Sample records for instruments hydrological hydrographic

  1. Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

  2. YELLOW SEA ACOUSTIC UNCERTAINTY CAUSED BY HYDROGRAPHIC DATA ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    the littoral and blue waters. After a weapon platform has detected its targets, the sensors on torpedoes, bathymetry, bottom type, and sound speed profiles. Here, the effect of sound speed errors (i.e., hydrographic

  3. Techniques for estimating flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, V.A.; Sauer, V.B.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clark Method, modified slightly, was used to develop a synthetic dimensionless hydrograph that can be used to estimate flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds. Application of the technique results in a typical (average) flood hydrograph for a given peak discharge. Input necessary to apply the technique is an estimate of basin lagtime and the recurrence interval peak discharge. Equations for this purpose were obtained from a recent nationwide study on flood frequency in urban watersheds. A regression equation was developed which relates flood volumes to drainage area size, basin lagtime, and peak discharge. This equation is useful where storage of floodwater may be a part of design or flood prevention. 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page 1 Lead Author L. Alexander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9

  5. Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999 Lynne D. Talley a,*, Pavel: Japan sea; Ocean chemistry; Ocean atlas; Marginal seas; Water masses 1. Introduction The Japan or East (Talley et al., 2004a). Here we present a comprehensive atlas of the methods and property distributions

  6. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 3550 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    an empirically derived unit hydrograph or a kinematic wave to generate runoff hydrographs. Precipitation, runoff modelling; kinematic wave; unit hydrograph; eastern Caribbean Received 20 August 2004; Accepted 28 July 2005

  7. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  8. Ocean Carbon and Repeat Hydrographic CLIVAR Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Effective management and archival of data is a fundamental requirement for successful scientific research endeavors, and future oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal with reference-quality global ocean CTD, water sample, and underway data, one (CDIAC) specializing in discrete CO2 and underway surface data, and the other (WHPO/CCHDO) specializing in CTD, hydrographic, and tracer data.

  9. Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd on Hydrographic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd QC) on Hydrographic Data Toste Tanhua, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Kiel, Germany. This Matlab package will help you perform secondary cite as: Tanhua, T. 2010. Matlab Toolbox to Perform Secondary Quality Control (2nd QC) on Hydrographic

  10. Hydrographic Preconditioning for Seasonal Sea Ice Anomalies in the Labrador Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian

    This study investigates the hydrographic processes involved in setting the maximum wintertime sea ice (SI) extent in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The analysis is based on an ocean and sea ice state estimate covering ...

  11. Techniques for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlow, M.D.

    TR-3 1966 Techniques for Hydrograph Synthesis Based on Analysis of Data from Small Drainage Basins in Texas M.D. Hudlow Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  12. Unit hydrograph application to stormwater collection system design and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinks, Melvin Gerald

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    review of each model studied and its capabilities follows. Storm Water Management Model. ? The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the analysis of urban stormwater runoff... backwater analysis option uses the Direct Step Method to compute the water surface profiles in the storm sewer system. Two case studies with complex stormwater collection systems were modeled to verify and validate the hydrologic and hydraulic methods...

  13. Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of...

  14. Hydrographic observations off Savannah and Brunswick, Georgia: March, May and September 1977 and January 1978. Technical report 80-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, J J; Atkinson, L P; Chandler, W S; Bishop, S S

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume 3 contains technical reports of hydrographic observations. (ACR)

  15. Exertion instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vawter, Noah (Noah Theodore)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the research, development and reasoning behind a family of musical instruments called Exertion Instruments. They use inline electrical generators to run a synthesizer and an amplifier while ...

  16. Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 A Single Vessel Approach to Inter-Vessel Normalization of Seafloor Backscatter Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 A Single of the #12;Proceedings: US Hydrographic Conference 2013, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 March 2013 measured

  17. ORNL/CDIAC-128 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center 1 Energy, Environment of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP#12;ORNL/CDIAC-128 NDP-075 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE R

  18. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

  19. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  20. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    , kinematic waves, transmissivity feedback, exchange between matrix and macropores, and so forth (Beven, 1989 these observations in the following way may prove useful. Paradox 1: Rapid Mobilization of Old Water The hydrology of old water' paradox, exemplified by Figure 1. In many small catchments, streamflow responds promptly

  1. Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Weather Radar and Hydrology 1 Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling variability as well as characteristics and hydrological behavior of catchments, we have proceeded simulator and a distributed hydrological model (with four production functions and a distributed transfer

  2. Ch.10 Connections Why is hydrology important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Ch.10 Connections ­ Why is hydrology important? #12;Introduction Modern hydrology study is rarely conducted independently of other natural sciences. Hydrology is involved in almost all contemporary. Connections among hydrology, ecology, atmospheric sciences, geology #12;Hydrology and Ecology The connection

  3. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements MediagovCampaignsListgovInstrumentsLocation

  4. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric OpticalExperiment (VORTEX)govCampaignsWintergovInstrumentsAirborne

  5. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Ph. D. Student: Christopher captures the hydrology is important for determining the effectiveness of a terrain simplification technique also present a novel ter- rain simplification algorithm based on the compression of hydrology features

  6. Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Evaluating Hydrology Preservation of Simplified Terrain Representations Jonathan Muckella , Marcus network. A quan- titative measurement of how accurately a drainage network captures the hydrology to preserve the important hydrology features. This method and other simplification schemes are then evaluated

  7. Teaching Estuarine Hydrology with Online Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed . Coastal ocean . Hydrology . Education . SanSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007a. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay andSchoellhamer, D.H. 2007b. Hydrology of San Francisco Bay and

  8. Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving Arsenic Release from Shallow Sediments to Groundwaters of the Mekong Integrated Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Driving...

  9. CDIAC -WHPO/CCHDO Data Management Plan for CTD/Hydrographic/CO2/Tracer Data for the Global Ocean Carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Repeat Hydrography Program Alex Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/home.html James H. Swift WOCE Hydrographic Program Office (CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office) UCSD oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 1 Lead Author J. Gardner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A UNCLOS Article 76 and the year each area has been mapped. #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 2A-3 Page 2 Lead Author J. Gardner Ocean Mapping

  11. Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 WATER-COLUMN VARIABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR UNDERWAY PROFILERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 1 WATER trials and from analysis of existing data sets are presented. #12;Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, New Orleans, LA, 25-28 Mar 2013 2 Introduction The application of timely measurements of sound

  12. Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Jasper Vrugt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    CEE 271 Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Instructor Jasper Vrugt Engineering Tower #834E / #536 (LAB) Tel.: 505-231-2698 jasper @uci.edu Office Hours: By Appointment Lecture, 1 hour; discussion, 20 minutes: ICS

  13. Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, Tampa, FL, 25-28 Apr 2011 THE PORT OF NORFOLK PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the US Hydrographic Conference, Tampa, FL, 25-28 Apr 2011 1 THE PORT OF NORFOLK for the Port of Norfolk Project are to explore viable methods of improvement with respect to both the process intuitive fashion, or providing it in a format that is inherently more useful. The Port of Norfolk Project

  14. Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 63, April 1 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deinert, Mark

    Proceedings of Hydrology Days 2002, Pages 56 ­ 63, April 1 ­ 4, 2002 Hydrology Days 2002 Real radiography can be used for quantitative imaging of hydrologic phenomena at video frame rates, with great

  15. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed mDn, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  16. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in theAN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARYGeochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in the

  17. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECHNOLOGY FOR FAULT ZONE HYDROLOGY Kenzi Karasaki Lawrencefor characterizing the hydrology of fault zones, recognizingstructure of faults to hydrology, that it still may be

  18. Low activated incore instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials.

  19. Low activated incore instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, D.E.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

  20. Candidate Selection Instrument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The candidate selection instrument is designed to take the guesswork out of selecting candidates for the various career development programs of interest. The instrument is straightforward and...

  1. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  2. TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-032 Hydrology March 2007 An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Citation: Hudson, R., and G. Horel. 2007. An operational method of assessing hydrologic recovery for Vancouver Island and south

  3. Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Early Mars hydrology: 2. Hydrological evolution in the Noachian and Hesperian epochs Jeffrey C, before a hydrologic and climatic transition in the late Noachian led to a decrease in erosion rates the temporal evolution of Martian groundwater hydrology during the Noachian and early Hesperian epochs using

  4. Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and QuestionsQuestions Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University Hydrologic Model Schematic state variables e.g. snow, soil moisture Hydrologic Models streamflow Meteorological Data ( )station, gridded Land Cover

  5. Career Map: Instrumentation Coordinator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Instrumentation Coordinator positions.

  6. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  7. RREC -October 2014 Use of Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    RREC - October 2014 Use of Hydrology and Hydraulics to Support Environmental Response Hydrology ­ the study of the movement of water. Usage for this application is to mean the quantification at the site was Broad scale steps: ­ Prepare hydrologic model to estimate river flow at points of interest

  8. Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

  9. 5, 547577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 547­577, 2008 Isotope hydrology of cave dripwaters L. Fuller et al. Title Page Abstract.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/5/547/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions Papers published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  10. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugster2 and Reto Burkard3 1 Water Resources, US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA 2 Institute of Plant the fog water inputs to ecosystems. In addition, stable isotopes may be used as a natural tracer for fog unresolved questions as to how cloud-affected ecosystems actually function hydrologically (Bruijnzeel 2001

  11. Regional analysis using the Geomorphoclimatic Instantaneous Unit HydrographHydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 93102 (2001) EGS Regional analysis using the Geomorphoclimatic Instantaneous Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . However, if this velocity is expressed in terms of the kinematic wave approximation, the peak and time for Infrastructural, Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft, The Netherlands 2 Water Resources Research Institute, National Water Research Centre, El-Qanater El-Khairyya, Egypt 13621 Email

  12. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

  13. Hydrological consequences of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change indicates there is strong evidence that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide far exceeds the natural range over the last 650,000 years, and this recent warming of the climate system is unequivocal, resulting in more frequent extreme precipitation events, earlier snowmelt runoff, increased winter flood likelihoods, increased and widespread melting of snow and ice, longer and more widespread droughts, and rising sea level. The effects of recent warming has been well documented and climate model projections indicate a range of hydrological impacts with likely to very likely probabilities (67 to 99 percent) of occurring with significant to severe consequences in response to a warmer lower atmosphere with an accelerating hydrologic cycle.

  14. Curso 7-Modelos Digitais de Elevao na Hidrologia: Extrao de Atributos Hidrolgicos da Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topografia (Digital Elevation Models in Hydrology: Extraction of Hydrologic Attributes from Topography Data

  15. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  16. Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    Estimating GRACE monthly water storage change consistent with hydrology by assimilating hydrological information B. Devaraju, N. Sneeuw Institute of Geodesy, Universit¨at Stuttgart, Germany estimates of mass changes with observed hydrological data, which is available for 20% of the land area

  17. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  18. TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-010 Hydrology March 2001 Comparative Analysis of Sediment Production in Two Partially Harvested Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Forest ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  19. TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest: effects of partial retention harvesting, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Abstract

  20. Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU Center for Contaminant Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Civil and Environmental Engineering CSU ­ Center for Contaminant Hydrology Coordinator The Center for Contaminant Hydrology (CCH) ( HYPERLINK "http://www.engr.colostate.edu/CCH/" www

  1. Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks Quatre remarques sur la online xxx Presented by Ghislain de Marsily Keywords: Geomorphology Hydrology River network Mots cle

  2. Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Modeling Capabilities for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanica...

  3. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  4. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Kettell; R. A. Rameika; R. S. Tschirhart

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes findings of the 2013 Snowmass Community Summer Study Instrumentation Frontier's subgroup on the Intensity Frontier. This report is directed at identifying instrumentation R&D needed to support particle physics research over the coming decades at the Intensity Frontier.

  5. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 Paper 5-2 Page 1 Lead Author A. Calado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    in the ocean bottom, and it is also there that spots rich in mineral resources and potential epicenters-2 Page 1 Lead Author A. Calado Integration of Hydrographic Data Products in a Global Web Based 2D and 3D-dimension data and information. The main products generated are KML files, which can be visualized with global

  6. Canadian Hydrographic Conference April 14-17, 2014 St. John's N&L Development of a fusion adaptive algorithm for marine debris detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    variability of the marine environment, the possible targets, and the variable skill levels of human operators and Brian Calder Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping & Joint Hydrographic Center ­ University of New, an adaptive algorithm is being developing that appropriately responds to changes in the environment

  7. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  8. Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Model Discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model: Initial Analysis Tom Fricker University discrepancy in the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (logSPM, Kuczera et al., 2006). The purpose). 1 #12;3 The Saturated Path Hydrology Model We consider the Saturated Path Hydrology Model (log

  9. 1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Charles

    Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

  10. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  11. Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report describes the methods used to determine hydrologic properties based on the available field data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The technical scope, content, and management of this analysis report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 2, 4, and 8). Fracture and matrix properties are developed by analyzing available survey data from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross-Drift, and/or boreholes; air-injection testing data from surface boreholes and from boreholes in the ESF; and data from laboratory testing of core samples. In addition, the report ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]) also serves as a source report by providing the geological framework model of the site. This report is a revision of the model report under the same title (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161773]), which in turn superceded the analysis report under the same title. The principal purpose of this work is to provide representative uncalibrated estimates of fracture and matrix properties for use in the model report Calibrated Properties Model. The term ''uncalibrated'' is used to distinguish the properties or parameters estimated in this report from those obtained from the inversion modeling used in ''Calibrated Properties Model''. The present work also provides fracture geometry properties for generating dual-permeability grids as documented in the scientific analyses report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling''.

  12. Space Instrument Realization (ISR-5)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Space Instrument Realization Providing expertise to support the design and fabrication of space-based custom instrumentation Contacts Group Leader Amy Regan Email Staff...

