Sample records for instrument beam spectrum

  1. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  2. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  3. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  4. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 ?A], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 ?A], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  5. Giga-bit optical data transmission module for Beam Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roedne, L T; Cenkeramaddi, L R; Jiao, L

    Particle accelerators require electronic instrumentation for diagnostic, assessment and monitoring during operation of the transferring and circulating beams. A sensor located near the beam provides an electrical signal related to the observable quantity of interest. The front-end electronics provides analog-to-digital conversion of the quantity being observed and the generated data are to be transferred to the external digital back-end for data processing, and to display to the operators and logging. This research project investigates the feasibility of radiation-tolerant giga-bit data transmission over optic fibre for beam instrumentation applications, starting from the assessment of the state of the art technology, identification of challenges and proposal of a system level solution, which should be validated with a PCB design in an experimental setup. Radiation tolerance of 10 kGy (Si) Total Ionizing Dose (TID) over 10 years of operation, Bit Error Rate (BER) 10-6 or better. The findings and results of th...

  6. DMSE Electron Beam Instruments Facility | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTION ADMSE Electron Beam Instruments

  7. Beam Test of the Superstructure Instrumentation Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the HOM-coupler signals ¯ Measurement of the BPM signals ¯ Measurement of beam orbit and energy #12 procedure "HOM Search". #12;Measurement of the BPM signals 8 Beam Test of the Superstructure Measurement of the BPM signals Beside (?!) the re-entrant cavity BPM (C. Magne), a stripline BPM (DESY

  8. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M. [University of Sofia (Bulgaria); et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  9. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICE Collaboration

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  10. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta Majumdar, M R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar energy, beamed solar energy, LSC, dielectric mirror, optical fibre, Photo-Voltaic

  11. Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

  12. Planck 2015 results. IV. Low Frequency Instrument beams and window functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the characterization of the in-flight beams, the beam window functions, and the associated uncertainties for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI). The structure of the paper is similar to that presented in the 2013 Planck release; the main differences concern the beam normalization and the delivery of the window functions to be used for polarization analysis. The in-flight assessment of the LFI main beams relies on measurements performed during observations of Jupiter. By stacking data from seven Jupiter transits, the main beam profiles are measured down to -25 dB at 30 and 44 GHz, and down to -30 dB at 70 GHz. The agreement between the simulated beams and the measured beams is confirmed to be better than 1% at each LFI frequency band (within the 20 dB contour from the peak, the rms values are: 0.1% at 30 and 70 GHz; 0.2% at 44 GHz). Simulated polarized beams are used for the computation of the effective beam window functions. The error budget for the window functions is estimated fro...

  13. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  14. THE PAIR BEAM PRODUCTION SPECTRUM FROM PHOTON-PHOTON ANNIHILATION IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ibscher, D. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Elyiv, A. [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Miniati, F., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: ibscher@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: elyiv@astro.ulg.ac.be, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly beamed relativistic e {sup {+-}}-pair energy distributions result in double photon collisions of the beamed gamma rays from TeV blazars at cosmological distances with the isotropically distributed extragalactic background light (EBL) in the intergalactic medium. The typical energies k {sub 0} {approx_equal} 10{sup -7} in units of m{sub e}c {sup 2} of the EBL are more than 10 orders of magnitude smaller than the observed gamma-ray energies k {sub 1} {>=} 10{sup 7}. Using the limit k {sub 0} << k {sub 1}, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of the generated pairs in the lab frame is highly beamed in the direction of the initial gamma-ray photons. For the astrophysically important case of power-law distributions of the emitted gamma-ray beam up to the maximum energy M interacting with Wien-type N(k {sub 0}){proportional_to}k{sup q} {sub 0}exp (- k {sub 0}/{Theta}) soft photon distributions with total number density N {sub 0}, we calculate analytical approximations for the electron production spectrum. For distant objects with luminosity distances d{sub L} >> r {sub 0} = ({sigma} {sub T} N {sub 0}){sup -1} = 0.49N {sup -1} {sub 0} Mpc (with Thomson cross section {sigma} {sub T}), the implied large values of the optical depth {tau}{sub 0} = d{sub L} /r {sub 0} indicate that the electron production spectra differ at energies inside and outside the interval [({Theta}ln {tau}{sub 0}){sup -1}, {tau}{sub 0}/{Theta}], given the maximum gamma-ray energy M >> {Theta}{sup -1}. In the case M >> {Theta}{sup -1}, the production spectrum is strongly peaked near E {approx_equal} {Theta}{sup -1}, being exponentially reduced at small energies and decreasing with the steep power law {proportional_to}E {sup -1-p} up to the maximum energy E = M - (1/2).

  15. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Tianhuan; /Indiana U.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  16. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  17. Development of a fast and feasible spectrum modeling technique for flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Woong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul110-744, South Korea and Research Institute of the Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bush, Karl; Mok, Ed; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5304 (United States); Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a fast and robust technique for the determination of optimized photon spectra for flattening filter free (FFF) beams to be applied in convolution/superposition dose calculations. Methods: A two-step optimization method was developed to derive optimal photon spectra for FFF beams. In the first step, a simple functional form of the photon spectra proposed by Ali ['Functional forms for photon spectra of clinical linacs,' Phys. Med. Biol. 57, 31-50 (2011)] is used to determine generalized shapes of the photon spectra. In this method, the photon spectra were defined for the ranges of field sizes to consider the variations of the contributions of scattered photons with field size. Percent depth doses (PDDs) for each field size were measured and calculated to define a cost function, and a collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm was used to calculate the PDDs. In the second step, the generalized functional form of the photon spectra was fine-tuned in a process whereby the weights of photon fluence became the optimizing free parameters. A line search method was used for the optimization and first order derivatives with respect to the optimizing parameters were derived from the CCC algorithm to enhance the speed of the optimization. The derived photon spectra were evaluated, and the dose distributions using the optimized spectra were validated. Results: The optimal spectra demonstrate small variations with field size for the 6 MV FFF beam and relatively large variations for the 10 MV FFF beam. The mean energies of the optimized 6 MV FFF spectra were decreased from 1.31 MeV for a 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field to 1.21 MeV for a 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2} field, and from 2.33 MeV at 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} to 2.18 MeV at 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2} for the 10 MV FFF beam. The developed method could significantly improve the agreement between the calculated and measured PDDs. Root mean square differences on the optimized PDDs were observed to be 0.41% (3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2}) down to 0.21% (40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2}) for the 6 MV FFF beam, and 0.35% (3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2}) down to 0.29% (40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2}) for the 10 MV FFF beam. The first order derivatives from the functional form were found to improve the speed of computational time up to 20 times compared to the other techniques. Conclusions: The derived photon spectra resulted in good agreements with measured PDDs over the range of field sizes investigated. The suggested method is easily applicable to commercial radiation treatment planning systems since it only requires measured PDDs as input.

  18. Precision laser surveying instrument using atmospheric turbulence compensation by determining the absolute displacement between two laser beam components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric effects on sighting measurements are compensated for by adjusting any sighting measurements using a correction factor that does not depend on atmospheric state conditions such as temperature, pressure, density or turbulence. The correction factor is accurately determined using a precisely measured physical separation between two color components of a light beam (or beams) that has been generated using either a two-color laser or two lasers that project different colored beams. The physical separation is precisely measured by fixing the position of a short beam pulse and measuring the physical separation between the two fixed-in-position components of the beam. This precisely measured physical separation is then used in a relationship that includes the indexes of refraction for each of the two colors of the laser beam in the atmosphere through which the beam is projected, thereby to determine the absolute displacement of one wavelength component of the laser beam from a straight line of sight for that projected component of the beam. This absolute displacement is useful to correct optical measurements, such as those developed in surveying measurements that are made in a test area that includes the same dispersion effects of the atmosphere on the optical measurements. The means and method of the invention are suitable for use with either single-ended systems or a double-ended systems.

  19. Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander E. Hramov; Alexey A. Koronovskii; Vladimir A. Maximenko; Olga I. Moskalenko

    2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems a number of the numerical technics have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods can not apply directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics in plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the system dynamics and the behavior of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents. Along with the proposed method, the possible problems of SLEs calculation are also discussed. It is shown that for the wide class of the spatially extended systems the set of quantities included in the system state for SLEs calculation can be reduced using the appropriate feature of the plasma systems.

  20. Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hramov, Alexander E. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya str., 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politechnicheskaja str., 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Maximenko, Vladimir A.; Moskalenko, Olga I. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya str., 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamics, a number of the numerical techniques have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods cannot be applied directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics of plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper, we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the system dynamics and the behavior of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents. Along with the proposed method, the possible problems of SLEs calculation are also discussed. It is shown that for the wide class of the spatially extended systems, the set of quantities included in the system state for SLEs calculation can be reduced using the appropriate feature of the plasma systems.

  1. Exact relativistic kinetic theory of the full unstable spectrum of an electron-beam-plasma system with Maxwell-Juettner distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A.; Gremillet, L.; Benisti, D. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent Letter by Bret et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 205008 (2008)], we present a detailed report of the entire unstable k spectrum of a relativistic collisionless beam-plasma system within a fully kinetic framework. In contrast to a number of previously published studies, our linear analysis makes use of smooth momentum distribution functions of the Maxwell-Juettner form. The three competing classes of instabilities, namely, two-stream, filamentation, and oblique modes, are dealt with in a unified manner, no approximation being made regarding the beam-plasma densities, temperatures, and drift energies. We investigate the hierarchy between the competing modes, paying particular attention to the relatively poorly known quasielectrostatic oblique modes in the regime where they govern the system. The properties of the fastest growing oblique modes are examined in terms of the system parameters and compared to those of the dominant two-stream and filamentation modes.

  2. PEP instrumentation and control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melen, R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the operating characteristics of the primary components that form the PEP Instrumentation and Control System. Descriptions are provided for the computer control system, beam monitors, and other support systems.

  3. Horizontal Beam Tubes - HFIR Technical Parameters | ORNL Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Tubes The reactor has four horizontal beam tubes that supply the neutrons to the neutron scattering instruments. Details for each beam tube and instrument can be found on...

  4. Exertion instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vawter, Noah (Noah Theodore)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the research, development and reasoning behind a family of musical instruments called Exertion Instruments. They use inline electrical generators to run a synthesizer and an amplifier while ...

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 401406 Generating a multi-line neutron beam using an electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180, USA Received 3 January 2006; received in revised form 20 February discrete energy lines in the range 34­6200 eV is produced by using a 238 U filter in conjunction beams of discrete energies can be generated by using an electron linear accelerator in combination

  6. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  7. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  8. Instruments | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase imaging... * Helios FIBSEM Bruce Arey (509) 371-6485 The FEI Helios Nanolab dual-beam focused ion beamscanning electron microscopy (FIBSEM) microscope combines two...

  9. The MICE PID Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bonesini

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will carry out a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. As the emittance measurement will be done on a particle-by-particle basis, sophisticated beam instrumentation is needed to measure particle coordinates and timing vs RF. A PID system based on three time-of-flight stations, two Aerogel Cerenkov detectors and a KLOE-like calorimeter has been constructed in order to keep beam contamination ($e, \\pi$) well below 1%. The MICE time-of-flight system will measure timing with a resolution better than 70 ps per plane, in a harsh environment due to high particle rates, fringe magnetic fields and electron backgrounds from RF dark current.

  10. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ? 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors.

  11. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  12. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.; /Fermilab /IIT, Chicago /PDT, Torino

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is {approx} 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  13. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer SinglegovInstrumentsvceilgovInstrumentsAirborne

  14. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentation ARMgovInstrumentswsiInstruments Related Links RHUBC

  15. ARM - Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become a User Recovery Act MissiongovInstruments

  16. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  17. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS SpectrumSpectrum

  18. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum Print

  19. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum PrintALS

  20. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum

  1. Low activated incore instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials.

  2. Low activated incore instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, D.E.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

  3. Plasma instrumentation for fusion power reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sager, G.T.; Bauer, J.F.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback control will be implemented in fusion power reactors to guard against unpredicted behavior of the plant and to assure desirable operation. In this study, plasma state feedback requirements for plasma control by systems strongly coupled to the plasma (magnet sets, RF, and neutral beam heating systems, and refueling systems) are estimated. Generic considerations regarding the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation are outlined. Solutions are proposed to minimize the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation. Key plasma diagnostics are evaluated with respect to their potential for upgrade and implementation as power reactor instruments.

  4. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  5. Candidate Selection Instrument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The candidate selection instrument is designed to take the guesswork out of selecting candidates for the various career development programs of interest. The instrument is straightforward and...

  6. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Old Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Seismically Vulnerable Beam-Column Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARK, SANGJOON

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compression block in the beam section at the column jointcompression block in the column section at the beam jointblock Figure IV.17 Instrumentation for rotation at the beam-joint

  7. BNL | ATF Specialized Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bunches. This picture was taken from the beam profile monitor located immediately downstream of the mask. The mask is placed in the region of a beam line where the beam's...

  8. Career Map: Instrumentation Coordinator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Instrumentation Coordinator positions.

  9. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  10. Method for improving instrument response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahn, David W. (7528 Oxford Cir., Dublin, Alameda County, CA 94568); Hencken, Kenneth R. (2665 Calle Alegre, Pleasanton, Alameda County, CA 94566); Johnsen, Howard A. (5443 Celeste Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Flower, William L. (5447 Theresa Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains generally to a method for improving the accuracy of particle analysis under conditions of discrete particle loading and particularly to a method for improving signal-to-noise ratio and instrument response in laser spark spectroscopic analysis of particulate emissions. Under conditions of low particle density loading (particles/m.sup.3) resulting from low overall metal concentrations and/or large particle size uniform sampling can not be guaranteed. The present invention discloses a technique for separating laser sparks that arise from sample particles from those that do not; that is, a process for systematically "gating" the instrument response arising from "sampled" particles from those responses which do not, is dislosed as a solution to his problem. The disclosed approach is based on random sampling combined with a conditional analysis of each pulse. A threshold value is determined for the ratio of the intensity of a spectral line for a given element to a baseline region. If the threshold value is exceeded, the pulse is classified as a "hit" and that data is collected and an average spectrum is generated from an arithmetic average of "hits". The true metal concentration is determined from the averaged spectrum.

  11. Design of a TOF-SANS instrument for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K.; Seeger, P. A.

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed a versatile high-throughput SANS instrument [Broad Range Intense Multipurpose SANS (BRIMS)] for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the SNS by using acceptance diagrams and the Los Alamos NISP Monte Carlo simulation package. This instrument has been fully optimized to take advantage of the 10 Hz source frequency (broad wavelength bandwidth) and the cold neutron spectrum from a tall coupled solid methane moderator (12 cm x 20 cm). BRIMS has been designed to produce data in a Q range spanning from 0.001 to 0.7 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement by simultaneously using neutrons with wavelengths ranging from 1 to 14.5 {angstrom} in a time of flight mode. A supermirror guide and bender assembly is employed to separate and redirect the useful portion of the neutron spectrum with {lambda} > 1 {angstrom}, by 2.3{degree} away from the direct beam containing high energy neutrons and {gamma} rays. The effects of the supermirror coating of the guide, the location of the bender assembly with respect to the source, the bend angle, and various collimation choices on the flux, resolution and Q{sub min} have been characterized using spherical particle and delta function scatterers. The overall performance of BRIMS has been compared with that of the best existing reactor-based SANS instrument D22 at ILL.

