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1

Using ns2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The network simulator (ns) v. 2 was developed by UCB, LLNL, Xerox PARC, USC/ICI, and is currently maintained by USC/ISI. ...

2

The ns Manual (formerly ns Notes and Documentation)1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

version of Tcl; and (3) the interface code to the OTcl interpreter is separate from the main simulator. Ns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.3 Class Tcl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.3.1 Obtain a Reference to the class Tcl instance

Sirer, Emin Gun

3

TCL: Comandi utili versione 3.3 set ns [new Simulator] crea un oggetto simulatore di nome ns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TCL: Comandi utili versione 3.3 set ns [new Simulator] crea un oggetto simulatore di nome ns $ns posto 0) $argv0 (diverso da [lindex argv 0]) restituisce il nome del file .tcl corrente [$ns get

Bregni, Stefano

4

Host cell killing by the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex: NS3 alone is sufficient to recruit caspase-8-based apoptotic pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Nile Virus (WNV) non-structural proteins 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) constitute the proteolytic complex that mediates the cleavage and processing of the viral polyprotein. NS3 recruits NS2B and NS5 proteins to direct protease and replication activities. In an effort to investigate the biology of the viral protease, we cloned cDNA encoding the NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex from brain tissue of a WNV-infected dead crow, collected from the Lower Merion area (Merion strain). Expression of the NS2B-NS3 gene cassette induced apoptosis within 48 h of transfection. Electron microscopic analysis of NS2B-NS3-transfected cells revealed ultra-structural changes that are typical of apoptotic cells including membrane blebbing, nuclear disintegration and cytoplasmic vacuolations. The role of NS3 or NS2B in contributing to host cell apoptosis was examined. NS3 alone triggers the apoptotic pathways involving caspases-8 and -3. Experimental results from the use of caspase-specific inhibitors and caspase-8 siRNA demonstrated that the activation of caspase-8 was essential to initiate apoptotic signaling in NS3-expressing cells. Downstream of caspase-3 activation, we observed nuclear membrane ruptures and cleavage of the DNA-repair enzyme, PARP in NS3-expressing cells. Nuclear herniations due to NS3 expression were absent in the cells treated with a caspase-3 inhibitor. Expression of protease and helicase domains themselves was sufficient to trigger apoptosis generating insight into the apoptotic pathways triggered by NS3 from WNV.

Ramanathan, Mathura P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chambers, Jerome A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pankhong, Panyupa [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Chattergoon, Michael [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Attatippaholkun, Watcharee [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Dang, Kesen [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Shah, Neelima [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Weiner, David B. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 422 Curie Blvd., 505 Stellar-Chance Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: dbweiner@mail.med.upenn.edu

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

3-1 Computer and Network Services (CaNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS User Resources CaNS User Resources Computer and Network Services (CaNS) The primary mission of the CaNS Group is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific research and business requirements. In supporting EMSL's growing business and research needs regarding information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the CaNS Group's efforts involves providing customer support to EMSL researchers and offsite users. For

6

Microsoft Word - CaNS_2006c.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS Overview CaNS Overview Section 3-1-1 Computing and Networking Services The primary mission of Computing and Networking Services (CaNS) is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific and business requirements. In supporting growing business and research needs of EMSL in the area of information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the efforts undertaken by CaNS staff members involves

7

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Parsons NS Stevens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parsons NS Stevens Parsons NS Stevens Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the Parsons NS Stevens archive, sorted by date. Teams Prove Solar Houses Can Be Affordable Tuesday, September 27, 2011 By Carol Anna Note: Corrections to the Affordability Contest results were announced Sept. 30, 2011. Proving that the cost of "going green" is decreasing, two teams tied for first place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 Affordability Contest. Parsons The New School for Design and Stevens Institute of Technology (which includes Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy at The New School) built Empowerhouse for less than $230,000. Purdue University's INhome came in at just less than $250,000. These teams earned 100 points for achieving a

8

XII SoNS School of Neutron Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XII School of Neutron Scattering (SoNS) XII School of Neutron Scattering (SoNS) "Francesco Paolo Ricci" "Introduction to the theory and techniques of neutron scattering and applications to Cultural Heritage" 30 April - 9 May 2014 A Course within the International School of Solid State Physics ETTORE MAJORANA FOUNDATION AND CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC CULTURE, Erice (I) Application deadline: 1 st April 2014 Application is now open for the XII School of Neutron Scattering (SoNS) "Francesco Paolo Ricci": Introduction to the theory and techniques of neutron scattering and applications to Cultural Heritage. The school will be held at the ETTORE MAJORANA FOUNDATION AND CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC CULTURE, Erice (Sicily, I) as a specialized course within the International School of Solid State Physics (Director: Giorgio Benedek), between the 30

9

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Parsons NS Stevens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Parsons NS Stevens' 'Parsons NS Stevens' European Teams Top Architecture and Communications Contests Friday, October 11, 2013 By Solar Decathlon Czech Technical University took first place in the highly competitive Architecture Contest and Vienna University of Technology received top honors in the Communications Contest this morning at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013. A jury of professional architects determined the Architecture Contest winners by assessing each house's architectural elements, environmental compatibility and occupant comfort, design inspiration, and construction specifications. Photo of the interior of AIR House. The interior of Czech Technical University's AIR House, which won first place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Architecture

10

Parsons NS Stevens Solar Decathlon 2011 Construction Drawings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARSONS NS STEVENS. FINAL CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 08.11.2011 PARSONS NS STEVENS. FINAL CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 08.11.2011 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT P R O D U C E D B Y A N A U T O D E S K S T U D E N T P R O D U C T PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT A101 1 Ref 1 Ref 1 Ref 1 Ref 101 1i 1i 1T A101 1 SIM 1i 1A 1T 1P 01 A4 A101 R @ 7 1/2" 20 1L 1T WINDOW TAG SPOT ELEVTATION STAIR TAG WALL TAG REVISON TAG CALLOUT HEAD ROOM TAG NUMBER FLOOR TAG ELECTRICAL FIXTURE TAG EQUIPMENT TAG DOOR TAG LIGHTING FIXTURE DETAIL ITEM CASEWORK TAG CEILING TAG INTERIOR ELEVATION TAG SECTION HEAD KEY NOTE TAG CENTERLINE ROOM NAME 101 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E SHEET TITLE LOT NUMBER DRAWN BY CHECKED BY COPYRIGHT TEAM NAME ADDRESS CONTACT CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN MARK DATE DESCRIPTION CLIENT US Department of Energy

11

Folding Proteins at 500 ns/hour with Work Queue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractMolecular modeling is a field that traditionally has large computational costs. Until recently, most simulation techniques relied on long trajectories, which inherently have poor scalability. A new class of methods is proposed that requires only a large number of short calculations, and for which minimal communication between computer nodes is required. We considered one of the more accurate variants called Accelerated Weighted Ensemble Dynamics (AWE) and for which distributed computing can be made efficient. We implemented AWE using the Work Queue framework for task management and applied it to an all atom protein model (Fip35 WW domain). We can run with excellent scalability by simultaneously utilizing heterogeneous resources from multiple computing platforms such as clouds (Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure), dedicated clusters, grids, on multiple architectures (CPU/GPU, 32/64bit), and in a dynamic environment in which processes are regularly added or removed from the pool. This has allowed us to achieve an aggregate sampling rate of over 500 ns/hour. As a comparison, a single process typically achieves 0.1 ns/hour. I.