  13. Global-scale flow routing using a source-to-sink algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivera, Francisco; Famiglietti, James; Asante, Kwabena

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrological and Earth system models. Hydrographs for somehydrological and Earth system models. FLOW ROUTING [1999

  14. Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Marla Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

  15. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regime on vernal pool hydrology. Freshwater Biology 50:and L. Stromberg. (1998). Hydrology of vernal pools on non-Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools

  16. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-IMPLICIT SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-arising in subsurface hydrology. These problems includeFinite Element Method in Hydrology," Int. Jour. Num. Meth.

  17. Research connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistry in California oak woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Dahlgren, Randy A; Swarowsky, Alexandre; Tate, Kenneth W; Lewis, David J; Singer, Michael J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dahlgren RA, Tate KW. 2000. Hydrology in a California oakResearch connects soil hydrology and stream water chemistrybetween nitrogen cycling and soil hydrology in a manner that

  18. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

  19. Instrument Technique Staff Assisted &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Nanophoton Raman 11 Raman Spectroscopy $150 $175 Newport Solar Simulator Solar Simulator $150 $175 Nicolet $175 CM Furnace Furnace $65 $120 CNT Furnace Furnace $65 $120 Desert Cryo Probe Station Probe Station will be added depending on your funding instrument or agreement. #12;Lead Furnace Furnace $65 $120 Lindberg 1

  20. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  1. ARM - Instrumentation Workshop 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDC documentationgovInstrumentstsigovInstrumentswsiFacilityInstrumentation

  2. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  4. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  5. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  8. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  9. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  10. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  11. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  13. Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dalton Lecture: How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling?Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(1), 1-12 (2001) © EGS How far can we go in distributed hydrological modelling? Keith hydrological models in hydrology as an expression of a pragmatic realism. Some of the problems of distributed

  14. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

  15. Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Hydrology-Aware Constrained Triangulation of Terrain Data Jonathan Muckella , Marcus Andradeb , W present a new data structure for simplifing terrain that captures hydrology significant features using. This allows better compression ratios the standard Triangu- lated Irregular Networks with highier hydrology

  16. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  17. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Hudson and Axel Anderson KEYWORDS: Water management, Coastal watersheds, hydrological modeling CITATIONPractice. ResearchSection,Coast ForestRegion, BCMOF,Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-022. EN-022 Hydrology March 2006

  18. Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Jim

    : Recent Developments in Bayesian Inference with Applications in Hydrology . James O. Berger potential use in hydrology. These tools include Bayesian model selection, new computational techniques be applied to problems in hy­ drology. Keywords: Bayesian Inference, Hydrology, Model Selection, Bayes

  19. Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

  20. CONTINUOUSTIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUS­TIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen­water system in groundwater hydrology is given. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation, i for an air­water system in groundwater hydrology, ff = a; w [1], [11], [26]: @(OEae ff s ff ) @t +r \\Delta

  1. Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Hydrology and Geostatistics of a Vermont, USA Kettlehole Peatland Paula J. Mousera,*, W. Cully to hydrologic changes is imperative for successful conservation and remediation efforts. We studied a 1.25-ha Vermont kettlehole bog for one year (September 2001­October 2002) to identify hydrologic controls

  2. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology,Tsitika Watershed.Research Section,CoastForest Region,BCMOF, Nanaimo, BC. Extension Note EN-021. EN-021 Hydrology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-021 March 2006 Forest Research

  3. 2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    2004 HYDROLOGY SECTION AWARD CITATION OF YORAM RUBIN Yoram Rubin, Professor of Civil hydrology. Starting from 1987, Yoram has published a considerable body of important articles, primarily works have always addressed central problems of hydrologic modeling, on both fundamental and applied

  4. Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Institute of Hydraulic Engineering Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dr Measurements with Hydrologic Data H. Kindt 1, J. Riegger 1, A. Bárdossy 1, B. Devaraju 2 and N. Sneeuw 2 henry pattern for which storage changes can be constrained within the limits of hydrological data uncertainty. 2

  5. Hydrology in Practice Elizabeth M. Shaw -Former Lecturer and Hydrologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Hydrology in Practice 4th Edition Elizabeth M. Shaw - Former Lecturer and Hydrologist Keith J Environment Centre, University of Lancaster, UK Rob Lamb - Consultant, JBA Consulting About the book Hydrology in Practice is an excellent and very successful introductory text for engineering hydrology students who go

  6. Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1 1 Great Lakes forecasts in operational hydrology builds a sample of possibilities for the future, of climate series from-parametric method can be extended into a new weighted parametric hydrological forecasting technique to allow

  7. Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    Snowcloud: A Complete Data Gathering System for Snow Hydrology Research Christian Skalka gathering system for snow hydrology field re- search campaigns conducted in harsh climates and remote areas for understanding hydrological and ecological processes and incorporating those pro- cesses in agricultural

  8. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  9. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 20952101 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2006; Lis et al., 2008). The capital cost is much lower, as well as the operation costs per analysed, Stockholm, Sweden 2 University of Arizona, Hydrology and Water Resources, Tucson, AZ, USA *Correspondence to), Pearce (1990), Burns (2002), Buttle and McDonnell (2004)] stream water comes. Such estimates can help

  10. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

  11. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI) bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total

  12. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

  13. Hydrology of the Texas Blackland Prairie: Riesel Watershed Data and Published Hydrologic Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    , OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas..., OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE MATERIAL FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR THAT THE USE OF THE MATERIAL WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK, OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, OR ANY OTHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. Hydrology of the Texas...

  14. Oceanic CO{sub 2} measurements for the WOCE hydrological survey in the Pacific Ocean; Shipboard alkalinity analyses during 1991 and 1992. Final technical report, February 1, 1992--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, C.D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research group contributed titration alkalinity analyses to transects of the WOCE Hydrological Survey during 1991 and 1992. The results have been transmitted to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC) of the Department of Energy in a technical data report having two parts: Oceanic CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey of the Pacific Ocean, 1990--1991: Shipboard Analyses During 1991 and 1992, Part 1. Alkalinity Measurements on TUNES, Leg 3, 1991. Oceanic CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey of the Pacific Ocean, 1990--1991: Shipboard Analyses During 1991 and 1992, Part 2. Alkalinity Measurements on CGC92, Legs 1 and 2, 1992. This report contains a paper entitled, ``Total dissolved inorganic carbon measurements made on WOCE leg P13`` by Andrew G. Dickson. A brief description of how these measurements were made and calibrated has been provided along with a statement of the quality of the measurements. The data themselves have been sent to ORNL CDIAC for archival and distribution.

  15. TMT Science and Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Crampton; Luc Simard; David Silva

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the scientific goals of the Thirty Meter Telescope Project, full diffraction-limited performance is required from the outset and hence the entire observatory is being designed, as a system, to achieve this. The preliminary design phases of the telescope and the first light adaptive optic facility are now approaching completion so that much better predictions of the system performance are possible. The telescope design and instrumentation are summarized in this presentation, with a brief description of some of the scientific programs that are foreseen.

  16. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infrared LandSystemCentral FacilityInstruments SGP

  17. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infrared LandSystemCentral FacilityInstruments

  18. ARM - Instrument Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements MediagovCampaignsList ofgovInstrumentsContacts

  19. ARM - Instrument Location Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements MediagovCampaignsListgovInstrumentsLocation Table

  20. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC

  1. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RelatedActRecovery

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing DataScience Questions Related Links AzoresInstruments

  3. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing DataScience Questions RelatedInactiveInstruments NSA

  4. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing DataScience Questions RelatedInactiveInstruments

  5. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing DataScience QuestionsInactiveInstruments TWP Related

  6. WNR Instrument Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable Version Bookmark and WindArchivesInstrument

  7. ARM - Instrument - 50rwp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAXAssociatedgovInstruments50rwp

  8. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  9. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  10. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  11. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bonesini

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well below 1%. The MICE time-of-flight system will measure timing with a resolution better than 70 ps per plane, in a harsh environment due to high particle rates, fringe magnetic fields and electron backgrounds from RF dark current.

  12. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  13. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonesini, M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well below 1%. The MICE time-of-flight system will measure timing with a resolution better than 70 ps per plane, in a harsh environment due to high particle rates, fringe magnetic fields and electron backgrounds from RF dark current.

  14. Variation and correlation of hydrologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrological properties vary within a given geological formation and even more so among different soil and rock media. The variance of the saturated permeability is shown to be related to the variance of the pore-size distribution index of a given medium by a simple equation. This relationship is deduced by comparison of the data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Peters et al., 1984), Las Cruces, New Mexico (Wierenga et al., 1989), and Apache Leap, Arizona (Rasmussen et al., 1990). These and other studies in different soils and rocks also support the Poiseuille-Carmen relationship between the mean value of saturated permeability and the mean value of capillary radius. Correlations of the mean values and variances between permeability and pore-geometry parameters can lead us to better quantification of heterogeneous flow fields and better understanding of the scaling laws of hydrological properties.

  15. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

  16. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Geological Survey, Water Res. Investigations Rep. 95-United States. J. Amer. Water Resources Assoc, 35, 1525-hydrology. J. American Water Resources Association, 39, 771-

  17. assessing hydrological alteration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (SFHS) is a non-profit, professional society, established to provide Sukop, Mike 217 South Florida Hydrologic Society Dr Joseph D Hughes Geosciences Websites Summary:...

  18. Hydrologic studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, P.B.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to provide a general overview of hydrologic conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by describing several key hydrologic studies that have been carried out as part of the site characterization program over the last 20 years. The paper is composed of three parts: background information about general objectives of the WIPP project; information about the geologic and hydrologic setting of the facility; and information about three aspects of the hydrologic system that are important to understanding the long-term performance of the WIPP facility. For additional detailed information, the reader is referred to the references cited in the text.

  19. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of Enhanced Geothermal System Development And Production: Evaluation of Stimulation at the...

  20. Nonlinear dependence and extremes in hydrology and climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shiraj

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The presence of nonlinear dependence and chaos has strong implications for predictive modeling and the analysis of dominant processes in hydrology and climate. Analysis of (more)

  1. Hydrological property measurements of Topopah Spring Tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J.J.; Lin, W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the progress made during FY 1994 on hydrological property measurements of samples from Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These measurements were performed in the laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This report contains descriptions of experimental designs and procedures, data, observations, and preliminary analyses, and also describes planned future work. The report is organized into three sections: (1) permeability of fractured Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature and confining pressure; (2) electrical properties of Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature and of saturation; and (3) moisture retention measurements of Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature.

  2. Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527537 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrological processes and their seasonal controls in a small Mediterranean mountain catchment in the Pyrenees 527 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 527­537 (2002) © EGS Hydrological processes in the catchments, playing a relevant hydrological and geomorphic role. Annual precipitation is 924 mm and potential

  3. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) © EGU The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology

  4. Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recession-based hydrological models for estimating low flows in ungauged catchments in the Himalayas 891 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 891902 (2004) © EGU Recession-based hydrological.R. Young1 and S.R. Kansakar2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK 2

  5. The Pipe vs. The Shed: Waste Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lather, Alaska; Wozniak, Monika

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water compared with Natural Hydrology in an Urban Setting Bypaper was to compare the hydrology of the East Bay Municipala stream and watershed hydrology. Using stream flow data for

  6. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

  7. Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  9. South Florida Hydrologic Society Rick Nevulis P.G.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    South Florida Hydrologic Society Presents Rick Nevulis P.G. South Florida Water Management District Reuse Coordinator Don't Judge Water by its History, but by its Quality: Reclaimed Water, a Valuable.johnson@mwhglobal.com The South Florida Hydrologic Society (SFHS) is a non-profit, professional society, established to provide

  10. Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    INSIGHT: Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools Laura Paeglis, IWM and GeoHydrologic Tools #12;What is INSIGHT? · Interactive, web-based maps. · Evaluations of basins and their status as fully or overappropriated. · Educational tool for water managers and the public. · One

  11. HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD BRINE AT THE OSAGE-SKIATOOK PETROLEUM production on the environment, we are investigating the hydrology and the fate and transport of contaminants tank batteries have contaminated soil, ground water, and surface water at this site. Based on soil

  12. MODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    ) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic AND BACKGROUND [2] The containment of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in a geological repositoryMODELING OF THERMALLY DRIVEN HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN PARTIALLY SATURATED FRACTURED ROCK Y. W

  13. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  14. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  15. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  17. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  18. LA-UR-00-949 Perched Zone Monitoring Well 1995 Analytical Water Quality and Hydrology Group, ESH-18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Hydrology Group, ESH-18 Mary Mullen Ecology Group, ESH-20 David B. Rogers Water Quality and Hydrology Group

  19. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  20. Research Report Hedonic and Instrumental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Mitchell,1 and James J. Gross2 1 Boston College and 2 Stanford University ABSTRACT--What motivates, & Rodriguez, 1989). Such instrumental motives might play a role in the regulation of emotion (Parrott, 1993

  1. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  2. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  3. Final Technical Report: Ocean CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey in the Pacific Ocean, 1992-1995 Field Years: Shore Based Analysis of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon January 1, 1993-April 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, Charles D.

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Participation in the hydrographic survey of the world ocean circulation experiment (WOCE) began in December 1990 with a two year grant from DOE for shore related analyses of inorganic carbon in sea water. These analyses were intended to assure that the measurements carried out under difficult laboratory conditions on board ships were consistent with measurements made under more carefully controlled shore laboratory conditions.