  12. Making Maps from Planck LFI 30GHz Data with Asymmetric Beams and Cooler Noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Planck CTP Working Group; Ashdown, M.A.J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bartlett, J.G.; Borrill, J.; Cantalupo, C.; de Gasperis, G.; Gorski, K.M.; Hivon, E.; Huffenberger, K.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Hurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C.R.; Natoli, P.; Poutanen, T.; Prezeau, G.; Reinecke, M.; Rocha, G.; Sandri, M.; Stompor, R..; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B.; de Troia, G.

    2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck satellite will observe the full sky at nine frequencies from 30 to 857 GHz. Temperature and polarization frequency maps made from these observations are prime deliverables of the Planck mission. The goal of this paper is to examine the effects of four realistic instrument systematics in the 30 GHz frequency maps: non-axially-symmetric beams, sample integration, sorption cooler noise, and pointing errors. They simulated one year long observations of four 30 GHz detectors. The simulated timestreams contained CMB, foreground component (both galactic and extra-galactic), instrument nolise (correlated and white), and the four instrument systematic effects. They made maps from the timelines and examined the magnitudes of the systematics effects in the maps and their angular power spectra. They also compared the maps of different mapmaking codes to see how they performed. They used five mapmaking codes (two destripers and three optimal codes). None of their mapmaking codes makes an attempt to deconvolve the beam from its output map. Therefore all our maps had similar smoothing due to beams and sample integration. This is a complicated smoothing, because every map pixel has its own effective beam. Temperature to polarization cross-coupling due to beam mismatch causes a detectable bias in the TE spectrum of the CMB map. The effects of cooler noise and pointing errors did not appear to be major concerns for the 30 GHz channel. The only essential difference found so far between mapmaking codes that affects accuracy (in terms of residual RMS) is baseline length. All optimal codes give essentially indistiguishable results. A destriper gives the same result as the optimal codes when the baseline is set short enough (Madam). For longer baselines destripers (Springtide and Madam) require less computing resources but deliver a noisier map.

  13. Instruments and Methods Singular spectrum analysis and envelope detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    such as Radan (Geophysical Survey Systems Inc.) or Haescan (Roadscanners Oy). In glaciological research

  14. Toward automated beam optics control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

  15. Luminosity and beam-beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papotti, G; Trad, G

    We report on observations on luminosity evolution and beam-beam interaction from the 2011 physics run. Extrapolations for 2012 are attempted and a list of desired studies and machine developments is included.

  16. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  17. The matter in extreme conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagler, Bob; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F.; Boyce, Richard M.; Callen, Alice; Campell, Marc; Curiel, Ruben; Galtier, Eric; Garofoli, Justin; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.

  18. Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg, thereby providing a means of "fine tuning" or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, an adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

  19. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  20. Instrumentation for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and coordinate nuclear instrumentation standards with resulting economies for the nuclear and radiation fields. There was particular emphasis on coordination and management of the Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) System, U.S. activity involving the CAMAC international standard dataway system, the FASTBUS modular high-speed data acquisition and control system and processing and management of national nuclear instrumentation and detector standards, as well as a modest amount of assistance and consultation services to the Pollutant Characterization and Safety Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The principal accomplishments were the development and maintenance of the NIM instrumentation system that is the predominant instrumentation system in the nuclear and radiation fields worldwide, the CAMAC digital interface system in coordination with the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories, the FASTBUS high-speed system and numerous national and international nuclear instrumentation standards.

  1. Instrument validation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, B.A.; Daymo, E.A.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company Project W-211 is responsible for providing the system capabilities to remove radioactive waste from ten double-shell tanks used to store radioactive wastes on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The project is also responsible for measuring tank waste slurry properties prior to injection into pipeline systems, including the Replacement of Cross-Site Transfer System. This report summarizes studies of the appropriateness of the instrumentation specified for use in Project W-211. The instruments were evaluated in a test loop with simulated slurries that covered the range of properties specified in the functional design criteria. The results of the study indicate that the compact nature of the baseline Project W-211 loop does not result in reduced instrumental accuracy resulting from poor flow profile development. Of the baseline instrumentation, the Micromotion densimeter, the Moore Industries thermocouple, the Fischer and Porter magnetic flow meter, and the Red Valve Pressure transducer meet the desired instrumental accuracy. An alternate magnetic flow meter (Yokagawa) gave nearly identical results as the baseline fischer and Porter. The Micromotion flow meter did not meet the desired instrument accuracy but could potentially be calibrated so that it would meet the criteria. The Nametre on-line viscometer did not meet the desired instrumental accuracy and is not recommended as a quantitative instrument although it does provide qualitative information. The recommended minimum set of instrumentation necessary to ensure the slurry meets the Project W-058 acceptance criteria is the Micromotion mass flow meter and delta pressure cells.

  2. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

  3. Pulse energy measurement at the SXR instrument

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moeller, Stefan; Brown, Garth; Dakovski, Georgi; Hill, Bruce; Holmes, Michael; Loos, Jennifer; Maida, Ricardo; Paiser, Ernesto; Schlotter, William; Turner, Joshua J.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas monitor detector was implemented and characterized at the Soft X-ray Research (SXR) instrument to measure the average, absolute and pulse-resolved photon flux of the LCLS beam in the energy range between 280 and 2000 eV. The detector is placed after the monochromator and addresses the need to provide reliable absolute pulse energy as well as pulse-resolved measurements for the various experiments at this instrument. This detector provides a reliable non-invasive measurement for determining flux levels on the samples in the downstream experimental chamber and for optimizing signal levels of secondary detectors and for the essential need of datamore »normalization. The design, integration into the instrument and operation are described, and examples of its performance are given.« less

  4. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, William E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Mike L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  5. Application of the Grillage Methodology to Determine Load Distribution Factors for Spread Slab Beam Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen-Gauthier, Joel

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , an existing slab beam bridge in Denison, Texas will be instrumented and observed for supplementary slab beam behavior data. To predict bridge behavior, computer models of the Riverside experimental bridge and of the Denison field bridge were developed using...

  6. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  7. ARM - Campaign Instrument - island-guest-instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentsisland-guest-instruments Comments?

  8. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  9. Space Instrument Realization (ISR-5)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Space Instrument Realization Providing expertise to support the design and fabrication of space-based custom instrumentation Contacts Group Leader Amy Regan Email Staff...

  10. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  11. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  12. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevelAtlanticInstruments

  13. ARM - Word Seek: Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities and InstrumentsInstruments Outreach Home

  14. Cloud Spectrum Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    droplets are within the laser beam long enough so they can be sized. · A running average of droplet transit, it is rejected from sizing but included in the running average. Laser Beam Fraction Correction #12;The velocity ­ Activity Fraction #12;Percentage of particle losses based on the measured FSSP activity. FSSP Particle Loss

  15. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  16. Instrumented Bioreactors BIOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instrumented Bioreactors BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to develop novel bioreactors that combine are embedding sensing techniques into a custom bioreactor platform to enable real-time monitoring of tissue integrity during growth. Our present design builds on earlier bioreactors constructed at NIST that provided

  17. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hof, Peter J. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  18. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  19. Robotics Methods for Beam Line Instrument Simulation and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J. A. [The Open University, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK; Oliver, E. C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Paradowska, A [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Edwards, L [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOBUGS 2008 Conference, Ansto, Lucas Heights, Australia, http://www.nbi.ansto.gov.au/nobugs2008/papers/paper107.pdf, November 3-5, 2008

  20. accelerator beam instrumentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atomic radius than C - Greater solubility than to trapped C atoms) Quench - Heat to Austenite (face centered higher C solubility) - Add Carbon - Cool Pulfrey,...

  1. Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montfrooij, Wouter

    Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli Research Reactor (MURR) provides significant thermal neutron flux, which enables neutron scattering]. There are presently 5 instruments located on the beam port floor that are dedicated to neutron scattering: (1) TRIAX

  2. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.

  3. Symmetry of Lyapunov spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupalo, D.; Kaganovich, A.S.; Cohen, E.G.D. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetry of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents provides a useful quantitative connection between properties of dynamical systems consisting of N interacting particles coupled to a thermostat, and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The authors obtain here sufficient conditions for this symmetry and analyze the structure of 1/N corrections ignored in previous studies. The relation of the Lyapunov spectrum symmetry with some other symmetries of dynamical systems is discussed.

  4. Magnetic Tweezers Instrumentation: We have used magnetic tweezers to study chromatin assembly and disassembly and RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leuba, Sanford

    > l F x surface Instrumental set-up video camera beam condenser hollow bearing with magnet 90x oil camera beam condenser hollow bearing with magnet 90x oil objective square glass cuvette white light., and McAllister, W. T. A tightly regulated molecular motor based upon T7 RNA polymerase. Nano Lett. 5

  5. Note: Vector reflectometry in a beam waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eimer, J. R.; Bennett, C. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-port calibration technique for characterization of beam waveguide components with a vector network analyzer. This technique involves using a set of known delays to separate the responses of the instrument and the device under test. We demonstrate this technique by measuring the reflected performance of a millimeter-wave variable-delay polarization modulator.

  6. The ARCADE 2 Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singal, J; Kogut, A; Levin, S; Limon, M; Lubin, P; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second generation Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the radiometric temperature of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic and extra-Galactic emission at six frequencies from 3 to 90 GHz. ARCADE 2 utilizes a double-nulled design where emission from the sky is compared to that from an external cryogenic full-aperture blackbody calibrator by cryogenic switching radiometers containing internal blackbody reference loads. In order to further minimize sources of systematic error, ARCADE 2 features a cold fully open aperture with all radiometrically active components maintained at near 2.7 K without windows or other warm objects, achieved through a novel thermal design. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE 2 instrument in its 2005 and 2006 flights.

  7. Accelerator beam profile analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

  8. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSA Related Links

  9. Instrumentation and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Status Report describes research and accomplishments for the Instrumentation and Diagnostics (I D) Projects within the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Process understanding and control can be improved through the development of advanced instrumentation and diagnostics. The thrust of the I D Projects is to further develop existing measurement and control techniques for application to advanced coal-based technologies. Project highlights are: an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) instrument has been developed to analyze trace elements in gasification and combustion process streams. An in situ two-color Mie scattering technique with LSS can simultaneously measure the size, velocity, and elemental composition of coal particles during combustion. A high-temperature, fluorescence thermometry technique has accurately measured gas temperatures during field testing in combustion and gasification environments. Expert systems have been developed to improve the control of advanced coal-based processes. Capacitance flowmeters were developed to determine the mass flowrate, solid volume fraction, and particle velocities of coal slurries. 32 refs., 9 figs.

  10. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 and differential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass such as Higgs boson mass, decay branching fractions and production rate. However, most of these studies did

  11. Geothermal high temperature instrumentation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants (United States)

    1998-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick look at the geothermal industry shows a small industry producing about $1 billion in electric sales annually. The industry is becoming older and in need of new innovative solutions to instrumentation problems. A quick look at problem areas is given along with basic instrumentation requirements. The focus of instrumentation is on high temperature electronics.

  12. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An error occurred. TryRing CurrentBeam

  13. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users LiveBattling birdBeam

  14. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users LiveBattlingBeam

  15. TMT Science and Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Crampton; Luc Simard; David Silva

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the scientific goals of the Thirty Meter Telescope Project, full diffraction-limited performance is required from the outset and hence the entire observatory is being designed, as a system, to achieve this. The preliminary design phases of the telescope and the first light adaptive optic facility are now approaching completion so that much better predictions of the system performance are possible. The telescope design and instrumentation are summarized in this presentation, with a brief description of some of the scientific programs that are foreseen.

  16. ARM - Campaign Instrument - issrwp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentsisland-guest-instruments

  17. ARM - Instrument - 50rwp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events,Forms Ingest Ingest WorkflowgovInstruments50rwp

  18. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home

  19. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-IIActRecovery Act

  20. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and82

  1. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and82

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel

  3. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSA Related Links Facilities and

  4. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSA Related Links Facilities

  5. ARM - Instrument Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQgovDataInstrument

  6. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru, Brazil Instruments Manacapuru

  7. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru, Brazil Instruments

  8. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru, Brazil InstrumentsOliktok Point,

  9. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru, Brazil InstrumentsOliktok

  10. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru,Manus Site-InactiveInstruments TWP

  11. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArcticManacapuru,Manus Site-InactiveInstruments

  12. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  13. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  14. Nuclear and fundamental physics instrumentation for the ANS project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Raman, S.; Arterburn, J.; McManamy, T.; Peretz, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Faust, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France); Piotrowski, A.E. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work carried out during the period 1991-1995 in connection with the refinement of the concepts and detailed designs for nuclear and fundamental physics research instrumentation at the proposed Advanced Neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Initially, emphasis was placed on refining the existing System Design Document (SDD-43) to detail more accurately the needs and interfaces of the instruments that are identified in the document. The conceptual designs of these instruments were also refined to reflect current thinking in the field of nuclear and fundamental physics. In particular, the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) facility design was reconsidered in the light of the development of interest in radioactive ion beams within the nuclear physics community. The second stage of this work was to define those instrument parameters that would interface directly with the reactor systems so that these parameters could be considered for the ISOL facility and particularly for its associated ion source. Since two of these options involved ion sources internal to the long slant beam tube, these were studied in detail. In addition, preliminary work was done to identify the needs for the target holder and changing facility to be located in the tangential through-tube. Because many of the planned nuclear and fundamental physics instruments have similar needs in terms of detection apparatus, some progress was also made in defining the parameters for these detectors. 21 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  16. Laser systems configured to output a spectrally-consolidated laser beam and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koplow, Jeffrey P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser apparatus includes a plurality of pumps each of which is configured to emit a corresponding pump laser beam having a unique peak wavelength. The laser apparatus includes a spectral beam combiner configured to combine the corresponding pump laser beams into a substantially spatially-coherent pump laser beam having a pump spectrum that includes the unique peak wavelengths, and first and second selectively reflective elements spaced from each other to define a lasing cavity including a lasing medium therein. The lasing medium generates a plurality of gain spectra responsive to absorbing the pump laser beam. Each gain spectrum corresponds to a respective one of the unique peak wavelengths of the substantially spatially-coherent pump laser beam and partially overlaps with all other ones of the gain spectra. The reflective elements are configured to promote emission of a laser beam from the lasing medium with a peak wavelength common to each gain spectrum.

  17. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  18. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  19. Synchronous Characterization of Semiconductor Microcavity Laser Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross-section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  20. FREQUENCY HOPPING SPREAD SPECTRUM DIRECT SEQUENCE SPREAD SPECTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    FREQUENCY HOPPING SPREAD SPECTRUM VS. DIRECT SEQUENCE SPREAD SPECTRUM RAYLINK AND RAYTHEON local-area network products, such as Raytheon's RaylinkTM products, use the frequency hopping method

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: meteorological instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meteorological instrumentation Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind...

  2. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Instruments | FDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Difference Spectrometer (FDS) is used for molecular vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic neutron scattering. The instrument is designed for high count rates by use of large...

  3. High Availability Instrumentation Packaging Standards for the ILC and Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, R.W.; Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ILC designers are exploring new packaging standards for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation, particularly high-speed serial interconnect systems for intelligent instruments versus the existing parallel backplanes of VME, VXI and CAMAC. The High Availability Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) system is a new industrial open standard designed to withstand single-point hardware or software failures. The standard crate, controller, applications module and sub-modules are being investigated. All modules and sub-modules are hot-swappable. A single crate is designed for a data throughput in communications applications of 2 Tb/s and an Availability of 0.99999, which translates into a downtime of five minutes per year. The ILC is planning to develop HA architectures for controls, beam instrumentation and detector systems.

  4. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Instruments | ASTERIX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SESAME-enabled-SANS spectrometer that is primarily used for experiments or neutron scattering techniques requiring polarized neutron beams. These experiments involve...

