 1.5 lower for 10 MV. Experimental results support the Monte Carlo findings for the short maze.

Biggs, P.J. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED MELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT DENSITY A Thesis by ROBIN KENT DEVORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED WELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The use of coated micropowders to reduce radiation heat transfer in foam insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyurethane foam is the most effective insulation currently available for buildings. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blowing agents, which have low thermal conductivities, contribute highly to the effectiveness of this insulation. ...

Marge, Arlene Lanciani

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Radiation-damage phenomena in insulated-gate field-effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study reports on investigation of the electrical influences of ionizing radiation on the characteristics of Insulated Gate Field Effect Transistors. It includes two major parts, i.e., (A) The electrical effects of device characteristics of the defect generated by silicon or oxygen ion implantation has been examined in detail. Surprisingly, large quantities of neutral electron traps (NET) are generated, and only small quantities of fixed positive charge (FPC) is observed. These studies also raise the issue of the correlation between E{sub {gamma}}{prime} centers and FPC. A similar correlation can be made between E{sub {gamma}}{prime} centers and NET since processes that annihilate FPC tend to create fixed negative charge (FNC) from NET, and processes that would tend to generate FPC would tend to create NET from FNC. It was found that silicon or oxygen implanted gate insulators are more susceptible to X-ray radiation than unimplanted devices and that insulator damage due to silicon or oxygen ion implantation is essentially unannealable. (B) A new electron trapping model has been proposed to model experimental data better than is accomplished by existing first-order trapping kinetic approaches. This model includes a continuous decrease of the trapping cross section, {sigma}{sub 0}, as a function of the number of filled traps, N{sub D}. The dependency of {sigma}{sub 0} is believed to be related physically to the annihilation, or buildup of coulombic charge, which repulsive effect has heretofore been neglected in first-order trapping kinetics that describe the entire defect concentration range. It was found that an injection current density dependency of electron trapping at constant total injected charge occurs only when NETs are being filled.

Sune, Chingtzong.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes one approach to the design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation. In this design, the vacuum insulation consists of a permanently sealed, thin sheet steel, evacuated envelope of whatever geometry is required for the application. The steel envelope is supported internally against the atmospheric pressure loads by an array of discrete, low-conductance, ceramic supports, and radiative heat transfer is blocked by layers of thin metal radiation shields. Thermal conductance through this insulation is controlled electronically by changing the temperature of a small metal hydride connected to the vacuum envelope. The hydride reversibly absorbs/desorbs hydrogen to produce a hydrogen pressure typically within the range from less than 10{sup {minus}6} to as much as 1 torr. Design calculations are compared with results from laboratory tests of bench scale samples, and some possible automotive applications for this variable-conductance vacuum insulation are suggested.

Benson, D K; Potter, T F; Tracy, C E

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Micha? [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

Bich, George J. (Penn Hills, PA); Gupta, Tapan K. (Monroeville, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

New dose-mortality data based on 3-D radiation shielding calculation for concrete buildings at Nagasaki  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of radiation doses received during the World War II attack on Nagasaki provides an important source of biochemical information. More than 40 years after the war, it has been possible to make a satisfactory calculation of the doses to personnel inside reinforced concrete buildings by use of a 3-dimensional discrete ordinates code, TORT. The results were used to deduce a new value of the LD50 parameter that is in good agreement with traditional values. The new discrete ordinates software appears to have potential application to conventional radiation transport calculations as well. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.; Ingersoll, D.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Penetration seals for TFTR shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The penetrations of the shielding provided for TFTR are required to be sealed to avoid radiation streaming. This report provides a discussion of the properties required for these penetration seals. Several alternate designs are discussed and evaluated and designs recommended for specific applications.

Hondorp, H.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Magnetic shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

62

Radio-transparent multi-layer insulation for radiowave receivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of radiowave detection, enlarging the receiver aperture to enhance the amount of light detected is essential for greater scientific achievements. One challenge in using radio transmittable apertures is keeping the detectors cool. This is because transparency to thermal radiation above the radio frequency range increases the thermal load. In shielding from thermal radiation, a general strategy is to install thermal filters in the light path between aperture and detectors. However, there is difficulty in fabricating metal mesh filters of large diameters. It is also difficult to maintain large diameter absorptive-type filters in cold because of their limited thermal conductance. A technology that maintains cold conditions while allowing larger apertures has been long-awaited. We propose radio-transparent multi-layer insulation (RT-MLI) composed from a set of stacked insulating layers. The insulator is transparent to radio frequencies, but not transparent to infrared radiation. The basic idea for cooling is similar to conventional multi-layer insulation. It leads to a reduction in thermal radiation while maintaining a uniform surface temperature. The advantage of this technique over other filter types is that no thermal links are required. As insulator material, we used foamed polystyrene; its low index of refraction makes an anti-reflection coating unnecessary. We measured the basic performance of RT-MLI to confirm that thermal loads are lowered with more layers. We also confirmed that our RT-MLI has high transmittance to radiowaves, but blocks infrared radiation. For example, RT-MLI with 12 layers has a transmittance greater than 95% (lower than 1%) below 200 GHz (above 4 THz). We demonstrated its effects in a system with absorptive-type filters, where aperture diameters were 200 mm. Low temperatures were successfully maintained for the filters. We conclude that this technology significantly enhances the cooling of radiowave receivers, and is particularly suitable for large-aperture systems. This technology is expected to be applicable to various fields, including radio astronomy, geo-environmental assessment, and radar systems.

Choi, J. [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ishitsuka, H. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)] [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Mima, S. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oguri, S., E-mail: shugo@post.kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Tajima, O. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan) [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Gas filled panel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Superconducting Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered...

65

Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa{sup n}. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Concrete Shield Performance of the VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Cask was surveyed for degradation of the concrete shield by radiation measurement, temperature measurement, and ultrasonic testing. No general loss of shielding function was identified.

Koji Shirai

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and mitigate the risks in LiH development for a project with an aggressive schedule like JIMO, some background or advanced development effort for LiH should be considered for future space reactor projects.

R. Lewis

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gamma ray detector shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Shielding design for the proposed Advanced Photon Source at Argonne  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk shielding was designed for the proposed Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The shielding is for two linacs, the positron converter, booster synchrotron, and the storage ring. Shielding design limits exposure to 20 mrem/wk for occupational and 25 mrem/y for an individual member of the public from the radiation products, which include high energy neutrons (HEN), giant resonance neutrons (GRN), and Bremsstrahlung radiation (BR). The beam loss parameters at various components were estimated. Dose rates were computed for continuous loss during beam decay using an empirical method. Normal operational losses and certain accidental beam losses were also considered.

Moe, H.J.; Veluri, V.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Adhesive particle shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel John (Albuquerque, NM); Walton, Christopher (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James (Livermore, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

SHIELD certification package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certification as applied to existing computer codes includes the verification and validation process, placing the code in configuration control, establishing user qualification standards and training requirements. All software intended for use in critical calculations must be certified. This report is intended to fulfill the requirements for the certification of the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system built February, 1992, by W.S. Parks. These modules are used for burnup, cooling, separate, and edit calculations.

Boman, C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Correction factors for the sun shield used with the Eppley pyranometer for the measurement of sky radiation under clear and partly cloudy skies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

times. This process is termed multiple scattering. In a qualitative sense, however, Ray- leigh's theory leads us to the conclusion that sky radiation is anisotropic and that its maximum intensity should be concentrated in the vicinity of the solar... of solar radiation are discussed. The method in which a metal. band is utilized to screen the direct rays of Sun from the pyrano- metric sensor is examined in detail. Based on the assumption that the distribution of skI ~adiation is isotropic...

Albro, William Arthur

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Topological insulators/Isolants topologiques An introduction to topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators/Isolants topologiques An introduction to topological insulators Introduction topology, the insulator is called a topological insulator. We introduce this notion of topological order sont finalement discutées. Keywords: topological insulator, topological band theory, quantum anomalous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation developed within the Eu electrical insulation candidates · EuCARD insulators certification conditions · Post irradiation tests and neutrino factories will be subjected to very high radiation doses. · The electrical insulation employed

McDonald, Kirk

75

Insulation spacer eliminates electric shorts between lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design criteria incorporated into the pipeline insulating spacer were: spacer material selected must have a very large compressive and tensile strength in order to withstand the weight and stress resulting on the pipelines; provide the necessary abrasive resistance, dielectric strength, and will not decay underground; must not soften with heat when used around or near stream lines or will not cold flow under pressure; minimum length and circumference to reduce ''Shielding Effects'' from any cathodic protection system; and provide a material that incorporates a maximum strength at a minimum thickness. Explains that electric shorts are caused by 2 or more metallic structures in contact with each other. Notes that the insulating spacer's use has been expanded to provide electrical and physical insulation between carrier pipe and casing, supports for piping in compressing stations, and for pipelines that are suspended on bridges.

Colaizzi, J.F.; Rockafellow, G.B.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction AEnhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction byTopological Insulator

Yu, Xinxin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

Alger, T.W.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Calcium silicate insulation structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Lightweight blast shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

Mixon, Larry C. (Madison, AL); Snyder, George W. (Huntsville, AL); Hill, Scott D. (Toney, AL); Johnson, Gregory L. (Decatur, AL); Wlodarski, J. Frank (Huntsville, AL); von Spakovsky, Alexis P. (Huntsville, AL); Emerson, John D. (Arab, AL); Cole, James M. (Huntsville, AL); Tipton, John P. (Huntsville, AL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SUPERCONDUCTING SHIELDING By W. O. HAMILTON,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41. SUPERCONDUCTING SHIELDING By W. O. HAMILTON, Stanford University, Department of Physics, Stanford, California (U.S.A.). Abstract. 2014 Superconducting shields offer the possibility of obtaining shielding from external time varying fields. Various techniques of superconducting shielding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

Muckenthaler, F.J.

1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Membranes Improve Insulation Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No Clear White Alum Temp Mem Mem Mem Foil FIGURE 7 Temperature Inside Room and Temperature Next to Top of Sheetrock Under Various insulation Configurations. It should be noted that after this test was completed, the fiber insulation was inspected...

Bullock, C. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Insulating polymer concrete  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

Schorr, H. Peter (Douglaston, NY); Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Topological Insulators & Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological Insulators & Superconductors New Frontiers in Low-Dimensional Systems Program 3-5 November 2010 Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407 Topological Insulators and Superconductors have quickly Insulators and Superconductors will gather the world- leading researchers in this field to present recent

88

Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radiation Health Physics 2011-2012 School Year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Discrimination (3): RHP 415 2 Nuclear Rulels & Reg RHP 435 4 Shielding & Ext Dosimetry RHP 481 4 Radiation

Tullos, Desiree

90

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, A.H.

1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made, further refinements of this analysis are needed as the project parameters change. The designs of the drip shield, the Emplacement Drift, and the other drip shield emplacement equipment all have a direct effect on the overall design feasibility.

Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Simple Holographic Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple holographic model of an insulator. Unlike most previous holographic insulators, the zero temperature infrared geometry is completely nonsingular. Both the low temperature DC conductivity and the optical conductivity at zero temperature satisfy power laws with the same exponent, given by the scaling dimension of an operator in the IR. Changing a parameter in the model converts it from an insulator to a conductor with a standard Drude peak.

Eric Mefford; Gary T. Horowitz

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler, Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A. (Livermore, CA)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler, Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Portable convertible blast effects shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Hollaway, Rocky (Modesto, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Deteresa, Steve (Livermore, CA); Grundler, Walter (Hayward, CA); Hagler,; Lisle B. (Berkeley, CA); Kokko, Edwin (Dublin, CA); Switzer, Vernon A (Livermore, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Welding shield for coupling heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pipe Insulation Economies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram written in IBM basic to simplify the economic insulation thickness for an insulated pipe. Many... ECONOMIES" 30 LOCATE 10,29:PRINT"ROBERT E. SCHILLING,P.E." 40 LOCATE l2,3l:PRINT"EATON CORPORATION" 50 LOCATE l3,26:PRINT"119 Q SOUTH CHILLICOTHE ROAD" 598 ESL-IE-86-06-97 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

Schilling, R. E.

99

Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

Dye, S.; Kopelove, A. [Quest Thermal Group, 6452 Fig Street Suite A, Arvada, CO 80004 (United States); Mills, G. L. [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp, 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Radation shielding pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation pellets having an outer shell, preferably, of Mo, W or depleted U nd an inner filling of lithium hydride wherein the outer shell material has a greater melting point than does the inner filling material.

Coomes, Edmund P. (Richland, WA); Luksic, Andrzej T. (Pasco, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dose measurements behind reduced shielding at the Texas A&M University variable energy cyclotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the reduced shielding by measuring neutron and gamma ray dose rates. A listing of currently available beams that are included in the study is given in Table 1. The purpose of this study is to provide information that can be used to limit radiation... conducted into accelerator shielding. It is known that a shield which is adequate to attenuate the high energy neutron component of the incident radiation will be more than enough to contain the charged particle and gamma ray com- ponents (NCRP77...

Kay, Douglas Carey

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Electrochemical patterning of the surface of insulators with electrically conductive polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The great potential of {pi}-conjugated polymers, especially polyacetylene, polyarylenes, and poly(arylenevinylene)s, as components in optical displays, sensors, rechargeable batteries, electromagnetic interference shielding, and microelectronics is well recognized. This paper presents a protocol for patterning the surface of insulators with electrically conductive polymers. The pattern is formed on a gold electrode surface via electro-oxidation of heteroarene monomers. An adhesion layer is used to bond the surface of the conducting polymer pattern to the surface of an insulator. The pattern is then developed by etching away the gold. The approach is illustrated with polypyrrole and is applicable to a wide range of substituted polyheteroarenes and insulating substrates.

Zheng, X.Y.; Ding, Y.; Bottomley, L.A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding ATLAS SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding 1 ATLAS SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note November 22 mostly connects existing mechanical electrical conductive #12; Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding 2 that equivalent. The barrel outer heat shield (150 aluminum) main element shield. #12; Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding

California at Santa Cruz, University of

106

Cooper-Pair Injection into Topological Insulators and Helical Wires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological Insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .phenomena : Topological Insulators and Superconductors. ”Colloquium : Topological insulators. ” Rev. Mod. Phys. , 82:

Sato, Koji

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Insulation fact sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

AXIAL SOURCE PROFILE EFFECT ON WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER SHIELDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scoping calculation is to support preliminary design of the Waste Package (WP) transporter radiation shield configuration. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is highly radioactive and site personnel must be protected during the period that the WPs are emplaced. Personnel protection is accomplished via a heavily shielded WP transporter that moves the waste from the surface to the emplacement drift. All previous WP transporter shielding calculations have assumed a Design Basis Fuel (DBF) in which the fuel burnup is uniform (e.g. Ref. 7.3, Ref. 7.4, and Ref. 7.12). In reality, SNF burnup varies significantly from one end of the fuel assembly to the other. Since source strengths are dependent upon fuel burnup, a model which varies the fuel burnup along the assembly axis will produce a more accurate depiction of the radiation field surrounding the WP transporter. The objective of this calculation is to determine the need for using the actual axial profile, as opposed to the uniform burnup assumption, in the WP transporter shield design. The scope of the calculation is as follows: (1) Determine the impact of axial source term variation on WP transporter contact dose rates. (2) Determine appropriate shielding modifications to account for expected dose rate peaking effects. Consistent with the previous subsurface shielding analyses, this calculation considers the bounding 21 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP only. The calculation will need to be revised and extended to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) SNF upon selection of the WP design for the License Application (LA) and availability of the source terms from the WP Operations Group.

A. Nielsen

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using sandwiched discs for intermittent flexing joints  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by the use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements are formed by sandwiching together, by fusing, a pair of thin hollow discs which are fixedly secured to both the main conductor sections and the conductor hub section. 4 figs.

Kommineni, P.R.

1983-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

James Valles

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Insulator for laser housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

Duncan, D.B.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Insulator for laser housing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Electoral Competition, Political Uncertainty and Policy Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty and Policy Insulation Horn, Murray. 1995. TheUncertainty and Policy Insulation United States Congress.UNCERTAINTY AND POLICY INSULATION Rui J. P. de Figueiredo,

de Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a framed basement wall with insulation...