Badi Abdul-wahid; Li Yu; Dinesh Rajan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Instructions to install the Wimax extension for NS-2 Content I ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... steps need to be followed to install the wimax extension: step1: add the wimax directory in the ns installation step2: add the tcl/wimax directory step3 ...

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Three Conformational Snapshots of the Hepatitis Virus NS3 Helicase Reveal a Ratchet Translocation Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virally encoded superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase (NS3h) is essential for the replication of hepatitis C virus, a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Efforts to elucidate the function of NS3h and to develop inhibitors against it, however, have been hampered by limited understanding of its molecular mechanism. Here we show x-ray crystal structures for a set of NS3h complexes, including ground-state and transition-state ternary complexes captured with ATP mimics (ADP {center_dot} BeF{sub 3} and ADP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -}). These structures provide, for the first time, three conformational snapshots demonstrating the molecular basis of action for a SF2 helicase. Upon nucleotide binding, overall domain rotation along with structural transitions in motif V and the bound DNA leads to the release of one base from the substrate base-stacking row and the loss of several interactions between NS3h and the 3{prime} DNA segment. As nucleotide hydrolysis proceeds into the transition state, stretching of a 'spring' helix and another overall conformational change couples rearrangement of the (d)NTPase active site to additional hydrogen-bonding between NS3h and DNA. Together with biochemistry, these results demonstrate a 'ratchet' mechanism involved in the unidirectional translocation and define the step size of NS3h as one base per nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. These findings suggest feasible strategies for developing specific inhibitors to block the action of this attractive, yet largely unexplored drug target.

Gu, M.; Rice, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

WiFi-Nano: Reclaiming WiFi Efficiency Through 800 ns Eugenio Magistretti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WiFi-Nano: Reclaiming WiFi Efficiency Through 800 ns Slots Eugenio Magistretti Rice University of WiFi has deteriorated from over 80% at 1 Mbps to under 10% at 1 Gbps. In this paper, we propose WiFi-Nano, thereby reducing ack overhead. We validate the effectiveness of WiFi-Nano through im- plementation

Mellor-Crummey, John

15

An underwater acoustic channel model using ray tracing in ns-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network (UASN) is the enabling technology for real-time underwater monitoring and data collection. The costly underwater trials and unknown underwater acoustic modem infrastructures increase the need and importance of a reliable ... Keywords: ns-2, ray tracing, sensor network, underwater

Tarik inar; M. Blent rencik

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

MHK Projects/Wavemill Energy Cape Breton Island NS CA | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Cape Breton Island NS CA Energy Cape Breton Island NS CA < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2487,"lon":-60.8518,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

The scalar perturbation spectral index n_s: WMAP sensitivity to unresolved point sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precision measurement of the scalar perturbation spectral index, n_s, from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe temperature angular power spectrum requires the subtraction of unresolved point source power. Here we reconsider this issue. First, we note a peculiarity in the WMAP temperature likelihood's response to the source correction: Cosmological parameters do not respond to increased source errors. An alternative and more direct method for treating this error term acts more sensibly, and also shifts n_s by ~0.3 sigma closer to unity. Second, we re-examine the source fit used to correct the power spectrum. This fit depends strongly on the galactic cut and the weighting of the map, indicating that either the source population or masking procedure is not isotropic. Jackknife tests appear inconsistent, causing us to assign large uncertainties to account for possible systematics. Third, we note that the WMAP team's spectrum was computed with two different weighting schemes: uniform weights transition to inv...

Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hansen, F K; Banday, A J; Grski, K M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ECN Implementations in the NS Simulator Sally Floyd and Kevin Fall \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

``test­all­ecn'' and ``test­all­ecn­ack'' in the tcl/test directory. To run only a single simulation from the file ``test­suite­ecn.tcl'', use the command: ns test­suite­ecn.tcl ecn nodrop tahoe in the directory tcl/test. For each simulation, more detailed information about the simulation scenario can be found

Floyd, Sally

19

ECN Implementations in the NS Simulator Sally Floyd and Kevin Fall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"test-all-ecn" and "test-all-ecn-ack" in the tcl/test directory. To run only a single simulation from the file "test-suite-ecn.tcl", use the command: ns test-suite-ecn.tcl ecn nodrop tahoe in the directory tcl files "test-suite-ecn.tcl" and "test-suite-ecn-ack.tcl" 3 Interpreting the diagrams The top diagram

Floyd, Sally

20

The scalar perturbation spectral index n_s: WMAP sensitivity to unresolved point sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precision measurement of the scalar perturbation spectral index, n_s, from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe temperature angular power spectrum requires the subtraction of unresolved point source power. Here we reconsider this issue. First, we note a peculiarity in the WMAP temperature likelihood's response to the source correction: Cosmological parameters do not respond to increased source errors. An alternative and more direct method for treating this error term acts more sensibly, and also shifts n_s by ~0.3 sigma closer to unity. Second, we re-examine the source fit used to correct the power spectrum. This fit depends strongly on the galactic cut and the weighting of the map, indicating that either the source population or masking procedure is not isotropic. Jackknife tests appear inconsistent, causing us to assign large uncertainties to account for possible systematics. Third, we note that the WMAP team's spectrum was computed with two different weighting schemes: uniform weights transition to inverse noise variance weights at l = 500. The fit depends on such weighting schemes, so different corrections apply to each multipole range. For the Kp2 mask used in cosmological analysis, we prefer source corrections A = 0.012 +/- 0.005 muK^2 for uniform weighting and A = 0.015 +/- 0.005 muK^2 for N_obs weighting. Correcting WMAP's spectrum correspondingly, we compute cosmological parameters with our alternative likelihood, finding n_s = 0.970 +/- 0.017 and sigma_8 = 0.778 +/- 0.045 . This n_s is only 1.8 sigma from unity, compared to the ~2.6 sigma WMAP 3-year result. Finally, an anomalous feature in the source spectrum at l<200 remains, most strongly associated with W-band.

K. M. Huffenberger; H. K. Eriksen; F. K. Hansen; A. J. Banday; K. M. Gorski

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Identification of human hnRNP C1/C2 as a dengue virus NS1-interacting protein  

SciTech Connect

Dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a key glycoprotein involved in the production of infectious virus and the pathogenesis of dengue diseases. Very little is known how NS1 interacts with host cellular proteins and functions in dengue virus-infected cells. This study aimed at identifying NS1-interacting host cellular proteins in dengue virus-infected cells by employing co-immunoprecipitation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Using lysates of dengue virus-infected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T), immunoprecipitation with an anti-NS1 monoclonal antibody revealed eight isoforms of dengue virus NS1 and a 40-kDa protein, which was subsequently identified by quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) as human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C1/C2. Further investigation by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization confirmed the association of hnRNP C1/C2 and dengue virus NS1 proteins in dengue virus-infected cells. Their interaction may have implications in virus replication and/or cellular responses favorable to survival of the virus in host cells.