  5. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  6. D0 Instrument Air System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serges, T.J.; /Fermilab

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main function of the instrument air system is to operate control valves associated with the cryogenics in the D0 hall. Occasionally, it will be used for purging purposes. Appendix A shows a schematic of the air instrument system along with a corresponding components list.

  7. Fidelity of a Time-Resolved Imaging Diagnostic for Electron Beam Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frayer, Daniel; Ekdahl, Carl A.; Johnson, Douglas

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical tomographic diagnostic instrument has been fielded at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Four optical lines of sight create projections of an image of an electron beam on a Cerenkov target, which are relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. From these projections, a reconstruction algorithm creates time histories of the beam’s cross section. The instrument was fielded during and after facility commissioning, and tomographic reconstructions reported beam parameters. Results from reconstructions and analysis are noted.

  8. An instrument for 3D x-ray nano-imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holler, M.; Raabe, J.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Quitmann, C.; Menzel, A.; Bunk, O. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an instrument dedicated to 3D scanning x-ray microscopy, allowing a sample to be precisely scanned through a beam while the angle of x-ray incidence can be changed. The position of the sample is controlled with respect to the beam-defining optics by laser interferometry. The instrument achieves a position stability better than 10 nm standard deviation. The instrument performance is assessed using scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy and we demonstrate a resolution of 18 nm in 2D imaging of a lithographic test pattern while the beam was defined by a pinhole of 3 {mu}m in diameter. In 3D on a test object of copper interconnects of a microprocessor, a resolution of 53 nm is achieved.

  9. Experimental Determination of the Antineutrino Spectrum of the Fission Products of $^{238}$U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Haag; A. Gütlein; M. Hofmann; L. Oberauer; W. Potzel; K. Schreckenbach; F. M. Wagner

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was performed at the scientific neutron source FRM II in Garching to determine the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of the fission products of $^{238}$U. This was achieved by irradiating target foils of natural uranium with a thermal and a fast neutron beam and recording the emitted $\\beta$-spectra with a gamma-suppressing electron-telescope. The obtained $\\beta$-spectrum of the fission products of $^{235}$U was normalized to the data of the magnetic spectrometer BILL of $^{235}$U. This method strongly reduces systematic errors in the $^{238}$U measurement. The $\\beta$-spectrum of $^{238}$U was converted into the corresponding antineutrino spectrum. The final $\\bar\

  10. Combined dispersive/interference spectroscopy for producing a vector spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring the spectral properties of broadband waves that combines interferometry with a wavelength disperser having many spectral channels to produce a fringing spectrum. Spectral mapping, Doppler shifts, metrology of angles, distances and secondary effects such as temperature, pressure, and acceleration which change an interferometer cavity length can be measured accurately by a compact instrument using broadband illumination. Broadband illumination avoids the fringe skip ambiguities of monochromatic waves. The interferometer provides arbitrarily high spectral resolution, simple instrument response, compactness, low cost, high field of view and high efficiency. The inclusion of a disperser increases fringe visibility and signal to noise ratio over an interferometer used alone for broadband waves. The fringing spectrum is represented as a wavelength dependent 2-d vector, which describes the fringe amplitude and phase. Vector mathematics such as generalized dot products rapidly computes average broadband phase shifts to high accuracy. A Moire effect between the interferometer's sinusoidal transmission and the illumination heterodynes high resolution spectral detail to low spectral detail, allowing the use of a low resolution disperser. Multiple parallel interferometer cavities of fixed delay allow the instantaneous mapping of a spectrum, with an instrument more compact for the same spectral resolution than a conventional dispersive spectrometer, and not requiring a scanning delay.

  11. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  12. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  13. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  14. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rubbia; A. Ferrari; Y. Kadi; V. Vlachoudis

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more favourably exploited with the heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with emission angles in a narrow angular cone and a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection as a neutral gas in a tiny volume with a technology at high temperatures perfected at ISOLDE. It is however of a much more general applicability. The method appears capable of producing a "table top" storage ring with an accumulation rate in excess of 10**14 Li-8 radioactive ion/s for possible use for radioactive beams for physics studies (for example for beta-beams) or for therapy.

  15. Beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  16. Attenuation of Beaming Oscillations Near Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coleman Miller

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations with RXTE have revealed kilohertz quasi-periodic brightness oscillations (QPOs) from nearly twenty different neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). These frequencies often appear as a pair of kilohertz QPOs in a given power density spectrum. In many models the higher-frequency of these QPOs is a beaming oscillation at the frequency of a nearly circular orbit at some radius near the neutron star. In such models it is expected that there will also be beaming oscillations at the stellar spin frequency and at overtones of the orbital frequency, but no strong QPOs have been detected at these frequencies. We therefore examine the processes that can attenuate beaming oscillations near neutron stars, and in doing so extend the work on this subject that was initiated by the discovery of lower-frequency QPOs from LMXBs. Among our main results are (1)in a spherical scattering cloud, all overtones of rotationally modulated beaming oscillations are attenuated strongly, not just the even harmonics, and (2)it is possible to have a relatively high-amplitude modulation near the star at, e.g., the stellar spin frequency, even if no peak at that frequency is detectable in a power density spectrum taken at infinity. We discuss the application of these results to modeling of kilohertz QPOs.

  17. Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio Amanpreet S Saini, Zhen Hu, Robert Qiu with spectrum sensing and spectrum reconstruction under the umbrella of cognitive radio which is the smart radio to explore and exploit the free spectrum. Spectrum analyzer is used to emulate cognitive radio to do spectrum

  18. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  19. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions, ultra-high intensity lasers, 3D Laser Imagingconcepts, ultra-high intensity lasers, x-ray generation,interests: Ultra-high vacuum, particle beam and laser beam

  20. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEL Collaboration: Photocathode/SCRF Collaboration: Two-BeamUniversity on Photocathode/ SCRF technology, LBNL-BNL on

  1. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  2. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  3. Semiconductor spectrometer for beams of low-energy positive pions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaisak, I.I.; Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Merzlyakov, S.I.; Oganesyan, K.O.; Osipenko, B.P.; Pasyuk, E.A.; Porokhovoi, S.Yu.; Rudenko, A.I.; Khomutov, A.A.; Shishkov, A.V.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measurement of the momentum distribution of a beam of low-energy positive pions is described. A spectrum is determined by measurement of the energies of associated heavy charged particles (p, d, t, and ..cap alpha..) in a thin semiconductor detector. The accuracy of determination of average beam momentum is less than or less than or equal to 10/sup -3/. The proposed method permits real-time monitoring and correction of the parameters of a pion beam in an accelerator experiment.

  4. Novel rubidium atomic beam with an alkali dispenser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Timothy M.; Henclewood, Dwayne [College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel atomic beam apparatus with a resistively heated alkali dispenser source and a cold-pumped intermediate chamber. Using laser fluorescence spectroscopy we have measured the atomic density to be 3x10{sup 11} atoms/m{sup 3} and the total flux to be 5x10{sup 8} atoms/s in a 0.3 cm diameter beam. We have also characterized the velocity distribution of the source based on the Doppler-shifted fluorescence spectrum. The compact geometry, flexibility, and simplicity of the beam may make it useful as an optical frequency reference or for experiments on atom-cooling.

  5. ATR NSUF Instrumentation Enhancement Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Mitchell K. Meyer; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Curtis Wilkins

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) effort is to expand instrumentation available to users conducting irradiation tests in this unique facility. In particular, development of sensors capable of providing real-time measurements of key irradiation parameters is emphasized because of their potential to increase data fidelity and reduce posttest examination costs. This paper describes the strategy for identifying new instrumentation needed for ATR irradiations and the program underway to develop and evaluate new sensors to address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide improved in-pile instrumentation to users.

  6. 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V.; Wang, Yongqiang; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA – 2013). This conference was held in Marriott Waterfront in Seattle, Washington, USA during June 23–28, 2013.

  7. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  8. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, S.; Caliebe, W.; Siddons, P.; So, I.; Clay, b.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.; Marinkovicl, N.; Hould, N.; ginder-Vogel, M.; Landrot, G.L.; Sparks, D.L.; Ganjoo, A.

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  9. Closing plenary summary of working group 4 instrumentation and controls for ERL2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; Obina, T.

    2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group 4 was charged with presentations and discussions on instrumentation and controls with regards to Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). There were 4 sessions spanning 3.5 hours in which 7 talks were delivered, the first being an invited plenary presentation. The time allotted for each talk was limited to 20-25 minutes in order to allow 5-10 minutes for discussion. Most of the talks were held in joint session with working group 5 (Unwanted Beam Loss). This format was effective for the purpose of this workshop. A final series of discussion sessions were also held with working group 5. Summary of the working group 4 activities, presented in the closing plenary session. We had a plenary presentation on operational performance, experience, and future plans at the existing ERL injector prototype at Cornell. This included instrumentation data, controls system configurations, as well as description of future needs. This was followed by four talks from KEK and RIKEN/SPring-8 that described electron beam instrumentation already in use or under development that can be applied to ERL facilities. The final talks described the ERLs under construction at KEK and BNL. The format of having joint sessions with working group 5 was beneficial as there were a significant number of common topics and concerns with regards to the causes of beam loss, instrumentation hardware, and techniques used to measure and analyze beam loss.

  10. The GRAVITY instrument software / High-level software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Leonard; Ott, Thomas; Kok, Yitping; Yazici, Senol; Anugu, Narsireddy; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Lacour, Sylvestre; Ott, Juergen; Paumard, Thibaut; Lapeyrere, Vincent; Kervella, Pierre; Abuter, Roberto; Pozna, Eszter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Blind, Nicolas; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Hans, Oliver; Haug, Marcus; Haussmann, Frank; Kellner, Stefan; Lippa, Magdalena; Pfuhl, Oliver; Sturm, Eckhard; Weber, Johannes; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Perrin, Guy S; Straubmeier, Christian; Schoeller, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRAVITY is the four-beam, near- infrared, AO-assisted, fringe tracking, astrometric and imaging instrument for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). It is requiring the development of one of the most complex instrument software systems ever built for an ESO instrument. Apart from its many interfaces and interdependencies, one of the most challenging aspects is the overall performance and stability of this complex system. The three infrared detectors and the fast reflective memory network (RMN) recorder contribute a total data rate of up to 20 MiB/s accumulating to a maximum of 250 GiB of data per night. The detectors, the two instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) as well as the five LCUs running applications under TAC (Tools for Advanced Control) architecture, are interconnected with fast Ethernet, RMN fibers and dedicated fiber connections as well as signals for the time synchronization. Here we give a simplified overview of all subsystems of GRAVITY and their interfaces and discuss two examples of...

  11. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  12. Operational experience with synchrotron light interferometers for CEBAF experimental beam lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam size and energy spread monitoring systems based on Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI) have been in operations at Jefferson Lab for several years. A non-invasive nature and a very high (a few mm) resolution of SLI make these instruments valuable beam diagnostic tools for the CEBAF accelerator. This presentation describes the evolution of the Synchrotron Light Interferometer at Jefferson Lab and highlights our extensive experience in the installation and operation of the SLI for CEBAF experimental beam lines.

  13. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  14. Advances in nuclear instrumentation for safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Reilly, T.D.; Miller, M.C.; Hollas, C.L.; Pickrell, M.M.; Prommel, J.M.; Dreicer, J.S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes detectors, instrumentation, and analytical methods under development to address the above issues. The authors will describe work underway on room-temperature semiconductors including attempts to model the response of these detectors to improve spectrum analysis procedures and detector design. Computerized tomography is used in many medical and industrial applications; they are developing both gamma-ray and neutron tomography for improved measurements of waste and direct-use materials. Modern electronics and scintillation detectors should permit the development of fast neutron coincidence detectors with dramatically improved signal-to-noise ratios. For active measurements, they are studying several improved neutron sources, including a high-fluence, plasma-based, d-t generator. New analysis tools from information theory may permit one to better combine data from different measurement systems. This paper attempts to briefly describe a range of new sensors, electronics, and data analysis methods under study at Los Alamos and other laboratories to promote discussion of promising technology that they may bring to bear on these important global issues.

  15. The UV spectrum of nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Zagury

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of the UV spectrum of some nebulae with clearly identified illuminating stars, all observed by the IUE satellite. The data show remarkable properties of the UV spectrum of the nebulae. Each spectrum is the product of the star spectrum and a linear function of 1/lambda. There is no peculiar behaviour in the spectrums at 2200A: no bump created in the spectrum of a nebula and no excess of scattering. When moving away from the star, the surface brightness of a nebula decreases as the inverse of the square of the angular distance to the star. These results can logically be interpreted in terms of scattering of starlight. They imply constant properties of the interstellar grains in the UV and in the directions of space sampled by the nebulae, and probably a strong forward scattering phase function. There is no evidence for any particular type of grain which would specifically extinguish starlight at 2200A. Concerning the UV spectrum of a star, this may imply a revisal of the traditional interpretation of the 2200A bump.

  16. Utilization and fairness in spectrum assignment for opportunistic spectrum access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, ChunYi; Zheng, Haitao; Zhao, Ben Y

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    985. [4] C AO , L. , AND Z HENG , H. Spectrum allocation in+ [26] Z HAO , J. , Z HENG , H. , AND Y ANG , G. Distributed2005, to appear). [27] Z HENG , H. , AND C AO , L. Device-

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information July 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information April 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information August 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. Performance Limits for Cherenkov Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hofmann

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Cherenkov instruments for the detection of very high energy gamma rays is ultimately limited by the fluctuations in the development of air showers. With particular emphasis on the angular resolution, the ultimate performance limits are investigated on the basis of simulations.

  4. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Joseph (St. Petersburg, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  5. LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC M. A. Furman, W. C. Turner, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract We present beam-beam simulation of simulations: (a) to as- sess undesirable effects from LBNL's luminosity monitor- ing scheme for the LHC [2

  6. LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS Miguel A. Furman, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong undesirable effects from LBNL's sweeping lumi- nosity monitoring scheme for the LHC [1], and (b) to assess

  7. Energy Spectrum of Vortex Tangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of superfluid turbulence in the absence of the normal fluid is studied numerically. In order to discuss the statistical properties, we calculated the energy spectra of the 3D velocity field induced by dilute and dense vortex tangles respectively, whose dynamics is calculated by the Biot-Savart law. In the case of a dense tangle, the slope of the energy spectrum is changed at $k=2\\pi/l$, where $l$ is the intervortex spacing. For $k>2\\pi/l$, the energy spectrum has $k^{-1}$ behavior in the same manner as the dilute vortex tangle, while otherwise the slope of the energy spectrum deviates from $k^{-1}$ behavior. We compare the behavior for $k<2\\pi/l$ with the Kolmogorov law.

  8. Spectrum of C_heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectrum of C_heart where 1 + z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2} heart(z)= ------------------------- 3 - z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2}. Figure 7.1, page 303, of "Composition Operators on Spaces ...

  9. Lyapunov spectrum of granular gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Sean; Mareschal, Michel

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and study the Lyapunov spectrum of a granular gas maintained in a steady state by an isokinetic thermostat. Considering restitution coefficients greater than unity allows us to show that the spectra change smoothly and continuously at equilibrium. The shearing instability of the granular gas, however, provokes an abrupt change in the structure of the spectrum. The relationship between various physically relevant quantities and the energy dissipation rate differs from previously studied nonequilibrium steady states.

  10. Methods of Beam Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Stochastic Cooling", presented at PAC, (1995).1991). Hangst, J. , "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem and Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of the

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  12. Courses on Beam Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the...