116

Shielding vacuum fluctuations with graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir-Polder interaction of ground-state and excited atoms with graphene is investigated with the aim to establish whether graphene systems can be used as a shield for vacuum fluctuations of an underlying substrate. We calculate the zero-temperature Casimir-Polder potential from the reflection coefficients of graphene within the framework of the Dirac model. For both doped and undoped graphene we show limits at which graphene could be used effectively as a shield. Additional results are given for AB-stacked bilayer graphene.

Sofia Ribeiro; Stefan Scheel

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Attenuation of high-energy x rays by iron shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo calculations are presented on electron-accelerator x-ray spectra for actual target thicknesses and electron energies of 4-50 MeV. Effective attenuation coefficients have been obtained as well as build-up factors for collimated beams andiron shielding of thickness form 1 to 80 cm. The radiation contrast has been determined as a function of thickness for this energy range.

Bespalov, V.I.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Shielding and grounding in large detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

Radeka, V.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Notes on topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a survey of the $\\mathbb{Z}/\\mathbb{Z}_2$-valued invariants of topological insulators in condensed matter physics. The $\\mathbb{Z}$-valued topological invariant was originally called the TKNN invariant in physics, which has been fully understood as the first Chern number. The $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ invariant is more mysterious, we will devote our efforts to reviewing its equivalent descriptions from different point of views. We emphasize that both invariants are realizations of the Atiyah--Singer index theorem in condensed matter physics. The topological K-theory also plays an important role in the classification of topological insulators with different symmetries.

Dan Li; Ralph M. Kaufmann; Birgit Wehefritz-Kaufmann

2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

Topological Mott Insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider extended Hubbard models with repulsive interactions on a honeycomb lattice, and the transitions from the semimetal to Mott insulating phases at half-filling. Because of the frustrated nature of the second-neighbor interactions, topological Mott phases displaying the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects are found for spinless and spin fermion models, respectively. The mean-field phase diagram is presented and the fluctuations are treated within the random phase approximation. Renormalization group analysis shows that these states can be favored over the topologically trivial Mott insulating states.

Raghu, S.

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

The use of isotopically tailored boron for advanced neutron shielding and moderating applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cm. The incident neutron flux was measured first without any shielding slab between the source and the detector. The first slab of shielding material was then placed nearest to the source and the transmitted intensity was measured by the detector... effects of nuclear radiation. This analysis examined the use of isotopically tailored boron for the purpose of moderating, reflecting and shielding neutrons. The source of neutrons in this study varied in energy from 0. 2 keV to 14 MeV. The material...

Deere, Laura Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Biological Diversity of the Guiana Shield: Georeferencing Plants of the Guiana Shield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Suriname, maximum elevation 500 m] #12;Georeferencing Plants of the Guiana Shield Google Earth allows

Mathis, Wayne N.

126

Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resinous body is placed in gas-insulated electrical apparatus to remove particulate material from the insulating gas.

Adcock, J.L.; Pace, M.O.; Christophorou, L.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the slowing of the jet flow due to turbulent mixing and entrainment of particles from the surrounding medium. The empirical formulations and velocity profiles derived for the respective regions of the jet consider this increase in entrained fluid... velocity profiles are integrated over their respective cross sections of the shielding jet to determine the total volumetric flowrate at the specified locations. A slug flow velocity approximation is then determined for each of the desired downstream...

Gilbride, Jennifer Frances

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

Physics World Archive Topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics World Archive Topological insulators Charles Kane, Joel Moore From Physics World February, how- ever, now uncovered a new electronic phase called a topological insulator. Putting the name; this "spin current" is a milestone in the realization of practical "spintronics". Topological insulators have

Johannesson, Henrik

130

Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons Desheng Kong, Jason C. Randel,,| Hailin Peng,, Judy material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface

Cui, Yi

131

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Holographic fractional topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low-energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

Hoyos, Carlos; Jensen, Kristan; Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

RSMASS-D: Reactor and shield mass minimization models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid metal cooled reactors (LMR's), in-core thermionic reactors (TI's) and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTR's). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the RSMASS model (Marshall 1986). The models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage and thermal limitations are accounted for in the computations. Thermionic requirements are also accounted for in the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated as well as instrumentation and control (I C), boom and safety system mass. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from detailed calculations within 16 percent for all three models.

Marshall, A.C. (Department 0410 Sandia National Laboratories (USA) NE-52 The Department of Energy, Germantown Building, Washington, D.C. 20545 (USA)); Gallup, D.R. (Division 6472 Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Light shield for solar concentrators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using protection tube in conductor plug-in joint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. A plug and socket arrangement is utilized for joining adjacent sections of the inner conductor, and a protection tube is utilized inside the hollow plug to maintain proper alignment of the joint when the transmission line is bent. 3 figs.

Kommineni, P.R.

1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Compact vacuum insulation embodiments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compact vacuum insulation embodiments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

2D Dirac Materials: From Graphene to Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2D Topological Insulators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .structure for a topological insulator. The Dirac cone fallsband structure for topological insulators. With the Fermi

Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improved DC Gun Insulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany); Ritter, Christine [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Shield Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt Ltd Jump to:Shenzhen79. It.Shida BatteryShield

144

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of metal-filled and metal-coated plastics and other modified dielectric materials to replace metals for enclosures has created a need to test these materials for their electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE). Shielding effectiveness involves a variety of electromagnetic environments, and useful data can be obtained from tests that carefully limit the environment to that of a plane wave. Such an environment can be created in a circular or rectangular transmission line. Two such transmission line test fixtures, which hold samples of the material to be tested, have been developed. The fixtures described in this report are the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) coaxial transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell, and a dual TEM cell constructed at ORNL from a design suggested by the NBS. The NBS coaxial fixture is an improved version of the device recommended by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The problems associated with measuring SE are well described in the literature. The two methods described here are the result of years of work to establish procedures and instrumentation that will produce acceptable data.

Googe, J.M.; Hess, R.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal-performance study of liquid metal fast breeder reactor insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three types of metallic thermal insulation were investigated analytically and experimentally: multilayer reflective plates, multilayer honeycomb composite, and multilayer screens. Each type was subjected to evacuated and nonevacuated conditions, where thermal measurements were made to determine thermal-physical characteristics. A variation of the separation distance between adjacent reflective plates of multilayer reflective plates and multilayer screen insulation was also experimentally studied to reveal its significance. One configuration of the multilayer screen insulation was further selected to be examined in sodium and sodium oxide environments. The emissivity of Type 304 stainless steel used in comprising the insulation was measured by employing infrared technology. A comprehensive model was developed to describe the different proposed types of thermal insulation. Various modes of heat transfer inherent in each type of insulation were addressed and their relative importance compared. Provision was also made in the model to allow accurate simulation of possible sodium and sodium oxide contamination of the insulation. The thermal-radiation contribution to heat transfer in the temperature range of interest for LMFBR's was found to be moderate, and the suppression of natural convection within the insulation was vital in preserving its insulating properties. Experimental data were compared with the model and other published results. Moreover, the three proposed test samples were assessed and compared under various conditions as viable LMFBR thermal insulations.

Shiu, Kelvin K.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Superconducting Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium OxideSumin KimSuperconducting Topological Insulators

151

Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara Department of Physics, University to the distinction between normal metals and insulators: the superconducting ``metal'' with delocalized qua- siparticle excitations and the superconducting ``insulator'' with localized quasiparticles. We describe

153

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Compact vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Print Tuesday, 23 April 2013 10:00 Inherently strange crystalline...

157

Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Print Inherently strange crystalline materials called 3D topological insulators (TIs) are all the rage in materials science....

158

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels September 20, 2011 - 7:13am Addthis These structural...

159

Types of Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

-- into insulation systems that can include a variety of backings, such as kraft paper, plastic film, polyethylene bubbles, or cardboard, as well as thermal insulation materials....

160

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A study of form-principles affording shielding from atomic fallout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"). The D.O.D.-O.C.D. program, for the moat part, has placed emphasis on methods of calculating "attenuation", which is a measurement of the reduction of radiation through masses of shielding materials, through distance and other means. The calculations...

Lanford, Samuel Taylor

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two, 111-GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (depleted uranium and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

Keith Rule; Paul Kalb; Pete Kwaschyn

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

PACKAGING AND DISPOSAL OF A RADIUM BERYLLIUM SOURCE USING DEPLETED URANIUM POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITE SHIELDING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two, 111 GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (DU and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

RULE,K.; KALB,P.; KWASCHYN,P.

2003-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Impact of External Heat-shielding Techniques on Shell Surface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

External Heat-shielding Techniques on Shell Surface Temperatures and Dynamic Shell Thermal Deformation of Diesel Engine Emission Control Systems Impact of External Heat-shielding...

166

Density Matrix Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal noise can destroy topological insulators (TI). However we demonstrate how TIs can be made stable in dissipative systems. To that aim, we introduce the notion of band Liouvillian as the dissipative counterpart of band Hamiltonian, and show a method to evaluate the topological order of its steady state. This is based on a generalization of the Chern number valid for general mixed states (referred to as density matrix Chern value), which witnesses topological order in a system coupled to external noise. Additionally, we study its relation with the electrical conductivity at finite temperature, which is not a topological property. Nonetheless, the density matrix Chern value represents the part of the conductivity which is topological due to the presence of quantum mixed edge states at finite temperature. To make our formalism concrete, we apply these concepts to the two-dimensional Haldane model in the presence of thermal dissipation, but our results hold for arbitrary dimensions and density matrices.

A. Rivas; O. Viyuela; M. A. Martin-Delgado

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Multiple layer insulation cover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Study of Active Shielding for {gamma} - Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The features of the ground located gamma ray spectrometer shielded passively with 12 cm of lead and actively by five 0.5m x 0.5m x 0.05m plastic veto shields are described. The detector mass related background was 0.345 C/kg s. The 511 keV annihilation line was reduced by the factor of 7 by the anticoincidence gate. It is shown that the plastic shields increase the neutron capture gamma line intensities due to neutron thermalization.

Bikit, I.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Conkic, Lj.; Krmar, M.; Varga, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID); Manhart, Larry K. (Pingree, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tunable Dirac Fermion Dynamics in Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable Dirac Fermion Dynamics in Topological Insulators Chaoyu Chen1 , Zhuojin Xie1 , Ya Feng1, Beijing 100190, China. Three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by insulating bulk state topological insulators. We have directly revealed signatures of the electron-phonon coupling and found

Wang, Wei Hua

172

STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSULATION STAGE CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSULATION STAGE CHECKLIST CEC-CF-6R-ENV-22 (Revised 05/12) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) - Insulation Stage be insulated in a manner that resists thermal bridging of the assembly separating conditioned from

173

Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly B.V.Gurudatta and Victor G.Corces Abstract Chromatin insulators are DNA^protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components

Corces, Victor G.

174

Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer-matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material with shielding effectiveness 124 dB, low surface impedance interference shielding 1. Introduction Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding is receiv- ing increasing

Chung, Deborah D.L.

175

SHIELDED CONTAINER COMPLETENESS COMMENTS July 13, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the possible dose rate changes at the surface of the package for the intended payloads to be shipped. The same concerns as outlined above apply here. Reference WTS 2008. Shielded Container Type A Evaluation Report, ECO

176

Insulation products promote thermal efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The judicious use of thermal insulation products in non-residential buildings can provide a number of advantages including increased energy efficiency, lower first costs (by avoiding overside HVAC systems), improved fire safety and better acoustics. Thermal insulation products are those products which retard the flow of heat energy. Materials include glass, plastics, and organic materials such as wood fibers, vermiculite and perlite. Forms range from the familiar batts and blankets of glass fibers to foamed plastic, rigid boards, losse fill and systems combining two or more products, such as polystyrene boards covered with insulating plaster. The R values of selected insulation materials with a cost/sq. ft. of each material at R 10 are given. Costs cover both the material and installation and may vary depending on local conditions.

Chalmers, R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Correlation effects on topological insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The strong correlation effects on topological insulator are studied in a two-sublattice system with an onsite single-particle energy difference $\\Delta$ between two sublattices. At $\\Delta=0$, increasing the onsite interaction strength $U$ drives the transition from the quantum spin Hall insulating state to the non-topological antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating (AFMI) state. When $\\Delta$ is larger than a certain value, a topologically trivial band insulator or AFMI at small values of $U$ may change into a quantum anomalous Hall state with antiferromagnetic ordering at intermediate values of $U$. Further increasing $U$ drives the system back into the topologically trivial state of AFMI. The corresponding phenomena is observable in the solid state and cold atom systems. We also propose a scheme to realize and detect these effects in cold atom systems.

Xiong-Jun Liu; Yang Liu; Xin Liu

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fully synthetic taped insulation cables  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note 1 ATLAS SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note 1 ATLAS SCT/Pixel Grounding and Shielding Note for SCT. This proposal mostly connects existing mechanical and electrical conductive #12;Atlas SCT. The barrel outer heat shield (150 µm aluminum) is the main element of the shield. #12;Atlas SCT

California at Santa Cruz, University of

183

ME 361F Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Ray Spectrometry 5. Gamma Ray Shielding/Low Level Counting 6. Neutron Activation Analysis 7. Sodium Iodide Detector-Ray Attenuation · Low-Level Gamma Ray Spectrometry · Reactor Health Physics · Neutron Shielding · Sodium Iodide and laboratory topics include personnel monitoring, radiation detection systems, gamma-ray spectroscopy

Ben-Yakar, Adela

184

Advancements in FBR shielding - Ten years in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development in the area of fast breeder reactor (FBR) shielding in Japan was fully under way in April 1987 when criticality of the JOYO experimental FBR was first attained. The main activities performed and results obtained during more than 10 yr of FBR shielding research are presented. The paper describes shielding research in Joyo; Monju shielding design and related research; research activities for future FBRs; and evaluation of Monju shielding designs.

Ohtani, Nobuo; Suzuki, Soju

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Surprising Control over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator Print Tuesday, 12 March 2013 00:00 Topological insulators are insulators in the bulk but metals on the surface, and the...

186

GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is WIUUTEO GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPCOn August 27, 1980, an insulation failure occurred dt-ringby a failure uf ground plane insulation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

SONY GXB5005 GPS RECEIVER DATA Without shield can Installed With shield can in place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SONY GXB5005 GPS RECEIVER DATA Without shield can Installed With shield can in place (for illustrative purposes only) The Sony GXB5005 GPS receiver is a miniature 12 channel GPS module with support for WAAS/EGNOS augmented positioning. The receiver is based on Sony's CXD2951 single-chip GPS receiver IC

Berns, Hans-Gerd

189

Biological shield design and analysis of KIPT accelerator-driven subcritical facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator-driven subcritical facility. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear research, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. This paper presents the design and analyses of the biological shield performed for the top section of the facility. The neutron source driving the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of a 100-kW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron energy is in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, and it has a uniform spatial distribution. The shield design and the associated analyses are presented including different parametric studies. In the analyses, a significant effort was dedicated to the accurate prediction of the radiation dose outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized for the transport calculation of electrons, photons, and neutrons. Weight window variance-reduction techniques were introduced, and the dose equivalent outside the shield can be calculated with reasonably good statistics.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SHIELDING AND DETECTOR RESPONSE CALCULATIONS PERTAINING TO CATEGORY 1 QUANTITIES OF PLUTONIUM AND HAND-HELD PLASTIC SCINTILLATORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear facilities sometimes use hand-held plastic scintillator detectors to detect attempts to divert special nuclear material in situations where portal monitors are impractical. MCNP calculations have been performed to determine the neutron and gamma radiation field arising from a Category I quantity of weapons-grade plutonium in various shielding configurations. The shields considered were composed of combinations of lead and high-density polyethylene such that the mass of the plutonium plus shield was 22.7 kilograms. Monte-Carlo techniques were also used to determine the detector response to each of the shielding configurations. The detector response calculations were verified using field measurements of high-, medium-, and low- energy gamma-ray sources as well as a Cf-252 neutron source.

Couture, A.