Noisakran, Sansanee [Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sengsai, Suchada [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Thongboonkerd, Visith; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Medical Proteomics Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sinchaikul, Supachok [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shui-Tein [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biochemical Sciences, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Puttikhunt, Chunya [Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Adulyadejvikrom Building (12th Floor), Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] (and others)

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

High fluence 1.05 {mu}m performance tests using 20 ns shaped pulses on the Beamlet prototype laser  

SciTech Connect

Beamlet is a single beamline, nearly full scale physics prototype of the 192 beam Nd:Glass laser driver of the National Ignition Facility. It is used to demonstrate laser performance of the NIF multipass amplifier architecture. Initial system characterization tests have all been performed at pulse durations less than 10 ns. Pinhole closure and modulation at the end of long pulses are a significant concern for the operation of NIF. We recently demonstrated the generation, amplification and propagation of high energy pulses temporally shaped to mimic 20 ns long ignition pulse shapes at fluence levels exceeding the nominal NIF design requirements for Inertial Confinement Fusion by Indirect Drive. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of a new conical pinhole design used in the transport spatial filter to mitigate plasma closure effects and increase closure time to exceed the duration of the 20 ns long pulse.

Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.E.; Burkhart, S.C.; Penko, F.; Henesian, M.A.; Auerbach, J.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Caird, J.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF A SECTION OF THE NS SAVANNAH PRIMARY PIPING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A section of NS Savannah primary pipe and part of a primary system gate valve were examined ultrasonically to determine whether a fluctuating flow of low- temperature makeup water entering through a nozzle in the valve hsnd damaged the components during service. Examination was prompted by failure of a Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR) recirculating pipe in which makeup water was introduced under conditions similar to those in the Savannah. The ultrasonic equipment was calibrated on spare components. The calibration standards, 11-mil- deep chisel marks in the pipe and 25-mil-deep marks in the valve, were more stringent than those used to calibrate equipment for inspection of components at the time of manufacture. The inspections of components conducted aboard ship are therefore thought to be more exacting than those performed on the original equipment. Ultrasonic inspections of the failed VBWR pipe completely defined the areas of defective material that led to the failure. The VBWR results, together with experience gained by Babcock & Wilcox, indicate that the inspections of Savannah's components were both applicable andd definitive. Since no indications of discontinuities were found in the valve or the pipe, both components are considered to be sound and unaffected by service. (auth)

Johnson, C.R.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

STATEMENT OF CON SID ERA TIO NS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TIO NS TIO NS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN CERTAIN IDENTIFIED INVENTIONS TO SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR SOLUTIONS, LLC (SRNS), MADE AND TO BE MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC09-08SR22470 WITHTHE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY, INCLUDING A CLASS ADVANCE WAIVER OF TITLE TO INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS (CRADAS) ENTERED INTO BY SRNS, PURSUANT TO CONTRACT DE-AC09-08SR22470 WITH DOE/NNSA. W(C)-2008-006 Background The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Prime Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470 (Prime Contract) to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) for management and operation of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on January 10, 2008. SRNS is

25

Aluminum and tungsten X-pinch experiments on 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-pinch experiments have been carried out on a 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage recently built up. The X-pinches exhibited a source size of about 10 {mu}m, a pulse duration of 3 ns, 3-5 keV radiation energy of 3.9 mJ, and a burst time jitter of tens of nanosecond with the 2-wire 8 {mu}m W X-pinch load. The generator output current and the X-pinch characteristics depended on the X-pinch wire materials in the tests. X-ray backlighting images from the insects showed the significant phase-contrast effect.

Wu Jian [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sun Tieping; Wu Gang; Wang Liangping; Han Juanjuan; Li Mo; Cong Peitian; Qiu Aici [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Lv Min [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ionization of Sodium and Rubidium nS, nP and nD Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Rb and Na Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR) are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states of Na and Rb, which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependencies on n. The calculated ionization rates are compared with the results of our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with n=8-20 at 300 K. A good agreement for all states except nS with n>15 is observed. We also present the useful analytical formulae for quick estimation ...

Beterov, I I; Ekers, A; Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ionization of Sodium and Rubidium nS, nP and nD Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Rb and Na Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR) are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states of Na and Rb, which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependencies on n. The calculated ionization rates are compared with the results of our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with n=8-20 at 300 K. A good agreement for all states except nS with n>15 is observed. We also present the useful analytical formulae for quick estimation of BBR ionization rates of Rydberg atoms.

I. I. Beterov; D. B. Tretyakov; I. I. Ryabtsev; A. Ekers; N. N. Bezuglov

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein interacts with ATM, impairs DNA repair and enhances sensitivity to ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinomas and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas. Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of HCV possesses serine protease, nucleoside triphosphatase, and helicase activities, while NS4A functions as a cofactor for the NS3 serine protease. Here, we show that HCV NS3/4A interacts with the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), a cellular protein essential for cellular response to irradiation. The expression of NS3/4A caused cytoplasmic translocation of either endogenous or exogenous ATM and delayed dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated ATM and {gamma}-H2AX following ionizing irradiation. As a result, the irradiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci persisted longer in the NS3/4A-expressing cells. Furthermore, these cells showed increased comet tail moment in single-cell electrophoresis assay, indicating increased double-strand DNA breaks. The cells harboring an HCV replicon also exhibited cytoplasmic localization of ATM and increased sensitivity to irradiation. These results demonstrate that NS3/4A impairs the efficiency of DNA repair by interacting with ATM and renders the cells more sensitive to DNA damage. This effect may contribute to HCV oncogenesis.

Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Machida, Keigo [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 2001 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Cheng, Yi-Sheng [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Michael M.C. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, 2001 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)], E-mail: michlai@gate.sinica.edu.tw

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver  

SciTech Connect

The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.

Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Fuller, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB - Leotek 4903 CA w PYMT INSTR.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leotek Electronics USA Corp., Leotek Electronics USA Corp., Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-CE-4903 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Leotek Electronics USA Corp. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me,

31

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB - Dialight 4902 CA w PYMT INSTR.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dialight Corporation, Dialight Corporation, Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-CE-4902 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Dialight Corporation ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me,

32

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB as signed CA - HKC 33002 CA-Order-Pymt Instr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HKC-US, LLC HKC-US, LLC Respondent ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-33002 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and HKC-US, LLC ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me, I find that the public interest would be served by adopting the Compromise

33

J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS* John H. Scofield Department noise and channel mobility measurements may be useful in defining nondestructive hardness assurance test

Scofield, John H.

34

MagmaHeatNS1D: One-dimensional visualization numerical simulator for computing thermal evolution in a contact metamorphic aureole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MagmaHeatNS1D is an IDL (Interactive Data Language) program that is aimed at numerically modeling heat transfer from an igneous intrusion to its host rocks and providing important thermal state information for minerals and organic matters in a contact ... Keywords: Contact metamorphism, Heat transfer model, Igneous intrusion, Maturation, Numerical simulation, Thermal evolution

Dayong Wang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

AN EVALUATION OF THE SUBSTITUTION OF ZIRCALOY FOR STAINLESS STEEL IN N.S. SAVANNAH FUEL-ELEMENT CONTAINERS. Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of reducing fuel-cycle costs for the N.S. SAVANNAH by replacing the stainless steel fuelelement containers in the permanent reactor core structure by similar containers of a zirconium alloy was investigated. These containers, although not integral parts of the fuel-bearing components, are located within the active core and divide the core into 32 separate channels into which the fuel elements are placed. Areas of investigation included reactor physics, fuel-cycle economics, materials compatibility, structural design, and reactor hazards. A summary of the method of analysis and results is given for each area ot investigation. Calculations indicated that the substitution of Zircaloy containers would increase core reactivity about 6% DELTA k and control- rod worth about 4% DELTA k. Fuel-cycle costs would be reduced about 26%. Zircaloy-4 appears to be compatible with the reactor system, except for some uncertainty with respect to fretting corrosion, which can be resolved only by tests. The substitution of cold-worked Zircaloy for stainless steel in the container assembly would necessitate only minor design modifications. Although this evaluation is strictly applicable only to the N.S. SAVANNAH reactor, the results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of using zirconium alloys for in-core capital-cost components. (auth)