  13. The Magnetic Sensitivity of the Second Solar Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Trujillo Bueno

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews some of the developments that over the last 10 years have allowed us to go from deciphering the physical origin of several of the enigmatic features of the second solar spectrum to discovering unknown aspects of the Sun's hidden magnetism via sophisticated radiative transfer modeling. The second solar spectrum is the observational signature of radiatively induced quantum coherences in the atoms and molecules of the solar atmosphere. Magnetic fields produce partial decoherence via the Hanle effect, giving rise to fascinating observable effects in the emergent spectral line polarization. Interestingly, these effects allow us to "see" magnetic fields to which the Zeeman effect is blind within the limitations of the available instrumentation. In the coming years, the physical interpretation of observations of the spectral line polarization resulting from the joint action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects might lead to a new revolution in our empirical understanding of solar magnetic fields.

  14. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  15. Observations of the high frequency range of the wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, M. [IFREMER, Plouzane (France); Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF Industrial Mathematics, Trondheim (Norway); Barstow, S. [OCEANOR, Trondheim (Norway); Guedes Soares, C. [Technical Univ. of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper takes a new look at the high frequency range of the wave spectrum. The analysis is based on data sets from two recent field campaigns offshore Portugal and Crete carried out in the MAST II WAVEMOD project, data from the WADIC experiment in the North Sea, and deep sea data from Haltenbanken and Voeringplataaet offshore Norway. In addition, the authors also show spectra obtained by spectral inversion of ERS-1 SAR imagery. The influence and calibration of wave measuring instrumentation and the use of wavenumber spectra when comparing spectra from shallow water is emphasized.

  16. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caresana, M; Esposito, A; Ferrarini, M; Golnik, N; Hohmann, E; Leuschner, A; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Manessi, G; Mayer, S; Ott, K; Röhrich, J; Silari, M; Trompier, F; Volnhals, M; Wielunski, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instru...

  17. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  18. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  19. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  20. Flow Cytometry Instrument Policy & Penalties Sample Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    the integrity of the instrument, all samples must be filtered with a 40 µm mesh cell strainer just before

  1. LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments:Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, J.; Boutet, S.; Castagna, J-C.; Chapman, H.; Feng, Y.; Foyt, W.; Fritz, D.M.; Gaffney, K.J.; Gr|bel, G.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.B.; Kurita, N.; Larsson, J.; Ludwig, K.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miao, J.; Reis, D.A.; Robert, A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Tschentscher, Th.; van Bakel, N.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /DESY /Lund Inst. Tech. /Boston U. /UCLA /Michigan U. /Argonne

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), along with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility, which will operate in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This FEL, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac will be used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons will be transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which will house a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength will be tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS will include two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing three X-ray instruments in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of this new LCLS facility. The technical objective of the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS three hard X-ray instruments that will complement the initial instrument included in the LCLS construction. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation needs to be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The LCLS instrument concepts have been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the LUSI project instruments have been identified as meeting the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community.

  2. Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 13, Fall 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation.

  4. Geomagnetic Temporal Spectrum Catherine Constable 1 GEOMAGNETIC TEMPORAL SPECTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Catherine G.

    of geomagnetic variations. The power spectral density S(f) is a measure of the power in geomagnetic field. At a distance of about 3 earth radii, the magnetospheric ring current for Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism measurements of the geomagnetic field to estimate the power spectrum. Power spectral estimation is usually

  5. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 11-13, 1981 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS J.J.W-7406-BW-48 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS* J.J.longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched particle beams.

  6. Causality and the Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Robinson; Benjamin D. Wandelt

    1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We find constraints on the generation of super-causal-horizon energy perturbations from a smooth initial state, under a simple physical scheme. We quantify these constraints by placing the upper limit $\\lambda_c = 3.0 d_H$ on the wavelength at which the power spectrum turns over to $k^4$ behavior. This means that sub-horizon processes can generate significant power on scales further outside the horizon than one might naively expect. The existence of this limit may have important implications for the interpretation of the small scale power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  7. Instrumentation for severe processes improved

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.J.

    1983-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the evolution of equipment to solve or at least mitigate the serious control problems involved in petroleum refineries, where control valves and sensors become fouled, lead lines plug, and overall process performance is impaired. Points out that visbreaking, coal liquefaction and residfining (resid desulfurization) are all processes that impose severe conditions on process instrumentation. Reports that experience at the Exxon Coal Liquefaction Plant (ECLP) has shown that conventional cylindrical thermowells are subject to severe erosion, which can be prevented by eliminating mechanical bending through improved shape.

  8. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  9. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  10. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (beams. We report on tests made at ESRF and DESY using diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  11. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  12. Effect of noncircularity of experimental beam on CMB parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Santanu; Paulson, Sonu Tabitha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies has been playing a lead role in precision cosmology by providing some of the tightest constrains on cosmological models and parameters. However, precision can only be meaningful when all major systematic effects are taken into account. Non-circular beams in CMB experiments can cause large systematic deviation in the angular power spectrum, not only by modifying the measurement at a given multipole, but also introducing coupling between different multipoles through a deterministic bias matrix. Here we add a mechanism for emulating the effect of a full bias matrix to the Planck likelihood code through the parameter estimation code SCoPE. We show that if the angular power spectrum was measured with a non-circular beam, the assumption of circular Gaussian beam or considering only the diagonal part of the bias matrix can lead to huge error in parameter estimation. We demonstrate that, at least for elliptical Gaussian beams, use of scalar beam window fun...

  13. Coherent beam-beam mode in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; White, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of single bunch beam-beam coherent modes during dedicated experiments in the LHC are presented. Their role in standard operation for physics is discussed and, in particular, candidates of beam-beam coherent mode driven unstable by the machine impedance are presented.

  14. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  15. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  16. Beam-Plasma Instabilities in a 2D Yukawa Lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrkos, S. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York 13214 (United States); Kalman, G. J. [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a 2D Yukawa lattice of grains, with a beam of other charged grains moving in the lattice plane. In contrast to Vlasov plasmas, where the electrostatic instability excited by the beam is only longitudinal, here both longitudinal and transverse instabilities of the lattice phonons can develop. We determine and compare the transverse and longitudinal growth rates. The growth rate spectrum in wave number space exhibits remarkable gaps where no instability can develop. Depending on the system parameters, the transverse instability can be selectively excited.

  17. LHC beam behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made to extract information on the LHC beam behaviour and dynamics from the observations made during the first runs in 2009. Although no systematic studies have been made, some basic properties can be established and in particular the observations in the presence of two beams and in collision are studied. They are analyzed in view of the foreseen runs at higher energy and possible improvements are proposed.

  18. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  19. Principal Components Instrumental Variable Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelried, Diego; Smith, Richard J.

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ,1]. The parameter µ is the absolute value of the largest correlation between any two elements of z i . 14 The determination of rn can be made through a heuristic rule designed to satisfy (A) and (B). This is inspired by usual practices in the selection of those PC... of eigenvectors (the so-called ‘loadings’) has the form C = ? ? ? ? C¯K?×s 0K?×a CˆK?×(K??s) 0a×s Ia 0a×(K??s) ? ? ? ? therefore ZC = [Z?C¯ : Za : Z?Cˆ ] . (14) The PC of Z used as instruments are Z¯ = ZC r , the first r columns of ZC . From (14) it is clear...

  20. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sviridova, V. [ed.] [All-Russian Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  1. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  2. E0 = 20 keV EDS records the entire spectrum. It is very appealing to directly and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Label: Substrate steel 1 20 keV/0.5 nA/300kX 6-29-94 offset=-30 Standardless Analysis Take-Off Angle: 40 beam energy Ec = excitation energy = EDS efficiency Measure this Calculate this #12;Spectrum Label: Substrate steel 1 20 keV/0.5 nA/300kX 6-29-94 offset=-30 Standardless Analysis Take-Off Angle: 40.00 Beam

  3. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS RING VACUUM INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; TANG,J.Y.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL is undertaking the design, construction and commissioning of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring and the beam transport lines [l]. Ultrahigh vacuum of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr is required in the accumulator ring to minimize beam-gas ionization, a contributing factor to the e-p instability observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. All vacuum instrumentation must be capable of local and remote operation to achieve a reliable vacuum system, especially in this extremely high intensity accelerator. The design and development of the SNS ring vacuum instrumentation and control through the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  4. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Robert

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 187­191 Geophysical aspects of very long baseline neutrino experiments Robert J. Gellera, *, Tatsuhiko Harab a Department of Earth, Tatehara 1, Tsukuba 305-0802, Japan Abstract Several proposed experiments will send beams of neutrinos

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 438 (1999) 217}220 Gold and isotopically enriched platinium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, Luis A.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800, USA Abstract Au and isotopically enriched Pt targetsNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 438 (1999) 217}220 Gold and isotopically enriched platinium targets for the production of radioactive beams of francium A.R. Lipski*, L.A. Orozco, M

  6. Characterization and use of the spent beam for serial operation of LCLS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Foucar, Lutz; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason E.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Seibert, M. Marvin; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free-electron laser sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source offer very exciting possibilities for unique research. However, beam time at such facilities is very limited and in high demand. This has led to significant efforts towards beam multiplexing of various forms. One such effort involves re-using the so-called spent beam that passes through the hole in an area detector after a weak interaction with a primary sample. This beam can be refocused into a secondary interaction region and used for a second, independent experiment operating in series. The beam profile of this refocused beam was characterized for amore »particular experimental geometry at the Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at LCLS. A demonstration of this multiplexing capability was performed with two simultaneous serial femtosecond crystallography experiments, both yielding interpretable data of sufficient quality to produce electron density maps.« less

  7. aexs instrument development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interferometer Ohta, Shigemi 2 Development of Models for Optical Instrument Transformers. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Optical Instrument Transformers...

  8. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  9. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  10. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Instrumentation and Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation and Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS On June...

  12. Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goeringer, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

  13. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; /SLAC; ,

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  14. Beurling spectrum of functions in Banach space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang Vu Giang

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We are interested in Beurling spectrum of $\\mathbb X-$valued functions with application in functional delay differential equations.

  15. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  16. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  17. Energy Spectrum of Quasi-Geostrophic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Constantin

    2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy spectrum of a quasi-geostrophic model of forced, rotating turbulent flow. We provide a rigorous a priori bound E(k) energy spectrum that is expected in a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes inverse cascade. Our bound provides theoretical support for the k^{-2} spectrum observed in recent experiments.

  18. The end of the Galactic spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. De Donato; G. A. Medina-Tanco

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a diffusion galactic model to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. We analyze the transition between Galactic and extragalactic components using two different extragalactic models. We compare the sum of the diffusive galactic spectrum and extragalactic spectrum with the available experimental data.

  19. The end of the Galactic spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Donato, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a diffusion galactic model to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. We analyze the transition between Galactic and extragalactic components using two different extragalactic models. We compare the sum of the diffusive galactic spectrum and extragalactic spectrum with the available experimental data.

  20. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  1. Instrumentation for CTA site characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruck, Christian; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandát, Dušan; Schweizer, Thomas; Häfner, Dennis; Bulik, Tomasz; Cieslar, Marek; Costantini, Heide; Dominik, Michal; Ebr, Jan; Garczarczyk, Markus; Lorentz, Eckart; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pech, Miroslav; Puerto-Giménez, Irene; Teshima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the "Cherenkov Telescope Array" CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision or the comparability to allow for a comprehensive characterization of the proposed sites to be made. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize ...

  2. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  3. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  4. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James Institute of Oncology The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)] [St James Institute of Oncology The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Evans, J. A. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom)] [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds, United Kingdom and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)] [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds, United Kingdom and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40?cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field. The PDDs of the FFF beams showed less variation with field size, the d{sub max} value was deeper for the matched FFF beam than the FFF beam and deeper than the flattened beam for field sizes greater than 5 cm × 5 cm. The head leakage when using the machine in FFF mode is less than half that for a flattened beam, but comparable for both FFF modes. The radiation protection dose-rate measurements show an increase of instantaneous dose-rates when operating the machines in FFF mode but that increase is less than the ratio of MU/min produced by the machine. Conclusions: The matching of a FFF beam to a flattened beam at a depth of 10 cm in water by increasing the FFF beam energy does not reduce any of the reported benefits of FFF beams. Conversely, there are a number of potential benefits resulting from matching the FFF beam; the depth of maximum dose is deeper, the out of field dose is potentially reduced, and the beam quality and penetration more closely resembles the flattened beams currently used in clinical practice, making dose distributions in water more alike. Highlighted in this work is the fact that some conventional specifications and methods for measurement of beam parameters such as penumbra are not relevant and further work is required to address this situation with respect to “matched” FFF beams and to determine methods of measurement that are not reliant on an associated flattened beam.

  5. Instrument and method for focusing x rays, gamma rays, and neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystal-diffraction instrument or diffraction-grating instrument is described with an improved crystalline structure or grating spacing structure having a face for receiving a beam of photons or neutrons and diffraction planar spacing or grating spacing along that face with the spacing increasing progressively along the face to provide a decreasing Bragg diffraction angle for a monochromatic radiation and thereby increasing the usable area and acceptance angle. The increased planar spacing for the diffraction crystal is provided by the use of a temperature differential across the line structures with different compositions, by an individual crystalline structure with a varying composition and thereby a changing planar spacing along its face, and by combinations of these techniques. The increased diffraction grating element spacing is generated during the fabrication of the diffraction grating by controlling the cutting tool that is cutting the grooves or controlling the laser beam, electron beam, or ion beam that is exposing the resist layer, etc. It is also possible to vary this variation in grating spacing by applying a thermal gradient to the diffraction grating in much the same manner as is done in the crystal-diffraction case.

  6. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wemple, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  7. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  8. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Moorman, Matthew W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  9. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  10. Instrument and Source Division Ron Crone, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Abercrombie Project Management/ Operations Analysis Barbara Thibadeau HFIR Instrument Operations Gary Lynn G. Visscher SNS Instrument Operations Bobby Lee Cross S. McNulty, Admin. Asst. Neutron Choppers J. Stockton. Knox1 Design Services K. Potter, Lead M. Hammons G. Jones W. Sharp S. Roy R. Taylor Survey, Alignment

  11. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  12. On the Extensive Air Shower density spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksander Zawadzki; Tadeusz Wibig; Jerzy Gawin

    1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In search for new methods of determining the primary energy spectrum of Cosmic Rays, the attention was paid to the density spectrum measurement. New methods available at present warrant an accurateness of conclusions derived from the density spectrum measurements. The general statement about the change of the spectral index of the charged particle density spectrum is confirmed very clearly. Results concerning the shower size and primary energy spectra are also presented and discussed. Interesting future prospects for applications of the density spectrum method are proposed.

  13. Observation of Coherent Beam-beam Effects in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Calaga, R; White, S M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early collisions in the LHC with a very limited number of bunches with high intensities indicated the presence of coherent beam-beam driven oscillations. Here we discuss the experimental results and compare with the expectations.

  14. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  15. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional...

  16. Analysis of the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of Cyclopropane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of Cyclopropane. Analysis of the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of Cyclopropane. Abstract: The high resolution infrared spectrum of...

  17. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  18. Colliding beams of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

  19. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  20. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thilly, William G. (Winchester, MA); Keohavong, Phouthone (Cambridge, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  1. The Cooling of Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67, 15. Hangst, J "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem an.d Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of theWorkshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Montreaux, CERN

  2. Hadron beams session-summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120, USA (US))

    1989-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of presently operating polarized beams at Fermilab, the AGS, and KEK is discussed. Other schemes such as Siberian Snakes and self-polarization of a beam in situ are briefly analyzed.(AIP)

  3. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  4. Applications of transputers to astronomical instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.M.; Beard, S,M.; Kelly, B.D.; Paterson, M.J. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel processing techniques based on transputers are being applied to astronomical instruments under development. On the COSMOS photographic plate measuring machine, a data farm of transputers allows backgrounds to be determined in realtime instead of requiring 1.5 hours of offline VAX processing per plate. Transputers have been adopted as the embedded processors in a submillimetre bolometer array instrument and their use is planned in demanding future applications such as thermal infrared array instruments and data compression applied to remote observing. The techniques of interfacing transputers to external hardware and to VAX/VMS computers are discussed.