  4. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

  5. Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    Yoram Rubin notes made at the Hydrology Section Award Ceremony, December 2005, San Francisco Dear Hydrology Section president Rafael Bras and President-elect George Hornberger, members of the hydrology of the breadth of possibilities that hydrology represents overall. Hence, I was grateful to be reminded, during

  6. Course offer (1/2) Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Course offer (1/2) · Hydrology II (1st Sem. MSc) · advanced engineering hydrology course focused on hydrological monitoring, processunderstanding and new analysis and modelling techniques · Fluvial Systems (1st management and riverine ecosystem sustainability · Hydrology of Glaciers (2nd Sem. MSc) · study of ice

  7. Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Position: Urban Natural Resource Specialist ­ Forest Hydrology Closing Date: January 9th, 2015 runoff. This position requires applied, working knowledge of forest hydrology, hydrology modelling to support the use of i-Tree-related hydrologic models and tools. Develop framework for i-Tree Hydro

  8. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  9. Review of soil water models with respect to savanna hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derry, Julian F; Russell, Graham; Liedloff, Adam C

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective management leading towards sustainable rangeland production in arid and semi-arid regions will stem from effective soil water management and comprehension of the hydrological properties of the soil in relation to pastoralism. However...

  10. Modelling the hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karatay, Mehmet Rahmi

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to better understand the relationships between basal water pressure, friction, and sliding mechanisms at ice sheet scales. In particular, it develops a new subglacial hydrology model (Hydro) to explicitly ...

  11. Mixed Hydrologic Recovery of a Degraded Mesquite Rangeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukenbach, Maxwell

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    landscapes become more common, an understanding of these new environments becomes essential. The ability of rangelands to rebound from past degradation is a factor of interest and one this study attempts to quantify. How a localized hydrologic cycle responds...

  12. CE 372 Engineering Hydrology and Hydraulics Learning objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmann, Chris

    time of concentration in two ways. Compute time of concentration using the kinematic-wave, Kerby for exams. 1. Identify and explain processes in the hydrologic cycle. Carry out a water balance. 2. Define

  13. HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INFLOWS TO PERTH, AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INFLOWS TO PERTH, AUSTRALIA JASON EVANS1 and SERGEI SCHREIDER2 1Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, Australia 2Integrated Catchment Assessment and Management Centre, Australian National University, Australia Abstract

  14. Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Building a Texas Hydrologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Transcending the Hydro-Illogical Cycle Building a Texas Hydrologic Information System TX-HIS #12;Q to couple streamflow models to GCMs · We need to break the hydro-illogical cycle and plan for the delivery

  15. Hydrology of a land-terminating Greenlandic outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowton, Thomas Ralph

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrology is recognised as an important component of the glacial system in alpine environments. In particular, the subglacial drainage of surface meltwaters is known to exert a strong influence on the motion of glaciers ...

  16. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  17. active layer hydrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SFHS) is a non information, contact: - Neil JohnsonMWH - Jayantha ObeysekeraSFWMD - Mike SukopFIU - Chris PetersCH2M HILL Sukop, Mike 199 Eco-hydrological controls on...

  18. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  19. General soil hydrology files for GOSSYM/COMAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akins, Dennis C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GENERAL SOIL HYDROLOGY FILES FOR GOSSYM/COMAX A Thesis DENNIS C. AKINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject...: Agricultural Engineering GENERAL SOIL HYDROLOGY FILES FOR GOSSYM/COMAX A Thesis DENNIS C. AKINS Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parnell (Chairman of Committee) ' ". John z (Member) Dr. Robert Metzer (Member) Donald Bender (Member) C...

  20. Streamflow forecasting for large-scale hydrologic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awwad, Haitham Munir

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STREAMFLOW FORECASTING FOR LARGE-SCALE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEMS A Thesis by HAITHAM MUNIR AWWAD Approved as to style and content by: uan B. Valdes (Chair of Committee) alph A. Wurbs (Member) Marshall J. Mc...

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information July 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information April 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information August 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Picken; B. Sc; R. Harmer; J. Picken; B. Sc; R. Harmer; A Nol

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicate the following results. (i) Fair agreement is obtained with the theory of Stine and Wanlass 2 at

  8. The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status 345 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 345354 (2004) © EGU Anatomy of a catchment: the relation of physical attributes of the Plynlimon catchments to variations in hydrology and water status C

  9. Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability 325 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 325338 (2003) © EGU Scale effects on the hydrological impact of upland afforestation and drainage using indices of flow variability: the River Irthing

  10. Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629644 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution 629 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 629­644 (2001) © EGS Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution M.T. van Wijk and W

  11. Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) © EGU Over-parameterisation, a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des

  12. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615627 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology 615 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615­627 (2001) © EGS Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity­rain rate relationships for radar hydrology* Remko Uijlenhoet1 Sub-department Water Resources

  13. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  14. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

  15. Lithogenic and cosmogenic tracers in catchment hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimz, G.J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water, which is one of the primary concerns in hydrology. Many groundwater solutes are derived as a result of interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system. These are termed {open_quotes}lithogenic{close_quotes} solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both internally and externally to the catchment system. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing {open_quotes}cosmogenic{close_quotes} nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing {open_quotes}thermonuclear{close_quotes} nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, such as U and Th (producing {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading {open_quotes}cosmogenic nuclides{close_quotes}, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage, although always clearly indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute compositions in groundwater, and how these compositions can therefore be used in integrative ways to understand the physical history of groundwater within a catchment system.

  16. Improving land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model better than a deeper soil profile?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer modelAL. : LAND-SURFACE MODEL HYDROLOGY Changnon, S. , et al. (land-surface model hydrology: Is an explicit aquifer model

  17. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  18. Updating the US Hydrologic Classification: An Approach to Clustering and Stratifying Ecohydrologic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic classifications unveil the structure of relationships among groups of streams with differing stream flow and provide a foundation for drawing inferences about the principles that govern those relationships. Hydrologic classes provide a template to describe ecological patterns, generalize hydrologic responses to disturbance, and stratify research and management needs applicable to ecohydrology. We developed two updated hydrologic classifications for the continental US using two streamflow datasets of varying reference standards. Using only reference-quality gages, we classified 1715 stream gages into 12 classes across the US. By including more streamflow gages (n=2618) in a separate classification, we increased the dimensionality (i.e. classes) and hydrologic distinctiveness within regions at the expense of decreasing the natural flow standards (i.e. reference quality). Greater numbers of classes and higher regional affiliation within our hydrologic classifications compared to that of the previous US hydrologic classification (Poff, 1996) suggested that the level of hydrologic variation and resolution was not completely represented in smaller sample sizes. Part of the utility of classification systems rests in their ability classify new objects and stratify analyses. We constructed separate random forests to predict hydrologic class membership based on hydrologic indices or landscape variables. In addition, we provide an approach to assessing potential outliers due to hydrologic alteration based on class assignment. Departures from class membership due to disturbance take into account multiple hydrologic indices simultaneously; thus, classes can be used to determine if disturbed streams are functioning within the realm of natural hydrology.

  19. Principal Components Instrumental Variable Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelried, Diego; Smith, Richard J.

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of the main results are displayed in two appendices. 2 Econometric Framework Consider the simultaneous equations model y = X? + u and X = Z?+ V , (1) 1 An advantage of such general structure is that the large-sample condition used in previous studies Kn/ p n... ? 0, where Kn is the number of instruments and n is the sample size, is not required in our asymptotic approximations. 4 where y is the n 1 vector containing n observations of the dependent variable; X is the n G matrix with observations...

  20. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  1. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON, INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThe natureINSTRUMENTATION

  2. ARM - AMF1 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011AstudiesRingFacilitiesAMF1 Baseline Instruments AMF

  3. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113­140 www.elsevier.comrlocaterjconhyd Natural.rJournal of Contaminant Hydrology 42 2000 113­140114 importance of various simultaneously occurring natural attenuation

  4. Simulation of hydrology and population dynamics of Anopheles mosquitoes around the Koka Reservoir in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endo, Noriko S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis applies the HYDRology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) to the environment around a water resources reservoir in Ethiopia. HYDREMATS was modified to simulate the local hydrology and the ...

  5. Hydrologic modeling to screen potential environmental management methods for malaria vector control in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianotti, Rebecca Louise

    This paper describes the first use of Hydrology-Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS), a physically based distributed hydrology model, to investigate environmental management methods for malaria vector ...

  6. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  7. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  8. HYDROLOGY AND CHEMISTRY OF FLOODWATERS IN THE YOLO BYPASS, SACRAMENTO RIVER SYSTEM, CALIFORNIA, DURING 2000.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGY AND CHEMISTRY OF FLOODWATERS IN THE YOLO BYPASS, SACRAMENTO RIVER SYSTEM, CALIFORNIA..................................................1 Introduction..............................................2 Hydrology of the Yolo Bypass....................7 Dissolved Metals....................................10 Samples collected by boat in the Yolo

  9. The hydrology of malaria : field observations and mechanistic modeling of the malaria transmission response to environmental climatic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bomblies, Arne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled HYDrology, Entomology and MAlaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) has been developed. The model simulates the hydrological and climatological determinants of malaria transmission mechanistically and at high ...

  10. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  11. Overview of coal conversion process instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liptak, B. G.; Leiter, C. P.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of standard instrumentation used in the processing industries is given, and the applicability of this instrumentation to measurements in mixed phase media and hostile environments such as those encountered in coal conversion processes is considered. The major projects in coal conversion sponsored by the US Department of Energy are briefly reviewed with schematics to pinpoint areas where the standard instrumentation is inadequate or altogether lacking. The next report in this series will provide detailed requirements on the instruments needed for these processes, will review new instruments which have recently become commercially available but are not yet considered standard instrumentation, and report on the status of new instruments which are being developed and, in some cases, undergoing tests in coal conversion plants.

  12. 2 Executive Summary Figure 1 Location of White Salmon subbasin, topography, vegetation, demographics, and hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , demographics, and hydrology #12;xii 2.1 Purpose and Scope The White Salmon subbasin management plan

  13. A cyber-infrastructure for the measurement and estimation of large-scale hydrologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkez, Branko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in hydropower production from globalirrigation, recreation, hydropower generation, and otheris also generated via hydropower. The major hydrologic

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.Understanding how the hydrologic cycle is affected by climate, trees and plants, soils, geology, topography, springs, or any Figure 1. The hydrologic cycle, or water cycle (courtesy of the US Geological Survey

  15. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology 1. Theory and synthetic examples Gwenn E; published 12 November 2002. [1] Basal hydrology is acknowledged as a fundamental control on glacier dynamics of existing basal hydrology models is the treatment of the glacier bed as an isolated system. We present

  16. Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

  17. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-11:50 AM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  18. Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS To obtain (choose 4 hours) Core Courses [Requireda ] CEE 450: Surface Hydrology CEE 451: Env. Fluid Mech. CEE 457: Groundwater Hydrology CEE 434: Environmental Systems I CEE 595W: Seminar CEE 595W: Seminar Choose at least

  19. Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology Environmental, Earth and Ocean. 9758 1998 M.S. CIVIL ENGINEERING, University of New Hampshire 1994 B.S. in HYDROLOGY, University of New Hampshire, GPA 3.94/4.00 1991 Summa Cum Laude , University Honors in Hydrology AWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING

  20. Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Andy Bullock and Mike Acreman 358 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 358389 (2003) © EGU The role of wetlands in the hydrological cycle Andy Bullock1 and Mike Acreman2 1 Independent Consultant, Ledbury, Herefordshire, HR8 2DX, UK 2 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxon. OX10 8BB, UK

  1. Franois Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    François Anctil and Nicolas Lauzon 940 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 940958 (2004.lauzon@golder.com Abstract Since the 1990s, neural networks have been applied to many studies in hydrology and water and stacking having been applied regularly in hydrology and water resources for some years, while Bayesian

  2. HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST IN CENTRAL AMERICA Alonso Caballero #12;HYDROLOGY, HYDROCHEMISTRY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER SUPPLY OF A CLOUD FOREST and dry periods. Consequently, the tropical hydrology of cloud-forest watersheds is not well studied

  3. Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bettina Ott and Stefan Uhlenbrook 62 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(1), 6278 (2004) © EGU, Wasserwirtschaftsamt Bamberg, Kasernstra?e 4, 96047 Bamberg, Germany 2 University of Freiburg, Institute of Hydrology, Fahnenbergplatz, D-79098 Freiburg, Germany E-mail for corresponding author: stefan.uhlenbro@hydrology

  4. GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5960.02) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography-12:00PM or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  5. Simulated Global Atmospheric Dust Distribution: Sensitivity to Regional Topography, Geomorphology, and Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    , and Hydrology Charles S. Zender, Earth System Science Dept., UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (zender@uci.edu) David for predicting future trends in dust production. We identify three related geomorphologic and hydrologic hydrologically disturbed/renewed sed- iments. Dust models which attempt to account for sediment-rich source

  6. GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    GEOG4750 (GEOG5750) Surface Water Hydrology University of North Texas Department of Geography:50 AM or by appointment. Email: feifei.pan@unt.edu Required Text: Elements of Physical Hydrology by Hornberger, G.M., Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. References: Physical Hydrology by Dingman, Prentice

  7. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 7389 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73­89 Transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain P17?ironmental Engineering, Uni?ersity of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA d Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, Uni-7722 98 00143-0 #12;( )D.G. Jewett et al.rJournal of Contaminant Hydrology 36 1999 73­8974 the interface

  8. DYES AS TRACERS FOR VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY Markus Flury and Nu Nu Wai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    DYES AS TRACERS FOR VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY Markus Flury and Nu Nu Wai Department of Crop and Soil tracers have provided clues about the hydrological cycle as well as flow and transport processes information on dyes used as hydrological tracers, with particular emphasis on vadose zone hydrol- ogy. We