Anderson, T.D.; Gross, E.E.; McCurdy, H.C.; Schaffer, L.D.; Shobe, L.R.; Whitmarsh, C.L.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS REQUEST n:~!:)lHi/",!!,'fCORPORArIQN FO~ ANADVANClWA1VER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS STATEM!NT''OF CONSIDEAAT10NS REQUEST n:~!:)lHi/",!!,'fCORPORArIQN FO~ ANADVANClWA1VER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN DOE PROPOSAL NO.OE-EE0000412 W(A} 2009-:060 The OhlipC1'!ve of this project Is the and comt'nercialization of a two-phase soluttofrfQf USe with The 1 lM,C'l_""""P H'tn(;lPI'" PJJ1'l.nn""". refrig1':'rant tooling solution provides certain improvements compared to conventional air-<:ooling syslems and water-cooling systems, The totalantfetpated cost the is $901,678 with the Petitl(};l)er approximately 19.% cost sm:tre, $262,191. Thiswaive(is contingent upo.n the Petitioner rrH~intaining the foregoing cost over tneCQUfse the grant As in its wai'\l\;f petition, the ~etitfoner isa leading global supplier of air conditioning and

37

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB - Lutron 5-xx CA SEND PYMT INSTR based on CITE FIX Philips 2605 BAD TEMPLATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-SE-3796 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for distributing in commerce in the United States Class A external power supplies that failed to meet the applicable standard for energy usage. See 10 C.F.R. § 430.32(m)(3). 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by

38

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB - Royal Pacific 33004 based on Act One 49001 Order-CA-Pymt Instr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Respondent ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-33004 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Royal Pacific, Ltd. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me, I find that the public interest would be served by adopting the Compromise Agreement,

39

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB Order, CA - OK, MINUS D'd MODELS - Trastar CA w PYMT INSTR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trastar Inc. Trastar Inc. Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-49003 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Trastar Inc. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me,

40

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB - PQL 27001 Order-CA-Pymt Instr based on RoyPac 33004.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In the Matter of: P.Q.L., Inc., Respondent ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-CE-27001 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and P.Q.L., Inc. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts before me,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26 MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV (1s{sup 2}-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1 mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing 'two-frame' imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20 ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151 keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3 ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181 keV Mn 1s{sup 2}-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast (1 ns gate time) digital x-ray camera is being developed [G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)] to extend the system to 'four-frame' and markedly improve the signal-to-noise ratio. [At present, time-integrating Fuji BAS-TR2025 image plate (scanned with a Fuji BAS-5000 device) forms the time-integrated image-plane detector.].

Bennett, G. R.; Smith, I. C.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Robertson, G.; Atherton, B. W.; Jones, M. C.; Porter, J. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

The ns Manual (formerly ns Notes and Documentation)1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oriented version of Tcl; and (3) the interface code to the OTcl interpreter is separate from the main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.3 Class Tcl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.3.1 Obtain a Reference to the class Tcl instance

Bregni, Stefano

43

The Network Simulator NS-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The model was designed to be relatively extensible. Glossary. BS: Base Station. CID: Connection Identifier. CS: Convergence Sublayer. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

44

Laser damage by ns and sub-ps pulses on hafnia/silica anti-reflection coatings on fused silica double-sided polished using zirconia or ceria and washed with or without an alumina wash step.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's Large Optics Coating Operation has extensive results of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) testing of its anti-reflection (AR) and high reflection coatings on substrates pitch polished using ceria and washed in a process that includes an alumina wash step. The purpose of the alumina wash step is to remove residual polishing compound to minimize its role in laser damage. These LIDT tests are for multi longitudinal mode, ns class pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm (NIF-MEL protocol) and mode locked, sub-ps class pulses at 1054 nm (Sandia measurements), and show reasonably high and adequate laser damage resistance for coatings in the beam trains of Sandia's Z-Backlighter terawatt and petawatt lasers. An AR coating in addition to coatings of our previous reports confirms this with LIDTs of 33.0 J/cm{sup 2} for 3.5 ns pulses and 1.8 J/cm{sup 2} for 350 fs pulses. In this paper, we investigate both ceria and zirconia in doublesided polishing (common for large flat Z-Backlighter laser optics) as they affect LIDTs of an AR coating on fused silica substrates washed with or without the alumina wash step. For these AR coated, double-sided polished surfaces, ceria polishing in general affords better resistance to laser damage than zirconia polishing and laser damage is less likely with the alumina wash step than without it. This is supported by specific results of laser damage tests with 3.5 ns, multi longitudinal mode, single shot pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm, with 7.0 ns, single and multi longitudinal mode, single and multi shot pulses at 532 nm, and with 350 fs, mode-locked, single shot pulses at 1054 nm.

Bellum, John Curtis; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kletecka, Damon; Atherton, Briggs W.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Smith, Ian Craig; Smith, Douglas (Plymouth Grating Laboratory, Carver, MA); Hobbs, Zachary (Sydor Optics, Inc., Rochester, NY)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Parsons NS Stevens Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2011 Team Revision date: August 10 2011 PROjECT MANUAL 2 U.S. D.O.E. SOLAR DECATHLON COMPETITION 2011 Team Parsons new school sTevens 2011 MAy 22 Project Manual TAbLE OF CONTENTS 3 U.S. D.O.E. SOLAR DECATHLON COMPETITION 2011 Team Parsons new school sTevens 2011 MAy 22 Project Manual TAbLE OF CONTENTS Table of ConTenTs Cover Page Table of Contents 2 summary of Changes 4 Rules Compliance Checklist 6 structural Calculations 10 Detailed Water budget 37 summary of Unlisted electrical Components 39 summary of Reconfigurable features 41 Interconnection applicatiogn form 43 energy analysis Results and Discussion 45 subjective Contest narratives 58 CONSTRUCTiON SPECiFiCATiONS 63 seCTIon 01000 - PRoJeCT sUmmaRY 65 seCTIon 06170 - PRefabRICaTeD sTRUCTURal WooD 66

46

STATE YJ#wIY STbNs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

w DWLETES 111 CYIWb, hu ww REEDM XTIW IS REWIW. tEVRE?ENT OF EXTRKTIOH OF UuwIUn t-KW Lx ANP bt&LYSIS a cm FM TtE bfc N.E. RbDccoGIC.@L EQLTNLb6 k?TW. LEbD U.S. PUBLIC KALTH...

47

Report on the Fermilab pilot N&S closure process  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the plans and protocols for conducting a pilot of the Department of Energy`s Necessary & Sufficient Closure Process (Attachment A) at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois. The result of this pilot will be a set of standards which will serve as the agreed upon basis for providing FNAL with adequate Environment, Safety and Health Protection at the lowest possible cost. This pilot will seek out and emulate compatible industry practices which have been proven successful both in terms of safety performance and cost-effectiveness. This charter has been developed as a partnership effort by the parties to this agreement (see ``Responsibilities`` below), and is considered to be a living document.