  5. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning Zhongxi; Liu Hui; Yu Daren [Plasma Propulsion Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou Zhongxiang [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  6. Power Spectrum of Inflationary Attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedict J. Broy; Diederik Roest; Alexander Westphal

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflationary attractors predict the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio to take specific values that are consistent with Planck. An example is the universal attractor for models with a generalised non-minimal coupling, leading to Starobinsky inflation. In this paper we demonstrate that it also predicts a specific relation between the amplitude of the power spectrum and the number of e-folds. The length and height of the inflationary plateau are related via the non-minimal coupling: in a wide variety of examples, the observed power normalisation leads to at least 55 flat e-foldings. Prior to this phase, the inflationary predictions vary and can account for the observational indications of power loss at large angular scales.

  7. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  8. LCLS Approved Experiments for Run 4, ~June 2011-October 2011 Proposal Lead Spokesperson/PI Approved Commissioning and User Experiments LCLS Beam Line Scientist (Point of Contact)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    LCLS Approved Experiments for Run 4, ~June 2011-October 2011 Beam Line/ Instrument Proposal # Proposal Lead Spokesperson/PI Approved Commissioning and User Experiments LCLS Beam Line Scientist (Point or John Bozek AMO L313 CHAPMAN,HENRY Water Window Imaging at LCLS Christoph Bostedt or John Bozek AMO L328

  9. A novel instrument for quantitative nanoanalytics involving complementary X-ray methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubeck, J.; Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Holfelder, I.; Hoenicke, P.; Mueller, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Reinhardt, F.; Weser, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel ultra-high vacuum instrument for X-ray reflectometry and spectrometry-related techniques for nanoanalytics by means of synchrotron radiation has been constructed and commissioned. This versatile instrument was developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute, and includes a 9-axis manipulator that allows for an independent alignment of the samples with respect to all degrees of freedom. In addition, a rotational and translational movement of several photodiodes as well as a translational movement of an aperture system in and out of the beam is provided. Thus, the new instrument enables various analytical techniques based on energy dispersive X-ray detectors such as reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), total-reflection XRF, grazing-incidence XRF in addition to optional X-ray reflectometry measurements or polarization-dependent X-ray absorption fine structure analyses. With this instrument samples having a size of up to 100 mm Multiplication-Sign 100 mm can be analyzed with respect to their mass deposition, elemental or spatial composition, or the species in order to probe surface contamination, layer composition and thickness, the depth profile of matrix elements or implants, the species of nanolayers, nanoparticles or buried interfaces as well as the molecular orientation of bonds. Selected applications of this advanced ultra-high vacuum instrument demonstrate both its flexibility and capability.

  10. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  11. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November – December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September – October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October – November 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  5. Results of long-range beam-beam studies - scaling with beam separation and intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Metral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roy, G; Trad, G; Kaltchev, D; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied possible limitations due to the long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC. With a large number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, we have reduced the crossing angles to enhance long-range beam-beam effects to evaluate their influence on dynamic aperture and losses. Different beta* and intensities have been used in two dedicated experiments and allow the test of the expected scaling laws.

  6. Klystron Instability of a Relativistic Electron Beam in a Bunch Compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klystron Instability of a Relativistic Electron Beam in a Bunch Compressor E.L. Saldina , E passing a magnetic bunch compressor. Analytical expressions are derived for the small-signal gain to Nuclear Instruments and Methods #12;1 Introduction Magnetic bunch compressors are designed to obtain short

  7. Extended Commissioning and Calibration of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Masiero; Klaus Hodapp; David Harrington; Haosheng Lin

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In our previous paper (Masiero et al. 2007) we presented the design and initial calibrations of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter (DBIP), a new optical instrument for the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. In this followup work we discuss our full-Stokes mode commissioning including crosstalk determination and our typical observing methodology.

  8. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  9. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  10. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Faccio, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Abdollahpour, D. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  11. Axion beams at HERA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Piotrzkowski

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    If the recently observed anomaly in the PVLAS experiment is due to the axion, then the powerful beams of synchrotron photons, propagating through high magnetic field of the HERA beamline, become strong axion sources. This gives a unique opportunity of detection of the axion-photon interactions by installing a small detector in the HERA tunnel, and to corroborate the axion hypothesis within a few days of running.

  12. PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    /email interaction. Course requirements: Participation in class discussion, problem sets, take home final exam of exponential behavior in chem., biochem., physics: molecules vs. instruments. 6 Light absorption densitometry, energy transfer, photobleaching and single molec., image analysis. Anisotropy and molecular mobility

  13. MENTORING EIN ERFOLGREICHES INSTRUMENT DER PERSONALENTWICKLUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    MENTORING ­ EIN ERFOLGREICHES INSTRUMENT DER PERSONALENTWICKLUNG VON JUNGEN WISSENSCHAFTLERINNEN für Doktorandinnen INFORMATIONEN UND KONTAKT MENTORING-PROGRAMM für Doktorandinnen Ansprechpartnerinnen an den Universitäten Greifswald und Rostock Annette Ehmler Telefon 03834 861146 mentoring

  14. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  15. A nano-stepping robotic instrumentation platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahab, Adam Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an Autonomous Nano-stepping Tool (ANT) system is presented. Each ANT is a small, tripodal, robotic instrument capable of untethered precision motion within a quasi-three-dimensional workspace of arbitrary ...

  16. Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run aah #12;2 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results ! Doc # 3308 v#3 by A. Ledovskoy " Using Data from 2004 Test Beam " Used "triplet" method for beam nominally perpendicular to Straw

  17. The stability of spectroscopic instruments: A unified Allan variance computation scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Ossenkopf

    2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Allan variance is a standard technique to characterise the stability of spectroscopic instruments used in astronomical observations. The period for switching between source and reference measurement is often derived from the Allan minimum time. We propose a new approach for the computation of the Allan variance of spectrometer data combining the advantages of the two existing methods into a unified scheme. Using the Allan variance spectrum we derive the optimum strategy for symmetric observing schemes minimising the total uncertainty of the data resulting from radiometric and drift noise. The unified Allan variance computation scheme is designed to trace total-power and spectroscopic fluctuations within the same framework. The method includes an explicit error estimate both for the individual Allan variance spectra and for the derived stability time. A new definition of the instrument stability time allows to characterise the instrument even in the case of a fluctuation spectrum shallower than 1/f, as measured for the total power fluctuations in high-electron-mobility transistors. We find a non-linear impact of the binning of spectrometer channels on the resulting noise and the Allan time deviating from the description in existing theoretical treatments.

  18. Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument (MECi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ) · LCLS parameters · Layout · X-ray optics · Lasers systems · Baseline component summary #12;LCLS Beam per pulse: ~ 1mJ (1x1012 photons @ 8 keV · Pulse length 100 fsec #12;LCLS Experimental HallsLCLS

  19. Low-frequency solar p modes as seen by GOLF and GONG instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Salabert; R. A. Garcia

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of spatially-revolved helioseismic data (such as MDI, GONG, HMI), the usual mode-fitting analysis consists of fitting the 2l+1 individual m-spectra of a given multiplet (n, l) either individually or simultaneously. Such fitting methods fail to obtain reliable estimates of the mode parameters (frequency, splitting, ...) when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low, which makes those methods not suitable when one wants to look at the low-amplitude, long-lived solar p modes in the low-frequency range. Instead, Salabert et al. (2007) developed a new method to extract the mode parameters by adjusting the rotation- and structure-induced frequency shift for each m-spectrum to minimize the mode width in the m-averaged spectrum (a "collapsogram"). The m-averaged spectrum technique, applied to the spatially-resolved GONG and MDI data, appeared to be a powerful tool for low SNR modes in the low-frequency range. Another possibility to increase the SNR is to combine data from different instruments (Garcia et al. 2004a). We present here an adaptation of both techniques: the "collapsograms" applied to a combination of observations from a Sun-as-a-star instrument, GOLF, and a disk-imaged one, GONG.

  20. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; /SLAC; Lee, R.W.; /LLNL, Livermore; Nagler, B.; /Rutherford; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC; ,

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS an X-ray instrument that will complement the initial instrument suite included in the LCLS construction and the LUSI Major Item of Equipment (MIE) Instruments. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation must be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The MEC concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the MEC instrument has been identified as meeting one of the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community. The primary purpose of the MEC instrument is to create High Energy Density (HED) matter and measure its physical properties. There are three primary elements of the MEC instrument: (A) Optical laser drivers that will create HED states by irradiation in several ways and provide diagnostics capability; (B) The LCLS x-ray free electron laser, which will provide the unique capability to create, probe and selectively pump HED states; and, (C) A suite of diagnostic devices required to observe the evolution of the HED state. These elements when combined in the MEC instrument meet the 'Mission Need' as defined in CD-0. For the purposes of the description we separate the types of experiments to be performed into three categories: (1) High pressure: Here we are interested in the generation of high pressure using the optical lasers to irradiate a surface that ablates and drives a pressure wave into a sample, similar to a piston. The pressures that can be reached exceed 1 Mbar and the properties of interest are for example, the reflectivity, conductivity, opacity as well as the changes driven by the pressure wave on, e.g., condensed matter structure. These phenomena will be studied by means of diffraction measurements, measurements of the pressure wave characteristics, in situ probing by

  1. SciTech Connect: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: N79400* --Reactors--Reactor Control Systems; N46110 -- Instrumentation--Radiation Detection Instruments--General...

  2. analysis instruments add: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to giveCHEM 434 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS Southern Illinois University Carbondale SYLLABUS FOR FALL 2014 Nickrent, Daniel L. 2 Instrumenting Executables for Dynamic Analysis...

  3. Development of a Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy Instrument...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy Instrument Using an Electrospray Ion Source and a Cryogenically Development of a Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy Instrument...

  4. Instrumentation Technical Program Management Team: FY-1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, M.L.; Englert, G.L.; Grametbauer, G.L.

    1988-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains evaluations of process, environmental, health, and safety instrumentation of gaseous diffusion plants. The study was conducted by the instrumentation technical program management team. (LSP)

  5. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggiore, M., E-mail: mario.maggiore@lnl.infn.it; Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A. [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  6. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 84, 022701 (2013) Intense terahertz pulses from SLAC electron beams using coherent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    February 2013) SLAC has two electron accelerators, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Facility via coherent transition radiation. For LCLS and FACET respectively, the THz pulse duration field at a THz focus has reached 4.4 GV/m (0.44 V/Å) at LCLS. This paper presents measurements

  7. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B I IS(1996) 663-669 Beam Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    , J.A. A.T. Motta `, J.A. Faldowski `, P.R. Okamoto d Davies b, aAECL Resrurch. Chalk River, e-mail: howe@crf.aecl.ca. alloys Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4 and Zr-2SNb [5.6]. Fe also appears to play

  8. Mechanisms of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Shannon Elizabeth

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANISMS OF FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS A Dissertation by SHANNON ELIZABETH WILSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Biomedical Sciences Mechanisms of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Copyright 2010 Shannon Elizabeth Wilson MECHANISMS OF FETAL ALCOHOL...

  9. Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis characteristics. These insights are due to the nature of the wavelet transform that would not be immediately or decay, is Wavelets in Geophysics 151 Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Praveen Kumar (eds.), pp. 151-166. ISBN 0

  10. Observations of beam-beam effects at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papotti, G; Herr, W; Giachino, R; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a list of observations related to the beam-beam interaction that were collected over the first years of LHC proton physics operation (2010-12). Beam-beam related effects not only have been extensively observed and recorded, but have also shaped the operation of the LHC for high-intensity proton running in a number of ways: the construction of the filling scheme, the choice of luminosity levelling techniques, measures to mitigate instabilities, and the choice of settings for improving performance (e.g. to reduce losses), among others.

  11. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  12. Neutral Beam Excitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30 NewNetworks,Beam

  13. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeMario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

    1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs. 7 figures.

  14. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

  15. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  16. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS REgtR?n Thermodynamics of dynamic nuclear polarization W.Th. Wenckebach Faculty ofApplied Physics, Delfr Unicersity of Technology, P.O.B. 5046, 2600 GA De& The Netherlands Abstract Dynamic nuclear

  17. Low energy beta-beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Volpe

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of a beta-beam facility is to determine the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector, the value of the third neutrino mixing angle and the mass hierarchy. Here we argue that a much broader physics case can be covered since the beta-beam concept can also be used to establish a low energy beta-beam facility. We discuss that the availability of neutrino beams in the 100 MeV energy range offers a unique opportunity to perform neutrino scattering experiments of interest for nuclear physics, for the study of fundamental interactions and of core-collapse supernova physics.

  18. First LHC Beams in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieger, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a talk on the ATLAS single beam running, to be given on February 9th at the Aspen Winter Conference.

  19. ANL Beams and Applications Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterization of the laser and electron beams of the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Heng Li Cornell University June 18 Interbeam Scattering Studies at CesrTA Michael Ehrlichman...

  20. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  1. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  2. Experiment Automation with a Robot Arm using the Liquids Reflectometer Instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A [ORNL; Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL; Sundaram, Madhan [ORNL; Parizzi, Andre A [ORNL; Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Hoffmann, Michael C [ORNL; Greene, Gayle C [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liquids Reflectometer instrument installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) enables observations of chemical kinetics, solid-state reactions and phase-transitions of thin film materials at both solid and liquid surfaces. Effective measurement of these behaviors requires each sample to be calibrated dynamically using the neutron beam and the data acquisition system in a feedback loop. Since the SNS is an intense neutron source, the time needed to perform the measurement can be the same as the alignment process, leading to a labor-intensive operation that is exhausting to users. An update to the instrument control system, completed in March 2013, implemented the key features of automated sample alignment and robot-driven sample management, allowing for unattended operation over extended periods, lasting as long as 20 hours. We present a case study of the effort, detailing the mechanical, electrical and software modifications that were made as well as the lessons learned during the integration, verification and testing process.

  3. Configuration and Validation of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamantzas, C; Emery, J; Fitzek, J; Follin, F; Jackson, S; Kain, V; Kruk, G; Misiowiec, M; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. As well as protecting the machine, the system is also used as a means of diagnosing machine faults, and providing feedback of losses to the control room and several systems such as the Collimation, the Beam Dump and the Post-Mortem. The system has to transmit and process signals from over 4’000 monitors, and has approaching 3 million configurable parameters. This paper describes the types of configuration data needed, the means used to store and deploy all the parameters in such a distributed system and how operators are able to alter the operating parameters of the system, particularly with regard to the loss threshold values. The various security mechanisms put in place, both at the hardware and software level, to avoid accidental or malicious modification of these BLM parameters are also shown for each case.

  4. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  5. Instrument performance on the short and long pulse second SNS target stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  6. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

  7. The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Andrew S.I.D. [Computer Science and Mathematics Department, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74171 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect between parallel plates is studied. Calculations are performed for both the massless scalar field and the electromagnetic field cases, first using a spectral weight function, and then via the Fourier transform of the renormalized expectation of the Casimir energy-momentum operator. The Casimir force is calculated using the spectrum for two plates which are perfectly transparent in a frequency band. The result of this calculation suggests a way to detect the frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  15. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Halzen, F.; Klein, S.

    2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams.