  9. Using X-ray computed tomography in hydrology: systems, resolutions, and limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Using X-ray computed tomography in hydrology: systems, resolutions, and limitations D and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551, USA c Hydrology Ltd. All rights reserved. PII: S0022-1694(02)00157-9 Journal of Hydrology 267 (2002) 285­297 www

  10. Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Mountain hydrology of the western United States Roger C. Bales,1 Noah P. Molotch,2,3 Thomas H, population growth, and land use change drive the need for new hydrologic knowledge and understanding. In the mountainous West and other similar areas worldwide, three pressing hydrologic needs stand out: first

  11. Baldassare Bacchi and Roberto Ranzi Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 785798 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Baldassare Bacchi and Roberto Ranzi 784 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 785798 (2003) © EGU Hydrological and meteorological aspects of floods in the Alps: an overview Baldassare Bacchi and summarises recent research on meteorological and hydrological aspects of floods in the Alps. The research

  12. Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj 322 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 322332 (2005) © EGU Precipitation forecasts and their uncertainty as input into hydrological models Mira Kobold and Kay Suelj the weather forecasts with the information on catchment conditions and a hydrological forecasting model can

  13. Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994)91-108 Variably saturated modeling of transient drainage: sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Journal of Hydrology ELSEVIER [1] Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994)91-108 Variably saturated modeling-1694(94)02509-A #12;92 W.R. Wise et al. / Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 91-108 transient unconfined flow through

  14. Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change and dynamics to biodiversity patterns. The focus of this paper is the key hydrologic controls crucial towards

  15. STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART I: BACKGROUND AND TRADITIONAL APPROACHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART I: BACKGROUND AND TRADITIONAL APPROACHES;3 Outline (1) Historical Perspective (2) Basic Characteristics of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Traditional Statistical Analysis of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (4) Spatial/Temporal Dependence of Climate

  16. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sviridova, V. [ed.] [All-Russian Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  17. Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada Stephen J. De´ry,1 for 45 rivers spanning 5.2 ? 106 km2 of northern Canada are investigated. Discharge averages 1153 km3 yr of northern Canada, excluding some rivers with outlets to the Labrador Sea and eastern James Bay

  18. The European Weather Radar Network (OPERA): An opportunity for hydrology!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    at the European level dates back to COST 72 (Measurement of precipitation by radar) which started in 1979The European Weather Radar Network (OPERA): An opportunity for hydrology! Iwan Holleman1 , Laurent (EARS), Ljubljana (Slovenia). 1 Introduction The tradition of weather radar collaboration

  19. Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    GRACE Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate Ole Baltazar of blood cell Delivers 10-Day / Monthly gravity field From 2002 Onwards Study gravity field changes | side 6 Range responds to Gravity #12;GRACE science results | 28. November 2007 | OA | side 7 Variations

  20. A method to hydrologically isolate water soluble wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooney, Daniel James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural cover system with gravel used as a capillary barrier was designed and evaluated as a method to hydrologically isolate buried water soluble oil and gas wastes. Simulated cover systems were installed in 200 liter barrels and tested in a...

  1. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) River System Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................. 140 JC Record ? Job Control .............................................................................................. 140 XL Record ? Multiplication Factors ............................................................................. 144... in the HIN file. The total number of control points is the number of CP records in the HIN file. The arrays hold data for all of the months in the hydrologic period-of-analysis specified in JC record fields 2 and 3. The total number of years is defined...

  2. CRWR Online Report 1006 Hydrologic Analysis Before and After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    as an integral part of the water management. As a result, the environmental condition in this reach has beenCRWR Online Report 1006 Hydrologic Analysis Before and After Reservoir Alteration Reservoir. Important habitats such as the Big Ben national and state park in the U.S. and Maderas del

  3. Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Fracture aperture reconstruction and determination of hydrological properties: a case study for fracture aperture reconstruction. The rst one is a correlation technique that estimates the normal aper techniques are applied to discontinuities extracted from a core drilled down to 20 m in a fractured marl

  4. Soil property database: Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    measurement campaigns have been carried out concurrently with large-scale remote sensing hydrologic campaigns surface and the subsurface and the highly nonlinear nature of local-scale water and heat transport head, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity) and the soil thermal properties (heat capacity, heat

  5. High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R.

    Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

  6. Climate and Hydrological Factors Affecting Variation in Chlorophyll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Rachel

    in the region, accompanied by scant wastewater treatment. In contrast, water clarity increased significantlyClimate and Hydrological Factors Affecting Variation in Chlorophyll Concentration and Water Clarity organisms. In the Caribbean, changes in nutrient loading that result from rapid development are thought

  7. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englert, A.; Hubbard, S.S.; Williams, K.H.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For guiding optimal design and interpretation of in-situ treatments that strongly perturb subsurface systems, knowledge about the spatial and temporal patterns of mass transport and reaction intensities are important. Here, a procedure was developed and applied to time-lapse concentrations of a conservative tracer (bromide), an injected amendment (acetate) and reactive species (iron(II), uranium(VI) and sulfate) associated with two field scale biostimulation experiments, which were conducted successively at the same field location over two years. The procedure is based on a temporal moment analysis approach that relies on a streamtube approximation. The study shows that biostimulated reactions can be considerably influenced by subsurface hydrological and geochemical heterogeneities: the delivery of bromide and acetate and the intensity of the sulfate reduction is interpreted to be predominantly driven by the hydrological heterogeneity, while the intensity of the iron reduction is interpreted to be primarily controlled by the geochemical heterogeneity. The intensity of the uranium(VI) reduction appears to be impacted by both the hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. Finally, the study documents the existence of feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and remediation-induced biogeochemical transformations at the field scale, particularly the development of precipitates that may cause clogging and flow rerouting.

  8. ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 March 2011 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream Restoration Design by J. Craig quantified element in stream restoration, working across and governing multiple disciplines and system, and management decisions to be made (Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (FISRWG) 1998). Figure

  9. Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

  10. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  11. ELSEVIER Journal of Hydrology 199 (1997) 88-120 Linking the hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    -stream saturated zones, centering on stream environments of the northern, teml~rate-forested zone. N retention and hydrodynamic scenarios relating N biogeochemistry and its response to hydrologic events (of both varying-state in terms of biological aggradation and N demand (Sullivan, 1993). The environmental consequences

  12. Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339350 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339­350 (2002) © EGS Hydrological ), this paper focuses on calibration of the hydrological part of the model and nitrogen (N) dynamics

  13. aexs instrument development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interferometer Ohta, Shigemi 2 Development of Models for Optical Instrument Transformers. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Optical Instrument Transformers...

  14. Computational and experimental study of instrumented indentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chollacoop, Nuwong, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of characteristic length scales, through dimensional and microstructural miniaturizations, on mechanical properties is systematically investigated by recourse to instrumented micro- and/or nanoindentation. This ...

  15. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  16. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  17. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  18. Instrumentation for CTA site characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruck, Christian; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandt, Duan; Schweizer, Thomas; Hfner, Dennis; Bulik, Tomasz; Cieslar, Marek; Costantini, Heide; Dominik, Michal; Ebr, Jan; Garczarczyk, Markus; Lorentz, Eckart; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pech, Miroslav; Puerto-Gimnez, Irene; Teshima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the "Cherenkov Telescope Array" CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision or the comparability to allow for a comprehensive characterization of the proposed sites to be made. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize ...

  19. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  20. Getting the right answers for the right reasons: linking measurements, analyses, and models to advance the science of hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    to advance the science of hydrology James W. Kirchner, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 U.S.A. The day-to-day business of hydrology has largely been shaped the science of hydrology, as opposed to the operational practice of hydrology -- that is, to improve our

  1. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  2. Effect of geotropism on instrument readings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolph, James T.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of gravity's effect on instrument readings, also referred to as geotropism. In this essay a review of meter movement construction and the effect are reviewed as it applies to portable radiation instruments. Reference to the three ANSI standards and their requirements are reviewed. An alternate approach to test for the effects is offered.

  3. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Moorman, Matthew W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  4. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  5. Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

  6. The seasonal dynamics of Arctic surface hydrology in permafrost environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trofaier, Anna Maria

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    understanding of permafrost surface hydrology. The free access to extensive archives of satellite data through the European Space Agencey (ESA) as well as the National Aeronau- tics and Space Administration (NASA) has become vital. Most importantly, access... support throughout my time at the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). At the beginning of my studies I was privileged to secure a DOC-fFORTE [Women in Research and Technology] Fellowship of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (AW). I would like to thank...

  7. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the proposed approach and to examine the flow direction and magnitude on both sides of a suspected fault. We describe a strategy for effective characterization of fault zone hydrology. We recommend conducting a long term pump test followed by a long term buildup test. We do not recommend isolating the borehole into too many intervals. We do recommend ensuring durability and redundancy for long term monitoring.

  8. Applications of transputers to astronomical instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.M.; Beard, S,M.; Kelly, B.D.; Paterson, M.J. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel processing techniques based on transputers are being applied to astronomical instruments under development. On the COSMOS photographic plate measuring machine, a data farm of transputers allows backgrounds to be determined in realtime instead of requiring 1.5 hours of offline VAX processing per plate. Transputers have been adopted as the embedded processors in a submillimetre bolometer array instrument and their use is planned in demanding future applications such as thermal infrared array instruments and data compression applied to remote observing. The techniques of interfacing transputers to external hardware and to VAX/VMS computers are discussed.

  9. Plasma instrumentation for fusion power reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sager, G.T.; Bauer, J.F.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback control will be implemented in fusion power reactors to guard against unpredicted behavior of the plant and to assure desirable operation. In this study, plasma state feedback requirements for plasma control by systems strongly coupled to the plasma (magnet sets, RF, and neutral beam heating systems, and refueling systems) are estimated. Generic considerations regarding the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation are outlined. Solutions are proposed to minimize the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation. Key plasma diagnostics are evaluated with respect to their potential for upgrade and implementation as power reactor instruments.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. Original article Natural mating of instrumentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    before they start egg laying. Thus, the control over mating of parents is lost. To prevent this, queen INTRODUCTION Instrumental insemination assures control over mating of parents in the honey bee. However, Woyke

  3. 274 CEREAL CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES AND INSTRUMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    274 CEREAL CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES AND INSTRUMENTATION Evaluation of the Displacement Value). Production of fuel-grade ethanol, initiated in the late 1970's as a result of rising gasoline prices

  4. PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    /email interaction. Course requirements: Participation in class discussion, problem sets, take home final exam of exponential behavior in chem., biochem., physics: molecules vs. instruments. 6 Light absorption densitometry, energy transfer, photobleaching and single molec., image analysis. Anisotropy and molecular mobility

  5. A nano-stepping robotic instrumentation platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahab, Adam Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an Autonomous Nano-stepping Tool (ANT) system is presented. Each ANT is a small, tripodal, robotic instrument capable of untethered precision motion within a quasi-three-dimensional workspace of arbitrary ...

  6. Optimization of nave dynamic binary instrumentation Tools/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleckner, Reid (Reid N.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proliferation of dynamic program analysis tools has done much to ease the burden of developing complex software. However, creating such tools remains a challenge. Dynamic binary instrumentation frameworks such as ...

  7. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Thomas T.

    1 Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis Carl K. Hoh, MD Department fast computer Filtered Back Projection Iterative Reconstruction PET Image Reconstruction #12 PET Scanner Design · Smaller individual crystal size = better spatial resolution · Physical limit

  9. Field instrumentation for vocalizing avian survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Grant (Grant Andrew)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present automated instruments to facilitate the monitoring of vocalizing species in their environment with minimal disruption. These devices offer recording and acoustic localization of bird calls and relay data via the ...

  10. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

  11. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  12. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  13. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones, Phaseof Characterization Technology for Fault Zones, LBNL-1635E,Characterization on Technology of Fault Zones Phase II

  14. Changes in hydrological extremes and climate variability in the Severn Uplands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Eloise M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Hydrological extremes within the UK have increased in intensity, frequency and persistence over recent years and are predicted to increase in variability throughout the 21st (more)

  15. Extraction of Hydrological Proximity Measures from DEMs using Parallel Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Tarboton, David G.; Watson, Daniel W.; Schreuders, Kimberly A.; Baker, Matthew M.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land surface topography is one of the most important terrain properties which impact hydrological, geomorphological, and ecological processes active on a landscape. In our previous efforts to develop a soil depth model based upon topographic and land cover variables, we extracted a set of hydrological proximity measures (HPMs) from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) as potential explanatory variables for soil depth. These HPMs may also have other, more general modeling applicability in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology, and so are described here from a general perspective. The HPMs we derived are variations of the distance up to ridge points (cells with no incoming flow) and variations of the distance down to stream points (cells with a contributing area greater than a threshold), following the flow path. These HPMs were computed using the D-infinity flow model that apportions flow between adjacent neighbors based on the direction of steepest downward slope on the eight triangular facets constructed in a 3 x 3 grid cell window using the center cell and each pair of adjacent neighboring grid cells in turn. The D-infinity model typically results in multiple flow paths between 2 points on the topography, with the result that distances may be computed as the minimum, maximum or average of the individual flow paths. In addition, each of the HPMs, are calculated vertically, horizontally, and along the land surface. Previously, these HPMs were calculated using recursive serial algorithms which suffered from stack overflow problems when used to process large datasets, limiting the size of DEMs that could be analyzed using that method to approximately 7000 x 7000 cells. To overcome this limitation, we developed a message passing interface (MPI) parallel approach for calculating these HPMs. The parallel algorithms of the HPMs spatially partition the input grid into stripes which are each assigned to separate processes for computation. Each of those processes then uses a queue data structure to order the processing of cells so that each cell is visited only once and the cross-process communications that are a standard part of MPI are handled in an efficient manner. This parallel approach allows analysis of much larger DEMs as compared to the serial recursive algorithms. In this paper, we present the definitions of the HPMs, the serial and parallel algorithms used in their extraction and their potential applications in hydrology, geomorphology and ecology.