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Process for making ceramic insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

Akash, Akash (Salt Lake City, UT); Balakrishnan, G. Nair (Sandy, UT)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Vehicle drive module having improved EMI shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

EMI shielding in an electric vehicle drive is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Power converter having improved EMI shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Approximating Metal-Insulator Transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate metal-insulator transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-Andre model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

C. Danieli; K. Rayanov; B. Pavlov; G. Martin; S. Flach

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60??T. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

Mori?, Igor [Observatoire de Paris, SYRTE, Avenue Denfert 77, 75014 Paris (France); CNES, Edouard Belin 18, 31400 Toulouse (France); De Graeve, Charles-Marie [SOGETI High Tech, chemin Laporte 3, 31300 Toulouse (France); Grosjean, Olivier [CNES, Edouard Belin 18, 31400 Toulouse (France); Laurent, Philippe [Observatoire de Paris, SYRTE, Avenue Denfert 77, 75014 Paris (France)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C).

Porter, W.D.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of bismuth breast shielding on radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-effect transistors positioned in a customized anthropomorphic whole- body dosimetry verification phantom. Image noise. Funding: Supported by NIH Grants 1R01 HL109711-01 and 5KL2 RR024157, a Nuclear Cardiology Foundation American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. doi:10.1007/s12350-011-9473-x 100 #12;achievable (ALARA), while

Brenner, David Jonathan

199

ELECTROMAGNETIC CONSTRUCTION OF A 1 KM-RADIUS RADIATION SHIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the light of recent studies on bootstrapped lunar solar-electric power plants, mass drivers, and autonomous-drivers, (g) teleoperation of lunar and orbital facilities, (h) orbital assembly of lunar-derived solar power presence beyond Earth is limited to a very few government employees and robots who are sent up, entirely

200

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE ­ INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION CEC-CF-6R-ENV-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

McIntyre, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Insulation board and process of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Insulation board capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission. Abstract: New photocathode...

204

Integrity evaluation of lower thermal shield under exposure to HFBR environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of exposure to the HFBR environment on the carbon steel in the HFBR lower thermal shield were evaluated. Corrosion was found to be a non-significant degradation process. Radiation embrittlement has occurred; portions of the plate closest to the reactor are currently operating in the lower-shelf region of the Charpy impact curve (i.e., below the fracture toughness transition temperature). In this region, the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of carbon steel are believed to have been saturated, so that no further deterioration is anticipated. A fracture toughness analysis shows that a large factor of safety (> 1.5) exists against propagation of credible hypothetical flaws. Therefore, the existing lower thermal shield structure is suitable for continued operation of the HFBR.

Kassir, M.; Weeks, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Shewmon, P. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Dynamics of Dirac Fermions in Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Dirac Fermions in Topological Insulators R. Hammer1 , C. Ertler1 , W. P¨otz1 , and A.hammer@uni-graz.at Abstract We study the coherent dynamics of Dirac fermions on the surface of topological insulators in one topological insulators (TI) we investigate theoretically the dynamics of Dirac fermion wave packets on their 2

Arnold, Anton

206

A Holographic Fractional Topological Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

Carlos Hoyos-Badajoz; Kristan Jensen; Andreas Karch

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Beer and Economic Growth Dr. Martin Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beer and Economic Growth Dr. Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University #12;The Idea · Regional economic growth depends, in part, on the ability to sell goods and services) ­ Industry employment is 35 times more concentrated in Larimer County than the US average! #12;Economic

209

Experimental Test of Self-Shielding in VUV Photodissociation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experimental Test of Self-Shielding in VUV Photodissociation of CO Experimental Test of Self-Shielding in VUV Photodissociation of CO Print Wednesday, 25 March 2009 00:00 One way...

210

Methane Emissions from a Small Wind Shielded Lake Determined by Eddy Covariance, Flux Chambers, Anchored Funnels, and Boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Emissions from a Small Wind Shielded Lake Determined by Eddy Covariance, Flux Chambers of methane, held to be responsible for 18% of the radiative forcing, to the atmosphere. Periods of lake but potentially one of the most important periods for methane emissions. We studied methane emissions using four

Wehrli, Bernhard

211

Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

Bayle, H., E-mail: bayle@bergoz.com [Bergoz Instrumentation, Saint-Genis-Pouilly (France); Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O. [CEA, Saclay (France)] [CEA, Saclay (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields Marina Koledintseva, PoornaAA@mpei.ru Abstract-- An electromagnetic shielding of objects using ferrite-graphite composites is considered- shielding; dielectric base material; ferrite- graphite composite, Maxwell Garnett formulation I

Koledintseva, Marina Y.

214

Insulation assembly for electric machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, W.Y.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measures for their Implementation in Kuwait (DOE-1), Volume 2: Development of Typical Meteorological Year for Kuwait (Element 2, Sub-element 6). Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research Report No. KISR5857, Kuwait. 2000. ... Department of Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research for revision of the code this paper analyzes the effect of using un-insulated floors on the peak cooling demand and energy consumption of a middle income residential private villa and a one- bedroom...

Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Topological Insulators at Room Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supplemental heating of deposition tooling shields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing particle generation from the thin coating deposited on the internal surfaces of a deposition chamber which undergoes temperature variation greater than 100.degree. C. comprising maintaining the temperature variation of the internal surfaces low enough during the process cycle to keep thermal expansion stresses between the coating and the surfaces under 500 MPa. For titanium nitride deposited on stainless steel, this means keeping temperature variations under approximately 70.degree. C. in a chamber that may be heated to over 350.degree. C. during a typical processing operation. Preferably, a supplemental heater is mounted behind the upper shield and controlled by a temperature sensitive element which provides feedback control based on the temperature of the upper shield.

Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peebles, Diane E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hunter, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Eckelmeyer, Kenneth H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermal transport in boron nitride nanotorus—towards a nanoscopic thermal shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotori, or nanorings, are topological variants of nanotubes and are conceived to have different properties from their tubular form. In this study, the toroidal arrangement of boron nitride is introduced. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal behaviour (thermal conductivity and thermal stability) of the boron nitride nanotorus and its relationship with the structural characteristics are investigated. Its circumferential thermal rectification strength displays a linear dependence on the bending coefficient of the nanostructure. Surface kinks are relatively inconsequential on its circumferential mode of conduction, as compared to its axial sense. The circumferential conductivity in the diffusive regime is calculated to be approximately 10?W/m K, while the axial conductivity is more than tenfold of this value. All nanotori with different toroidal characters show excellent thermal stability at extremely high temperatures approaching 3400?K. With consideration to its favourable properties, a thermal shield made up of a parallel row of nanotori is proposed as a nanoscale thermal insulation device.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, 16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

MAGNETIC SHIELDING OF EXOMOONS BEYOND THE CIRCUMPLANETARY HABITABLE EDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With most planets and planetary candidates detected in the stellar habitable zone (HZ) being super-Earths and gas giants rather than Earth-like planets, we naturally wonder if their moons could be habitable. The first detection of such an exomoon has now become feasible, and due to observational biases it will be at least twice as massive as Mars. However, formation models predict that moons can hardly be as massive as Earth. Hence, a giant planet's magnetosphere could be the only possibility for such a moon to be shielded from cosmic and stellar high-energy radiation. Yet, the planetary radiation belt could also have detrimental effects on exomoon habitability. Here we synthesize models for the evolution of the magnetic environment of giant planets with thresholds from the runaway greenhouse (RG) effect to assess the habitability of exomoons. For modest eccentricities, we find that satellites around Neptune-sized planets in the center of the HZ around K dwarf stars will either be in an RG state and not be habitable, or they will be in wide orbits where they will not be affected by the planetary magnetosphere. Saturn-like planets have stronger fields, and Jupiter-like planets could coat close-in habitable moons soon after formation. Moons at distances between about 5 and 20 planetary radii from a giant planet can be habitable from an illumination and tidal heating point of view, but still the planetary magnetosphere would critically influence their habitability.

Heller, René [McMaster University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [McMaster University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Zuluaga, Jorge I., E-mail: rheller@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jzuluaga@fisica.udea.edu.co [FACom - Instituto de Física - FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Transparent self-cleaning dust shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

Zhang, T. X. [Physics Department, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Shielding Studies for the CERN Super-Proton-Synchrotron at Experimental Point 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Laboratory for Particle Research, CERN has been operated the Super Proton Sychrotron (SPS) for more than 30 years with the shielding design knowledge of the early 70s. At that time particle transport codes were neither available nor capable of dealing with deep lateral shielding calculations. For the future LHC increasing projected values of beam intensity in the SPS and decreasing limits to radiation exposure have led to the need to re-assess the shielding at point 5 of the SPS. 20 years ago this area housed the UA1 experiment of Carlo Rubbia (nobel-price 1984). The thesis describes a re-assessment based on simulations using the multi-purpose radiation transport codes FLUKA and MCNPX. The latter one was utilized for geometry design and to compare variance reduction methods. Different assumed beam-loss points along the beam-line together with fluence-to-doserate conversion calculations were used to find the worst case scenario. Dose-rates as well as particle-energy spectra inside the accessible a...

Müller, Mario J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Characterization of TFTR shielding penetrations of ITER-relevance in D-T neutron field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

D-T operation of TFTR began successfully with trace tritium discharges in mid-November 1993. During the next year, the TFTR plasma tritium fraction is scheduled to be increased to at least 50%. The availability of larger amounts of D-T fusion neutrons in the high power D-T plasma phase of TFTR provides a useful opportunity to characterize tokamak shielding-penetration geometries of potential interest to ITER. These types of measurements can provide direct experimental data on the degree of enhancement of transmitted neutron flux along or across a realistic penetration and, as such, can be used to validate, calculational methods and to meet fusion reactor licensing requirements. The enhancement of neutron streaming in the shielding penetrations has the following significant consequences from the ITER viewpoint: (1) increased radiation damage to plasma diagnostics/detectors, (2) increased biological dose rates behind the shield, (3) increased radiation damage to the superconducting magnet on the inboard side. TFTR has penetrations of different varieties inside the vacuum vessel, the test cell, and the adjoining hot cell. In the initial stage, the authors have chosen to characterize three different types of penetrations in and around the TFTR test cell: (1) a straight hollow pipe coming out of the test cell concrete wall on east side of the test cell into the hot cell, (2) a bent pipe coming out of the test cell through the north concrete wall, and (3) a labyrinth in the north-west end of the test cell.

Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

T-Duality of Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators and D-brane charges in string theory can both be classified by the same family of groups. In this letter, we extend this connection via a geometric transform, giving a novel duality of topological insulators which can be viewed as a condensed matter analog of T-duality in string theory. For 2D Chern insulators, this duality exchanges the rank and Chern number of the valence bands.

Varghese Mathai; Guo Chuan Thiang

2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Insulator damage endangers public, power reliability; ratepayers...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insulator-damage-endangers-public-power-reliability-ratepayers-foot-repair-bill Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us...

235

How Much Insulation is Too Much?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

236

Farmers RECC- Residential Insulation Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative (RECC) Button-Up Program provides free energy audits and rebates for insulation upgrades to its residential customers. Farmers RECC's energy advisor will...

237

Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

238

Thermal insulation by heat resistant polymers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is a layer of heat-barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case and the propellant. The… (more)

Ahmed, Ashraf Fathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Science Corporation team held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011, at the Westford Regency Hotel in...

240

Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fully synthetic taped insulation cables  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

On Holographic Insulators and Supersolids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain holographic realisations for systems that have strong similarities to Mott insulators and supersolids, after examining the ground states of Einstein-Maxwell-scalar systems. The real part of the AC conductivity has a hard gap and a discrete spectrum only. We add momentum dissipation to resolve the delta function in the conductivity due to translational invariance. We develop tools to directly calculate the Drude weight for a large class of solutions and to support our claims. Numerical RG flows are also constructed to verify that such saddle points are IR fixed points of asymptotically AdS_4 geometries.

Kiritsis, Elias

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiative Transfer in Interacting Media J.Kenneth Shultis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear energy. Today, radiative transport plays an important role in many other areas besides nuclear, and many others. 1.1 Radiative Transfer Regimes The transport of radiant energy through a medium falls shielding analyses, the radiative transfer equation is linear, and a wealth of numerical techniques exist

Shultis, J. Kenneth

245

MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

RSMASS-D models: An improved method for estimating reactor and shield mass for space reactor applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs), in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) reactors, and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTRs). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the Reactor/Shield Mass (RSMASS) model. Like the original RSMASS models, the new RSMASS-derivative (RSMASS-D) models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations, along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within a range specified by the user to achieve a parameter choice that yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage, and thermal limitations are accounted for to determine the required fuel mass. The effect of thermionic limitations are also taken into account for the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated, as well as instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, and safety system masses. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three reactor concept models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from separate detailed calculations within 15 percent for all three models.

Marshall, A.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cross Section Evaluation Group shielding benchmark compilation. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the time of the release of ENDF/B-IV in 1974, the Shielding Subcommittee had identified a series of 12 shielding data testing benchmarks (the SDT series). Most were used in the ENDF/B-IV data testing effort. A new concept and series was begun in the interim, the so-called Shielding Benchmark (SB) series. An effort was made to upgrade the SDT series as far as possible and to add new SB benchmarks. In order to be designated in the SB class, both an experiment and analysis must have been performed. The current recommended benchmark for Shielding Data Testing are listed. Until recently, the philosophy has been to include only citations to published references for shielding benchmarks. It is now our intention to provide adequate information in this volume for proper analysis of any new benchmarks added to the collection. These compilations appear in Section II, with the SB5 Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark as the first entry.

Rose, P.F.; Roussin, R.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Topological insulators of bosons/spins T. Senthil (MIT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators of bosons/spins T. Senthil (MIT) Thanks: X.-G.Wen, M.P.A. Fisher Trivial phases Eg: Band insulators, superfluids, antiferromagnets, ......... Gapped `topologically ordered phases Eg: Band insulators, superfluids, antiferromagnets, ......... Gapped `topologically ordered

249

Classification and characterization of topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antiferromagnetic topological insulators 5.1 Z 2 topological1.3 Topological insulators in 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3.1 Strong topological insulators (STI) . . . . . 1.3.2

Mong, Roger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Widespread spin polarizationeffects in photoemission from topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photoemission from topological insulators C. Jozwiak, 1, ?approach in the 3D topological insulators. [1] D. Hsieh, D.three-dimensional topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 using a

Jozwiak, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Semi-insulating semiconductor heterostructures: Optoelectronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Semi-insulating semiconductor heterostructures: Optoelectronic properties of optoelectronic properties of and uses for semi-insulating semiconductor heterostructures and thin films. The principal optical and optoelectronic properties of semi-insulating epilayers and heterostructures

Nolte, David D.

252

Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

Vohra, A.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1, *, Alexander J Ninfa2 a remarkable insulation property, due to the fast timescales of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: computational methods; metabolic and regulatory networks Keywords: feedback; insulation; modularity; singular

Sontag, Eduardo

255

Shielded serpentine traveling wave tube deflection structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shielded serpentine slow wave deflection structure (10) having a serpene signal conductor (12) within a channel groove (46). The channel groove (46) is formed by a serpentine channel (20) in a trough plate (18) and a ground plane (14). The serpentine signal conductor (12) is supported at its ends by coaxial feed through connectors 28. A beam interaction trough (22) intersects the channel groove (46) to form a plurality of beam interaction regions (56) wherein an electron beam (54) may be deflected relative to the serpentine signal conductor (12).

Hudson, Charles L. (Santa Barbara, CA); Spector, Jerome (Berkeley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Longwall shield design: is bigger better?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article evaluates the bigger is better design philosophy for longwall shields. The conventional support design approach based on simplistic models of supporting the full dead weight detached rock masses is replaced by a ground reaction design approach. Here, the goal is to match the support characteristics to the ground response, and not to try and overpower the ground forces with some massive support capability. The ground reaction concept embodies both the force and displacement controlled loading aspects, and therefore provides a more accurate representation of the support loading requirements. 7 figs.

Barczak, T.M.; Tadolini, S.C. [NIOSH-PRL, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Methods and Procedures for Shielding Analyses for the SNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods, used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations is presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well.

Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL] [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL] [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL] [ORNL; Lu, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Popova, Irina [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Charge and spin topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The topologically nontrivial states of matter-charge and spin topological insulators, which exhibit, respectively, properties of the integer quantum Hall effect and the quantum spin Hall effect-are discussed. The topological characteristics (invariant with respect to weak adiabatic changes in the Hamiltonian parameters) which lead to such states are considered. The model of a 2D hexagonal lattice having symmetries broken with respect to time reversal and spatial inversion which was proposed by Haldane and marked the beginning of unprecedented activity in the study of topologically nontrivial states is discussed. This model relates the microscopic nature of the symmetry breaking with respect to the time reversal to the occurrence of spontaneous orbital currents which circulate within a unit cell. Such currents become zero upon summation over the unit cell, but they may form spreading current states at the surface which are similar to the edge current states under the quantum Hall effect. The first model of spontaneous currents (exciton insulator model) is considered, and the possibility of implementing new topologically nontrivial states in this model is discussed.

Kopaev, Yu. V., E-mail: kopaev@sci.lebedev.ru; Gorbatsevich, A. A.; Belyavskii, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Epoxy Composites Ning (SWNT)-polymer composites have been fabricated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference (EMI

Gao, Hongjun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

Moody, Nathan Andrew

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Kingspan Insulated Panels: Order (2013-CE-5353)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Kingspan Insulated Panels, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kingspan Insulated Panels had failed to certify that any basic models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

264

Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes.

Kosek, Jacek [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland and CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211, Switzerland and ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Materials - Next-generation insulation ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials - Next-generation insulation ... A composite foam insulation panel being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and partners could reduce wall-generated heating and...

266

Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices - Building America Top...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Effec guid-exterior rigid insulation.jpg For years, Building America research teams have advocated using the thermal, air, and vapor properties of rigid foam sheathing insulation...

267

Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with...

268

Building America Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce...

269

ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John L [ORNL] [ORNL; Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL] [ORNL; Reed, Richard P [Cryogenic Materials, Inc.] [Cryogenic Materials, Inc.; Walsh, Robert P [Florida State University] [Florida State University; McColskey, J D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder] [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Evans, D [Advanced Cryogenic Materials] [Advanced Cryogenic Materials

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program North Slope, Alaska Bringing Climate Change Into The Classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to solar energy coming in as well as an insulator trapping heat below. An indication of climate change going out exceeds incoming solar energy; global warming occurs when the incoming solar energy is greater use to shield their plants fomr the outside weather. Greenhouses trap solar energy and keep the inside

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

272

MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberra's ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

Sansone, Kenneth R

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

SHIELDING ANALYSIS FOR PORTABLE GAUGING COMBINATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioisotopic decay has been used as a source of photons and neutrons for industrial gauging operations since the late 1950s. Early portable moisture/density gauging equipment used Americium (Am)-241/Beryllium (Be)/Cesium (Cs)-137 combination sources to supply the required nuclear energy for gauging. Combination sources typically contained 0.040 Ci of Am-241 and 0.010 Ci of CS-137 in the same source capsule. Most of these sources were manufactured approximately 30 years ago. Collection, transportation, and storage of these sources once removed from their original device represent a shielding problem with distinct gamma and neutron components. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project is planning to use a multi-function drum (MFD) for the collection, shipping, and storage of AmBe sources, as well as the eventual waste package for disposal. The MFD is an approved TRU waste container design for DOE TRU waste known as the 12 inch Pipe Component Overpack. As the name indicates, this drum is based on a 12 inch ID stainless steel weldment approximately 25 inch in internal length. The existing drum design allows for addition of shielding within the pipe component up to the 110 kg maximum pay load weight. The 12 inch pipe component is packaged inside a 55-gallon drum, with the balance of the interior space filled with fiberboard dunnage. This packaging geometry is similar to the design of a DOT 6M, Type B shipping container.

J. TOMPKINS; L. LEONARD; ET AL

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi /sup 57/Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% /sup 240/Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures.

Kuckertz, T.H.; Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, PR (China); Li, L. F. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, PR China and State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, C (China); Li, J. W. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, PR China and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, PR (China); Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P. [North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206, PR (China)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions.

Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Slab edge insulating form system and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

Lee, Brain E. (Corral de Tierra, CA); Barsun, Stephan K. (Davis, CA); Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Hoeschele, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Springer, David A. (Winters, CA)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

F. Hua

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

A robust and well shielded thermal conductivity device for low temperature measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a compact mechanically robust thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for measurements at low temperatures (<1 K) and high magnetic fields on small high-purity single crystal samples. A high-conductivity copper box is used to enclose the sample and all the components. The box provides protection for the thermometers, heater, and most importantly the sample increasing the portability of the mount. In addition to physical protection, the copper box is also effective at shielding radio frequency electromagnetic interference and thermal radiation, which is essential for low temperature measurements. A printed circuit board in conjunction with a braided ribbon cable is used to organize the delicate wiring and provide mechanical robustness.

Toews, W. H.; Hill, R. W. [GWPI and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [GWPI and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Conceptional Design of the Shielding Layout and Beam Absorber at the PXIE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project X is a high intensity proton facility conceived to support a world-leading physics program at Fermilab. Project X will provide high intensity beams for neutrino, kaon, muon, and nuclei based experiments and for studies supporting energy applications. The Project X Injector Experiment (PIXIE) is a prototype of the Project X front end. A 30 MeV 50 kW beam will be used to validate the design concept of the Project X. This paper discusses a design of the accelerator enclosure radiation shielding and the beam dump.

Eidelman, Yu.; Kerby, J.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Leveling, T.; Nagaisev, S.; Stanek, R.; /Fermilab

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fan-fold shielded electrical leads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fan-fold shielded electrical leads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

Rohatgi, Rajeev R. (Mountain View, CA); Cowan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Protective shield for an instrument probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Insulation failure assessment under random energization overvoltages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper offers a new simple approach to the evaluation of the risk of failure of external insulation in view of their known probabilistic nature. This is applied to EHV transmission systems subjected to energization overvoltages. The randomness, both in the applied stresses and insulation`s withstand characteristics are numerically simulated and then integrated to assess the risk of failure. Overvoltage control methods are accounted for, such as the use of pre-insertion breaker resistors, series capacitive compensation, and the installation of shunt reactors.

Mahdy, A.M.; Anis, H.I. [Cairo Univ. (Egypt)] [Cairo Univ. (Egypt); El-Morshedy, A. [Faculty of Science for Girls, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)] [Faculty of Science for Girls, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Analysis of the conceptual shielding design for the upflow Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conceptual Shielding Configuration III for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) was analyzed by performing global calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences and correcting the results as appropriate with bias factors from localized calculations. Included among the localized calculations were the radial and axial cell streaming calculations, plus extensive preliminary calculations and three final confirmation calculations of the plenum flow-through shields. The global calculations were performed on the GCFR mid-level and the lower and upper plenum regions. Calculated activities were examined with respect to the design constraint, if any, imposed on the particular activity. The spatial distributions of several activities of interest were examined with the aid of isoplots (i.e., symbols are used to describe a surface on which the activity level is everywhere the same). In general the results showed that most activities were below the respective design constraints. Only the total neutron fluence in the core barrel appeared to be marginal with the present reactor design. Since similar results were obtained for an earlier design, it has been proposed that the core barrel be cooled with inlet plenum gas to maintain it at a temperature low enough that it can withstand a higher fluence limit. Radiation levels in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and liner appeared to be sufficiently below the design constraint that expected results from the Radial Shield Heterogeneity Experiment should not force any levels above the design constraint. A list was also made of a number of issues which should be examined before completion of the final shielding design.

Slater, C.O.; Reed, D.A.; Cramer, S.N.; Emmett, M.B.; Tomlinson, E.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

1 Introduction 3 2 Topological insulators -Overview 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Topological insulators - Overview 5 2.1 Introduction quantum spin Hall insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.4 Three dimensional topological insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3 Bulk band structure in a 2D spin orbit induced topological insulator 11 3.1 Introduction

Johannesson, Henrik

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical shielding calculations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of Magnetic and Electrically Conductive Fillers in a Polymer Matrix for Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Summary: for Electromagnetic Interference Shielding JUNHUA WU1,2...

295

RELATIVE ATTENUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR PuB NEUTRONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1: Polyethylene Water Spodumene-gypsum Gypsum, wet and dryconstituents of the spodumene-gypsum, and gypsum shields.SPODUMENK·,GYPSUM SHIELD 30% Spodumene by weight 40% Gypsum

Bringham, P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Insulate Steam Distribution and Condensate Return Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on insulating steam distribution and condensate return lines provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Saving Energy and Money with Aerogel Insulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department is investing in an innovative insulation material that saves energy and money for industrial facilities while also helping to support 50 full-time clean energy jobs for Americans.

299

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nonlinear boundary value problem of magnetic insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of generalization of upper and lower solution method to the singular two point boundary value problems, the existence theorem of solutions for the system, which models a process of magnetic insulation in plasma is proved.

A. V. Sinitsyn

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Metal-insulator transition in holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We exhibit an interaction-driven metal-insulator quantum phase transition in a holographic model. Use of a helical lattice enables us to break translation invariance while preserving homogeneity. The metallic phase is characterized by a sharp Drude peak and a d.c. resistivity that increases with temperature. In the insulating phase the Drude spectral weight is transferred into a `mid-infrared' peak and to energy scales of order the chemical potential. The d.c. resistivity now decreases with temperature. In the metallic phase, operators breaking translation invariance are irrelevant at low energy scales. In the insulating phase, translation symmetry breaking effects are present at low energies. We find the near horizon extremal geometry that captures the insulating physics.

Aristomenis Donos; Sean A. Hartnoll

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

302

Phosphorylation based insulation devices design and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the analysis of a phosphorylation based insulation device implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisae and the minimization of the retroactivity to the input and retroactivity to the output of a single cycle ...

Rivera Ortiz, Phillip M. (Phillip Michael)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Irradiation imposed degradation of the mechanical and electrical properties of electrical insulation for future accelerator magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future accelerators will make extensive use of superconductors made of Nb{sub 3}Sn, which allows higher magnetic fields than NbTi. However, the wind-and-react technology of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet production makes polyimide Kapton® non applicable for the coils' electrical insulation. A Nb{sub 3}Sn technology compatible insulation material should be characterized by high radiation resistivity, good thermal conductivity, and excellent mechanical properties. Candidate materials for the electrical insulation of future accelerator's magnet coils have to be radiation certified with respect to potential degradation of their electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This contribution presents procedures and results of tests of the electrical and mechanical properties of DGEBA epoxy + D400 hardener, which is one of the candidates for the electrical insulation of future magnets. Two test sample types have been used to determine the material degradation due to irradiation: a untreated one (unirradiated) and irradiated at 77 K with 11 kGy/min intense, 4MeV energy electrons beam to a total dose of 50 MGy.

Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Bogdan, P.; Strychalski, M. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Rijk, G. de [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 165440 (2011) Electron interaction-driven insulating ground state in Bi2Se3 topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

topological insulators in the two-dimensional limit Minhao Liu,1 Cui-Zu Chang,1,2 Zuocheng Zhang,1 Yi Zhang,2 of ultrathin Bi2Se3 topological insulators with thickness from one quintuple layer to six quintuple layers that this unusual insulating ground state in the two-dimensional limit of topological insulators is induced

Wang, Wei Hua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions-Si and SiGe-on-insulator were fabricated, combining both the benefits of high-mobility strained-Si and SOI) to oxidized handle wafers. Layer transfer onto insulating handle wafers can be accomplished using grind

307

T-Duality and Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that topological insulators are classified by a family of groups, which coincidentally also classifies D-brane charges on orientifolds in string theory. In this letter, we extend this correlation via a geometric analog of the real Fourier transform to obtain a novel duality of topological insulators that can be viewed as a condensed matter analog of T-duality in string theory.

Mathai, Varghese

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Status of surface conduction in topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we scrutinize the thickness dependent resistivity data from the recent literature on electrical transport measurements in topological insulators. A linear increase in resistivity with increase in thickness is expected in the case of these materials since they have an insulating bulk and a conducting surface. However, such a trend is not seen in the resistivity versus thickness data for all the cases examined, except for some samples, where it holds for a range of thickness.

Barua, Sourabh, E-mail: sbarua@iitk.ac.in; Rajeev, K. P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Measure Guideline: Internal Insulation of Masonry Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline provides recommendations for interior insulation assemblies that control interstitial condensation and durability risks; recommendations for acceptable thermal performance are also provided. An illustrated guide of high-risk exterior details (which concentrate bulk water), and recommended remediation details is provided. This is followed by a recommended methodology for risk assessment of a masonry interior insulation project: a series of steps are suggested to assess the risks associated with this retrofit, with greater certainty with added steps.

Straube, J. F.; Ueno, K.; Schumacher, C. J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Guide to Insulation Selection for Industrial Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new insulations on th mar ket, it is important that the insulation selection process be upgraded. Insulation peci fications need to be reviewed in terms of new products and installation techniques. Also, the specific application or end use should... be critically analyzed to determine whic~ pro f ducts are best suited for that application. INSULATION MATERIAL SELECTION The selection and specification of insulation materials can be broken down int two I separate but interrelated activities. The first...

Harrison, M. R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Topological insulators and superconductors from string theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and superconductors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the {theta} term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond noninteracting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Topological Insulators and Superconductors from String Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and supercondutors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K-theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K-theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the $\\theta$-term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond non-interacting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

Shinsei Ryu; Tadashi Takayanagi

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Fesmire, J. E. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida; Augustynowicz, S. D. [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Magnetic insulation at finite temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-temperature non-neutral plasma (FTNNP) theory of magnetically insulated (MI) electron flows in crossed-field vacuum devices is developed and applied in planar geometry. It is shown that, in contrast to the single type of MI flow predicted by traditional cold-plasma treatments, the nonlinear FTNNP equations admit five types of steady flow, of which three types are MI flows, including flows in which the electric field and/or the tangential velocity at the cathode may be zero or nonzero. It is also shown that finite-temperature Vlasov-Poisson treatments yield solutions for electron number densities and electrostatic potentials that are a subset of the FTNNP solutions. The algorithms that are used to solve the FTNNP equations numerically are discussed, and the numerical results are presented for several examples of the three types of MI flow. Results include prediction of the existence, boundaries, number density profiles, and other properties of sheaths of electrons in the anode-cathode gap.

Goedecke, G. H.; Davis, Brian T.; Chen, Chiping [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States); Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion.

Schoenfeld, Michael P. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, 800 SW Archer Rd. Bldg.554, P.O. Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Radiation-hard electrical coil and method for its fabrication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation-hard insulated electrical coil and method for making the same are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a conductor, preferably copper, is wrapped with an aluminum strip and then tightly wound into a coil. The aluminum-wrapped coil is then annealed to relax the conductor in the coiled configuration. The annealed coil is then immersed in an alkaline solution to dissolve the aluminum strip, leaving the bare conductor in a coiled configuration with all of the windings closely packed yet uniformly spaced from one another. The coil is then insulated with a refractory insulating material. In the preferred embodiment, the coil is insulated by coating it with a vitreous enamel and subsequently potting the enamelled coil in a castable ceramic concrete. The resulting coil is substantially insensitive to radiation and may be operated continuously in high radiation environments for long periods of time.

Grieggs, R.J.; Blake, R.D.; Gac, F.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Electric field shielding in dielectric nanosolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To gain some insight into electrochemical activity of dielectric colloids of technical and biomedical interest we investigate a model of dielectric nanosolution whose micro-constitution is dominated by dipolarions -- positively and negatively charged spherically symmetric nano-structures composed of ionic charge surrounded by cloud of radially polarized dipoles of electrically neutral molecules of solvent. Combing the standard constitutive equations of an isotropic dielectric liquid with Maxwell equation of electrostatics and presuming the Boltzmann shape of the particle density of bound-charge we derive equation for the in-medium electrostatic field. Particular attention is given to numerical analysis of obtained analytic solutions of this equation describing the exterior fields of dipolarions with dipolar atmospheres of solvent molecules endowed with either permanent or field-induced dipole moments radially polarized by central symmetric field of counterions. The presented computations show that the electric field shielding of dipolarions in dielectric nanosolutions is quite different from that of counterionic nano-complexes of Debye-H\\"uckel theory of electrolytes.