  16. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  17. Head-on beam-beam collisions with high intensities and long range beam-beam studies in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, M; Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Miyamoto, R; Norman, L; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In two experiments we studied possible limitations due to the beam-beam effects in the LHC. In the first experiment we collided high intensity bunches head-on to explore the region for high luminosity collisions. In the second test we reduced the crossing angle in the presence of long range encounters to increase their effects.

  18. 305 Stimulus Isolator WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    dry cell batteries. NOTE: The Model 305 may be driven from devices other than the WPI Series Anapulse INSTRUMENTS 2 Specifications Isolation Impedance to signal source ........................1011 Ohms, shunted by 2 pF Impedance to ground ..................................1011 Ohms, shunted by 15 pF Input Accepts

  19. EXPERIMENT 5 FTIR Instrument Operation and Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    EXPERIMENT 5 FTIR Instrument Operation and Calibration OBJECTIVE 1. To become acquainted with the operation of the FTIR spectrometer and with calibration of the wavelength scale. 2. To prepare reference guide. You will use a polystyrene film standard to check the wavelength calibration. INTRODUCTION

  20. UW SCHOOL OF PHARMACY INSTRUMENTATION COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    UW SCHOOL OF PHARMACY INSTRUMENTATION COMMITTEE 2013-2014 Warren Heideman (chair) Mass spec users-related activities of the School. 4. Provide input and advice to the Dean on issues of importance to the AIC the research enterprise within the School of Pharmacy, across campus, and in the scientific community such as

  1. Integrated polymerase chain reaction/electrophoresis instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach and instrument for field identification of micro-organisms and DNA fragments using a small and disposable device containing integrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzymatic reaction wells, attached capillary electrophoresis (CE) channels, detectors, and read-out all on/in a small hand-held package. The analysis instrument may be made inexpensively, for example, of plastic, and thus is disposable, which minimizes cross contamination and the potential for false positive identification between samples. In addition, it is designed for multiple users with individual applications. The integrated PCR/CE is manufactured by the PCR well and CE channels are "stamped" into plastic depressions where conductive coatings are made in the wells and ends of the CE microchannels to carry voltage and current to heat the PCR reaction mixtures and simultaneously draw DNA bands up the CE channels. Light is transmitted through the instrument at appropriate points and detects PCR bands and identifies DNA fragments by size (retention time) and quantifies each by the amount of light generated as each phototransistor positioned below each CE channel detects a passing band. The instrument is so compact that at least 100 PCR/CE reactions/analyses can be performed easily on one detection device.

  2. SNS Vacuum Instrumentation and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Y. Tang; L. A. Smart; H. C. Hseuh; P. S. Marroquin; L. R. Dalesio; S. A. Lewis; C. A. Lionberger; K. Kishiyama; D. P. Gurd; M. Hechler; W. Schneider

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) vacuum instrumentation and control systems are being designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator facility (TJNAF) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Each participating lab is responsible for a different section of the machine: LBNL for the Front-End section, LANL for the warm LINAC section, TJNAF for the cold LINAC section and BNL for the Ring and transfer line sections. The vacuum instrumentation and control systems are scheduled to be installed and be in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 or 2005. Although the requirements vary for different sections of the machine, a collaborative effort has been made to standardize vacuum instrumentation components and the global control system interfaces. This paper summarizes the design of each sub-section of vacuum instrumentation and control system and discusses SNS standards for Ion Pump and Gauge controllers, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) interfaces, Ladder Logic programming and the SNS global control system interfaces.

  3. Cooling the dark energy camera instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

  4. MICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY -PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will comprise a very low cost alternative to currently available technology for deep subsurface characterizationMICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY - PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT Jim Albright j Microhole technology development is based on the premise that with advances in electronics and sensors

  5. Economic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    providers, and government regulatory bodies. Providing proper economic incentives for everyone involved, proper economic incentives, and timely policy reforms. DSM is a promising solution to this issue. In DSMEconomic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management Jianwei Huang Network Communications

  6. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  7. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring.

  8. The vibrational Raman spectrum of CS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Harold Noble

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CSp A Thesis By HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD Approved as to style and content by Chairman o| Committee THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CS2 HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD A Thesis Suhmitted to the Graduate School... in the procurement of necessary equipment. SECTION I: INTRODUCTION. SECTION II: CLASSICAL THEORY OF RAHAM SCATTERING . SECTION III: THEORY OF NORMAL VIBRATIONS AND VIBRATIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS. A, Morsel Vibrations B. Vibrational Wave Eqnation and lhergy Levels...

  9. Axion isocurvature fluctuations with extremely blue spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuya, Shinta [Department of Information Science, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an axion model for generating isocurvature fluctuations with blue spectrum, n{sub iso}=2-4, which is suggested by recent analyses of admixture of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations with independent spectral indices, n{sub ad}{ne}n{sub iso}. The distinctive feature of the model is that the spectrum is blue at large scales while scale invariant at small scales. This is naturally realized by the dynamics of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field.

  10. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  11. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  12. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  13. Instrumentation Report No. 3: performance and reliability of instrumentation deployed for the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Rector, N.L.; Scarafiotti, J.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration of the short-term storage and subsequent retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies was successfully completed at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. Nearly 1000 instruments were deployed to monitor the temperature of rock, air, and metallic components of the test; displacements and stress changes within the rock mass; radiation dosage to personnel and to the rock; thermal energy input; characteristics of the ventilation airstream; and the operational status of the test. Careful selection, installation, calibration, and maintenance of these instruments ensured the acquisition of about 15.3 x 10{sup 6} high-quality data points. With few exceptions, the performance and reliability of the instrumentation and associated data acquisition system (DAS) were within specified acceptable limits. Details of the performance and reliability of the instrumentation are discussed in this report. 42 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew L.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , characteristics of the peer group. The author concluded the following: (1) published articles in the four health education journals inconsistently reported survey instrument characteristics or results of psychometric property testing for the data collected...

  15. Technique Recovers Atomic Resolution in Spectrum Images | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Spectrum Images April 08, 2015 Raw Fe L-shell spectrum image data, which indicate magnetic properties of the material, were acquired using scanning transmission electron...

  16. Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Rebecca A.

    Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also spectrum light bulbs produce light that is seen by the human eye in a bluish-white tint. Where is full

  17. Observations of the high-frequency range of the wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, M. [IFREMER, Plouzane (France); Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF Industrial Mathematics, Trondheim (Norway); Barstow, S.F. [OCEANOR, Trondheim (Norway); Guedes Soares, C. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper takes a new look at the high-frequency range of the wave spectrum. The analysis is based on data sets from two recent field campaigns offshore Portugal and Crete carried out in the MAST II WAVEMOD project, data from the WADIC experiment in the North Sea, and deep-sea data from Haltenbanken and Voeringplataaet offshore Norway. In addition, the authors also show spectra obtained by spectral inversion of ERS-1 SAR imagery. The influence and calibration of wave-measuring instrumentation and the use of wavenumber spectra when comparing spectra from shallow water is emphasized.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF BEAM CHARACTERISTICS FOR PHOTO- ELECTRON BEAM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron beam is expected to be used in a wide field, such as X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering, pulse radiolysis, etc. The laser driven photo cathode rf gun system is...

  19. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  20. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  1. Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Thermal stresses in laminated beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  3. Thermal stresses in laminated beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  4. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was �¢����shell space�¢��� that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

  5. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, M.J.; Hsu, D.K.; Thompson, D.O.; Wormley, S.J.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  6. Signal conditioning circuitry design for instrumentation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Cory A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the current progress in the design, implementation, and validation of the signal conditioning circuitry used in a measurement instrumentation system. The purpose of this text is to document the current progress of a particular design in signal conditioning circuitry in an instrumentation system. The input of the signal conditioning circuitry comes from a piezoresistive transducer and the output will be fed to a 250 ksps, 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with an input range of 0-5 V. It is assumed that the maximum differential voltage amplitude input from the sensor is 20 mV with an unknown, but presumably high, sensor bandwidth. This text focuses on a specific design; however, the theory is presented in such a way that this text can be used as a basis for future designs.

  7. Comparison between an in-house vs. a commercial control system for beam line control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pieck, M. (Martin); Kasemir, K. U. (Kay-Uwe)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two independent magnet and vacuum control systems were implemented in the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility. The first one, for the High-Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) in context of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, used the in-house Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The second one, for the high-power proton beam-halo experiment (HALO-Channel) as an extension to the existing accelerator, is based on commercial products (National Instruments, LabVIEW). This paper will evaluate our experience during implementation, operation, and maintenance of these systems. It will include a discussion of various problems encountered and solutions implemented.

  8. The NSTX Central Instrumentation and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Oliaro; J. Dong; K. Tindall; P. Sichta

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Earlier this year the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieved ''first plasma''. The Central Instrumentation and Control System was used to support plasma operations. Major elements of the system include the Process Control System, Plasma Control System, Network System, Data Acquisition System, and Synchronization System. This paper will focus on the Process Control System. Topics include the architecture, hardware interface, operator interface, data management, and system performance.

  9. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  10. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  11. Instrumentation status of the low-b magnet systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darve, C.; /Fermilab; Balle, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Perin, A.; Vauthier, N.; /CERN

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-{beta} magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 10{sup 34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-{beta} magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents the instrumentation used to optimize the engineering process and operation of the final focusing/defocusing quadrupole magnets for the first years of operation.

  12. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  13. Initial study of the optical spectrum of the ISIS H{sup -} ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C. [ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Philippe, K. [Institut Universitaire de Technologie Paris Jussieu, University of Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The front end test stand is being constructed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, with the aim of producing a 60 mA, 2 ms, 50 Hz, perfectly chopped H{sup -} ion beam. To meet the beam requirements, a more detailed understanding of the ion source plasma is required. To this end, an initial study is made of the optical spectrum of the plasma using a digital spectrometer. The atomic and molecular emission lines of hydrogen and caesium are clearly distinguished and a quantitative comparison is made when the ion source is run in different conditions. The electron temperature is 0.6 eV and measured line widths vary by up to 75%.

  14. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  15. Observation of Nonlinear Self-Trapping of Broad Beams in Defocusing Waveguide Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, Francis H.; Haslinger, Franz; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Centre for Ultrahigh-Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Alexander, Tristram J. [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Centre for Ultrahigh-Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW-ADFA, Canberra ACT 2600 (Australia); Mitchell, Arnan [CUDOS, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne Vic 3001 (Australia)

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate experimentally the localization of broad optical beams in periodic arrays of optical waveguides with defocusing nonlinearity. This observation in optics is linked to nonlinear self-trapping of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms in stationary periodic potentials being associated with the generation of truncated nonlinear Bloch states, existing in the gaps of the linear transmission spectrum. We reveal that unlike gap solitons, these novel localized states can have an arbitrary width defined solely by the size of the input beam while independent of nonlinearity.

  16. A new measurement of Beam Asymmetry in Pion Photoproduction from the Neutron using CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Sokhan, D. Watts, D. Branford, F. Klein

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a preliminary analysis of the photon beam asymmetry observable (Sigma) from the photoproduction reaction channel gamma+ n -> p + pi-. This new data was obtained using the near-4pi CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Laboratory, USA, employing a linearly polarised photon beam with an energy range 1.1 - 2.3 GeV. The measurement will provide new data to address the poorly established neutron excitation spectrum and will greatly expand the sparse world data-set both in energy and angle.

  17. Interpretation of the UV spectrum of some stars with little reddening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Zagury

    2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of five stars is analysed and explained by the superimposition of two components. One is the extinction of the direct starlight, with an extinction coefficient A which varies as the inverse of the wavelength across all the UV. This linear dependence of extinction upon the inverse of wavelength prolongs to the UV the well known relation which exist in the optical between extinction and wavelength. The second component is an additional feature, superimposed on the extincted direct starlight. This feature is interpreted as starlight scattered by dust at close angular distance to the star, into the beam of the observation.

  18. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  19. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chuyu (Newport News, VA); Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  20. Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    1 Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Educating Michigan's Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): An Initial Exploration of Programming "The ASD-Michigan Project" August 3, 2011 Final Report Sara Bolt, Ph.D. and Summer Ferreri, Ph.D. College of Education Michigan State

  1. Emergent irreversibility and entanglement spectrum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Chamon; Alioscia Hamma; Eduardo R. Mucciolo

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of irreversibility when the dynamical evolution of a many-body system is described by a stochastic quantum circuit. Such evolution is more general than a Hamiltonian one, and since energy levels are not well defined, the well-established connection between the statistical fluctuations of the energy spectrum and irreversibility cannot be made. We show that the entanglement spectrum provides a more general connection. Irreversibility is marked by a failure of a disentangling algorithm and is preceded by the appearance of Wigner-Dyson statistical fluctuations in the entanglement spectrum. This analysis can be done at the wave-function level and offers an alternative route to study quantum chaos and quantum integrability.

  2. Analytical energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honghua Zhong; Qiongtao Xie; Xiwen Guan; Murray T. Batchelor; Kelin Gao; Chaohong Lee

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems described by non-parity-symmetric quantum Rabi models. A set of analytical solutions in terms of the confluent Heun functions and their analytical energy spectrum are obtained. The analytical energy spectrum includes regular and exceptional parts, which are both confirmed by direct numerical simulation. The regular part is determined by the zeros of the Wronskian for a pair of analytical solutions. The exceptional part is relevant to the isolated exact solutions and its energy eigenvalues are obtained by analyzing the truncation conditions for the confluent Heun functions. By analyzing the energy eigenvalues for exceptional points, we obtain the analytical conditions for the energy-level-crossings, which correspond to two-fold energy degeneracy.

  3. The QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Burch; Thomas A. DeGrand; Saumen Datta; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; Kostas Orginos; Robert Sugar; Doug Toussaint

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks - two light and one strange, and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a byproduct we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0++ (a0) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  4. BACKSCATTERING BY NON-SPHERICAL NATURAL PARTICLES: INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT, IOP'S,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    of the proposed instrument. Figure 1: Engineering view of the self-contained battery powered instrument. In light-spherical effects on backscatter. b. Characterization of scattering from terrigenous and biological size-sorted non

  5. Instrumentation for multiaxial mechanical testing of inhomogeneous elastic membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Ariel Marc

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design, development, and construction of an instrument for biaxial mechanical testing of inhomogeneous elastic membranes. The instrument incorporates an arrangement of linear motion stages for ...

  6. Development and Validation of an Occupational Skills Assessment Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and validation of an occupational skills assessment instrument is described. The instrument was designed to describe accurately a participant's actual level of occupational skills in a variety of job-related ...

  7. Chameleon Guitar : a physical heart in a digital instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoran, Amit (Amit Shlomo)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's tools and instruments, whether musical or graphical, fall into two very distinct classes, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. Traditional physical instruments offer a richness and uniqueness of qualities that ...

  8. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  9. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  10. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo De Vittori; Philippe Jetzer; Antoine Klein

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  11. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vittori, Lorenzo; Klein, Antoine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  12. KTeV beam systems design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocean, V.; Childress, S.; Coleman, R. [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary and secondary beams for the KTeV experiments E799-II and E832 are discussed. The specifications are presented and justified. The technical details of the implementation of the primary beam transport and stability are detailed. The target, beam dump, and radiation safety issues are discussed. The details of the collimation system for the pair of secondary beams are presented.