  16. Hydrologic resources management program, FY 1998 progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, F.C.; Criss, R.E.; Davisson, M.L.; Eaton, G.F.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Rose, T.P.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from FY 1998 technical studies conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), and supports DP operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through studies of radiochemistry and resource management related to the defense programs mission. Other participating organizations include the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Bechtel-Nevada (BN). The UGTA project is an Environmental Management (EM) activity of DOE/NV that supports a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. UGTA's primary function is to address the legacy release of hazardous constituents at the Nevada Test Site, the Tonopah Test Range, and off-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear testing areas. Participating contractors include LLNL (Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate, Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division), LANL, DRI, USGS, BN, HSI-GeoTrans, and IT Corporation. The FY 1998 HRMP and UGTA annual progress report follows the organization and contents of our FY 1997 report (Smith et al., 1998), and includes our results from CY 1997-1998 technical studies of radionuclide migration and isotope hydrology at the Nevada Test Site. During FY 1998, LLNL continued its efforts under the HRMP to pursue a technical agenda relevant to the science-based stockpile stewardship program at DOE/NV. Support to UGTA in FY 1998 included efforts to quantitatively define the radionuclide source term residual from underground nuclear weapons testing and the derivative solution, or hydrologic source term, from radionuclides dissolved in or transported by groundwater. The hydrologic source term is a component of a predicted dose assessment for the five principal NTS testing areas.

  17. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  18. Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

  19. Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  20. National Instruments online training and training credits offering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Instruments online training and training credits offering The lab has entered into an Enterprise Agreement with National Instruments (NI) to offer online training and...

  1. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halzen, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy Francis Halzen 1 andAn Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy Francis Halzen 1 and94720 Abstract Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first

  2. Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors. The Facility Representative observes calibration testing of instruments and channels...

  3. SciTech Connect: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 You...

  4. Development of Characterization Technology for Fault Zone Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Gasperikova, Erika; Goto, Junichi; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Tadashi; Ueta, Keiichi; Kiho, Kenzo; MIyakawa, Kimio

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Several deep trenches were cut, and a number of geophysical surveys were conducted across the Wildcat Fault in the hills east of Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is believed to be a strike-slip fault and a member of the Hayward Fault System, with over 10 km of displacement. So far, three boreholes of ~;; 150m deep have been core-drilled and borehole geophysical logs were conducted. The rocks are extensively sheared and fractured; gouges were observed at several depths and a thick cataclasitic zone was also observed. While confirming some earlier, published conclusions from shallow observations about Wildcat, some unexpected findings were encountered. Preliminary analysis indicates that Wildcat near the field site consists of multiple faults. The hydraulic test data suggest the dual properties of the hydrologic structure of the fault zone. A fourth borehole is planned to penetrate the main fault believed to lie in-between the holes. The main philosophy behind our approach for the hydrologic characterization of such a complex fractured system is to let the system take its own average and monitor a long term behavior instead of collecting a multitude of data at small length and time scales, or at a discrete fracture scale and to ?up-scale,? which is extremely tenuous.

  5. Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

  6. Reconstructing the duty of water: a study of emergent norms in socio-hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    This paper assesses the changing norms of water use known as the duty of water. It is a case study in historical socio-hydrology, or more precisely the history of socio-hydrologic ideas, a line of research that is useful ...

  7. An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    An energetic perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison-ocean general circulation models simulating experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project perspective on hydrological cycle changes in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, J. Geophys. Res

  8. Towards Better Utilization of NEXRAD Data in Hydrology: an Overview of Hydro-NEXRAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Ramon

    Towards Better Utilization of NEXRAD Data in Hydrology: an Overview of Hydro-NEXRAD Witold F metadata extraction and management techniques are required. The authors describe and discuss the Hydro of the Hydro-NEXRAD project is to increase the use of NEXRAD data in hydrologic research. The project

  9. Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright © 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro Arc Hydro: GIS in Water Resources Seminar/Workshop Gainesville, Florida ­ November 15, 2007 Christine Dartiguenave, ESRI inc. cdartiguenave@esri.com #12;Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 2 2Arc Hydro

  10. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  11. STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Unified Approach (Extremes/Non-Extremes) (4) Complex Extreme Climate Design -- No longer only need for extreme value theory · Complex Extreme Events -- e. g., heat waves

  12. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeelani, G.; Feddema, Johannes J.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Stearns, Leigh

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Snowmelt and icemelt are believed to be important regulators of seasonal discharge of Himalayan rivers. To analyze the long term contribution of snowmelt and glacier/icemelt to river hydrology we apply a water budget model to simulate hydrology...

  13. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  14. Advances in instrumentation for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pain, S. D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the nuclear physics properties which govern energy generation and nucleosynthesis in the astrophysical phenomena we observe in the universe is crucial to understanding how these objects behave and how the chemical history of the universe evolved to its present state. The low cross sections and short nuclear lifetimes involved in many of these reactions make their experimental determination challenging, requiring developments in beams and instrumentation. A selection of developments in nuclear astrophysics instrumentation is discussed, using as examples projects involving the nuclear astrophysics group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developments will be key to the instrumentation necessary to fully exploit nuclear astrophysics opportunities at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams which is currently under construction.

  15. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 360 (1995) 189-192 INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 360 (1995) 189-192 NUCLEARFaculty ofPhysics and Nuclear Techniques Academy ofMining and Metallurgy, Cracow, Poland h INFN, Torino INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SectIonA A fast, high-granularity silicon multiplicity detector

  16. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS REgtR?n Thermodynamics of dynamic nuclear polarization W.Th. Wenckebach Faculty ofApplied Physics, Delfr Unicersity of Technology, P.O.B. 5046, 2600 GA De& The Netherlands Abstract Dynamic nuclear

  17. Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach 833 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) © EGU Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach R. Ludwig1

  18. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans for the South Central Texas Region*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans. The economic, hydrologic, and environmental consequences of the "best" choice of regional water management plan, and water management plans. #12;3 An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management

  20. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 3148, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 31­48, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-31 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova, via Loredan 20

  1. Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht, Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrology: The Influence of Climate Change and/or Land Cover/Use Change Steven R. Fassnacht. Precipitation and temperature are the main drivers of hydrological systems, which influence water availability in those temperatures has decreased. Hydrologic changes are occurring due to a changing climate. For snow

  2. Nordic Hydrology, 33 (5),2002,331-346 No part may be reproducedby any process without complete reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Nordic Hydrology, 33 (5),2002,331-346 No part may be reproducedby any process without complete models. Considerable time and effort has been directed to model this process, and many hydrologic models models. Considerable time and effort has been devoted to model these processes, and many hydrologic

  3. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111­126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-111 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Constraints of artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff modelling: trade-offs in hydrological state representation

  4. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 1929, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 19­29, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-19 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport. Marani International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova

  5. Inferring catchment precipitation by doing hydrology backward: A test in 24 small and mesoscale catchments in Luxembourg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Inferring catchment precipitation by doing hydrology backward: A test in 24 small and mesoscale September 2012; published 10 October 2012. [1] The complexity of hydrological systems and the necessary simplification of models describing these systems remain major challenges in hydrological modeling. Kirchner

  6. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127­137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-127 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Centre, Maun, Botswana Received: 11 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

  7. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 314, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 3­14, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-3 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Bringing it all, Dublin, Ireland Received: 6 December 2004 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

  8. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139­155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-139 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Using stable isotope tracers to assess hydrological flow paths, residence times and landscape influences in a nested

  9. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173­183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-173 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Soil moisture ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 2 March 2005 Revised: 29 June 2005 ­ Accepted

  10. Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 A physically based, two-dimensional, finite-difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Journal of Hydrology ELSEVIER [1] Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 A physically based, two SSDI 0022-1694(94)02512-A #12;72 T.P. Clement et al. / Journal of Hydrology 161 (1994) 71-90 present

  11. DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DanielViviroli and RolfWeingartner 1016 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 10161029 (2004) © EGU The hydrological significance of mountains: from regional to global scale Daniel Viviroli and Rolf share of the worlds population with fresh water. Quantification of the hydrological significance

  12. Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Atul H. Haria and Paul Shand 334 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 334344 (2004) © EGU and stream flow generation Atul H. Haria1 and Paul Shand2 1 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean, groundwater, Hafren, hillslope hydrology, Plynlimon, recharge, soil water, streamflow generation Introduction

  13. Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Soon Thiam Khu and Micha G.F.Werner 680 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 680692 (2003) © EGU Reduction of Monte-Carlo simulation runs for uncertainty estimation in hydrological modelling Soon applied for the estimation of uncertainties in hydrological models due to uncertain parameters. One

  14. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 7991, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 79­91, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-79 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Scale, USA Received: 1 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 30 August

  15. UW SCHOOL OF PHARMACY INSTRUMENTATION COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    UW SCHOOL OF PHARMACY INSTRUMENTATION COMMITTEE 2013-2014 Warren Heideman (chair) Mass spec users-related activities of the School. 4. Provide input and advice to the Dean on issues of importance to the AIC the research enterprise within the School of Pharmacy, across campus, and in the scientific community such as

  16. Integrated polymerase chain reaction/electrophoresis instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach and instrument for field identification of micro-organisms and DNA fragments using a small and disposable device containing integrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzymatic reaction wells, attached capillary electrophoresis (CE) channels, detectors, and read-out all on/in a small hand-held package. The analysis instrument may be made inexpensively, for example, of plastic, and thus is disposable, which minimizes cross contamination and the potential for false positive identification between samples. In addition, it is designed for multiple users with individual applications. The integrated PCR/CE is manufactured by the PCR well and CE channels are "stamped" into plastic depressions where conductive coatings are made in the wells and ends of the CE microchannels to carry voltage and current to heat the PCR reaction mixtures and simultaneously draw DNA bands up the CE channels. Light is transmitted through the instrument at appropriate points and detects PCR bands and identifies DNA fragments by size (retention time) and quantifies each by the amount of light generated as each phototransistor positioned below each CE channel detects a passing band. The instrument is so compact that at least 100 PCR/CE reactions/analyses can be performed easily on one detection device.

  17. Regulative and voluntary instruments for responsible forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    carrotssermonssticks PES Comand and control Taxes and subsibies ­ Directness + Education ­Useofeconomicincentives,700 ha di farmland producing corn converted to organic · 92% of the area involved in the program · 200) A similar type of classification " Regulative instruments promoted by public institutions: international

  18. Cooling the dark energy camera instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

  19. Utility Indifference Pricing of Credit Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaimungal, Sebastian

    in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Mathematics Instruments Georg Sigloch Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Mathematics University of Toronto 2009 consequences of being exposed to credit risk. In this thesis we address these issues by pricing credit

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  4. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  7. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and retrieve the required data, and their ability to integrate the data into environmental models using the FRAMES environment.

  8. Associations among hydrologic classifications and fish traits to support environmental flow standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Frimpong, Dr. Emmanuel A, [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classification systems are valuable to ecological management in that they organize information into consolidated units thereby providing efficient means to achieve conservation objectives. Of the many ways classifications benefit management, hypothesis generation has been discussed as the most important. However, in order to provide templates for developing and testing ecologically relevant hypotheses, classifications created using environmental variables must be linked to ecological patterns. Herein, we develop associations between a recent US hydrologic classification and fish traits in order to form a template for generating flow ecology hypotheses and supporting environmental flow standard development. Tradeoffs in adaptive strategies for fish were observed across a spectrum of stable, perennial flow to unstable intermittent flow. In accordance with theory, periodic strategists were associated with stable, predictable flow, whereas opportunistic strategists were more affiliated with intermittent, variable flows. We developed linkages between the uniqueness of hydrologic character and ecological distinction among classes, which may translate into predictions between losses in hydrologic uniqueness and ecological community response. Comparisons of classification strength between hydrologic classifications and other frameworks suggested that spatially contiguous classifications with higher regionalization will tend to explain more variation in ecological patterns. Despite explaining less ecological variation than other frameworks, we contend that hydrologic classifications are still useful because they provide a conceptual linkage between hydrologic variation and ecological communities to support flow ecology relationships. Mechanistic associations among fish traits and hydrologic classes support the presumption that environmental flow standards should be developed uniquely for stream classes and ecological communities, therein.

  9. Instrumentation Report No. 3: performance and reliability of instrumentation deployed for the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Rector, N.L.; Scarafiotti, J.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration of the short-term storage and subsequent retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies was successfully completed at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. Nearly 1000 instruments were deployed to monitor the temperature of rock, air, and metallic components of the test; displacements and stress changes within the rock mass; radiation dosage to personnel and to the rock; thermal energy input; characteristics of the ventilation airstream; and the operational status of the test. Careful selection, installation, calibration, and maintenance of these instruments ensured the acquisition of about 15.3 x 10{sup 6} high-quality data points. With few exceptions, the performance and reliability of the instrumentation and associated data acquisition system (DAS) were within specified acceptable limits. Details of the performance and reliability of the instrumentation are discussed in this report. 42 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was ?¢????shell space?¢??? that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

  11. Signal conditioning circuitry design for instrumentation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Cory A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the current progress in the design, implementation, and validation of the signal conditioning circuitry used in a measurement instrumentation system. The purpose of this text is to document the current progress of a particular design in signal conditioning circuitry in an instrumentation system. The input of the signal conditioning circuitry comes from a piezoresistive transducer and the output will be fed to a 250 ksps, 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with an input range of 0-5 V. It is assumed that the maximum differential voltage amplitude input from the sensor is 20 mV with an unknown, but presumably high, sensor bandwidth. This text focuses on a specific design; however, the theory is presented in such a way that this text can be used as a basis for future designs.