Sergey Bastrukov; Pik-Yin Lai; Irina Molodtsova

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data is presented in support of project and model assumptions. Finally, current and suggested testing protocol and procedure for future model validation and IG physical testing are discussed.

Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor airrange of the clothing insulation calculated for eachbuilding). Figure 8 Clothing insulation versus dress code [

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Influence of two dynamic predictive clothing insulation models on building energy performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energyunnecessarily higher clothing insulation and lower heatingthat the constant clothing insulation assumption lead to the

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012) Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoorPredictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor airpredictive models of clothing insulation have been developed

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Versatile Indian sari: Clothing insulation with different drapes of typical sari ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension of the Clothing Insulation Database for Standardand air movement on that insulation. , s.l. : s.n. Havenith,Estimation of the thermal insulation and evaporative

Indraganti, Madhavi; Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is prevented by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

Pace, M.O.; Adcock, J.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vulnerable organs, created an urgent need for investigation of proton radiation cataracto- genesis. In a statistical analysis of collected data on solar proton events taking into consideration possible shield- ing and mission duration, an investigator... energy group to a high of 74 for the 20 Mev proton energy group. As previously stated, the maximum possible numerical value was 400. The mean values for degree of lens opacities for the controls and the five dosage subgroups within the 10 Mev, 20 Mev...

Kyzar, James Ronald

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Method for the construction of x-ray shielding masks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for the production of a rigid model of a patient's face onto which lead shielding sheets may be contoured. The model is cast in Lipowitz's metal using a plaster mold.

Canup, D.; Ekstrand, K.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University csurei, economic performance has been mixed. The northern Front Range has fared best

329

Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for...

330

RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor and shield masses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple mathematical model (RSMASS) has been developed to provide rapid estimates of reactor and shield masses for space-based reactor power systems. Approximations are used rather than correlations or detailed calculations to estimate the reactor fuel mass and the masses of the moderator, structure, reflector, pressure vessel, miscellaneous components, and the reactor shield. The fuel mass is determined either by neutronics limits, thermal/hydraulic limits, or fuel damage limits, whichever yields the largest mass. RSMASS requires the reactor power and energy, 24 reactor parameters, and 20 shield parameters to be specified. This parametric approach should be applicable to a very broad range of reactor types. Reactor and shield masses calculated by RSMASS were found to be in good agreement with the masses obtained from detailed calculations.

Marshall, A.C.; Aragon, J.; Gallup, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Topological insulators and topological nonlinear {sigma} models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we link the physics of topological nonlinear {sigma} models with that of Chern-Simons insulators. We show that corresponding to every 2n-dimensional Chern-Simons insulator there is a (n-1)-dimensional topological nonlinear {sigma} model with the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. Breaking internal symmetry in these nonlinear {sigma} models leads to nonlinear {sigma} models with the {theta} term. [This is analogous to the dimension reduction leading from 2n-dimensional Chern-Simons insulators to (2n-1) and (2n-2)-dimensional topological insulators protected by discrete symmetries.] The correspondence described in this paper allows one to derive the topological term in a theory involving fermions and order parameters (we shall referred to them as ''fermion-{sigma} models'') when the conventional gradient-expansion method fails. We also discuss the quantum number of solitons in topological nonlinear {sigma} model and the electromagnetic action of the (2n-1)-dimensional topological insulators. Throughout the paper we use a simple model to illustrate how things work.

Yao Hong; Lee, Dung-Hai [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Radiation absorption properties of different plaster samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the plaster is one of the oldest known synthetic building materials, nowadays, it is used as interior coating of walls and ceilings of buildings. Thus measuring its radiation shielding properties is vital. For this purpose, radiation absorption properties of different plaster samples in this study. The measurements have been performed using gamma spectrometer system which connected to 3'' Multiplication-Sign 3''NaI (TI) detector.

Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir; Mavi, Betuel; K Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I l Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ncarslan, Semsettin; Seven, Aysun [Suleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Isparta (Turkey); Amasya University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Amasya (Turkey); Suleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Technical Education, Department of Construction Education, Isparta (Turkey)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Constraints on topological order in Mott Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out certain symmetry induced constraints on topological order in Mott Insulators (quantum magnets with an odd number of spin $\\tfrac{1}{2}$ per unit cell). We show, for example, that the double semion topological order is incompatible with time reversal and translation symmetry in Mott insulators. This sharpens the Hastings-Oshikawa-Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem for 2D quantum magnets, which guarantees that a fully symmetric gapped Mott insulator must be topologically ordered, but is silent on which topological order is permitted. An application of our result is the Kagome lattice quantum antiferromagnet where recent numerical calculations of entanglement entropy indicate a ground state compatible with either toric code or double semion topological order. Our result rules out the latter possibility.

Michael P. Zaletel; Ashvin Vishwanath

2015-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multilayer insulation blanket, fabricating apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method of fabricating a multilayer insulation blanket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Is graphene in vacuum an insulator?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evidence, from Lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the phase diagram of graphene as a function of the Coulomb coupling between quasiparticles, that graphene in vacuum is likely to be an insulator. We find a semimetal-insulator transition at $\\alpha_g^\\text{crit} = 1.11 \\pm 0.06$, where $\\alpha_g^{} \\simeq 2.16$ in vacuum, and $\\alpha_g^{} \\simeq 0.79$ on a SiO$_2^{}$ substrate. Our analysis uses the logarithmic derivative of the order parameter, supplemented by an equation of state. The insulating phase disappears above a critical number of four-component fermion flavors $4 < N_f^{\\text{crit}} < 6$. Our data are consistent with a second-order transition.

Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Edge modes in band topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We characterize gapless edge modes in translation invariant topological insulators. We show that the edge mode spectrum is a continuous deformation of the spectrum of a certain gluing function defining the occupied state bundle over the Brillouin zone (BZ). Topologically non-trivial gluing functions, corresponding to non-trivial bundles, then yield edge modes exhibiting spectral flow. We illustrate our results for the case of chiral edge states in two dimensional Chern insulators, as well as helical edges in quantum spin Hall states.

Lukasz Fidkowski; T. S. Jackson; Israel Klich

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

McCarthy, A.M.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

McCarthy, A.M.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

PET/CT shielding design comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moving through the gantry (with permission from Bushong 2001). 7 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool that takes advantage of certain radiopharmaceuticals and allows abnormal metabolic... activity in and around organs to be examined by injection of a radionuclide into a patient (Radiology 2006). These radiopharmaceuticals, biological compounds linked to radiation-emitting radionuclides, can in some cases be tailored for concentration...

Coker, Audra Lee

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insulator Print Wednesday, 27 May 2009 00:00 It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of...

348

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of...

349

Gapped symmetry preserving surface state for the electron topological insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the three-dimensional (3D) electronic topological insulator (TI) with charge-conservation and time-reversal symmetry cannot have a trivial insulating surface that preserves symmetry. It is often ...

Wang, Chong

350

A Rapid Scanning Inspection Method for Insulated Ferromagnetic Tubing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

long expanse of insulated piping. PA Incorporated has developed an electromagnetic inspection device which rapidly scans nearly 100 percent of an insulated pipeline (flanges and tees excluded) and provides a quantitative (2 percent) measurement...

Marsh, G. M.; Milewits, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

An analytical and experimental investigation for an interstitial insulation technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) as the interstitial insulation material. Both the inner and outer surface temperatures of the coaxial pipes were measured in order to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the insulation concept. The predicted results from the model...

Kim, Dong Keun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Classification and characterization of topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weak topological insulators (WTI) . . . . . 1.4 Topologicalweak topological insulators (WTI). The surfaces of STIs haveSTI STM TI TRIM/TRIMs TRS TKNN VPT WTI one-dimension, two-

Mong, Roger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

antiferromagnetic mott insulator: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

354

atomic mott insulator: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

355

Insulated laser tube structure and method of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An insulated high temperature ceramic laser tube having substantially uniform insulation along the length of the tube is disclosed having particulate ceramic insulation positioned between the outer wall of the ceramic laser tube and the inner surface of tubular ceramic fiber insulation which surrounds the ceramic laser tube. The particulate ceramic insulation is preferably a ceramic capable of sintering to the outer surface of the ceramic laser tube and to the inner surface of the tubular ceramic fiber insulation. The addition of the particulate ceramic insulation to fill all the voids between the ceramic laser tube and the fibrous ceramic insulation permits the laser tube to be operated at a substantially uniform temperature throughout the length of the laser tube.

Dittbenner, Gerald R. (4353 Findlay Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Transport properties in the vicinity of Mott insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the states in the vicinity of the Mott insulator is crucial to understanding both the physics of the transition between a Mott insulating phase and a metallic phase and the physics of the cuprate high-temperature ...

Nave, Cody Patrick, 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Expanded Coverage for Preventive Care Under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue. Effect the New Rules Will Have on Members and Accounts Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will offer the following services with no member cost share

Aalberts, Daniel P.

359

Mechanics of Insulator Behavior in Concrete Crosstie Fastening Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Insulator Behavior Analysis of failure modes and causes · Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) used

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

360

Topological insulators and superconductors Xiao-Liang Qi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators and superconductors Xiao-Liang Qi Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, California 94305, USA (Received 2 August 2010; published 14 October 2011) Topological insulators are new-dimensional and three-dimensional topological insulators are reviewed, and both the topological band theory

Wu, Zhigang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermal Insulation Performance in the Process Industries: Facts and Fallacies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Industrial Insulation," Eurima-News, Roskilde, Denmark (October, 1979). 4. "High Temperature Thermal Insulation Usage in the U.K. Process Industries," UKAEA, Harwell, Report, 1982. 5. Tye, R.P., J. Thermal Insulation 2., 69, July, 1983. 6. Tye, R...

Tye, R. P.

362

Molecular Cell Mode of Regulation and the Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Cell Article Mode of Regulation and the Insulation of Bacterial Gene Expression Vered.molcel.2012.04.032 SUMMARY A gene can be said to be insulated from environ- mental variations if its the insulation of the lac promoter of E. coli and of synthetic constructs in which the transcription factor CRP

363

MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE 7 MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY MATTHEW P.A. FISHER insulators and quantum magnetism 583 3.1 Spin models and quantum magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 #12;MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY Matthew P.A. Fisher

364

Vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for B. Bayanov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

273 Vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for NCT B. Bayanov1 , Yu. Belchenko1 , V. Belov1 , G of high current hydrogen negative ions by special geometry of potential electrodes with vacuum insulation. Fig. 1 shows the construction of vacuum insulation tandem accelerator developed at BINP, as a base

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

365

Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

Arasteh, D.K.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Insulation Energy Appraisal Assessing the True Value of Insulated System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulation remains a seriously under-utilized technology in the manufacturing and industrial sectors of the economy even though its role in energy efficiency and environmental preservation is clear. The objective of the presentation is to educate...

Schell, S.

367

Summary of Disposable Debris Shields (DDS) Analysis for Development of Solid Debris Collection at NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collection of solid debris from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being developed both as a diagnostic tool and as a means for measuring nuclear reaction cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship Program and nuclear astrophysics. The concept is straightforward; following a NIF shot, the debris that is produced as a result of the capsule and hohlraum explosion would be collected and subsequently extracted from the chamber. The number of nuclear activations that occurred in the capsule would then be measured through a combination of radiation detection and radiochemical processing followed by mass spectrometry. Development of the catcher is challenging due to the complex environment of the NIF target chamber. The collector surface is first exposed to a large photon flux, followed by the debris wind that is produced. The material used in the catcher must be mechanically strong in order to withstand the large amount of energy it is exposed to, as well as be chemically compatible with the form and composition of the debris. In addition, the location of the catcher is equally important. If it is positioned too close to the center of the target chamber, it will be significantly ablated, which could interfere with the ability of the debris to reach the surface and stick. If it is too far away, the fraction of the debris cloud collected will be too small to result in a statistically significant measurement. Material, geometric configuration, and location must all be tested in order to design the optimal debris collection system for NIF. One of the first ideas regarding solid debris collection at NIF was to use the disposable debris shields (DDS), which are fielded over the final optics assemblies (FOA) 7 m away from the center of the target chamber. The DDS are meant to be replaced after a certain number of shots, and if the shields could be subsequently analyzed after removal, it would serve as a mechanism for fielding a relatively large collection area through the use of a part meant to be replaced regularly. The solid angle covered by one of the shields is roughly 10{sup -4} of 4{pi}. If several shields were analyzed at once, it would increase the solid angle of the collection area accordingly. The glass shields consist of ammonia hardened silica with a sol gel coating and kapton tape around the edge. The square sheets are 14-inch on each side. The original shields were 1 mm thick, but it was determined that a thicker shield (3.3 mm) was more effective in preventing debris from reaching the FOA. The Solid Radchem group received two sets of DDS as part of our evaluation of the potential use of the DDS as solid debris collectors. The first set consisted of two 3.3 mm shields, one each from the top and bottom of the chamber (the '3mm set'). The second set consisted of four 1mm shields, one from the top of the chamber and the other three from the bottom (the 'IFSA set'). For each set, the shields were cut into smaller subsamples, which were then imaged using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) followed by chemical leaching and mass spectrometry. The purpose was to evaluate both the quantity and identity of the debris that was present on the DDS surfaces, and to determine if any of the capsule debris was reaching the chamber walls. In addition, potential enhancement due to gravity in the chamber was evaluated by directly comparing shields fielded in the top and bottom of the chamber. Based on the results, the use of the DDS as debris collectors would be evaluated. The results from both sets were presented to the DDS Working Group. The slides are attached to this document. The 3mm set results are presented first, followed by the results from the IFSA set. In both cases it was determined that a small fraction of the overall debris field was collected on the DDS. This means that the debris that is formed during a NIF shot is condensing out of the plasma and depositing on surfaces closer to the target chamber center, or else it is simply falling to the bottom of the chamber. In either case, it was determined that using

Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D; Lindvall, R; Gostic, J M

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

D-Algebra Structure of Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the quantum Hall effect, the density operators at different wave-vectors generally do not commute and give rise to the Girvin MacDonald Plazmann (GMP) algebra with important consequences such as ground-state center of mass degeneracy at fractional filling fraction, and W_{1 + \\infty} symmetry of the filled Landau levels. We show that the natural generalization of the GMP algebra to higher dimensional topological insulators involves the concept of a D-algebra formed by using the fully anti-symmetric tensor in D-dimensions. For insulators in even dimensional space, the D-algebra is isotropic and closes for the case of constant non-Abelian F(k) ^ F(k) ... ^ F(k) connection (D-Berry curvature), and its structure factors are proportional to the D/2-Chern number. In odd dimensions, the algebra is not isotropic, contains the weak topological insulator index (layers of the topological insulator in one less dimension) and does not contain the Chern-Simons \\theta form (F ^ A - 2/3 A ^ A ^ A in 3 dimensions). The Chern-Simons form appears in a certain combination of the parallel transport and simple translation operator which is not an algebra. The possible relation to D-dimensional volume preserving diffeomorphisms and parallel transport of extended objects is also discussed.

B. Estienne; N. Regnault; B. A. Bernevig

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Tunable Chern insulator with shaken optical lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven optical lattices permit the engineering of effective dynamics with well-controllable tunneling properties. We describe the realization of a tunable a Chern insulator by driving particles on a shaken hexagonal lattice with optimally designed polychromatic driving forces. Its implementation does not require shallow lattices, which favors the study of strongly-correlated phases with non-trivial topology.

Albert Verdeny; Florian Mintert

2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Shielded fluid stream injector for particle bed reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shielded fluid-stream injector assembly is provided for particle bed reactors. The assembly includes a perforated pipe injector disposed across the particle bed region of the reactor and an inverted V-shaped shield placed over the pipe, overlapping it to prevent descending particles from coming into direct contact with the pipe. The pipe and shield are fixedly secured at one end to the reactor wall and slidably secured at the other end to compensate for thermal expansion. An axially extending housing aligned with the pipe and outside the reactor and an in-line reamer are provided for removing deposits from the inside of the pipe. The assembly enables fluid streams to be injected and distributed uniformly into the particle bed with minimized clogging of injector ports. The same design may also be used for extraction of fluid streams from particle bed reactors.

Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Shielding analysis of the NAC-MPC storage system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the shielding analyses of the NAC-MPC dry cask storage system. The NAC-MPC dry cask storage system consists of a transportable storage canister, a transfer cask, and a vertical concrete storage cask. The NAC-MPC is designed to accommodate 36 {open_quotes}Yankee Class{close_quotes} fuel assemblies with a maximum burnup of 36,000 MWd/tonne U burnup and 8 yr cooling time. The shielding analysis is performed with the SCALE 4.3 code package which includes SAS2H for source term generation and SAS4A, a modification of SAS4, for shielding evaluations. SAS4 utilizes a one-dimensional XSDRNPM adjoint calculation of the cask to generate biasing parameters for a three-dimensional MORSE-SGC Monte Carlo model of the cask geometry.

Napolitano, D.G.; Romano, N.J. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode is disclosed. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor. 34 figs.

Lemke, R.W.; Clark, M.C.; Calico, S.E.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity (C4) portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor.

Lemke, Raymond W. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, Miles C. (Albuquerque, NM); Calico, Steve E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A NEW ALGORITHM FOR RADIOISOTOPE IDENTIFICATION OF SHIELDED AND MASKED SNM/RDD MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection and identification of shielded and masked nuclear materials is crucial to national security, but vast borders and high volumes of traffic impose stringent requirements for practical detection systems. Such tools must be be mobile, and hence low power, provide a low false alarm rate, and be sufficiently robust to be operable by non-technical personnel. Currently fielded systems have not achieved all of these requirements simultaneously. Transport modeling such as that done in GADRAS is able to predict observed spectra to a high degree of fidelity; our research is focusing on a radionuclide identification algorithm that inverts this modeling within the constraints imposed by a handheld device. Key components of this work include incorporation of uncertainty as a function of both the background radiation estimate and the hypothesized sources, dimensionality reduction, and nonnegative matrix factorization. We have partially evaluated performance of our algorithm on a third-party data collection made with two different sodium iodide detection devices. Initial results indicate, with caveats, that our algorithm performs as good as or better than the on-board identification algorithms. The system developed was based on a probabilistic approach with an improved approach to variance modeling relative to past work. This system was chosen based on technical innovation and system performance over algorithms developed at two competing research institutions. One key outcome of this probabilistic approach was the development of an intuitive measure of confidence which was indeed useful enough that a classification algorithm was developed based around alarming on high confidence targets. This paper will present and discuss results of this novel approach to accurately identifying shielded or masked radioisotopes with radiation detection systems.

Jeffcoat, R.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Multiterminal Conductance of a Floquet Topological Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on simulations of the dc conductance and quantum Hall response of a Floquet topological insulator using Floquet scattering theory. Our results reveal that laser-induced edge states in graphene lead to quantum Hall plateaus once imperfect matching with the non-illuminated leads is lessened. But the magnitude of the Hall plateaus is not directly related to the number and chirality of all the edge states at a given energy as usual. Instead, the plateaus are dominated only by those edge states adding to the dc density of states. Therefore, the dc quantum Hall conductance of a Floquet topological insulator is not directly linked to topological invariants of the full the Floquet bands.

L. E. F. Foa Torres; P. M. Perez-Piskunow; C. A. Balseiro; G. Usaj

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electric-Magnetic Duality and Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We work out the action of the SL(2,Z) electric-magnetic duality group for an insulator with a non-trivial permittivity, permeability and theta-angle. This theory has recently been proposed to be the correct low-energy effective action for topological insulators. As applications, we give manifestly SL(2,Z) covariant expressions for the Faraday rotation at orthogonal incidence at the interface of two such materials, as well as for the induced magnetic and electric charges, slightly clarifying the meaning of expressions previously derived in the literature. We also use electric-magnetic duality to find a gravitational dual for a strongly coupled version of this theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence.

Andreas Karch

2009-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fractional topological insulators in three dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle theta of 0 or pi. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal (T) invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P_3, and a `halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form (p/q)(e^2/2h) with p,q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged `quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) `color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P_3 and allows fractional values consistent with T-invariance.

Joseph Maciejko; Xiao-Liang Qi; Andreas Karch; Shou-Cheng Zhang

2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electric-Magnetic Duality and Topological Insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We work out the action of the SL(2,Z) electric-magnetic duality group for an insulator with a nontrivial permittivity, permeability, and theta angle. This theory has recently been proposed to be the correct low-energy effective action for topological insulators. As applications, we give manifestly SL(2,Z) covariant expressions for the Faraday rotation at orthogonal incidence at the interface of two such materials, as well as for the induced magnetic and electric charges, slightly clarifying the meaning of expressions previously derived in the literature. We also use electric-magnetic duality to find a gravitational dual for a strongly coupled version of this theory using the gauge/gravity correspondence.

Karch, A. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fractional Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle {theta} of 0 or {pi}. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal T invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P{sub 3}, and a 'halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form {sigma}{sub H}=(p/q)(e{sup 2}/2h) with p, q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged 'quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) 'color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P{sub 3} and allows fractional values consistent with T invariance.

Maciejko, Joseph; Zhang Shoucheng [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Qi Xiaoliang [Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Transgression field theory for interacting topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider effective topological field theories of quantum Hall systems and time-reversal invariant topological insulators that are Chern-Simons and BF field theories. The edge states of these systems are related to the gauge invariance of the effective actions. For the edge states at the interface of two topological insulators, transgression field theory is proposed as a gauge invariant effective action. Transgression actions of Chern-Simons theories for (2+1)D and (4+1)D and BF theories for (3+1)D are constructed. By using transgression actions, the edge states are written in terms of the bulk connections of effective Chern-Simons and BF theories.

Aç?k, Özgür

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Apparatus for insulating windows and the like  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in "kit" form.

Mitchell, Robert A. (R.D. #1, Box 462-A, Voorheesville, NY 12186)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

aperture shield materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aperture shield materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Light-weight Flexible...

392

A Note on Hamilton Cycles in Kneser Graphs Ian Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Note on Hamilton Cycles in Kneser Graphs Ian Shields IBM P.O. Box 12195 Research Triangle Park) have Hamilton cycles when n #20; 27. A similar result is shown for bipartite Kneser graphs. 1 for Hamilton cycles in Kneser graphs, K(n; k), and bipartite Kneser graphs, H(n; k). With the exception

Savage, Carla D.

393

February, 2010 Fire Analysis of the Shielded Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Plant Carlsbad, New Mexico Preparer: Independent Technical Review: Ray Sprankle RSL Safety;FIRE ANALYSIS OF THE SHIELDED CONTAINER FOR THE WIPP-032, REV. 0 WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT, CARLSBAD, CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO PAGE 3 OF 28 Executive Summary Transuranic waste is currently shipped to the WIPP from

394

RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, DEN/DM2S/SERMA/LENR, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

PERGAMON Carbon 39 (2001) 279285 Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERGAMON Carbon 39 (2001) 279­285 Review Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding are reviewed. They include composite materials-structural and structural composites, colloi- dal graphite, as well as EMI gasket materials. Electromagnetic interference

Chung, Deborah D.L.

396

Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the feasibility of the development or adoption of technologies that would enable a large percentage of existing homes in cold climates to apply a combination 'excavationless' soil removal process with appropriate insulation and water management on the exterior of existing foundations at a low cost. Our approach was to explore existing excavation and material technologies and systems to discover whether potential successful combinations existed.

Mosiman, G.; Wagner, R.; Schirber, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Constraints on target chamber first wall and target designs that will enable NIF debris shields to survive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility target chamber interior materials and target designs themselves have to be compatible with survival of the final-optics debris shields. To meet the planned maintenance and refinishing rate, the contamination of the debris shields cannot exceed about 1 nm equivalent thickness per shot of total material. This implies that the target mass must be limited to no more than 1 gram and the ablated mass released to the chamber from all other components must not exceed 3 grams. In addition, the targets themselves must either completely vaporize or send any minor amounts of shrapnel towards the chamber waist to prevent excessive cratering of the debris shields. The constraints on the first-wall ablation require that it be louvered to provide passive collection of remobilized contamination, because the expected target debris will remobilize at a rate fast enough to require cleaning every 3 weeks, about three times more frequent than possible with planned robotics. Furthermore, a comparison of ablatants from B{sub 4}C and stainless-steel louvers suggests that remobilization of target debris by x rays will be greater than of the base material in both cases, thereby reducing the performance advantage of clean B{sub 4}C over much-cheaper stainless steel. Neutronics calculations indicate that activation of thin Ni-free stainless steel is not a significant source of maintenance personnel radiation dose. Consequently, the most attractive first wall design consists of stainless-steel louvers. Evaluation of various unconverted-light beam dump designs indicates that stainless steel louvers generate no more debris than other materials, so one single design can serve as both first wall and beam dumps, eliminating beam steering restrictions caused by size and location of the beam dumps. One reservation is that the allowable contamination rate of the debris shield is not yet completely understood.

Hibbard,W.; Burnham, A. K.; Curran, D. R; Genin, F. Y.; Gerassimenko, M.; Latkowski, J. F.; Peterson, P. F.; Scott, J. M.; Tokheim, R. E.; Whitman, P. K.

1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total dose outside the shield boundary at less than 0.5-mrem/hr. The shield configuration and parameters of the accelerator building have been determined and are presented in this paper. (authors)

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Witten effect in a crystalline topological insulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been noted a long time ago that a term of the form theta(e{sup 2}/2pih)Bcentre dotE may be added to the standard Maxwell Lagrangian without modifying the familiar laws of electricity and magnetism. theta is known to particle physicists as the 'axion' field and whether or not it has a nonzero expectation value in vacuum remains a fundamental open question of the standard model. A key manifestation of the axion term is the Witten effect: a unit magnetic monopole placed inside a medium with thetanot =0 is predicted to bind a (generally fractional) electric charge -e(theta/2pi+n) with n integer. Here we conduct a test of the Witten effect based on the recently established fact that the axion term with theta=pi emerges naturally in the description of the electromagnetic response of a class of crystalline solids called topological insulators--materials distinguished by strong spin-orbit coupling and nontrivial band structures. Using a simple physical model for a topological insulator we demonstrate the existence of a fractional charge bound to a monopole by an explicit numerical calculation. We also propose a scheme for generating an 'artificial' magnetic monopole in a topological insulator film that may be used to facilitate an experimental test of Witten's prediction.

Rosenberg, G.; Franz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Topological insulators with arbitrarily tunable entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We elucidate how Chern and topological insulators fulfill an area law for the entanglement entropy. By explicit construction of a family of lattice Hamiltonians, we are able to demonstrate that the area law contribution can be tuned to an arbitrarily small value, but is topologically protected from vanishing exactly. We prove this by introducing novel methods to bound entanglement entropies from correlations using perturbation bounds, drawing intuition from ideas of quantum information theory. This rigorous approach is complemented by an intuitive understanding in terms of entanglement edge states. These insights have a number of important consequences: The area law has no universal component, no matter how small, and the entanglement scaling cannot be used as a faithful diagnostic of topological insulators. This holds for all Renyi entropies which uniquely determine the entanglement spectrum which is hence also non-universal. The existence of arbitrarily weakly entangled topological insulators furthermore opens up possibilities of devising correlated topological phases in which the entanglement entropy is small and which are thereby numerically tractable, specifically in tensor network approaches.

J. C. Budich; J. Eisert; E. J. Bergholtz

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

Appelhans, Leah

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Correctly specify insulation for process equipment and piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Insulation serves as a thermal barrier to resist the flow of heat. When insulation is installed over piping or equipment to minimize heat losses, the insulation is categorized as heat conservation. Software programs for determining heat losses are based on ASTM C 680. If heat conservation insulation is calculated to determine the most cost-effective thickness for piping or equipment, then the insulation is categorized as economic insulation. Methods for manually determining economic thicknesses using various graphs and precalculated charts are given in Turner and Malloy. However, modern software programs available from industrial associations calculate economic thicknesses based on after-tax annual costs. Costs associated with owning insulation are expressed on an equivalent uniform annual cost basis. The thickness with the lowest annual cost is reported as the economic thickness. Some of the economic data needed to calculate economic thicknesses are fuel cost, depreciation period, annual fuel inflation rate, annual hours of operation, return on investment, effective income tax rate, annual insulation maintenance costs, and installed costs. To obtain accurate economical thicknesses, it is best to solicit installed costs from a local contractor likely to bid on the work. This paper covers the most suitable insulation materials for certain applications, the most economic material and thickness to use, and how the total insulation system should be designed.

Allen, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Birmingham, AL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A low-noise ferrite magnetic shield T. W. Kornack,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low-noise ferrite magnetic shield T. W. Kornack,a S. J. Smullin, S.-K. Lee, and M. V. Romalis April 2007; published online 29 May 2007 Ferrite materials provide magnetic shielding performance by thermal Johnson currents due to their high electrical resistivity. Measurements inside a ferrite shield

Romalis, Mike

405

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung; Silica fume; Shielding 1. Introduction Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding [1­4] is in critical, NY 14260-4400, USA Received 9 January 2002; accepted 14 August 2003 Abstract An electromagnetic

Chung, Deborah D.L.

406

Blue Shield ensures uninterrupted access to quality medical care after Palm Drive Hospital ceases operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue Shield ensures uninterrupted access to quality medical care after Palm Drive Hospital ceases and inpatient services due to the hospital's bankruptcy filing. This closure affects Blue Shield HMO plan members who have been utilizing Palm Drive Hospital services. Please be advised that Blue Shield

Ravikumar, B.

407

Company Name: Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Web Site: www.bluecrossma.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company Name: Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA Web Site: www.bluecrossma.com Industry: Healthcare Brief Company Overview: Headquartered in Boston, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts provides comprehensive-level position: Please visit www.bluecrossma.com/careers. With almost 3 million members, Blue Cross Blue Shield

New Hampshire, University of

408

Colorado Supplement to the Summary of Benefits and Coverage Form Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement to the Summary of Benefits and Coverage Form Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield CHEIBA Prime PPO Screenings, Prostate Cancer Screenings, and Colorectal Cancer Screenings. Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Colorado, Inc. Independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ®ANTHEM is a registered

409

Colorado Supplement to the Summary of Benefits and Coverage Form Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement to the Summary of Benefits and Coverage Form Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield CHEIBA Custom Plus Screenings, Prostate Cancer Screenings, and Colorectal Cancer Screenings. Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Colorado, Inc. Independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ®ANTHEM is a registered

410

Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell BRUNO KIEFFER1, ETHIOPIA 4 DEEPARTEMENT DES SCIENCES DE LA TERRE ET DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT, UNIVERSITEE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES 50 the shield volcanoes. KEY WORDS: Ethiopia; flood basalts; shield volcanism; superswell INTRODUCTION According

Demouchy, Sylvie

411

Progress Report Rad Effects in Concrete Bio Shield Final  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) typically exhibit higher radiation levels outside the PV than the boiling water reactors. Among the PWRs, the highest radiation levels outside...

412

Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Milorad Boji?; Dragan Cvetkovi?; Marko Mileti?; Jovan Maleševi?; Harry Boyer

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy, cost, and CO 2 emission comparison between radiant wall panel systems and radiator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of application or replacement of radiators with low-temperature radiant panels. This paper shows the comparison results of operations of 4 space heating systems: the low-temperature radiant panel system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WOI), the low-temperature radiant panel system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (PH-WI), the radiator system without any additional thermal insulation of external walls (the classical heating system) (RH-WOI), and the radiator system with additional thermal insulation of external walls (RH-WI). The operation of each system is simulated by software EnergyPlus. The investigation shows that the PH-WI gives the best results. The RH-WOI has the largest energy consumption, and the largest pollutant emission. However, the PH-WI requires the highest investment.