  13. Proposal for a Universal Test Mirror for Characterization of SlopeMeasuring Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Warwick, Tony; Noll,Tino; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf D.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of third generation light sources like theAdvanced Light Source (ALS) or BESSY II brought to a focus the need forhigh performance synchrotron optics with unprecedented tolerances forslope error and micro roughness. Proposed beam lines at Free ElectronLasers (FEL) require optical elements up to a length of one meter,characterized by a residual slope error in the range of 0.1murad (rms),and rms values of 0.1 nm for micro roughness. These optical elements mustbe inspected by highly accurate measuring instruments, providing ameasurement uncertainty lower than the specified accuracy of the surfaceunder test. It is essential that metrology devices in use at synchrotronlaboratories be precisely characterized and calibrated to achieve thistarget. In this paper we discuss a proposal for a Universal Test Mirror(UTM) as a realization of a high performance calibration instrument. Theinstrument would provide an ideal calibration surface to replicate aredundant surface under test of redundant figure. The application of asophisticated calibration instrument will allow the elimination of themajority of the systematic error from the error budget of an individualmeasurement of a particular optical element. We present the limitationsof existing methods, initial UTM design considerations, possiblecalibration algorithms, and an estimation of the expectedaccuracy.

  14. SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15 INSTRUCTION MANUAL Serial No._____________________ 8/94 World Precision Instruments, Inc. SP100i Syringe Pump Digital Infusion Syringe Pump #12;SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Contents GENERAL DESCRIPTION

  15. Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyc, Tomas

    Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics Tom´as Tyc, Lenka Herz symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically

  16. Head-on beam-beam tune shifts with high brightness beams in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; McPherson, A; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Schaumann, M; Suykerbuyk, R; Trad, G; Paret, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this experiment (fills 1765, 1766) we have collided bunches with highest brightness, i.e. small emittances and high intensities, to explore the achievable beam-beam tune shift for head-on collisions. Different parameters and filling schemes have been used for this experiment and tune shifts above 0.015 have been achieved in single collisions and above 0.030 for two collision points.

  17. Cavity Beam Position Monitor System for ATF2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boogert, Stewart; /Oxford U., JAI; Boorman, Gary; /Oxford U., JAI; Swinson, Christina; /Oxford U., JAI; Ainsworth, Robert; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Molloy, Stephen; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, Alexander; /KEK, Tsukuba; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; Urakawa, Junji; /KEK, Tsukuba; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Nelson, Janice; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC; White, Glen; /SLAC; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Hyoung-Suk; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /University Coll. London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Fermilab /Pohang Accelerator Lab.

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 38 C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (CBPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitizers. The current status of the BPM system is described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance. The ATF2 C-band system is performing well, with individual CBPM resolution approaching or at the design resolution of 50 nm. The changes in the CBPM calibration observed over three weeks can probably be attributed to thermal effects on the mixer electronics systems. The CW calibration tone power will be upgraded to monitor changes in the electronics gain and phase. The four S-band CBPMs are still to be investigated, the main problem associated with these cavities is a large cross coupling between the x and y ports. This combined with the large design dispersion in that degion makes the digital signal processing difficult, although various techniques exist to determine the cavity parameters and use these coupled signals for beam position determination.

  18. Planck 2015 results. VII. HFI TOI and beam processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leahy, J P; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Mottet, S; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has observed the full sky at six frequencies (100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz) in intensity and at four frequencies in linear polarization (100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz). In order to obtain sky maps, the time-ordered information (TOI) containing the detector and pointing samples must be processed and the angular response must be assessed. The full mission TOI is included in the Planck 2015 release. This paper describes the HFI TOI and beam processing for the 2015 release. HFI calibration and map-making are described in a companion paper. The main pipeline has been modified since the last release (2013 nominal mission in intensity only), by including a correction for the non-linearity of the warm readout and by improving the model of the bolometer time response. The beam processing is an essential tool that derives the angular response used in all the Planck science papers and we report an improvement in the effective beam window function uncertainty of more than a...

  19. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  20. Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Beta beam R&D status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact 08 1 Beta beam R&D status Elena Wildner, CERN on behalf of the Beta Beam Study Group EURISOL/Euronu #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact08Nufact08 Outline Recall, EURISOL Ion Production Loss Management Improvements New Program, EuroNu 2 #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - 5mm-mwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearchSOLICITATIONIMODI FICATIONCLASIC Science Team RelatedgovInstruments5mm-mwr

  2. ARM - Campaign Instrument - kandz-cm21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentsisland-guest-instruments Comments?

  3. Mars Rover's ChemCam Instrument gets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHz WaterMarkRover's ChemCam Instrument

  4. Green Wireless Cognition: Future Efficient Spectrum Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Underwater Vehicles The project aims to develop an unmanned fully autonomous under water vehicles (UWV Spectrum Wireless Sensor in Underwater Networks * Bell's Law of Computer Classes formulated by Gordon Bell the challenges of underwater communications by an integration of sensor and multihop networks. Human

  5. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  6. The hadron spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peardon, Mike [School of Mathematics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice spectroscopy is becoming increasingly sophisticated. This review will introduce the methodology and describe progress made recently probing the spectrum of excitations of QCD. The focus will be on describing new developments that enable excited states, exotic quantum numbers and resonances to be explored.

  7. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt) [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  8. Accommodating subject and instrument variations in spectroscopic determinations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rowe, Robert K. (Corrales, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring a biological attribute, such as the concentration of an analyte, particularly a blood analyte in tissue such as glucose. The method utilizes spectrographic techniques in conjunction with an improved instrument-tailored or subject-tailored calibration model. In a calibration phase, calibration model data is modified to reduce or eliminate instrument-specific attributes, resulting in a calibration data set modeling intra-instrument or intra-subject variation. In a prediction phase, the prediction process is tailored for each target instrument separately using a minimal number of spectral measurements from each instrument or subject.

  9. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  10. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  11. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  12. Commissioning of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter for the UH 88-inch telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Masiero; Klaus Hodapp; Dave Harrington; Haosheng Lin

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the design, calibration method, and initial results of the Dual-Beam Imaging Polarimeter (DBIP). This new instrument is designed to measure the optical polarization properties of point sources, in particular Main Belt asteroids. This instrument interfaces between the Tek 2048x2048 camera and the University of Hawaii's 88-inch telescope, and is available for facility use. Using DBIP we are able to measure linear polarization with a 1-sigma Poisson signal noise of 0.03% per measurement and a systematic error of order 0.06% +/- 0.02%. Additionally, we discuss measurements of the polarization of the asteroid 16 Psyche which were taken as part of the instrument commissioning. We confirm Psyche's negative polarization of -1.037% +/- 0.006% but find no significant modulation of the signal with rotation above the 0.05% polarization level.

  13. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  14. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Smith, K. M.; Bogdan, M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Nixon, G. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Vanderlinde, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Davis, R.; Dickinson, C., E-mail: newburgh@princeton.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the cosmic microwave background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales({approx}1 Degree-Sign ). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters that form the focal planes use a compact design based on high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l {approx} 25-975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance, and sources of systematic error of the instrument.

  15. Instrument Series: Spectroscopy & Diffraction High-Resolution RBS System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PIXE, PESA, and STIM Ì Surface analysis and ion beam analysis in one UHV chamber Ì Manufacturer: NEC and ion beam analysis in one chamber ­ suite of surface analysis capabilities (XPS, ISS, oxygen plasma source, and sputter cleaning) and ion beam analysis (RBS/channeling, NRA, PIXE, and PIGE) in one chamber

  16. C H A P T E R F O U R T E E N Single-Molecule Dual-Beam Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudich, James A.

    C H A P T E R F O U R T E E N Single-Molecule Dual-Beam Optical Trap Analysis of Protein Structure. Introduction 322 2. Insights into Myosin Function Using a Dual-Beam Optical Trap 322 3. Optical Trap Instrumentation 324 3.1. Basic concept of an optical trap 324 3.2. Design and components 325 3.3. Noise

  17. Harmonic analysis of irradiation asymmetry for cylindrical implosions driven by high-frequency rotating ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, Antoine; Tahir, Naeem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical implosions driven by intense heavy ions beams should be instrumental in a near future to study High Energy Density Matter. By rotating the beam by means of a high frequency wobbler, it should be possible to deposit energy in the outer layers of a cylinder, compressing the material deposited in its core. The beam temporal profile should however generate an inevitable irradiation asymmetry likely to feed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) during the implosion phase. In this paper, we compute the Fourier components of the target irradiation in order to make the junction with previous works on RTI performed in this setting. Implementing a 1D and 2D beam models, we find these components can be expressed exactly in terms of the Fourier transform of the temporal beam profile. If $T$ is the beam duration and $\\Omega$ its rotation frequency, "magic products" $\\Omega T$ can be identified which cancel the first harmonic of the deposited density, resulting in an improved irradiation symmetry.

  18. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  19. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  20. The parent population of flat-spectrum radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berton, Marco; Ciroi, Stefano; Cracco, Valentina; La Mura, Giovanni; Lister, Matthew L; Mathur, Smita; Peterson, Bradley M; Richards, Joseph L; Rafanelli, Piero

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat-spectrum radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are a recently discovered class of $\\gamma$-ray emitting Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), that exhibit some blazar-like properties which are explained with the presence of a relativistic jet viewed at small angles. When blazars are observed at larger angles they appear as radio-galaxies, and we expect to observe an analogue parent population for beamed NLS1s. However, the number of known NLS1s with the jet viewed at large angles is not enough. Therefore, we tried to understand the origin of this deficit. Current hypotheses about the nature of parent sources are steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s, radio-quiet NLS1s and disk-hosted radio-galaxies. To test these hypotheses we built three samples of candidate sources plus a control sample, and calculated their black hole mass and Eddington ratio using their optical spectra. We then performed a Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test to investigate the compatibility of our different samples with a beamed popula...

  1. Characterization of Dosimetry of the BMRR Horizontal Thimble Tubes and Broad Beam Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu,J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was a 5 mega-watt, light-water cooled and heavy-graphite moderated research facility. It has two shutter-equipped treatment rooms, three horizontally extended thimble tubes, and an ex-core broad beam facility. The three experimental thimbles, or activation ports, external to the reactor tank were designed for several uses, including the investigations on diagnostic and therapeutic methods using radioactive isotopes of very short half-life, the analysis of radiation exposure on tissue-equivalent materials using a collimated neutron beam, and the evaluation of dose effects on biological cells to improve medical treatment. At the broad beam facility where the distribution of thermal neutrons was essential uniform, a wide variety of mammalian whole-body exposures were studied using animals such as burros or mice. Also studied at the broad beam were whole-body phantom experiments, involving the use of a neutron or photon beam streaming through a screen to obtain the flux spectrum suitable for dose analysis on the sugar-urea-water mixture, a tissue-equivalent material. Calculations of the flux and the dose at beam ports based on Monte Carlo particle-transport code were performed, and measurements conducted at the same tally locations were made using bare or cadmium-covered gold foils. Analytical results, which show good agreement with measurement data, are presented in the paper.

  2. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouhani, M. H.; Maraghechi, B.; Saberi, H. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A local and nonlinear simulation of two-beam and tapered free-electron laser (FEL) is presented self-consistently. The slippage of the electromagnetic wave with respect to the electron beam is ignored and the relativistic electron beams are assumed to be cold. The fundamental resonance and the third harmonic radiation of the beam with lower energy are considered, in which the third harmonic is at the fundamental resonance of the beam with higher energy. The wiggler field is set to decrease linearly when the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point of tapering and the slope of the reduction in the amplitude of wiggler are found by successive run of the code. Using the slowly varying envelope approximation, a set of nonlinear equations is derived which describes this system. These equations are solved numerically by the Runge-Kutta method. This method can be used to improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions of spectrum.

  3. A ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect in a detached double WD binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shporer, Avi; Steinfadt, Justin D R; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass ratio and low luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during 3 nights at the 2.0m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter, and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^(-3), consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic radial velocity amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due t...

  4. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  5. Finding beam focus errors automatically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

  6. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  7. Thermographic calorimetry of the neutral beam injectors heating beams at TJ-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.; Doncel, J.; Botija, J.; Wolfers, G.; Alonso, J.; Acedo, M.; Sanchez, E.; Marcon, G.; Weber, M.; Carrasco, R.; Sarasola, X.; Zurro, B.; Tera, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion/Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new beam diagnostic based on infrared thermography has been developed for the neutral beam injectors of the stellarator TJ-II. A highly anisotropic movable target intercepts the beam at its entrance into the stellarator. The thermal print of the beam is captured with a high resolution infrared camera. The infrared images of the target can be translated, with the appropriate analysis, into power density patterns of the beam. The system is calibrated in situ with two thermocouples adiabatically mounted in the target. The two-dimensional beam power density distribution can be accurately characterized allowing beam optimization with respect to the different parameters involved in the beam formation and transport.

  8. Perturbation spectrum in inflation with cutoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kempf; J. C. Niemeyer

    2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been pointed out that the perturbation spectrum predicted by inflation may be sensitive to a natural ultraviolet cutoff, thus potentially providing an experimentally accessible window to aspects of Planck scale physics. A priori, a natural ultraviolet cutoff could take any form, but a fairly general classification of possible Planck scale cutoffs has been given. One of those categorized cutoffs, also appearing in various studies of quantum gravity and string theory, has recently been implemented into the standard inflationary scenario. Here, we continue this approach by investigating its effects on the predicted perturbation spectrum. We find that the size of the effect depends sensitively on the scale separation between cutoff and horizon during inflation.

  9. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  10. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Langford

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  11. Curvature perturbation spectrum from false vacuum inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1390 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1390 (United States); Sasaki, Misao [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the inflationary cosmology it occurs frequently that the inflaton field is trapped in a local, transient minimum with non-zero vacuum energy. The difficulty regarding the curvature perturbation produced during such a stage is that classically the inflaton does not move so that the comoving hypersurfaces are not well defined at linear order in the scalar field perturbation. In this paper, assuming a mechanism of trapping which resembles a high temperature correction to the potential, we explicitly calculate for the first time the resulting power spectrum of the curvature perturbation by evaluating the quantum two-point correlation function directly. The spectrum is steeply blue with the spectral index n{sub R} = 4.

  12. Curvature perturbation spectrum from false vacuum inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong; Misao Sasaki

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the inflationary cosmology it occurs frequently that the inflaton field is trapped in a local, transient minimum with non-zero vacuum energy. The difficulty regarding the curvature perturbation produced during such a stage is that classically the inflaton does not move so that the comoving hypersurfaces are not well defined at linear order in the scalar field perturbation. In this paper, assuming a mechanism of trapping which resembles a high temperature correction to the potential, we explicitly calculate for the first time the resulting power spectrum of the curvature perturbation by evaluating the quantum two-point correlation function directly. The spectrum is steeply blue with the spectral index n_R = 4.

  13. Curvature perturbation spectrum from false vacuum inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1390 (United States)

    2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the inflationary cosmology it occurs frequently that the inflaton field is trapped in a local, transient minimum with non-zero vacuum energy. The difficulty regarding the curvature perturbation produced during such a stage is that classically the inflaton does not move so that the comoving hypersurfaces are not well defined at linear order in the scalar field perturbation. In this paper, assuming a mechanism of trapping which resembles a high temperature correction to the potential, we explicitly calculate for the first time the resulting power spectrum of the curvature perturbation by evaluating the quantum two-point correlation function directly. The spectrum is steeply blue with the spectral index n{sub R} = 4.

  14. Quantized black holes, their spectrum and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under quite natural general assumptions, the following results are obtained. The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The general structure of the horizon spectrum is found. In the special case of loop quantum gravity, the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is found. The discrete spectrum of thermal radiation of a black hole fits the Wien profile. The natural widths of the lines are much smaller than the distances between them. The total intensity of the thermal radiation is estimated. If the density of quantized primordial black holes is close to the present upper limit on the dark-matter density in our Solar system, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation.