  12. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  13. Geography 547: Fluvial Geomorphology Tentative Lecture Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    & Field Hydrology Easterbrook, p.111-113; Adv: Simon 9 Shear stress; flow regimes: critical, subcritical, binomial probability theory -------- 18 Discharge data calibrations; hydrograph development; Water

  14. Instrument development continues in Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peer review panels composed of 80 external scientists recently visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review almost 700 proposals for experiments on 23 instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These were proposed for the time period from January-June 2012. About 40% of the proposals were approved for beam time and 20% were placed on an alternate list if time becomes available. The Hybrid Spectrometer HYSPEC at SNS began its commissioning in September 2011. HYSPEC is otpimized for studying low energy dynamics in single-crystal samples using a broad variety of sample environments, and is equipped with a polarization analysis capability. It is expected to be available for users on a limited basis in the second half of 2012. The detector tank of CORELLI has been installed on beamline 9 at SNS. Now that the tank is in place, banks of neutron detectors and boron carbide shielding will be installed around the interior. CORELLI is optimized to probe complex disorder in crystalline materials through diffuse scattering from single-crystal samples. It will begin commissioning in 2014. CORELLI is one of four instruments being developed under the SING II (SNS Instruments Next Generation II) project. The others are the Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MANDI), the Vibrational Spectrometer (VISION, scheduled to begin commissioning in 2012), and the Time of Flight Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument (TOF-USANS). The single crystal neutron diffractometer IMAGINE, was deliverd to HFIR in October 2011. Preliminary testing has been carried out. IMAGINE will provide atomic resolution information on chemical, organic, metallo-organic and protein single crystals that will enable their chemical, physical and biological structure and function to be understood. This instrument will benefit scientists with interests in pharmaceuticals, minerals and other inorganic crystals, small molecules, molecular organo-metallic crystals and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) molecular crystal structures. The quasi-Laue geometry, combined with a large solid angle detector, will enable rapid data collection from crystals with volume < 1mm{sup 1} and unit cell < 100 {angstrom}. Construction and installation of the optical system is in progress. Commissioning is expected to start in April 2012.

  15. Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on developing and evaluating efficient and effective parameter calibration and uncertainty methods for hydrologic modeling. Five single objective optimization algorithms and six multi-objective optimization algorithms were tested...

  16. Hydrology and dynamics of a land-terminating Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholomew, Ian David

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the hydrology and dynamics of a land-terminating outlet glacier on the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The investigations are motivated by uncertainty about ...

  17. The influence of subglacial hydrology on the flow of West Antarctic ice streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Narelle Paula Marie

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Subglacial hydrology is known to influence the flow of ice. However, difficulty in accessing the base of large ice sheets has made determining the interaction between ice streams, basal sediment and water difficult to discern. The aim of this thesis...

  18. Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    --Research Approaches and Results: Water Quantity/Hydrologic Impacts Water and energy balance in a forested stand University Union, Parlor A (3rd Floor) University of Utah Salt Lake City, December 1, 2011 Video Conference

  19. Influence of woody dominated rangelands on site hydrology and herbaceous production, Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hester, Justin Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station at Sonora, Texas. The objective was to characterize interception by juniper canopy and litter, and to determine the redistributive effects of throughfall and stemflow on site hydrology. Based on a 10-year distribution pattern of rainfall, 66...

  20. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

  1. Instrumentation for multiaxial mechanical testing of inhomogeneous elastic membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Ariel Marc

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design, development, and construction of an instrument for biaxial mechanical testing of inhomogeneous elastic membranes. The instrument incorporates an arrangement of linear motion stages for ...

  2. CU-LASP Test Facilities ! and Instrument Calibration Capabilities"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ­ Star tracker ­ Solar position sensors ­ Test & calibration applications ­ End-to-end instrument;Total Solar Irradiance Radiometer Facility (TRF) · Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) instrument calibrations

  3. Role of modern climate and hydrology in world oil preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szatmari, P. (Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of oil requires a favorable source, a reservoir, good seal-rock quality, and suitably timed thermal history and structuring. The accumulated oil, especially its light fractions, may be subsequently removed by hydrologically controlled processes such as water washing, biodegradation, and tilting of the oil-water contact. These processes are dependent on the climate. In regions that have become increasingly cold or dry during late Cenozoic time, low rainfall, low ground-water flow rates, and low input of nutrients and microorganisms have protected the oil; in warm or temperate rainy climates, high flow rates and high input of nutrients and microorganisms have led to partial or total removal of oil. Thus, most of the rich (>500,000 barrels/day) oil provinces on land are in cold or dry regions, where water is recharged in highlands that receive little rain (<500 mm/yr), such as Texas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Alaska's North Slope, California, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, the Middle East, the Volga-Ural basin, and western Siberia. Where upland recharge areas are warm or temperate and rainy, as in the eastern United States, western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, Brazil, India, and most of China, rich oil provinces on land (outside young deltas) are rare, and biodegradation is widespread. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Implementation of instruments and facilities at the SGP CART site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D.L.; Wesely, M.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the installation of instruments and trailers at the southern Great Plains Clouds and Radiation Testbed site.

  5. SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15 INSTRUCTION MANUAL Serial No._____________________ 8/94 World Precision Instruments, Inc. SP100i Syringe Pump Digital Infusion Syringe Pump #12;SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Contents GENERAL DESCRIPTION

  6. Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyc, Tomas

    Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics Tom´as Tyc, Lenka Herz symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically

  7. MHD power plant instrumentation and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

  8. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  9. Curtis Instruments Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)Crowley County,Curran, Illinois:Instruments Inc Jump to:

  10. Licenses Available in Analytical Instrumentation | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE CAnalytical Instrumentation SHARE

  11. ARM - Campaign Instrument - 5mm-mwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARMFacilitiesCERAgovInstruments5mm-mwr

  12. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Smith, K. M.; Bogdan, M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Nixon, G. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Vanderlinde, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Davis, R.; Dickinson, C., E-mail: newburgh@princeton.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the cosmic microwave background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales({approx}1 Degree-Sign ). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters that form the focal planes use a compact design based on high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l {approx} 25-975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance, and sources of systematic error of the instrument.

  13. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  14. Accommodating subject and instrument variations in spectroscopic determinations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rowe, Robert K. (Corrales, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring a biological attribute, such as the concentration of an analyte, particularly a blood analyte in tissue such as glucose. The method utilizes spectrographic techniques in conjunction with an improved instrument-tailored or subject-tailored calibration model. In a calibration phase, calibration model data is modified to reduce or eliminate instrument-specific attributes, resulting in a calibration data set modeling intra-instrument or intra-subject variation. In a prediction phase, the prediction process is tailored for each target instrument separately using a minimal number of spectral measurements from each instrument or subject.

  15. 4.10 Earthquake Hydrology M. Manga and C.-Y. Wang, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    4.10 Earthquake Hydrology M. Manga and C.-Y. Wang, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA ª 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 4.10.1 Introduction 293 4.10.2 Hydrologic Response.10.3.3 Mud Volcanoes 310 4.10.3.4 Geysers 311 4.10.4 Feedback between Earthquakes and Hydrology 312 4

  16. Influence of soil physicochemical properties on hydrology and restoration response in Carolina Bay wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C. D.; Andrews, D.M.; Kolka, R.K.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina Bays are shallow depression wetlands found in the southeast US that have been severely altered by human activity. The need to restore these complex and diverse systems is well established, but our understanding of basic wetland hydrological processes is limited, hence our ability to predict the need for and/or assess the effectiveness of bay restorations is hindered. Differing physicochemical properties of soils within bay interiors may control bay hydrology. However, previous efforts to establish relationships between soil characteristics and bay hydrology have been inconclusive and the question still remains as to why some bays are ponded throughout the year while others, within a similar landscape unit, are predominantly dry. An assessment of soil and hydrologic characteristics was initiated in restored and unrestored control bays to determine if a relationship exists. Soil morphology was described and permanent monitoring wells were installed at each site. Soil samples were collected by horizon to a depth of 2 meters at the topographic center of each site, and then analyzed. After three years, multiple regression analysis (stepwise backward and forward) was used to establish relationships between the soil physicochemical characteristics and bay hydroperiod in the undisturbed sites. Results from surface soils indicated that exchangeable acidity (EA) was the best single predictor of hydrology. The best double predictor was EA and total N and EA, total N and total C as the best triple predictor. A significant relationship (r2 = 0.96) between hydroperiod and clay content in the argillic horizon (Bt) was also observed. Subsequently, this relationship was utilized to predict hydrologic response using pre-restoration hydroperiod data. The model accurately identified sites that did not need hydrologic restoration (too wet), and effectively showed sites that responded well to restoration activities.

  17. CIWS-FW: a Customizable InstrumentWorkstation Software Framework for instrument-independent data handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conforti, Vito; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Franceschi, Enrico; Nicastro, Luciano; Zoli, Andrea; Dadina, Mauro; Smart, Ricky; Morbidelli, Roberto; Frailis, Marco; Sartor, Stefano; Zacchei, Andrea; Lodi, Marcello; Cirami, Roberto; Pasian, Fabio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CIWS-FW is aimed at providing a common and standard solution for the storage, processing and quick look at the data acquired from scientific instruments for astrophysics. The target system is the instrument workstation either in the context of the Electrical Ground Support Equipment for space-borne experiments, or in the context of the data acquisition system for instrumentation. The CIWS-FW core includes software developed by team members for previous experiments and provides new components and tools that improve the software reusability, configurability and extensibility attributes. The CIWS-FW mainly consists of two packages: the data processing system and the data access system. The former provides the software components and libraries to support the data acquisition, transformation, display and storage in near real time of either a data packet stream and/or a sequence of data files generated by the instrument. The latter is a meta-data and data management system, providing a reusable solution for the...

  18. 1) Start the Instrument and Software 2 1.1 Start the Instrument 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    adhesive film. ColorofLeftLED ColorofRightLED StatusofInstrument Orange *flashing* Orange *flashing on the computer workstation (if it is not already on). 2. Login to Windows. a. User name: operator b. Password: LC Window will appear. Click on New Ex- periment. 2. The software will open the New Experiment Window

  19. SRS delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studley, R.V. [Westinghouse SRC, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analytical systems measuring delayed neutrons have been used for safeguards measurements at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A predecessor, the 252Cf Activation Analysis Facility installed at the Savannah River Technology Center (formally SR Laboratory) has been used since 1974 to analyze small samples, measuring both delayed neutrons and gammas. The six shufflers, plus one currently being fabricated, were developed, designed and fabricated by the LANL N-1 group. These shufflers have provided safeguards measurements of product (2 each), in-process scrap (2 each plus a conceptual replacement) and process waste (2 each plus one being fabricated). One shuffler for scrap assay was the first shuffler to be installed (1978) in a process. Another (waste) was the first installed in a process capable of assaying barrels. A third (waste) is the first pass-through model and a fourth (product) is the most precise ({+-}.12%) and accurate NDA instrument yet produced.

  20. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  1. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Steven A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  2. Assessing the local windfield with instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zambrano, T.G.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concerns the development and testing of a technique for the initial screening and evaluation of potential sites for wind-energy conversion systems (WECS). The methodology was developed through a realistic siting exercise. The siting exercise involved measurements of winds along the surface and winds aloft using a relatively new instrument system, the Tethered Aerodynamic Lifting Anemometer (TALA) kite; notation of ecological factors such as vegetation flagging, soil erosion and site exposure, and verification of an area best suited for wind-energy development by establishing and maintaining a wind monitoring network. The siting exercise was carried out in an approximately 100-square-mile region of the Tehachapi Mountains of Southern California. The results showed that a comprehensive site survey involving field measurements, ecological survey, and wind-monitoring can be an effective tool for preliminary evaluation of WECS sites.

  3. SUNRISE: INSTRUMENT, MISSION, DATA, AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Danilovic, S.; Feller, A.; Gandorfer, A.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Bonet, J. A.; Pillet, V. MartInez [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 3004, E-18080, Granada (Spain); Domingo, V.; Palacios, J. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Gonzalez, N. Bello; Berkefeld, T.; Franz, M.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Title, A. M., E-mail: solanki@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysical Lab., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory consists of a 1 m aperture Gregory telescope, a UV filter imager, an imaging vector polarimeter, an image stabilization system, and further infrastructure. The first science flight of SUNRISE yielded high-quality data that revealed the structure, dynamics, and evolution of solar convection, oscillations, and magnetic fields at a resolution of around 100 km in the quiet Sun. After a brief description of instruments and data, the first qualitative results are presented. In contrast to earlier observations, we clearly see granulation at 214 nm. Images in Ca II H display narrow, short-lived dark intergranular lanes between the bright edges of granules. The very small-scale, mixed-polarity internetwork fields are found to be highly dynamic. A significant increase in detectable magnetic flux is found after phase-diversity-related reconstruction of polarization maps, indicating that the polarities are mixed right down to the spatial resolution limit and probably beyond.

  4. HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  5. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Instrumentation and Control, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Instrumentation and Control Fundamentals Handbook personnel, and the technical staff facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of instrumentation and control systems. The handbook includes information on temperature, pressure, flow, and level detection systems; position indication systems; process control systems; and radiation detection principles. This information will provide personnel with an understanding of the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility instrumentation and control systems.

  6. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Instrumentation and Control, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Instrumentation and Control Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of instrumentation and control systems. The handbook includes information on temperature, pressure, flow, and level detection systems; position indication systems; process control systems; and radiation detection principles. This information will provide personnel with an understanding of the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility instrumentation and control systems.