Coulson, L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

ns Notes and Documentation 1 The VINT Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and composability; (2) the configuration interface is now OTcl, an object oriented version of Tcl; and (3 Linkage 11 2.1 Class Tcl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.1 Obtain a Reference to the class Tcl instance

Johnson, David B.

49

ns Notes and Documentation1 The VINT Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and composability; (2) the configuration interface is now OTcl, an object oriented version of Tcl; and (3 Linkage 11 2.1 Class Tcl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.1 Obtain a Reference to the class Tcl instance

Johnson, David B.

50

Application of QCLs to ns IR Spectroscopy Following Pulse Radiolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis David C. Grills, Andrew R....

51

Microsoft Word - RPSEA Final Report RPSEA Format ns.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

halotolerant, sulfate---reducing bacterium isolated from exhaust water of a Tunisian oil refinery. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59: 1 059---63 12. Blum JS, Han S, Lanoil B,...

52

NS-2 model of HomePlug AV PLC technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power-Line Communication (PLC) technology has received considerable attention over the last few years because of its connectivity advantages and its transmission capacity. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is a lack of simulation tools to ... Keywords: HomePlug AV, PLC, access network, in-home network, power line communication, simulation

Mortharia Meftah; Laurent Toutain; David Ros; Abdesselem Kortebi

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

(ns) Al-2024 Alloy Obtained via Cryogenic Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Milling Al-2024 powder of big particle size (>100 microns) in cryogenic regime resulted in nanostructured powder of 46 nm grain size after 18h. Furthermore...

54

NIST CNR SANS NG7 30 Meter SANS Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Instr. 73, 6, 2345, 2002. 2, Chain conformation in ultrathin polymer films, RL Jones, CL Soles, FW Starr, Proc. SPIE, 4690, 342, 2002. ... SPIE, 4689, 541 ...

55

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Journal of Newar Studies - Volume 1, Number 1, NS 1118 / 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initiated various activities. meetings were held regularly and members started working with new zeal. Organizational, cultural and humanitarian activities were intensified. The old units were revived and several new units were established. With those... beginners. The Khalah also devotes iiself to social services. for examples it provides first aid medical service for the pilgrims to the Swayambhu site and its member from time to time. It is also shortly installing a depot for Health Test Service...

Shakya, Daya R; Shrestha, Uma

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Bulletin 2011-2012 UNdERGRAdUATE AdMISSIoNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to survive natural disasters has become more of chance than design. For example, there are underground cables in power sector deregulation. The new concept of microgrids and the latest related research and development of the society. #12;22 IEEE power & energy magazine july/august 2007 Finally, the article "Microgrids," by Nikos

Hone, James

58

Bulletin 2012-2013 UNdERGRAdUATE AdMISSIoNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protection against malicious sabotage and natural disasters [204]. However, new require- ments and demands in a microgrid (described in Section IV-D) that has been `islanded' due to power failures. The microgrid can, microgrid, electric vehicle, and integrated systems. These con- cepts will be described in the following

Hone, James

59

I was born in Halifax, N.S. in 1977, but grew up and went to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Biochemistry. Along the way I was fortunate to work in marine physiology labs both at UBC and in Okinawa, Japan

Argerami, Martin

60

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 5, NS 1125 / 2004-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, strength, power meat raw meat meat-puree buck-wheat noodles ball l brick tea steamed meat-ball 8 f lou~ K a n s a k a r , T e j R I T h e Cha l l enges of M u l t i l i n g u i s m . . S English file form lamp suitcase rubber drlver... ~stered Karmacharyas i n high cstccm fnr their power and sorne o f Nepal's most significant cultural and religious knowledge o f esoteric goddess-hased rituals. l 'he i r tradit~ons. For centuries. Bhaktapur served as the pr:lctices and ritual tradition had...

Shakya, Daya R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Complete genome sequence of Dyadobacter fermentans type strain (NS114T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inin the acknowledgements. Genome sequencing and annotationin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Bristow, Jim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Study of a TeV Level Linear Collider Using Short rf Pulse (20ns...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency and the cost to sustain such a gradient should be considered as well in the optimization process of an overall design. We propose a high energy linear collider based...

63

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 4, NS 1121 / 2000-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: .. .4 "personal" in a secretive sense, but rather in its individual sense, and in the sense that personal motives are particularly motivating in the way that "personal convictions" are ideas to which one has particularly strong attachments. What then... learned from Rafe Jenanyan years before: that language provided an extraordinary window into culture, and learning the native language(s) of those whom I was to study would be essential to the success of my research. It had never occurred to me that Nepali...

Shakya, Daya R; Manandhar, Gaurishankar

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Audit Letter Report: 1NS-L-07-0 1 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

65

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 2, NS 1119 / 1998-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t a Ram Shakya and Mr. Labha Ram Tuladhar who helped us in so many ways. Due to our wish to publish the first issue of the journal on the occasion of New Nepal Samht Year day {Mhapujii), we mhed at the last minute and spent less time in careful... revolts. So the Ranas considered the Newars as the inhabitants of the politically centralized state and as possible antagonists who might strangle them any time. Intellectuals, social reformers, political activists or religious reformers such as Thenv...

Shakya, Daya R; Manandhar, Gaurishankar

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 6, NS 1128 / 2007-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

submitted by the latter requesting Jar permission to mint coins (doli) we had written to Lord Eden Saheb through the Political Officer and obtained his con currence. In pursuance thereoforder has been issued to Lakshmida1; the Nev.'ar Trader, and others com...

Shakya, Daya R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Microsoft Word - 41763 FINAL _NETL Comments_11AUG2010_NS.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT Final Technical Report Reporting Period: July 9, 2004 to March 31, 2010 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-04NT41763 Date Report Issued: June 29, 2010 Report Submitted by: Great River Energy Authors: Charles W. Bullinger, PE Dr. Nenad Sarunac Senior Principle Engineer Principle Research Engineer Great River Energy Energy Research Center 1611 E. Century Avenue 117 ATLSS Drive, Imbt Labs Bismarck, ND 58503 Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015 © 2010 Great River Energy. All Rights Reserved. This copyrighted data was produced in the performance of U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement no. DE-FC26-04NT41763. The copyright owner has granted to the Government, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide

68

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 3, NS 1120 / 1999-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of every king is mentioned and number of years ruling the kingdom including good deeds of his period. Therefore, in the v a ~ & a l i , mentioned above, only a section of a passive sentence written in Sanskrit is readable ' Shree Pasupatinaath ycita... in conference papers and publications, I have . argued that Thangmi occupies a half-way house between a canonical Kiranti-style verbal agreement system and that of the less inflecting Tibeto-Burman languages. Moreover, I have shown evidence...

Shakya, Daya R; Manandhar, Gaurishankar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Universitetet i Oslo Uttak 31.01.2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calorimeter, and a muon chamber system. The detector is installed in a large magnet providing a uniform 0 the ? \\Gamma and K 0 , ff ? \\Gamma K 0 , is estimated as the difference between the center of gravity. Instr. and Meth. A323 (1992) 162; J. A. Bakken, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A275 (1989) 81. [5] A. Arefiev et

Johansen, Tom Henning

70

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores and other cavity components. Experimental results will be presented at the Conference and in future publications.