Boji?, Milorad; Mileti?, Marko; Maleševi?, Jovan; Boyer, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Clothing Insulation Models based on Outdoor AirPREDICTIVE CLOTHING INSULATION MODELS ON BUILDING ENERGYthat the clothing insulation is equal to a constant value of

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Compact gas-insulated transformer. Fourteenth quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is to develop a compact, more efficient, quieter transformer which does not rely on mineral oil insulation. Compressed SF/sub 6/ is used as the external insulation and polymer film as the insulation between turns. A separate liquid cooling system is also provided. This document reports progress made in design, mechanical, dielectric, short circuit, thermal, materials, prototype, accessories, commercialization, and system studies. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for cable-shielding corrosion. Special attention was paid to the comparative behavior of active and static cables. Results indicate that steel shieldings are most susceptible to the effects of alternating current (AC) in active cables. Results of a wide range of shieldings are presented and evaluated.

Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. (Texas Instruments Inc., Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab., 34 Forest St., Mail Station 10-13, Attleboro, MA (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

insulation technologies available on the market. Instead of hydroflurocarbon, it uses carbon dioxide as the blowing agent. This technology represents a highly valuable market...

419

Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Shaking the bonds: Atomic vibrations drive insulator to metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phase stability for more than 50 years. When heated to just above room temperature, the material undergoes an abrupt transformation from an electrical insulator to a conducting...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

THE ENTROPY OF COOPERATIVE RADIATION SENSING BY DISTRIBUTED SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation activity is motivated by applica- tions in the field of nuclear nonproliferation: nuclear foren; or detection of shielded spe- cial nuclear material, being smuggled through international points of entry. One-to- Noise-Ratio follows an inverse square law with respect to the distance as well as with respect

Tanner, Herbert G.

422

Prediction of effective atomic number (Z) for laminated shielding material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(&?/P)=3. 103E-2 (P/P)=5. 951E-2 (P, ?/P)=2. 603 E-2 (&/P)=6. 803E-2 P', ?/P)=3. 654E-2 3. 0 (&/P)=3. 968E-2 (&, ?/P)=2. 281E-2 (4/P)=3. 616E-2 (P, ?/P)=2, 042E 2 (P/P)=4. 200E-2 (&??/P)=2. 322E-2 25 35 30 25 20 N 15 10 ~ffe w ~2fe w ~3... fe w ~4fe w ~5fe w 0 0 4 mfp 10 Fig. 5a. Z?fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function of mfp 90 80 70 4D ~2w pb 3D ~3w pb 20 ~4w pb 10 ~6w pb 0 0 2 4 6 8 1D m fp Fig. 5. b. Z, fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function...

Sarder, Md. Maksudur Rahaman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

Topological insulators with SU(2) Landau levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct continuum models of 3D and 4D topological insulators by coupling spin-1/2 fermions to an SU(2) background gauge field, which is equivalent to a spatially dependent spin-orbit coupling. Higher dimensional generalizations of flat Landau levels are obtained in the Landau-like gauge. The 2D helical Dirac modes with opposite helicities and 3D Weyl modes with opposite chiralities are spatially separated along the third and fourth dimensions, respectively. Stable 2D helical Fermi surfaces and 3D chiral Fermi surfaces appear on open boundaries, respectively. The charge pumping in 4D Landau level systems shows quantized 4D quantum Hall effect.

Yi Li; Shou-Cheng Zhang; Congjun Wu

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Möbius Graphene Strip as Topological Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the electronic properties of M\\"{o}bius graphene strip with a zigzag edge. We show that such graphene strip behaves as a topological insulator with a gapped bulk and a robust metallic surface, which enjoys some features due to its nontrivial topology of the spatial configuration, such as the existence of edge states and the non-Abelian induced gauge field. We predict that the topological properties of the M\\"{o}bius graphene strip can be experimentally displayed by the destructive interference in the transmission spectrum, and the robustness of edge states under certain perturbations.

Z. L. Guo; Z. R. Gong; H. Dong; C. P. Sun

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

Novel metals and insulators from holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using simple holographic models in $D=4$ spacetime dimensions we construct black hole solutions dual to $d=3$ CFTs at finite charge density with a Q-lattice deformation. At zero temperature we find new ground state solutions with broken translation invariance, either in one or both spatial directions, which exhibit insulating or metallic behaviour depending on the parameters of the holographic theory. For low temperatures and small frequencies, the real part of the optical conductivity has a power-law behaviour, with the exponent determined by the ground state. We also obtain an expression for the the DC conductivity at finite temperature in terms of horizon data of the black hole solutions.

Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Holographic Metals and Insulators with Helical Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homogeneous, zero temperature scaling solutions with Bianchi VII spatial geometry are constructed in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory. They correspond to quantum critical saddle points with helical symmetry at finite density. Assuming $AdS_{5}$ UV asymptotics, the small frequency/(temperature) dependence of the AC/(DC) electric conductivity along the director of the helix are computed. A large class of insulating and conducting anisotropic phases is found, as well as isotropic, metallic phases. Conduction can be dominated by dissipation due to weak breaking of translation symmetry or by a quantum critical current.

Aristomenis Donos; Blaise Goutéraux; Elias Kiritsis

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Types of Insulation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1Two NovelTwoTypes ofInsulation

430

Concrete Shield Performance of the VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, representatives from the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete spent nuclear fuel storage cask. Radiation and environmental effects may cause chemical alteration of the concrete that could result in excessive cracking, spalling, and loss of compressive strength. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project team and CRIEPI representatives identified the Ventilated Storage Cask (VSC-17) spent nuclear fuel storage cask as a candidate to study cask performance, because it had been used to store fuel as part of a dry cask storage demonstration project for more than 15 years. The project involved investigating the properties of the concrete shield. INL performed a survey of the cask in the summers of 2003 and 2004. Preliminary cask evaluations performed in 2003 indicated that the cask has no visual degradation. However, a 4-5 mrem/hr step-change in the radiation levels about halfway up the cask and a localized hot spot beneath an upper air vent indicate that there may be variability in the density of the concrete or localized cracking. In 2005, INL and CRIEPI scientists performed additional surveys on the VSC-17 cask. This document summarizes the methods used on the VSC-17 to evaluate the cask for compressive strength, concrete cracking, concrete thickness, and temperature distribution.

Sheryl L. Morton; Philip L. Winston; Toshiari Saegusa; Koji Shirai; Akihiro Sasahara; Takatoshi Hattori

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Insulating conduction in Sn/Si(111): Possibility of a Mott insulating ground state and metallization/localization induced by carrier doping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulating conduction in Sn/Si(111): Possibility of a Mott insulating ground state measurements. The temperature dependence of the surface-state conductivity showed an insulating behavior from is insulating with a very small energy gap, which is consistent with a recent theoretical study G. Profeta and E

Hasegawa, Shuji

432

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

433

Electrical Transport of Topological Insulator-Bi2Se3 and Thermoelectric Properties of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hall effect and topological insulators. Phys Today Klitzing,L. & Mele, E. J. Topological insulators in three dimensions.Zhang, H. J. et al. Topological insulators in Bi 2 Se 3 , Bi

WEI, PENG

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Scattering of Dirac Fermions in Barrier Geometries on the Surface of Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scattering of Dirac Fermions in Barrier Geometries on the Surface of Topological Insulators Lindsay Fleischer 1 Introduction Predicted theoretically and discovered experimentally, the topological insulators topological in- sulators and the trivial insulating vacuum have wavefunctions which are not smoothly

Torquato, Salvatore

435

Polarization dependent photocurrents in thin films of the topological insulator Bi?Se?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators are a new class of three-dimensional quantum materials whose interior or bulk is an insulator but whose surface is a conductor. Bi?Se? is a prototypical topological insulator that physicists at MIT ...

Lau, Claudia (Claudia M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Variably insulating portable heater/cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Variably insulating portable heater/cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

Potter, T.F.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

Benson, David K. (14154 W. First Dr., Golden, CO 80401); Potter, Thomas F. (515 S. Magnolia La., Denver, CO 80224)

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida is now Florida Blue State Employees' PPO Plan health insurance provider Blue Cross and Blue Shield of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida is now Florida Blue State Employees' PPO Plan health insurance provider Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida has recently changed its name to Florida Blue Resources Benefits Office at (850) 6444015, or insben@admin.fsu.edu. RELATED LINKS ­ Florida Blue

Ronquist, Fredrik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4+1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4+1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2+1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2+1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3+1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4+1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the $Z_2$ topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

Xiao-Liang Qi; Taylor Hughes; Shou-Cheng Zhang

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Bosonic Topological Insulators and Paramagnets: a view from cobordisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We classify Bosonic Topological Insulators and Paramagnets in DTopological Insulator protected by time-reversal symmetry whose surface admits an all-fermion topologically ordered state. For D=4 there is a unique "beyond group cohomology" phase. It is protected by gravitational anomalies of the boundary theory and is stable without any additional symmetry.

Anton Kapustin

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4 + 1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the Z{sub 2} topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/hc. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

444

Benchmarking FENDL libraries through analysis of bulk shielding experiments on large SS316 assemblies for verification of ITER shielding characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FENDL-1 data base has been developed recently for use in ITER/EDA phase and other fusion-related design activities. It is now undergoing extensive testing and benchmarking using experimental data of differential and integral measured parameters obtained from fusion-oriented experiments. As part of co-operation between UCLA (U.S.) with JAERI (Japan) on executing the required neutronics R&D tasks for ITER shield design, two bulk shielding experiments on large SS316 assemblies were selected for benchmarking FENDL/MG-1 multigroup data base and FENDL/MC-1 continous energy data base. The analyses with the multigroup data (performed with S8, P5, DORT calculations with shielded and unshielded data) also included library derived from ENDF/B-VI data base for comparison purposes. The MCNP Monte Carlo code was used by JAERI with the FENDL/MC-1 data. The results of this benchmarking is reported in this paper along with the observed deficiencies and discrepancies. 20 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Konno, Chikara; Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Oyama, Yukio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip shield Degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), an analysis of the degradation of the engineered barrier system (EBS) drip shields and waste packages at the Yucca Mountain repository is developed. The purpose of this activity is to provide the TSPA with inputs and methodologies used to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. This analysis provides information useful to satisfy ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) requirements. Several features, events, and processes (FEPs) are also discussed (Section 6.2, Table 15). The previous revision of this report was prepared as a model report in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Due to changes in the role of this report since the site recommendation, it no longer contains model development. This revision is prepared as a scientific analysis in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'' and uses models previously validated in (1) ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]); (2) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169984]); and (3) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169845]). The integrated waste package degradation (IWPD) analysis presented in this report treats several implementation-related issues, such as defining the number and size of patches per waste package that undergo stress corrosion cracking; recasting the weld flaw analysis in a form as implemented in the Closure Weld Defects (CWD) software; and, general corrosion rate manipulations (e.g., change of scale in Section 6.3.4). The weld flaw portion of this report takes input from an engineering calculation (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170024]) and uses standard mathematical methods to enable easier implementation. The IWPD analysis also provides guidance on implementation of early failures (importance sampling and multinomial distribution usage). These manipulations are evident from standard scientific practices, approaches, or methods and do not require changes to the previously validated models. The IWPD analysis itself (Section 6.4), not the resultant curves from executing the IWPD analysis presented in Section 6.5 (which are for illustrative purposes), is used directly in total system performance assessment (TSPA). The IWPD analysis simulates general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of the waste package outer barrier and general corrosion of the drip shield. The effects of igneous and seismic events and localized corrosion on drip shield and waste package performance are not evaluated in this report. The outputs of this report are inputs and methodologies used by TSPA to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. The analyses presented in this report are for the current repository design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]).

K. Mon

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

Correlated topological insulators and the fractional magnetoelectric effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk {theta} term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional {theta}/{pi}. We show that fractional {theta}/{pi} is only possible in a gapped time-reversal-invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically nontrivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time-reversal-symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with {theta}=({pi}/4). Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

Swingle, B.; Barkeshli, M.; McGreevy, J.; Senthil, T. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Correlated Topological Insulators and the Fractional Magnetoelectric Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk theta term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional theta/pi. We show that fractional theta/pi is only possible in a gapped time reversal invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically non-trivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time reversal symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with theta = pi/4. Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

Brian Swingle; Maissam Barkeshli; John McGreevy; T. Senthil

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

Design of Experiments Results for the Feedthru Insulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design of experiments (DoE) was performed at Ceramtec to improve the yield of a cermet part known as the feedthru insulator. The factors chosen to be varied in this DoE were syringe orifice size, fill condition, solvent, and surfactant. These factors were chosen because of their anticipated effect on the cermet slurry and its consequences to the feedthru insulator in succeeding fabrication operations. Response variables to the DoE were chosen to be indirect indicators of production yield for the feedthru insulator. The solvent amount used to mix the cermet slurry had the greatest overall effect on the response variables. Based upon this DoE, there is the potential to improve the yield not only for the feedthru insulator but for other cermet parts as well. This report thoroughly documents the DoE and contains additional information regarding the feedthru insulator.

BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; VAN ORNUM,DAVID J.; BACA,MAUREEN R.; APPEL,PATRICIA E.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Scattering of radiation in collisionless dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scattering of electromagnetic waves in collisionless dusty plasmas is studied in the framework of a multi-component kinetic model. The investigation focuses on the spectral distribution of the scattered radiation. Pronounced dust signatures are identified in the coherent spectrum due to scattering from the shielding cloud around the dust grains, dust acoustic waves, and dust-ion acoustic waves. The magnitude and shape of the scattered signal near these spectral regions are determined with the aid of analytical expressions and its dependence on the dust parameters is investigated. The use of radiation scattering as a potential diagnostic tool for dust detection is discussed.

Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S. [Space and Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-100 44 (Sweden)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Scattering theory of topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The topological invariant of a topological insulator (or superconductor) is given by the number of symmetry-protected edge states present at the Fermi level. Despite this fact, established expressions for the topological invariant require knowledge of all states below the Fermi energy. Here, we propose a way to calculate the topological invariant employing solely its scattering matrix at the Fermi level without knowledge of the full spectrum. Since the approach based on scattering matrices requires much less information than the Hamiltonian-based approaches (surface versus bulk), it is numerically more efficient. In particular, is better-suited for studying disordered systems. Moreover, it directly connects the topological invariant to transport properties potentially providing a new way to probe topological phases.

I. C. Fulga; F. Hassler; A. R. Akhmerov

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electromagnetic Scattering by Spheres of Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic scattering properties of topological insulator (TI) spheres are systematically studied in this paper. Unconventional backward scattering caused by the topological magneto-electric (TME) effect of TIs are found in both Rayleigh and Mie scattering regimes. This enhanced backward scattering can be achieved by introducing an impedance-matched background which can suppress the bulk scattering. For the cross-polarized scattering coefficients, interesting antiresonances are found in the Mie scattering regime, wherein the cross-polarized electromagnetic fields induced by the TME effect are trapped inside TI spheres. In the Rayleigh limit, the quantized TME effect of TIs can be determined by measuring the electric-field components of scattered waves in the far field.

Ge, Lixin; Zi, Jian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Photonic spin Hall effect in topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we theoretically investigate the photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) of a Gaussian beam reflected from the interface between air and topological insulators (TIs). The photonic SHE is attributed to spin-orbit coupling and manifests itself as in-plane and transverse spin-dependent splitting. We reveal that the spin-orbit coupling effect in TIs can be routed by adjusting the axion angle variations. Unlike the transverse spin-dependent splitting, we find that the in-plane one is sensitive to the axion angle. It is shown that the polarization structure in magneto-optical Kerr effect is significantly altered due to the spin-dependent splitting in photonic SHE. We theoretically propose a weak measurement method to determine the strength of axion coupling by probing the in-plane splitting of photonic SHE.

Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Chen, Shizhen; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

From topological insulators to superconductors and Confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological matter in 3D is characterized by the presence of a topological BF term in its long-distance effective action. We show that, in 3D, there is another marginal term that must be added to the action in order to fully determine the physical content of the model. The quantum phase structure is governed by three parameters that drive the condensation of topological defects: the BF coupling, the electric permittivity and the magnetic permeability of the material. For intermediate levels of electric permittivity and magnetic permeability the material is a topological insulator. We predict, however, new states of matter when these parameters cross critical values: a topological superconductor when electric permittivity is increased and magnetic permeability is lowered and a charge confinement phase in the opposite case of low electric permittivity and high magnetic permeability. Synthetic topological matter may be fabricated as 3D arrays of Josephson junctions.