  7. Radiation Protection Instrument Manual, Revision 1, PNL-MA-562

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    PNL-MA-562 This manual provides specific information for operating and using portable radiological monitoring instruments available for use on the Hanford Site.

  8. automatic stapling instrument: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DETECTOR BY USING EVOLUTIONARY LEARNING METHOD Yoshiyuki Kobayashi SONY Corporation, Japan Yoshiyuki.Kobayashi@jp.sony.com ABSTRACT This paper presents a novel...

  9. adaptive nonparametric instrumental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both selects Faraway, Julian 27 Spanish Version of the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (SSI) Adapted to Physical Education CiteSeer Summary: The objective of this research was to...

  10. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 POSTER SESSION I: INSTRUMENT FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    -of-the-art instrument and the research that we will do with it. Kohout T. Elbra T. Pesonen L. J. Schnabl P. Slechta S

  11. QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration 5/26/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors. The Facility Representative observes...

  12. activation instrumental analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    car electronics industry. There are currently many electronic systems improving the safety Wieringa, Roel 17 Runtime Instrumentation for Precise Flow-Sensitive Type Analysis...

  13. Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    29127, Berkeley, CA, 1990. Forecast of Thermal-HydrologicalDecember 1996 Figures A-l Forecast ofThermal-HydrologicalT I O N A L L A B ORATORY Forecast o f T h e n n a l - H y d

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of Geoengineering in the1 Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)2 Simone Tilmes,1 John Fasullo,1 Jean.: THE HYDROLOGIC IMPACT OF GEOENGINEERING 10 Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l'Environnement, CEA, CNRS, UVSQ, 2013, 11:09am D R A F T #12;TILMES ET AL.: THE HYDROLOGIC IMPACT OF GEOENGINEERING X - 3 Abstract

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF HYDRATED SULFATES ACROSS ARABIA TERRA USING CRISM DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR MARTIAN HYDROLOGY. S. M. Wiseman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Saint Louis, MO. Introduction: Hydrologic modeling relevant to late Noachian through Hesperian conditions on Mars predicts that Arabia Terra was a region of enhanced groundwater upwelling that resulted topography (Fig. 1). The most well preserved deposit explained by the Andrews-Hanna hydrologic model

  16. Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

  17. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (?10{sup ?9} - 10{sup ?8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  18. Advances in nuclear instrumentation for safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Reilly, T.D.; Miller, M.C.; Hollas, C.L.; Pickrell, M.M.; Prommel, J.M.; Dreicer, J.S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes detectors, instrumentation, and analytical methods under development to address the above issues. The authors will describe work underway on room-temperature semiconductors including attempts to model the response of these detectors to improve spectrum analysis procedures and detector design. Computerized tomography is used in many medical and industrial applications; they are developing both gamma-ray and neutron tomography for improved measurements of waste and direct-use materials. Modern electronics and scintillation detectors should permit the development of fast neutron coincidence detectors with dramatically improved signal-to-noise ratios. For active measurements, they are studying several improved neutron sources, including a high-fluence, plasma-based, d-t generator. New analysis tools from information theory may permit one to better combine data from different measurement systems. This paper attempts to briefly describe a range of new sensors, electronics, and data analysis methods under study at Los Alamos and other laboratories to promote discussion of promising technology that they may bring to bear on these important global issues.

  19. ERB and Northern European FRIEND Project 5 Conference, Demnovsk dolina, Slovakia, 2002 Evaluation of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration efforts in small watersheds with limited data: from to assist in decision making. Distributed hydrologic modeling in geographic information systems (GIS) has scale, or they require excessive calibration, or they are not based on the dominant hydrologic processes

  20. Revisiting Experimental Catchment Studies in Forest Hydrology (Proceedings of a Workshop held during the XXV IUGG General Assembly in Melbourne, JuneJuly 2011) (IAHS Publ. 353, 2012).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Revisiting Experimental Catchment Studies in Forest Hydrology (Proceedings of a Workshop held, 50080 Zaragoza, Spain Abstract The hydrological response of two neighbouring catchments in the central for this switching behaviour could be an increase in the hydrological connectivity within the slopes of the forested

  1. Multivariate synthetic streamflow generation using a hybrid model based on artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(4), 641654 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    networks 641 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(4), 641­654 (2002) © EGS Multivariate synthetic associated with hydrological processes, making it valuable as a practical tool for synthetic generation backpropagation, hydrological scenario generation, multivariate time-series. Introduction It has been almost four

  2. H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    H.Bach,M.Braun,G.Lampart andW.Mauser 862 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 862876 (2003) © EGU Use of remote sensing for hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments H. Bach1 , M. Braun2, which makes the hydrological parameterisation of Alpine catchments difficult. Within a few kilometres

  3. Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration in a soil profile during the 1999 MAP-Riviera Campaign Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Riviera Campaign 903 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 903919 (2003) © EGU Simulation of soil moisture and evapotranspiration scheme in hydrological models. This study presents the validation of soil moisture soil plot at the edge of a corn field. The hydrological model PREVAH was driven using three

  4. Modelling water flow and seasonal soil moisture dynamics in an alluvial groundwater-fed wetland Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 5766 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 57­66 (2003) © EGU Modelling water flow and seasonal soil between groundwater, surface water and climatic conditions. Knowledge of the hydrology of these systems tool to capture their hydrological complexity. In this study, a 2D-model describing saturated

  5. Chapter 4 Regional Hydrology [Draft August 2007] 2007 FORREX Forest Research Extension Society and B.C. Ministry of Forests and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Brett

    Chapter 4 ­ Regional Hydrology [Draft August 2007] © 2007 FORREX Forest Research Extension Society and B.C. Ministry of Forests and Range Eaton B., and R.D. Moore. 2007. Chapter 4 ­ Regional Hydrology [Draft]. In Compendium of Forest Hydrology and Geomorphology in British Columbia [In Prep.] R.G. Pike et

  6. Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Bowling (bowling@purdue.edu) and Keith A. Cherkauer, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkauer, Keith

    Current capabilities in soil thermal representations within a large scale hydrology model Laura C. Adam, now at Washington State University, Pullman, WA · Observations of dramatic hydrologic change hydrology under a changing climate (e.g. Smith et al. 2005; Adam & Lettenmaier 2008). Although mathematical

  7. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43­55 (2003) © EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

  8. Hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, K.V.; Garcia, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument uses a number-oriented microprocessor sequenced by a single component microprocessor. The incorporation of new CMOS integrated circuits makes possible complex analysis in a small, easily operated, battery-powered unit. The instrument solves an immediate problem with threshold setting of plastic scintillators and promises numerous other applications.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  10. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph: A Hubble Replacement Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph: A Hubble Replacement Instrument for the 2002 Reservicing Mission Origins Spectrograph (COS) has recently been selected as a replacement instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope. Installation is scheduled for late 2002, replacing COSTAR, which at that time will be unnecessary

  11. PNWD-SA-6893 Instrumenting the Intelligence Analysis Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNWD-SA-6893 Instrumenting the Intelligence Analysis Process Ernest Hampson Paula Cowley PresentedLean, VA, USA Battelle Memorial Institute #12;Instrumenting the Intelligence Analysis Process Ernest process Abstract The Advanced Research and Development Activity initiated the Novel Intelligence from

  12. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; /SLAC; ,

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  13. Eos, Vol. 73, No. 3, January 21, 1992 Hydrology and Hydrochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Eos, Vol. 73, No. 3, January 21, 1992 Hydrology and Hydrochemistry of Alpine Basins PAGE 33 Jeff Dozier and Mark Williams This year has seen the first strides toward a global understanding in meltwater from the snow pack dif ferentially; the first meltwater has a chemical Jeff Dozier, NASA Goddard

  14. Aquifers and Wetlands SUMMARY: This chapter begins with an overview of the hydrological cycle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    cycle and considers the flow of water in wetlands and undergraound. Special attention is paid to flow through vegetated wetlands. 14.1 The Hydrological Cycle Rivers and streams are but a link in the global cycle of water, called the hydro- logical cycle. Approximately half of the solar energy striking

  15. Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Earth'sFuture Socio-hydrology: Use-inspired water sustainability science for the Anthropocene M for Islamic Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, 7Department is at the core of the most difficult sustainability challenges facing humans in the modern era, involving

  16. The fate of Earth's ocean Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569575 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The fate of Earth's ocean 569 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 569­575 (2001) © EGS The fate of Earth's ocean Christine Bounama, Siegfried Franck and Werner von Bloh Potsdam Institute@pik-potsdam.de Abstract Questions of how water arrived on the Earth's surface, how much water is contained in the Earth

  17. Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones -- Yucca Mountain paleohydrogeology paleoclimate U-series dating secondary ion mass spectrometry Yucca Mountain Understanding to Pleistocene climate change within a deep vadose zone in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  18. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed-effects model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in areas with limited hydrological data using a mixed of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Abstract: Sediment rating curves are commonly used to estimate the suspended sediment load in rivers and streams under the assumption

  19. Comparison of three downscaling methods in simulating the impact of climate change on the hydrology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of three downscaling methods in simulating the impact of climate change on the hydrology change on water resources usually fol- low a top to bottom approach: a scenario of emissions is used a demand in assessments on the impact of climate change hy- drological systems. The purpose of the study

  20. FOG AND DEW COLLECTION PROJECTS IN CROATIA Metorological and Hydrological lnstitiute of Croatia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FOG AND DEW COLLECTION PROJECTS IN CROATIA M. Mileta* Metorological and Hydrological lnstitiute of Croatia Zagreb, Croatia D. Beysens*, V. Nikolayev* CEA-Grenoble, and ESPCI, Paris, France) I. Milimouk and dew water collection in Croatia. Zavizan, the highest meteorological station in Croatia( 1594m

  1. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates

  2. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    intercepts snow- fall, alters the snow/atmosphere energy exchange and reduces wind speed. Dense canopies tendEvaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 September 2012 Received in revised form 8 March 2013

  3. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that control denitrifica- tion. Hydrological discharge regimes affect the degree of interaction of the water, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model

  4. Hydrologic responses to earthquakes and a general metric CHI-YUEN WANG AND MICHAEL MANGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to earthquakes, including liquefaction, changes in stream and spring discharge, changes in the properties to relate and compare the various hydrologic responses. We show that liquefaction, eruption of mud volcanoes seismicity may respond to seismic energy density as small as 10)3 and 10)4 J m)3 , respectively. Com- paring

  5. Sensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    and is the largest nonpolar ice cap in Europe. Because it is temperate (isothermal at the melting point) and storesSensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap hydrology and dynamics to climate warming over the next 2] The sensitivity of Vatnajokull ice cap to future climate change is examined using spatially distributed coupled

  6. Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal, Venezuelan Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Holocene hydrologic balance of tropical South America from oxygen isotopes of lake sediment opal is derived from Atlantic Ocean evaporation which is modified by passage over lowland South America suggest that the decreasing 18 O reflects a decrease in the fraction of moisture entering South America

  7. Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert Oglesby**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Mountain Precipitation and Hydrology in the Middle East Ronald. B. Smith*, Jason Evans*, Robert shadow effect. Recent studies have tried to quantify this effect on Alpine terrain [Smith et al. 2003a model of this is the response to heating in a steady stratified stream [Smith and Lin, 1982

  8. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modelling Groundwater flow Solute transport INTRODUCTION Predicting any natural process is a very difficultHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE MODELLING Scales of heterogeneity, REV, dispersion and measurement scale groundwater flow and convection

  9. BEE 6740 2012 http://www.hydrology.bee.cornell.edu/BEE6740Index.htm (coming)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    the Cornell Soil & Water Lab Content & Objective: This course is an introduction to simulation modeling ecohydrology Modeling Session: Introduction to R Soil Water Budget: The keystone to hydrological modeling Soil, groundwater recharge, and some simplifications Modeling Session: the Thornthwaite-Mather model

  10. Identifying hydrologically sensitive areas: Bridging the gap between science and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    nutrient management plans, lack a sound hydrological underpinning for pollutant transport processes S. Steenhuisa , M. Todd Waltera, * a Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701, USA b Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

  11. Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Statistics of extremes in hydrology Richard W. Katz a,*, Marc B. Parlange b , Philippe Naveau c Abstract The statistics of extremes have played an important role in engineering practice for water resources design and management. How recent developments in the statistical theory of extreme values can

  12. Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

  13. SOURCES OF HYDROGRAPHIC AND METERIOLOGICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contract No. 14-19-008-9381 e lt

  14. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI?s rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  15. Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1December 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. The localization of instrumental learning within the spinal cord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Grace Alexandra Tsu-Chi

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinal neurons of surgically transected rats can support a simple form of instrumental learning. Rats learn to maintain leg flexion as a response to shock. The present experiments localized the region of the spinal cord that mediates this learning...

  20. Instrumenting Buildings to Determine Retrofit Savings: Murphy's Law Strikes Again

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Bryant, J.; Carlson, K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University. Metering typically includes monitoring for the whole-building electric load, chilled and hot water thermal loads and selected submetered electrical loads. The emphasis of the lessons learned was on the instrumentation used and installation...

  1. Instant Profiling: Instrumentation Sampling for Profiling Datacenter Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Instant Profiling: Instrumentation Sampling for Profiling Datacenter Applications Hyoun Kyu Cho Profile-guided optimization possesses huge potential to save costs for datacenters. Hardware performance programmers find code regions to optimize by monitoring datacenter applications continuously on live traffic

  2. Hybrid percussion : extending physical instruments using sampled acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aimi, Roberto Mario, 1973-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a system architecture for creating hybrid digital-acoustic percussion instruments by combining extensions of existing signal processing techniques with specially-designed semi-acoustic physical ...