Ward, Kevin S. (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

An Energy Framework for the Network Simulator 3 (ns-3) He Wu, Sidharth Nabar and Radha Poovendran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations. Since wireless network nodes are typically powered by bat- teries, the amount of energy available of the proposed energy framework and demonstrate the framework's usage in wireless network simulations. Sec- tionFi radio energy consumption. Based on the power consumption for typical WiFi radios [6], the transmit

Poovendran, Radha

72

National Institute of Standards and Technology Draft 1.2.1 -1 -The Network Simulator NS-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................. 5 3.3 TCL commands................................................................................................................ 11 4.6.2 TCL commands............................................................................................... 12 4.7.2 TCL commands

Magee, Joseph W.

73

Supramolecular NanoStamping (SuNS) : fabricating nano/bio devices using DNA as a movable type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a useful device is developed, it always requires a mass-production technique to industrialize it. In the era of nano/biotechnology, the development of printing techniques has not followed the speed of the inventions ...

Yu, Arum Amy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reversible wettability of electron-beam deposited indium-tin-oxide driven by ns-UV irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely used semiconductor oxides in the field of organic optoelectronics, especially for the realization of anode contacts. Here the authors report on the control of the wettability properties of ITO films deposited by reactive electron beam deposition and irradiated by means of nanosecond-pulsed UV irradiation. The enhancement of the surface water wettability, with a reduction of the water contact angle larger than 50 deg., is achieved by few tens of seconds of irradiation. The analyzed photo-induced wettability change is fully reversible in agreement with a surface-defect model, and it can be exploited to realize optically transparent, conductive surfaces with controllable wetting properties for sensors and microfluidic circuits.

Persano, Luana [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti, I-73010 Arnesano-LE (Italy); Del Carro, Pompilio [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Pisignano, Dario [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti, I-73010 Arnesano-LE (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ''Ennio De Giorgi'', Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Rebates thRough salaRy sacRifice (uNsW and other approved organisations)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment n health & cardiac risk factors n postural & functional analysis n stress management The results is designed to help you take an active role in improving your quality of life. At the Lifestyle Clinic, we use've experienced before. Our scientifically-based programs and friendly university-trained staff listen to what you

New South Wales, University of

76

Use of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Results: General Decision Making, the Charleston Earthquake Issue, and Severe Accident Evaluatio ns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed practical criteria and procedures for using probabilistic seismic hazard results in nuclear plant seismic safety decision making. These criteria and procedures provide utility engineers with meaningful tools for resolving a variety of seismic-related regulatory issues that may arise in the operation and management of nuclear power plants. This report illustrates the use of such tools by describing the resolution of the Charleston earthquake issue and Severe Accident Policy concerns wit...

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

WiMsh: a simple and efficient tool for simulating IEEE 802.16 wireless mesh networks in ns-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless mesh networks (WMNs) are two-tier wireless multihop networks. The top tier is made of wireless routers, which provide access to the wireless clients in the bottom tier. One technology for enabling multi-hop communication in the top tier is IEEE ... Keywords: IEEE 802.16, network simulator 2, simulation, wireless mesh networks

Claudio Cicconetti; Ian F. Akyildiz; Luciano Lenzini

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fetal transabdominal pulse oximeter studies using a hypoxic sheep SHOKO NIOKA1,4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transabdom- inal oximeter (Optical Device Inc., PA) with a light Emitting Diode (LED) as a light source in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous- wave imager. Rev Sci Instr 2002;3065­3074. 24. Proakis JG

79

l!Jm~~Ut~'1CV GrandChalienge",regardiessexl,'Cpt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,;,,,,,..<:,,) ,;,,,,,..<:,,) l!Jm~~Ut~'1CV GrandChalienge",regardiessexl,'Cpt tiide'rnJtlrsuant toP.,L 96-511,'asamended, and Natiunal i11lcnsifi.catiol1 capabHffies which yield.amatic cn~gf to a wide range chemical producti()n~ iB) High,. of stich inod refining, non.cmctallic.materials ·IKi[tHtle!tm4;ti. l't.~"<.4 u.an'~:1:;f:) .1.'<1 conventi onal hi gh jeat.!,\iltnillnl·l'AiJ1l~illl~t!l Recvvery - .... ,·"", :l~IWtlra.,;:c~ftjcjtl\tl'tsteaJn.PJtlfYd!uctio}jti!hilgh perr~lanceJllmacesand 5ustainability7 reduced ""liter and a carbQn t(lOtprint li)f indt.t,'}try; (D) Sustainable Manufacturing

80

Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/ MobileMobileMobileMobile NetworkingNetworkingNetworkingNetworking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Otherwise, forward the packet to its base-station node ~ns/tcl/ex/wired-cum-wireless-sim.tcl, ~ns/tcl/lib/ns-bsnode.tcl, ~ns/tcl/mobility/{com.tcl,dsr.tcl, dsdv.tcl}, ~ns/dsdv/dsdv.{cc,h} and ~ns/dsr/dsragent.{cc,h} 4, its COA changes. ~ns/mip.{cc,h}, ~ns/mip-reg.cc, ~ns/tcl/lib/ns-mip.tcl and ~ns/tcl/lib/ns-wireless-mip.tcl

Yu, Chansu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Multiscale modeling of the causal functional roles of nsSNPs in a genome-wide association study: application to hypoxia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Li Xie, Dan Zhou, Clara Ng, Thahmina Ali, Raoul Valencia,Li Xie, Lei Xie, Clara Ng, Philip E. Bourne. Competingto hypoxia Li Xie 1 , Clara Ng 2 , Thahmina Ali 3 , Raoul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estimating Realistic Confidence Intervals for the Activation Energy Determined from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Simul- taneous Measurement of Calorimetric and Rheological Evolutions", Rev. Sci. Instr., 79, 023905-008-0273-4 Titomanlio, G., et al., "On the Simulation of Thermoplastic Injection Moulding Process. 2 Relevance Lags during Poly- mer Solidification", Thermochim. Acta, 413, 101­110 (2004), DOI:10.1016/j.tca.2003

Utah, University of

83

pubs.acs.org/MacromoleculesPublished on Web 03/02/2010r 2010 American Chemical Society Macromolecules 2010, 43, 34153421 3415  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Simul- taneous Measurement of Calorimetric and Rheological Evolutions", Rev. Sci. Instr., 79, 023905-008-0273-4 Titomanlio, G., et al., "On the Simulation of Thermoplastic Injection Moulding Process. 2 Relevance Lags during Poly- mer Solidification", Thermochim. Acta, 413, 101­110 (2004), DOI:10.1016/j.tca.2003

Gidley, David

84

Controlled mobility in sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATLAB program generates o a Tcl script for ns2 [ns2], whichin MATLAB and generated a Tcl script for ns2. The semi-

Sugihara, Ryo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2011 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 for the DOE/NNSA Slide 2 Some MIF-IFE reactor considerations #12;A Wide Range of Driver/Target Combinations for the DOE/NNSA S. A. Slutz, et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010) A. G. Lynn, et al, Rev. Sci. Instr. 81

86

Double Degenerate Binary Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

Yakut, K. [University of Ege, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 35100-Izmir (Turkey)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Cactus Framework & Numerical Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ray bursts, ... Solving Einstein's Equations #12;4/8/07 BSSN System Plus equations for gauge variables hole physics, neutron star physics, vacuum spacetimes, BH-BH/NS-NS/NS-BH binaries, supernovae, gamma

Allen, Gabrielle

88

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS User Resources 3-1 l Computer and Network Services (CaNS) The primary mission of Computer and Network Services (CaNS) is to provide the infra- structure and services within...