M. Cristina Diamantini; Pasquale Sodano; Carlo A. Trugenberger

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Topological Insulators Avoid the Parity Anomaly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface of a 3+1d topological insulator hosts an odd number of gapless Dirac fermions when charge conjugation and time-reversal symmetries are preserved. Viewed as a purely 2+1d system, this surface theory would necessarily explicitly break parity and time-reversal when coupled to a fluctuating gauge field. Here we explain why such a state can exist on the boundary of a 3+1d system without breaking these symmetries, even if the number of boundary components is odd. This is accomplished from two complementary perspectives: topological quantization conditions and regularization. We first discuss the conditions under which (continuous) large gauge transformations may exist when the theory lives on a boundary of a higher-dimensional spacetime. Next, we show how the higher-dimensional bulk theory is essential in providing a parity-invariant regularization of the theory living on the lower-dimensional boundary or defect.

Michael Mulligan; F. J. Burnell

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Reflector and Shield Material Properties for Project Prometheus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter provides updated reflector and shield preliminary material property information to support reactor design efforts. The information provided herein supersedes the applicable portions of Revision 1 to the Space Power Program Preliminary Reactor Design Basis (Reference (a)). This letter partially answers the request in Reference (b) to provide unirradiated and irradiated material properties for beryllium, beryllium oxide, isotopically enriched boron carbide ({sup 11}B{sub 4}C) and lithium hydride. With the exception of {sup 11}B{sub 4}C, the information is provided in Attachments 1 and 2. At the time of issuance of this document, {sup 11}B{sub 4}C had not been studied.

J. Nash

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Submicron carbon filament cement-matrix composites for electromagnetic interference shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon filaments of diameter 0.1 mm were found to be a much more effective additive than conventional carbon fibers of diameter 10 mm in providing cement pastes capable of electromagnetic interference shielding. With 0.54 vol. % filaments and a shield thickness of 4 mm, a shielding effectiveness of 30 dB was attained at 1--2 GHz. However, the filaments were less effective than the fibers for reinforcing and for providing strain sensing cement-matrix composites.

Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

New Six-Layer Magnetically-Shielded Room for MEG D. Cohen1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Imedco, to house a 4-D MEG system, containing both gradiometers and magnetometers (Vectorview of the passive shielding factor yield 1,630 (64dB), 3,600 (71dB), 240,000 (107dB) , and 78,000,000 (158d of 0.010 to 0.10 Hz. The 78 dB was to combine 58 dB of passive shielding with 20 dB of active shielding

460

Analysis and testing of multilayer and aerogel insulation configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayer insulation systems that have robust operational characteristics have long been a goal of many research projects. Such thermal insulation systems may need to offer some degree of structural support and/or mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel-based composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel blanket and multilayer insulation materials have been tested at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MLI and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenicvacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

Johnson, W L [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Fesmire, J. E. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insulation radiation shielding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A. B.; Guo, X.L.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Instrumented, Shielded Test Canister System for Evaluation of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Dry Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the development of an instrumented, shielded test canister system to store and monitor aluminum-based spent nuclear duel under dry storage conditions.

Sindelar, R.L.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft shield test reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 50 PERGAMON Carbon 39 (2001) 279285 Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of carbon Summary: -matrix structural composites...

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced shielding systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Engineering, University of Rochester Collection: Engineering 77 Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer-matrix...

465

1. Shielding against Electromagnetic Interference With telecommunication networks connecting wireless devices around the globe, there  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;1. Shielding against Electromagnetic Interference With telecommunication networks connecting electromagnetic interference (EMI) across the airwaves. These communication networks are ubiquitous and dynamic

Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

466

Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Reid, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Holographic classification of Topological Insulators and its 8-fold periodicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using generic properties of Clifford algebras in any spatial dimension, we explicitly classify Dirac hamiltonians with zero modes protected by the discrete symmetries of time-reversal, particle-hole symmetry, and chirality. Assuming the boundary states of topological insulators are Dirac fermions, we thereby holographically reproduce the Periodic Table of topological insulators found by Kitaev and Ryu. et. al, without using topological invariants nor K-theory. In addition we find candidate Z_2 topological insulators in classes AI, AII in dimensions 0,4 mod 8 and in classes C, D in dimensions 2,6 mod 8.

André LeClair; Denis Bernard

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

468

Torsional Response and Dissipationless Viscosity in Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the visco-elastic response of the electronic degrees of freedom in 2D and 3D topological insulators (TI). Our primary focus is on the 2D Chern insulator which exhibits a bulk dissipationless viscosity analogous to the quantum Hall viscosity predicted in integer and fractional quantum Hall states. We show that the dissipationless viscosity is the response of a TI to torsional deformations of the underlying lattice geometry. The visco-elastic response also indicates that crystal dislocations in Chern insulators will carry momentum density. We briefly discuss generalizations to 3D which imply that time-reversal invariant TI's will exhibit a quantum Hall viscosity on their surfaces.

Taylor L. Hughes; Robert G. Leigh; Eduardo Fradkin

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Outdoor polymeric insulators long-term exposed to HVDC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field experience from outdoor polymeric insulators exposed to HVDC under natural contamination conditions is presented. This paper summarizes the peak leakage current statistics, the hydrophobicity and the surface material conditions studied by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The results show a strong interrelation between the surface conditions and the performance with respect to leakage currents. Moreover, the results show that the surface conditions and the performance of the insulators exposed to HVDC are rather similar to those of the insulators exposed to HVAC.

Soerqvist, T.; Vlastos, A.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pipeline system insulation: thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. December 1985-February 1988 (citations from the rubber and plastics research association data base). Report for December 1985-February 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulating of pipeline systems used to transfer liquids and gases. Thermal aging of polyurethane foam for insulating heating pipes, extrusion-film pipeline-insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile-rubber pipeline insulation with class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass-reinforced polyester insulated-pipeline systems are among the topics discussed. Applications in solar-heating systems, underground water, oil, and gas, interior hot water and cold water lines under seawater, and chemical-plant pipeline-system insulation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 139 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S. [BOC Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Science Highlight August 2010 New State of Topological Insulators Offers New Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Highlight ­ August 2010 New State of Topological Insulators Offers New Opportunities Three dimensional topological insulators are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number insulator enters the insulating masive Dirac fermion state, a state that harbors striking topological

Wechsler, Risa H.

473

Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I. Satija and Erhai Zhao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I. Satija and Erhai Zhao Abstract- tance is topological insulators, materials that are insulating in the interior but con- duct along of matter known as Topological Insulators. I.I. Satija (B) · E. Zhao School of Physics, Astronomy

Satija, Indu

474

Fermi-level tuning of topological insulator thin films Masaki Aitani,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermi-level tuning of topological insulator thin films Masaki Aitani,1 Yusuke Sakamoto,1 Toru Topological insulators are insulating materials but have metallic edge states with peculiar prop- erties properties of topological insulator ultrathin Bi2Te3 films by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

Hasegawa, Shuji

475

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115415 (2012) Smooth gauge for topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115415 (2012) Smooth gauge for topological insulators Alexey A. Soluyanov polarization3,4 and the anomalous Hall conductance.5,6 The recent discovery of topological insulators7,8 has-like functions for 2D Z2 insulators (i.e., quantum spin- Hall insulators) that are smooth functions of k

Vanderbilt, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I Satija and Erhai Zhao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I Satija and Erhai Zhao School of Physics is topological insulators, materials that are insulating in the interior but conduct along the edges. Quantum to the family of exotic states of matter known as Topological Insulators. QH and QSH effect usually requires

Satija, Indu

477

Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

09NVC-0163 Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory Laurent [20,200] Hz, sound-insulation layer modeling remains a critical topic. Recent work allows- insulation layer. Nevertheless, such an approach requires a FE model of sound-insulation layer, which may

Boyer, Edmond

478

Key-Insulated Signcryption (Science and Technology on Communication Security Laboratory,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key-Insulated Signcryption Jia Fan 1 (Science and Technology on Communication Security Laboratory addresses the issue of key exposure by proposing a key-insulated signcryption technique. We define a security model for key-insulated signcryption and prove that the key- insulated signcryption technique

Zheng, Yuliang

479

Ris-M-2270 SHIELDING FACTORS FOR GAMMA RADIATION PROM ACTIVITY DEPOSITED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear reactor accidents where radioactivity is re- leased to the atmosphere, attention has in the last for different photon energies and for a uniform surface activity distribution as well as for separate activity covered by windows, photon energy, and decontamination percentage for outer walls, ground and roofs

480

ANL/APS/TB-21 Radiation Shielding of Insertion Device Beamlines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258Department of31 . Wiggler9 A .01

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481

Movable insulation. A guide to reducing heating and cooling losses through the windows in your home  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A typical house loses 25 to 30% of its heat through windows, and a house with large windows may lose as much as 50%. Numerous movable-insulation systems that will cut the heat loss through windows in half are described. Chapters are: The Energy-Responsive Dwelling, Past to Present; Window Heat Losses and Gains; Enhanced Glazing Systems; Choosing a Window-Insulation Design for Your Home; Pop-In Shutters; Thermal Curtains - Blankets that Fold; Thermal Shades - Blankets that Roll; Thermal Shutters and Folding Screens; Insulation Between Glazing and Interior Louvers; Exterior Hinged and Sliding Shutters; Sun-Shading Screens; Exterior Roll Shutters; Shutters for Skylights; Shutters for Clerestory Windows; Interior Greenhouse Insulation Systems; Exterior Insulation for Greenhouses; Movable Insulation to Assist Passive Space Heating; and Movable Insulation to Assist Solar Water Heaters. Appendices include the following: insulated shade and shutter construction; the economics of window insulation; movable insulation products, hardware, and components; further technical information; and design sources. (MCW)

Langdon, W.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Exchange-Coupling-Induced Symmetry Breaking in Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exchange gap in the Dirac surface states of a topological insulator (TI) is necessary for observing the predicted unique features such as the topological magnetoelectric effect as well as to confine Majorana fermions. ...

Wei, Peng

483

Correlated topological insulators and the fractional magnetoelectric effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk ? [theta] term ...

Swingle, Brian Gordon

484

Topological crystalline insulators and Dirac octets in antiperovskites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We predict a class of topological crystalline insulators in the antiperovskite material family with the chemical formula A[subscript 3]BX. Here the nontrivial topology arises from band inversion between two J = 3/2 quartets, ...

Liu, Junwei

485

Classification of Interacting Electronic Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental open problem in condensed-matter physics is how the dichotomy between conventional and topological band insulators is modified in the presence of strong electron interactions. We show that there are six ...

Wang, Chong

486

Driven electronic states at the surface of a topological insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent photoemission experiments on the surface of topological insulators we compute the spectrum of driven topological surface excitations in the presence of an external light source. We completely characterize ...

Fregoso, Benjamin M.

487

Interacting fermionic topological insulators/superconductors in three dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases are a minimal generalization of the concept of topological insulators to interacting systems. In this paper, we describe the classification and properties of such phases for ...

Wang, Chong

488

Topological Crystalline Insulators in the SnTe Material Class  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological crystalline insulators are new states of matter in which the topological nature of electronic structures arises from crystal symmetries. Here we predict the first material realization of topological crystalline ...

Hsieh, Timothy Hwa-wei

489

Homotopy Theory of Strong and Weak Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use homotopy theory to extend the notion of strong and weak topological insulators to the non-stable regime (low numbers of occupied/empty energy bands). We show that for strong topological insulators in d spatial dimensions to be "truly d-dimensional", i.e. not realizable by stacking lower-dimensional insulators, a more restrictive definition of "strong" is required. However, this does not exclude weak topological insulators from being "truly d-dimensional", which we demonstrate by an example. Additionally, we prove some useful technical results, including the homotopy theoretic derivation of the factorization of invariants over the torus into invariants over spheres in the stable regime, as well as the rigorous justification of replacing $T^d$ by $S^d$ and $T^{d_k}\\times S^{d_x}$ by $S^{d_k+d_x}$ as is common in the current literature.

Ricardo Kennedy; Charles Guggenheim

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

490

Microscopic Realization of Two-Dimensional Bosonic Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that a bosonic Mott insulator can be realized by condensing vortices of a boson condensate. Usually, a vortex becomes an antivortex (and vice versa) under time reversal symmetry, and the condensation of ...

Liu, Zheng-Xin

491

Design and analysis of SMES-ETM electrical insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical design and the electrical field analysis of the Ebasco/Westinghouse SMES-ETM coil electrical insulation system are presented. The electrical insulation design of the coil includes the turn to turn, layer to layer, and between the coil to the wall of the liquid helium vessel of the cryostat. A finite element analysis code (WEMAP) was used to obtain detailed electrical field plots of the high electrically stressed regions of the coil. These analytical results were used in conjunction with the experimental data of dielectric breakdown, available in the literature or obtained by in-house testing, to determine the optimum configuration and materials of the insulation spacers. An adequate design safety factor between the insulation capability and the maximum operating electrical stress was adopted to ensure the design integrity under all operating conditions and to allow for the uncertainties of the experimental dielectric breakdown data.

Wu, J.L.; Roach, J.F.; Johnson, D.C.; Dederer, J.T.; Singh, S.K.; Hackworth, D.T. [Westinghouse Science & Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

Expansion Joint Concepts for High Temperature Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPANSION JOINT CONCEPTS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE INSULATION SYSTEMS Michael R. Harrison Johns-Manville Sales Corporation ";.,' Denver, Colorado ABSTRACT As high temperature steam and process piping expands with heat, joints beg in to open...

Harrison, M. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Topological Spin Texture in a Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect has been recently discovered in an experiment using a thin-film topological insulator with ferromagnetic ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. Here we investigate the spin degree ...

Wu, Jiansheng

494

Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

High constriction ratio continuous insulator based dielectrophoretic particle sorting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low frequency insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a promising technique to study cell surface dielectric properties. To date, iDEP has been exploited to distinguish, characterize, and manipulate particles and ...

Wang, Qianru, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Identification of building applications for a variable-conductance insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments have confirmed the feasibility of controllable, reversible disabling of a vacuum insulation panel, which may result in the development of energy-efficient building envelope components. These components could extend the managed energy exchange through the building envelope from about 30% (typical with fenestration systems in commercial buildings), to as much as 90% of the gross wall and roof areas. Further investigation will be required to optimized the thermal response and the magnitude of the R-value swing (from a difference between insulating and conducting insulating values of 4 to as high as a factor of 100). The potential for energy reduction by using the variable-conductance insulation in the building envelope is discussed, and other potential building applications are mentioned.

Potter, T.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Tuluca, A. [Winter (Steven) Associates, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Aerogel-Based Insulation for Industrial Steam Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal losses in industrial steam distribution systems account for 977 trillion Btu/year in the US, more than 1% of total domestic energy consumption. Aspen Aerogels worked with Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program to specify, develop, scale-up, demonstrate, and deliver Pyrogel XT®, an aerogel-based pipe insulation, to market to reduce energy losses in industrial steam systems. The product developed has become Aspen’s best selling flexible aerogel blanket insulation and has led to over 60 new jobs. Additionally, this product has delivered more than ~0.7 TBTU of domestic energy savings to date, and could produce annual energy savings of 149 TBTU by 2030. Pyrogel XT’s commercial success has been driven by it’s 2-4X better thermal performance, improved durability, greater resistance to corrosion under insulation (CUI), and faster installation times than incumbent insulation materials.

John Williams

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

Aerogel Insulation: The Materials Science of Empty Space  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Empty space can be good, like a blank canvas for an artist, or it can be bad, like an attic without insulation for a homeowner.  But when a technological breakthrough provides just the right amount...

499

Energy and Emissions Savings through Insulation Upgrade Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presentation demonstrates the value of including insulation system assessment, repairs and upgrades on a facility's physical function and its importance in the overall energy and environmental management program. Financial and environmental...

Lettich, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Manipulation of bacteria using three dimensional insulator based dielectrophoresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a very promising technique for sorting microparticles based on their electrical properties. By using constrictions in a microchannel to generate large electric field gradients, ...

Braff, William Allan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z