  3. Internship experience at Texas Instruments: the internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Kerry Cloyce, 1954-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a survey of the author's internship experience with Texas Instruments from November 1980 to November 1981. The internship was spent in the Advanced Research and Development Division of the Digital Systems Group...

  4. PLC & DTAM Software Programs for Pumping Instrumentation & Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HORNER, T.M.

    2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the software programs for the programmable logic controller and the datable access module for pumping instrumentation and control skid P. The appendices contains copies of the printouts of these software programs.

  5. Historical perspective of innovation in electronic payment instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pogor, Iulian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic Payment Instruments have seen unprecedented innovation in the past XX-th century. Most of this innovation was made possible by advances in information and communication technology. Advances in ICT paired with ...

  6. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  7. Digital configurable instrument for emulation of signals from radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Geraci, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering-DEIB, Milan 20133 (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering-DEIB, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a digital instrument characterized by a specially designed architecture that is able to emulate in real time signals from a generic radiation detection system. The instrument is not a pulse generator of recorded shapes but a synthesizer of random pulses compliant to programmable statistics for height and starting time of events. Completely programmable procedures for emulation of noise, disturbances, and reference level variation are implemented.

  8. Instrumentation and control for fossil-energy processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1982 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes was held June 7 through 9, 1982, at Adam's Mark Hotel, Houston, Texas. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy; Argonne National Laboratory; and the Society for Control and Instrumentation of Energy Processes. Fifty-two papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; eleven papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. Geologic characterization of fractures as an aid to hydrologic modeling of the SCV block at the Stripa mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of hydrologic tests have been conducted at the Stripa research mine in Sweden to develop hydrologic characterization techniques for rock masses in which fractures form the primary flow paths. The structural studies reported here were conducted to aid in the hydrologic examination of a cubic block of granite with dimensions of 150 m on a side. This block (the SCV block) is located between the 310- and 460-m depth levels at the Stripa mine. this report describes and interprets the fracture system geology at Stripa as revealed in drift exposures, checks the interpretive model against borehole records and discusses the hydrologic implications of the model, and examines the likely effects of stress redistribution around a drift (the Validation drift) on inflow to the drift along a prominent fracture zone.

  10. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  11. HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGY AND EROSION IMPACTS OF MINING DERIVED COASTAL SAND DUNES, C H ~ A R A LBAY, CHILE Daniel, nitrates, iodine, and lithium. Some of the gold and silverandallofthemolybdenumareproducedasby- products

  12. Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Gabriel Arduino,Paolo Reggiani and EzioTodini 280 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 280284 (2005) © EGU Recent advances in flood forecasting and flood risk assessment Gabriel Arduino1 , Paolo

  13. Hydrological Cycles over the Congo and Upper Blue Nile Basins: Evaluation of General Circulation Model Simulations and Reanalysis Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demory, Marie-Estelle

    The simulations and predictions of the hydrological cycle by general circulation models (GCMs) are characterized by a significant degree of uncertainty. This uncertainty is reflected in the range of Intergovernmental Panel ...

  14. Test plan: Hydraulic fracturing and hydrologic tests in Marker Beds 139 and 140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.; Beauheim, R.L.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements in this test plan are designed to evaluate the potential influence of fracture formation in anhydrite Marker Beds 139 and 140 on gas pressure in and gas flow from the disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant with time. The tests have the further purpose of providing comparisons of permeabilities of anhydrite interbeds in an undisturbed (virgin) state and after fracture development and/or opening and dilation of preexisting partially healed fractures. Three sets of combined hydraulic fracturing and hydrological measurements are planned. A set of trial measurements is expected to last four to six weeks. The duration of each subsequent experiment is anticipated to be six to eight weeks.

  15. Hydrologic sensitivities of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River basin, California, to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, D.P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Gan, Thian Yew (Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic sensitivities of four medium-sized mountainous catchments in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins to long-term global warming were analyzed. The hydrologic response of these catchments, all of which are dominated by spring snowmelt runoff, were simulated by the coupling of the snowmelt and the soil moisture accounting models of the U.S. National Weather Service River Forecast System. In all four catchments the global warming pattern, which was indexed to CO{sub 2} doubling scenarios simulated by three (global) general circulation models, produced a major seasonal shift in the snow accumulation pattern. Under the alternative climate scenarios more winter precipitation fell as rain instead of snow, and winter runoff increased while spring snowmelt runoff decreased. In addition, large increases in the annual flood maxima were simulated, primarily due to an increase in rain-on-snow events, with the time of occurrence of many large floods shifting from spring to winter.

  16. Validation study of a multidimensional hydrologic model of rainfall, and the simulation of orographic influences, using data from Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Hiraldo, Roberto

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Meteorology VALIDATION STUDY OF A MULTIDIMENSIONAL HYDROLOGIC MODEL OF RAINFALL, AND THE SIMULATION OF OROGRAPHIC INFLUENCES, USING... University of P. R. Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dennis M. Driscoll Dr. Juan B. Valdes The main purpose of this research was validate an existing multidimensional stochastic hydrologic model of precipitation, which attempts to characterize...

  17. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 11 and 12, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  18. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 10 and 11, 2010. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, analyzed the samples. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  19. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 12, and 13, 2008. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods

  20. Rio Blanco, Colorado, Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 13 and 14, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  1. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... Interval 1: 1920' s ? 41. Interval 2: 1942 ? 51. . . . . . . ~ . . - - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ Interval 5: 1952 ? 74. Interval 4: 1942 ? 74. Discharge Control During Flood Stages 20 25 25 25 51 54 54 SEDIMENTOLOGY. Suspended Load. Bed Load. Coastal...

  2. Structure and Origins of Trends in Hydrological Measures over the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, T; Hidalgo, H G; Dettinger, M D; Cayan, D R; Pierce, D W; Bonfils, C; Barnett, T P; Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines, at 1/8 degree spatial resolution, the geographic structure of observed trends in key hydrologically relevant variables across the western United States (U.S.) over the period 1950-1999, and investigates whether these trends are statistically significantly different from trends associated with natural climate variations. A number of variables were analyzed, including late winter and spring temperature, winter-total snowy days as a fraction of winter-total wet days, 1st April Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) as a fraction of October through March precipitation total (P{sub ONDJFM}), and seasonal (January-February-March; JFM) accumulated runoff as a fraction of water year accumulated runoff. The observed changes were compared to natural internal climate variability simulated by an 850-year control run of the CCSM3-FV climate model, statistically downscaled to a 1/8 degree grid using the method of Constructed Analogues. Both observed and downscaled temperature and precipitation data were then used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model to obtain the hydrological variables analyzed in this study. Large trends (magnitudes found less than 5% of the time in the long control run) are common in the observations, and occupy substantial part of the area (37-42%) over the mountainous western U.S. These trends are strongly related to the large scale warming that appears over 89% of the domain. The strongest changes in the hydrologic variables, unlikely to be associated with natural variability alone, have occurred at medium elevations (750 m to 2500 m for JFM runoff fractions and 500 m-3000 m for SWE/PONDJFM) where warming has pushed temperatures from slightly below to slightly above freezing. Further analysis using the data on selected catchments across the simulation domain indicated that hydroclimatic variables must have changed significantly (at 95% confidence level) over at least 45% of the total catchment area to achieve a detectable trend in measures accumulated to the catchment scale.

  3. Uncertainties associated with the definition of a hydrologic source term for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.; Esser, B.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thompson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Division is seeking to evaluate groundwater contamination resulting from 30 years of underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This evaluation requires knowledge about what radioactive materials are in the groundwater and how they are transported through the underground environment. This information coupled with models of groundwater flow (flow paths and flow rates) will enable predictions of the arrival of each radionuclide at a selected receptor site. Risk assessment models will then be used to calculate the expected environmental and human doses. The accuracy of our predictions depends on the validity of our hydrologic and risk assessment models and on the quality of the data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water at each underground nuclear test site. This paper summarizes what we currently know about radioactive material in NTS groundwater and suggests how we can best use our limited knowledge to proceed with initial modeling efforts. The amount of a radionuclide available for transport in groundwater at the site of an underground nuclear test is called the hydrologic source term. The radiologic source term is the total amount of residual radionuclides remaining after an underground nuclear test. The hydrologic source term is smaller than the radiologic source term because some or most of the radionuclide residual cannot be transported by groundwater. The radiologic source term has been determined for each of the underground nuclear tests fired at the NTS; however, the hydrologic source term has been estimated from measurements at only a few sites.

  4. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  5. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  6. Equifinality of formal (DREAM) and informal (GLUE) bayesian approaches in hydrologic modeling?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robinson, Bruce A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ter Braak, Cajo J F [NON LANL; Gupta, Hoshin V [NON LANL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, a strong debate has emerged in the hydrologic literature regarding what constitutes an appropriate framework for uncertainty estimation. Particularly, there is strong disagreement whether an uncertainty framework should have its roots within a proper statistical (Bayesian) context, or whether such a framework should be based on a different philosophy and implement informal measures and weaker inference to summarize parameter and predictive distributions. In this paper, we compare a formal Bayesian approach using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) with generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) for assessing uncertainty in conceptual watershed modeling. Our formal Bayesian approach is implemented using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM) MCMC scheme with a likelihood function that explicitly considers model structural, input and parameter uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that DREAM and GLUE can generate very similar estimates of total streamflow uncertainty. This suggests that formal and informal Bayesian approaches have more common ground than the hydrologic literature and ongoing debate might suggest. The main advantage of formal approaches is, however, that they attempt to disentangle the effect of forcing, parameter and model structural error on total predictive uncertainty. This is key to improving hydrologic theory and to better understand and predict the flow of water through catchments.

  7. Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, Justin

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

  8. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  9. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced wind-tunnel instrumentation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-tunnel instrumentation Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced wind-tunnel instrumentation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced instrumentation information Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    instrumentation information Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced instrumentation information Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 2nd...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced instrumented center Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    34 Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI-R) Recovery and Reinvestment Summary: report on "Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities" (ARIF) was that the NSF should...

  13. ECE 331 -Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Statistics & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Lab #1(n) [modulating generating] sensor. #12;ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer

  14. ECE 331 -Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Limb Plethysmography & Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Lab #2 scale and flow (in L/ min). Compute linearity. #12;ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation Department

  15. ECE 331 -Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Implant Design & Total Hip Arthroplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC Lab #6 screw from the implant once it is successfully implanted. #12;ECE 331 - Biomedical Instrumentation

  16. Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

  17. Nuclear and fundamental physics instrumentation for the ANS project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Raman, S.; Arterburn, J.; McManamy, T.; Peretz, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Faust, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France); Piotrowski, A.E. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work carried out during the period 1991-1995 in connection with the refinement of the concepts and detailed designs for nuclear and fundamental physics research instrumentation at the proposed Advanced Neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Initially, emphasis was placed on refining the existing System Design Document (SDD-43) to detail more accurately the needs and interfaces of the instruments that are identified in the document. The conceptual designs of these instruments were also refined to reflect current thinking in the field of nuclear and fundamental physics. In particular, the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) facility design was reconsidered in the light of the development of interest in radioactive ion beams within the nuclear physics community. The second stage of this work was to define those instrument parameters that would interface directly with the reactor systems so that these parameters could be considered for the ISOL facility and particularly for its associated ion source. Since two of these options involved ion sources internal to the long slant beam tube, these were studied in detail. In addition, preliminary work was done to identify the needs for the target holder and changing facility to be located in the tangential through-tube. Because many of the planned nuclear and fundamental physics instruments have similar needs in terms of detection apparatus, some progress was also made in defining the parameters for these detectors. 21 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. DAS: a data management system for instrument tests and operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frailis, Marco; Zacchei, Andrea; Lodi, Marcello; Cirami, Roberto; Pasian, Fabio; Trifoglio, Massimo; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Franceschi, Enrico; Nicastro, Luciano; Conforti, Vito; Zoli, Andrea; Smart, Ricky; Morbidelli, Roberto; Dadina, Mauro

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Data Access System (DAS) is a metadata and data management software system, providing a reusable solution for the storage of data acquired both from telescopes and auxiliary data sources during the instrument development phases and operations. It is part of the Customizable Instrument WorkStation system (CIWS-FW), a framework for the storage, processing and quick-look at the data acquired from scientific instruments. The DAS provides a data access layer mainly targeted to software applications: quick-look displays, pre-processing pipelines and scientific workflows. It is logically organized in three main components: an intuitive and compact Data Definition Language (DAS DDL) in XML format, aimed for user-defined data types; an Application Programming Interface (DAS API), automatically adding classes and methods supporting the DDL data types, and providing an object-oriented query language; a data management component, which maps the metadata of the DDL data types in a relational Data Base Management Syste...

  19. ATR NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC USER FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION ENHANCEMENT EFFORTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) effort is to enhance instrumentation techniques available to users conducting irradiation tests in this unique facility. In particular, development of sensors capable of providing real-time measurements of key irradiation parameters is emphasized because of their potential to offer increased fidelity data and reduced post-test examination costs. This paper describes the strategy for identifying new instrumentation needed for ATR irradiations and the program underway to develop and evaluate new sensors to address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing several new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users improved in-pile instrumentation.

  20. Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, C.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog contains entries on new developments and on items listed in BNL 51450, which have either been carried over unchanged or been updated. More than 70 entries were deleted because of either obsolescence, insufficient interest in terms of safeguards, or lack of documentable development activities in recent years. Some old listings as well as new material was consolidated into more generic entries. As in the earlier document, the emphasis is on devices and instruments that are either in field use at this time or under active development. A few items such as NDA reference materials, instrument vans and certain shipping containers are included because they are important adjuncts to optimum utilization of safeguards instrumentation. This catalog does not include devices for physical protection. As was the case with its predecessor, most of the material in this catalog originated in the US and Canada; a few contributions came from member states of the European Community.