89

Measuring and Modeling Applications for Content Distribution in the Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which conforms to NS-2s [125] TCL format. Data Analysis Wewhich are similar to NS2-TCL format, this provides a pain-

Banerjee, Anirban

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

OPTICAL TIMING RECEIVER FOR THE NASA SPACEBORNE RANGING SYSTEM, PART II: HIGH PRECISION EVENT-TIMING DIGITIZER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Register only. Rear panel: TTL, (20 ns min. ) pusle clearsMISSION CLEAR connector: TTL (20 ns min. ) pulse clearsconnectors for the slow (TTL) signals. Front panels have

Leskovar, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

2012 DOE Facility Representatives/SSO Workshop Presentation ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements for explosive, chemical, and industrial hazards are contained in other DOE Rules and Directives. 4 CD NS Chief, Defense Nuclear Safety 420.1C - 420.1B NS , y...

92

2012 DOE Safety System Oversight Workshop Presentation ? QA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sykes NA-SH-10 (CDNS staff) Why do we have CSEs and SSOs? CD NS Chief, Defense Nuclear Safety Why do we have CSEs and SSOs? NS , y Why do we have Cognizant System Engineers? * 10...

93

Passive mode locking of a XeCl laser  

SciTech Connect

Passive mode locking of a 20-ns pulse duration XeCl laser was achieved. A modulation of 90% and less than 2-ns pulses are reported using Coumarin 1 and Auramine-0 dyes as saturable absorbers.

Efthimiopoulos, T.

1984-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

TCL: Comandi utili versione 2.1. [open stringa mode] restituisce il descrittore di un file aperto (di nome stringa) in modalit "riscrittura" (se mode w) o in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TCL: Comandi utili versione 2.1. [open stringa mode] restituisce il descrittore di un file aperto]) restituisce il nome del file .tcl corrente [$ns get-ns-traceall] restituisce il descrittore del file di trace

Bregni, Stefano

95

Investigating the Role of Conserved Coding-Region Regulatory RNA Elements in Modulating the Dengue Viral Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cancleaveNS3withinthehelicasedomain. Virology193:cancleaveNS3withinthehelicasedomain. Virology193:andB. Canard. 2004. TheRNA helicase, nucleotide 5'?

Groat Carmona, Anna Maria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based on a dielectric-loaded waveguide. Building upon earlier work on single electron bunch tests, 10 ns and 22 ns megawatt-level RF pulses have been generated with trains...

97

HSS Integrated Project Schedule - 12-1-2010.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - JM 2 - Red-Team 3 - Review 4 - Concur 5 - AM 6 - Complete NS DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual (03072008) Complete (11182010) NS DOE G 420.1-1, Nonreactor...

98

The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma-emitting) spot fragment will increase its area in time (~10-100 ns timescale) due to heat conduction,

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Der Balebatisher Yoyred / The Honorable Emigrant (From Israel)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxn PX nrx n i _ o^a T>T oio os o^i pnaoni oran ,n nyosa^x^x PX ns .ns u n px IUP os oio. ns ni pxiisa tw^raoa n^a

Lazar Traister, Leyzer Treyster /

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

PMC·EF2. U.S. DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EF2. EF2. U.S. DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETFIU.UNATION RECIPIENT:lllinois Institute of Technology PROJECT T ITLE : Mixed Conducting Corrosion Resistant Materials for PEM fuel cells Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instr umen t Num ber NEPA Control Number C ID Number DE-PS36-08G098OO9 OE-EE0000461 GF0-10-478 0 Based on my Ryiew orthe information concerning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autbori7.ed under DOE Order 4SLIA), 1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUM BER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation , and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

u.s. DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT: Northwest Energy Innovations Page 1 of3 STATE: OR PROJECT TITLE: WAVE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY-NEW ZEALAND MULTI-MODE WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER ADVANCEMENT PROJECT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA -OOOO293 DE-EEOOO3642 GFO-OO03642-OO2 G03642 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the rollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: Rational for determination: EA Category: DOE/EA 1917 and DOE Mitigated FONSI signed 8-15-2012 This determination is being made for tasks 2.12 -

102

F.F2.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rJ,lC· rJ,lC· F.F2. u .s. DEP.-\.RIIIIENI OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlvlINAIION RECIPIENT:EI Paso County PROJECT TITLE; EI Paso County Geothermal Project at Ft Bliss Page 1 of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000109 Procurement Instr ument Number DE-EE0002827 NEPA Control Number elD Number GFO-10-277 0 Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA C ompliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1. i A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not lim ited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

103

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERM DETERM INATION RECIPIENT:MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth PRQJECf TITLE: SEP ARRA - The Power Alternative - BioEnergy Page 1 of2 STATE: MI Funding Opportunity Announ~ement Number Procurement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 DE-EEOOOO166 GFQ-OOOO166-038 GOO Based on my Rview of the information ~onterning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Offh:er (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Adions to ronserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor ooncentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

104

PMC·F.F2a u.s. DEPARTl'dENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a a u.s. DEPARTl'dENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlYIINATION REC1PI ENT:Lee, County of PROJECT TITLE: eecgb block grant - Activity #8 Sio-Diesel Page I of 2 STATE: FL Funding Opportunity Anno uncement Number Procurement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number em Number OE-FOA-0000013.001 DE-EE 0000787.001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [ IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

105

DFPARThIFN'I OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DI!rnu.nNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DFPARThIFN'I OF ENERGY DFPARThIFN'I OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DI!rnu.nNATION RECIPIENT:Kansas Corporation Commission - Renewable Energy Subgrant PROJECT T ITLE : City of Chanute GSHP Page 1 of2 STATE; KS Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pr~urement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number $E·FOA.{)()(X)()13 EEOOOO727 GF0-0000727-010 0 Based on my review o(tbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Onter 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency thai do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

106

U.S DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGE M ENT CEN TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGE M ENT CEN TER NEPA DETERllIINATION RECIPIENT:lllinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity PROJECT TITLE: WM Renewable Energy, LLC; Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II Page 1 of2 STATE: IL funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO119 GFO-1D-363 EE119 Based on my uview or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conselVation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase lhe indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

107

The observed neutron star mass distribution as a probe of the supernova explosion mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observed distribution of neutron star (NS) masses reflects the physics of core-collapse supernova explosions and the structure of the massive stars that produce them at the end of their evolution. We present a Bayesian analysis that directly compares the NS mass distribution observed in double NS systems to theoretical models of NS formation. We find that models with standard binary mass ratio distributions are strongly preferred over independently picking the masses from the initial mass function, although the strength of the inference depends on whether current assumptions for identifying the remnants of the primary and secondary stars are correct. Second, NS formation models with no mass fallback are favored because they reduce the dispersion in NS masses. The double NS system masses thus directly point to the mass coordinate where the supernova explosion was initiated, making them an excellent probe of the supernova explosion mechanism. If we assume no fallback and simply vary the mass coordinate sepa...