  15. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Crawford

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of Cosmic Microwave Background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (l ~ 100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime -- i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  16. Using instrument scraper surveys for corrosion repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhnoukh, S.R.; Baghabrah, M.A. (Aramco (SA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a program for overall pipe line repair. This program was implemented to maintain pipe line integrity and for identifying problem areas which require reconditioning or replacing by: reviewing pipe line leak history; checking periodically lifetime expectancy and integrity of pipe coatings; using cathodic protection annual survey results to locate low potential areas (close-interval survey is needed to identify the exact location of corrosion); and hydrotesting the pipe line (using leaks or ruptures from the hydrotest to identify problem areas). The pipe line revalidation plan is insufficient for identifying pipe line leaks. Instrumented pig testing provides more accurate and reliable ways of testing the pipe line for internal or external corrosion or defects.

  17. Assessing the local windfield with instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zambrano, T.G.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concerns the development and testing of a technique for the initial screening and evaluation of potential sites for wind-energy conversion systems (WECS). The methodology was developed through a realistic siting exercise. The siting exercise involved measurements of winds along the surface and winds aloft using a relatively new instrument system, the Tethered Aerodynamic Lifting Anemometer (TALA) kite; notation of ecological factors such as vegetation flagging, soil erosion and site exposure, and verification of an area best suited for wind-energy development by establishing and maintaining a wind monitoring network. The siting exercise was carried out in an approximately 100-square-mile region of the Tehachapi Mountains of Southern California. The results showed that a comprehensive site survey involving field measurements, ecological survey, and wind-monitoring can be an effective tool for preliminary evaluation of WECS sites.

  18. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Steven A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  19. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  20. SUNRISE: INSTRUMENT, MISSION, DATA, AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Danilovic, S.; Feller, A.; Gandorfer, A.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Bonet, J. A.; Pillet, V. MartInez [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 3004, E-18080, Granada (Spain); Domingo, V.; Palacios, J. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Gonzalez, N. Bello; Berkefeld, T.; Franz, M.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Title, A. M., E-mail: solanki@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysical Lab., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory consists of a 1 m aperture Gregory telescope, a UV filter imager, an imaging vector polarimeter, an image stabilization system, and further infrastructure. The first science flight of SUNRISE yielded high-quality data that revealed the structure, dynamics, and evolution of solar convection, oscillations, and magnetic fields at a resolution of around 100 km in the quiet Sun. After a brief description of instruments and data, the first qualitative results are presented. In contrast to earlier observations, we clearly see granulation at 214 nm. Images in Ca II H display narrow, short-lived dark intergranular lanes between the bright edges of granules. The very small-scale, mixed-polarity internetwork fields are found to be highly dynamic. A significant increase in detectable magnetic flux is found after phase-diversity-related reconstruction of polarization maps, indicating that the polarities are mixed right down to the spatial resolution limit and probably beyond.

  1. SRS delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studley, R.V. [Westinghouse SRC, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analytical systems measuring delayed neutrons have been used for safeguards measurements at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A predecessor, the 252Cf Activation Analysis Facility installed at the Savannah River Technology Center (formally SR Laboratory) has been used since 1974 to analyze small samples, measuring both delayed neutrons and gammas. The six shufflers, plus one currently being fabricated, were developed, designed and fabricated by the LANL N-1 group. These shufflers have provided safeguards measurements of product (2 each), in-process scrap (2 each plus a conceptual replacement) and process waste (2 each plus one being fabricated). One shuffler for scrap assay was the first shuffler to be installed (1978) in a process. Another (waste) was the first installed in a process capable of assaying barrels. A third (waste) is the first pass-through model and a fourth (product) is the most precise ({+-}.12%) and accurate NDA instrument yet produced.

  2. Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

  3. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  4. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  5. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  6. antinucleon beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  7. automatic beam alignment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  8. accidental beam loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  9. antiparticle beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  10. accelerating beam stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  11. accelerated oxygen-14 beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  12. accelerator school beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  13. Analysis of the Failures and Corrective Actions for the LHC Cryogenics Radiation Tolerant Electronics and its Field Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balle, Ch; Vauthier, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC cryogenic system radiation tolerant electronics and their associated field instruments have been in nominal conditions since before the commissioning of the first LHC beams in September 2008. This system is made of about 15’000 field instruments (thermometers, pressure sensors, liquid helium level gauges, electrical heaters and position switches), 7’500 electronic cards and 853 electronic crates. Since mid-2008 a software tool has been deployed, this allows an operator to report a problem and then lists the corrective actions. The tool is a great help in detecting recurrent problems that may be tackled by a hardware or software consolidation. The corrective actions range from simple resets, exchange of defective equipment, repair of electrical connectors, etc. However a recurrent problem that heals by itself is present on some channels. This type of fault is extremely difficult to diagnose and it appears as a temporary opening of an electrical circuit; its duration can range from a few minutes to ...

  14. Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

  15. On the Characteristics of Spectrum-Agile Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xin

    , both the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the federal government have made important1 On the Characteristics of Spectrum-Agile Communication Networks Xin Liu Wei Wang Department almost all spectrum suitable for wireless communications have been allocated, preliminary studies

  16. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  17. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Cobb, Donald D. (Los Alamos, NM); Robiscoe, Richard T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  18. On Gaussian Beams Described by Jacobi's Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven T.

    Gaussian beams describe the amplitude and phase of rays and are widely used to model acoustic propagation. This paper describes four new results in the theory of Gaussian beams. (1) A new version of the ?ervený equations ...

  19. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  20. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  1. 2H Evaporator CP class instrumentation uncertainties evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, E.

    1994-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaporator Pot Temperature Instrumentations and the Steam Condensate Gamma Monitors are two instrumentation systems in the 2H Evaporator facilities that are classified as the critical protection. The temperature high alarm and interlock circuit and the temperature recorder circuit of the pot temperature instrumentation loop are described. From the gamma monitor loop, the high gamma alarm and interlock circuit, failure alarm and interlock circuit, cesium activity recorder circuit, and americium activity recorder circuit are described. (GHH)

  2. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Instrumentation and Control, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Instrumentation and Control Fundamentals Handbook personnel, and the technical staff facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of instrumentation and control systems. The handbook includes information on temperature, pressure, flow, and level detection systems; position indication systems; process control systems; and radiation detection principles. This information will provide personnel with an understanding of the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility instrumentation and control systems.

  3. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Instrumentation and Control, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Instrumentation and Control Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of instrumentation and control systems. The handbook includes information on temperature, pressure, flow, and level detection systems; position indication systems; process control systems; and radiation detection principles. This information will provide personnel with an understanding of the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility instrumentation and control systems.

  4. Multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communication. A method includes individually spread-spectrum modulating at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers, wherein the resulting individually spread-spectrum modulated at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers are substantially mutually orthogonal with respect to both frequency division multiplexing and spread-spectrum modulation.

  5. QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration 5/26/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors.  The Facility Representative observes...

  6. analytical instrumentation handbook: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Three instrumental approaches to process analytical chemistry are introduced.First, a field portable, multiwavelength,...

  7. adaptive nonparametric instrumental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both selects Faraway, Julian 27 Spanish Version of the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (SSI) Adapted to Physical Education CiteSeer Summary: The objective of this research was to...

  8. activation instrumental analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    car electronics industry. There are currently many electronic systems improving the safety Wieringa, Roel 17 Runtime Instrumentation for Precise Flow-Sensitive Type Analysis...

  9. Radiation Protection Instrument Manual, Revision 1, PNL-MA-562

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    PNL-MA-562 This manual provides specific information for operating and using portable radiological monitoring instruments available for use on the Hanford Site.

  10. automatic stapling instrument: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MUSICAL INSTRUMENT DETECTOR BY USING EVOLUTIONARY LEARNING METHOD Yoshiyuki Kobayashi SONY Corporation, Japan Yoshiyuki.Kobayashi@jp.sony.com ABSTRACT This paper presents a novel...

  11. CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CLEAN-Linking International Instruments to Support Low Emission Planning Webinar- TNAs, NAMAs, LEDS and Roadmaps Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  12. Orders of Magnitude: Three Works for Instruments and Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einbond, Aaron Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EINBOND for viola and live electronics Indifferent (q » 60-piano, percussion, and electronics WHAT THE BLIND SEE tofor Instruments and Electronics by Aaron Michael Einbond

  13. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 POSTER SESSION I: INSTRUMENT FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    -of-the-art instrument and the research that we will do with it. Kohout T. Elbra T. Pesonen L. J. Schnabl P. Slechta S

  14. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  15. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  16. Precision Reactor e Spectrum Measurements: Recent Results and PROSPECTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precision Reactor e Spectrum Measurements: Recent Results and PROSPECTs Bryce Littlejohn Illinois;Outline · Intro: Reactor e Flux and Spectrum Predictions · Reactor Anomaly and recent flux for PROSPECT 2 #12;Outline · Intro: Reactor e Flux and Spectrum Predictions · Reactor Anomaly and recent flux

  17. High Gradient Two-Beam Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kazakov, S. Yu. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kuzikov, S. V. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-gradient two-beam electron accelerator structure using detuned cavities is described. A self-consistent theory based on a circuit model is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam. Experimental efforts are being carried out to demonstrate this acceleration concept.

  18. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  19. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Representation of the First Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 41 Figure 3.12 Schematic Representation of the Second Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh... of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 42 Figure 3.13 Schematic Representation of the Third Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 44...

  20. JET neutral beam power upgrade Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JET neutral beam power upgrade Introduction A tokamak is a complex assembly, a system of systems the challenging requirements that fusion demands. The neutral beam heating system and its upgrade for the JET systems) are the main plasma heating scheme on fusion devices such as JET and ITER. The JET neutral beam

  1. Beam heat load in superconducting wigglers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casalbuoni, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam heat load is a fundamental input parameter for the design of superconducting wigglers since it is needed to specify the cooling power. In this presentation I will review the possible beam heat load sources and the measurements of beam heat load performed and planned onto the cold vacuum chambers installed at different synchrotron light sources.

  2. Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    buckling L length of beam vx lateral de¯ection measured in the minor- axis direction (which rotates with yLateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

  3. Results of long range beam-beam studies and observations during operation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied possible limitations due to the long range beam-beam effects in the LHC. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, we have reduced the crossing angles to enhance long range beam-beam effects to evaluate their influence on dynamic aperture and losses. Experience from operation with reduced separation was analysed and provides additional evidence.

  4. Instrumentation development for real time brainwave monitoring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Lawrence Frederick; Clough, Benjamin W.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human brain functions through a chemically-induced biological process which operates in a manner similar to electrical systems. The signal resulting from this biochemical process can actually be monitored and read using tools and having patterns similar to those found in electrical and electronics engineering. The primary signature of this electrical activity is the ''brain wave'', which looks remarkably similar to the output of many electrical systems. Likewise, the device currently used in medical arenas to read brain electrical activity is the electroencephalogram (EEG) which is synonymous with a multi-channel oscilloscope reading. Brain wave readings and recordings for medical purposes are traditionally taken in clinical settings such as hospitals, laboratories or diagnostic clinics. The signal is captured via externally applied scalp electrodes using semi-viscous gel to reduce impedance. The signal will be in the 10 to 100 microvolt range. In other instances, where surgeons are attempting to isolate particular types of minute brain signals, the electrodes may actually be temporarily implanted in the brain during a preliminary procedure. The current configurations of equipment required for EEGs involve large recording instruments, many electrodes, wires, and large amounts of hard disk space devoted to storing large files of brain wave data which are then eventually analyzed for patterns of concern. Advances in sensors, signal processing, data storage and microelectronics over the last decade would seem to have paved the way for the realization of devices capable of ''real time'' external monitoring, and possible assessment, of brain activity. A myriad of applications for such a capability are likewise presenting themselves, including the ability to assess brain functioning, level of functioning and malfunctioning. Our plan is to develop the sensors, signal processing, and portable instrumentation package which could capture, analyze, and communicate information on brain activity which could be of use to the individual, medical personnel or in other potential arenas. To take this option one step further, one might foresee that the signal would be captured, analyzed, and communicated to a person or device and which would result an action or reaction by that person or device. It is envisioned that ultimately a system would include a sensor detection mechanism, transmitter, receiver, microprocessor and associated memory, and audio and/or visual alert system. If successful in prototyping, the device could be considered for eventual implementation in ASIC form or as a fully integrated CMOS microsystem.

  5. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  6. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  7. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  8. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  9. Calibration facility for environment dosimetry instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bercea, Sorin; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constantin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului St, Magurele, Jud Ilfov, P.O.B. MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last ten years, the nuclear activities, as well as the major nuclear events (see Fukushima accident) had an increasing impact on the environment, merely by contamination with radioactive materials. The most conferment way to quickly identify the presence of some radioactive elements in the environment, is to measure the dose-equivalent rate H. In this situation, information concerning the values of H due only to the natural radiation background must exist. Usually, the values of H due to the natural radiation background, are very low (?10{sup ?9} - 10{sup ?8} Sv/h). A correct measurement of H in this range involve a performing calibration of the measuring instruments in the measuring range corresponding to the natural radiation background lead to important problems due to the presence of the natural background itself the best way to overlap this difficulty is to set up the calibration stand in an area with very low natural radiation background. In Romania, we identified an area with such special conditions at 200 m dept, in a salt mine. This paper deals with the necessary requirements for such a calibration facility, as well as with the calibration stand itself. The paper includes also, a description of the calibration stand (and images) as well as the radiological and metrological parameters. This calibration facilities for environment dosimetry is one of the few laboratories in this field in Europe.

  10. Bilinear control of discrete spectrum Schrödinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais Ammari; Zied Ammari

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The bilinear control problem of the Schr\\"odinger equation $i\\frac{\\partial}{\\partial t}\\psi(t)$ $=(A+u(t) B)\\psi(t)$, where $u(t)$ is the control function, is investigated through topological irreducibility of the set $\\mathfrak{M}=\\{e^{-it (A+u B)}, u\\in \\mathbb{R}, t>0\\}$ of bounded operators. This allows to prove the approximate controllability of such systems when the uncontrolled Hamiltonian $A$ has a simple discrete spectrum and under an appropriate assumption on $B$.

  11. Spectrum Policy Seminar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |SolarSpecial Report:Spectrum Policy Seminar

  12. Spectrum Policy Seminar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 June 2015Spectrum Policy

  13. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  14. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  15. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  16. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  17. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  18. Fresnel diffraction patterns as accelerating beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Wu, Zhenkun; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that beams originating from Fresnel diffraction patterns are self-accelerating in free space. In addition to accelerating and self-healing, they also exhibit parabolic deceleration property, which is in stark contrast to other accelerating beams. We find that the trajectory of Fresnel paraxial accelerating beams is similar to that of nonparaxial Weber beams. Decelerating and accelerating regions are separated by a critical propagation distance, at which no acceleration is present. During deceleration, the Fresnel diffraction beams undergo self-smoothing, in which oscillations of the diffracted waves gradually focus and smooth out at the critical distance.

  19. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  20. Scattering apodizer for laser beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.; Hagen, W.F.; Boyd, R.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for apodizing a laser beam to smooth out the production of diffraction peaks due to optical discontinuities in the path of the laser beam, such method comprising introduction of a pattern of scattering elements for reducing the peak intensity in the region of such optical discontinuities, such pattern having smoothly tapering boundaries in which the distribution density of the scattering elements is tapered gradually to produce small gradients in the distribution density, such pattern of scattering elements being effective to reduce and smooth out the diffraction effects which would otherwise be produced. The apodizer pattern may be produced by selectively blasting a surface of a transparent member with fine abrasive particles to produce a multitude of minute pits. In one embodiment, a scattering apodizer pattern is employed to overcome diffraction patterns in a multiple element crystal array for harmonic conversion of a laser beam. The interstices and the supporting grid between the crystal elements are obscured by the gradually tapered apodizer pattern of scattering elements.