Pejcha, Ondrej; Kochanek, Christopher S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as we now have 14 instruments at sNs and 14 at hFir either available to users or in commission- ingNs reliability for FY 2010 was 88% at power levels of 1 mw; to date in FY 2011, we are achieving 92%! hFir analy- sis tools at high Flux isotope reactor (hFir) and spallation Neutron source (sNs) have grown over

109

Development of a Method for the Detection of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus in Water Samples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes significant loss to the mink industry in Nova Scotia (NS). Contaminated water is a speculated virus source therefore my (more)

Larsen, Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nicos S. Martys - Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... proceedings of the 9th Annual Symposium of ... Martys, NS, "Energy Conserving Discrete Boltzmann ... models of suspensions," Physical Review E, Vol. ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

VARIATIONAL CONVERGENCE OF BIFUNCTIONS: MOTIVATING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?Research supported in part by grants of the National Science Foundation, Army Research Office (ARO). W911NS1010246 and Fondap-Matematicas Aplicadas...

112

Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contractors Group EFRT External Flowsheet Review Team EM DOE Office of Environmental Management EM-1 Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management E&NS Environment and Nuclear...

113

"Manufacturing in New England: Making It Here" from the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... othER locatioNs Qingdao, China; Taiping, China; London, England ... Studies' Master's degree in Regulatory Affairs for Drugs, Biologics, and Medical ...

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Development of a Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and con- rity, non-proliferation, and nuclear safeguards5 10 11 n/s in non-proliferation applica- tions. Microwave

Waldmann, Ole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility + , Rural Electric Cooperative + , Utility + IncentiveContDept Nova Scotia Environment + IncentiveContDiv Air Quality Branch + IncentiveContEmail air@gov.ns.ca +...

116

Velocity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Delta t ffl \\Delta t = 1ns. Pulse-Dri ven Wall Motion ( ff = ... varies, can increase (!), eventually decays tozero. Pulse-Dri ven Domain Wall Velocity ( ff = ...

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Halifax's Award-Winning Mathresources - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halifax, NS ? Award-winning Halifax innovator MathResources Inc., was awarded $2 million from the Atlantic Innovation Fund yesterday. Founded on the ...

118

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new modeling tools to improve carbon cycle simulatio ns. The group also studies environmental effects of carbon mitigation strategies, and impacts of global change on the...

119

Performance Evaluation of Two Layered Mobility Management ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The simulations are run using NS2(v2.1b9a) from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL), which is widely used in the networking ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

ENERGY-EFFICIENT NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN THE NORTHWEST REGION: A COMPILATION OF MEASURED DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have computerized energy management systems. Many use activeon the Energy Management System); PC - photocell for dimmingSTRATEGIES: EMS Energy Management Control System NS Night

Piette, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Superconducting phase qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy decay time T 1 ? 10 ns, a value compatible with loss from phonon radiation due to AlN being piezoelectric [

Martinis, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NIST Time and Frequency Transfer using the Two Way ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to the 1 ns level, but this requires a portable earth station ... For questions or more information contact Marc Weiss at mweiss@boulder.nist.gov. Home.

123

Solved: The Case of the Missing "Excited" Nucleons | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

some of these previously missing N* resonances; the crucial breakthrough was to search for the missing N*s in unusual decays that produced strange quarks. Since the...

124

DLMF: Bibliography B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... functions for real and positive energy to high ... NS Scott (1980) Coulomb functions (negative energies), Comput. ... External Links: MathReview (L. Fox). ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Propagation and Attenuation of Surge Voltages and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reflected pulse appearing 740 ns later, from which a propagation speed of ... nonreflection obtained by terminating the line with a resistance equal to ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Indoor to Outdoor Channel Measurements & Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... delay dispersion statistics for outdoor-indoor average PDPs (all values in ns). Band RMS Delay Spread Delay Window 90% Energy Delay Interval ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Scanning Tunneling Microscopic Characterization of Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (7.15nS) for dDT and two order of magnitude larger (0.078nS) than hDT. ... Formation of Silver Nanocube Array via Silica-Polymer Nanocomposites ... of Cu- Nb Multilayers as a Function of Dislocation/Disconnection Content ... Synthesis of W25 Wt%Cu Composite Powders Using Ammonium Para Tungstate and Copper...

128

Descent Relations in Type 0A/0B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The type 0 theories have twice as many stable D-branes as the type II theories. In light of this added complication, we find the descent relations for D-branes in the type 0A and 0B theories. In addition, we work out how the two types of D-branes differ in their couplings to NS-NS fields.

David M. Thompson

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research and Devt. Grid-Tied Solar power: $3,133/kW (2000) $Near Term/Future Stand-Alone Solar power: $3,133/kW (2000) $Electrolysis n.s. 10 MW of solar power Small-Medium n.s. 10

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Joe W. Kwan U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington DC December 5, 2012 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory #12;We presented to NAS diameter spot 0.03 J/cm2 (50 ns window) 5.3 J/cm2 (0.6 ns window) Fluence w/in focal radius & FWHM duration

131

Submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Preprint typeset using L A T E X style emulateapj v. 19/02/01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the electron- deuteron unpolarized elastic differential cross section can be written as ds dV sNS A Q2 1 B Q2 tan2 ue 2 , (1) where sNS is the Mott cross section multiplied by the deuteron recoil factor [5], Q

132

RAL220 / DORIC4 Project Specification Version 1.02 Project Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ns. Long term variation of propagation delay should be less than 0.5ns over lifetime. Two sets be attached to long leads or by connectors to other modules should aim for electrostatic discharge (ESD as defined in test plan. 4.7 Costs and finance Original estimate based on IMEC/Europractice MPW run using AMS

California at Santa Cruz, University of

133

NEC's Itanium prototype server (see Figure 1), code-named AzusA after a river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aimed at reliability, availability, and serviceability. These features include cell hot- plug capability 200 ns for a local memory access or local CPU cache hit, and less than 300 ns for a remote (other cell. Availability As in PCI cards, a cell in a partitioned con- figuration can be hot swapped while other domains

Skadron, Kevin

134

3-1 Computing and Networking Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CaNS Overview CaNS Overview Section 3-1-1 Computing and Networking Services The primary mission of Computing and Networking Services (CaNS) is to provide the infrastructure and computing services within the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) for an advanced computing environment that enables staff, visitors, and collaborators to effectively use computer and network resources for their scientific and business requirements. In supporting growing business and research needs of EMSL in the area of information sciences, CaNS secures global information access to our facilities by providing online remote access to both computing resources and scientific equipment. A large portion of the efforts undertaken by CaNS staff members involves

135

Shock Wave Structure for Argon, Helium, and Nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the thickness of shock wave fronts at different Mach numbers, modeled via Navier-Stokes (NS) and Quasi-gasdynamic (QGD) equations, with experimental results from the literature. Monoatomic argon and helium, and diatomic nitrogen, are considered. In this modeling a finite-difference scheme with second-order spatial accuracy is employed. For argon the density thickness calculated via QGD and NS models are in good agreement with each other, and with the experimental results. For helium QGD and NS results agree well with those from the bimodal model. For nitrogen, the QGD results are closer to the experimental data than NS results. The QGD-based algorithm converges to the steady state solution faster than the NS-based one.

T. G. Elizarova; I. A. Shirokov; S. Montero

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

Tateishi, Yoshihisa [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: tateishi@kochi-u.ac.jp; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples  

SciTech Connect

Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range  

SciTech Connect

A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: Expanding the application range  

SciTech Connect

A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010]. Here we report on a significant expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

2-5 Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Interfacial & Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation related to the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities that exist in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution preven- tion, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, charac- terization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mini-Supernovae from Outflows from Accretion Disks formed by Compact Mini-Supernovae from Outflows from Accretion Disks formed by Compact Object Mergers and Accretion-Induced Collapse Brian Metzger (UC Berkeley) Abstract: Massive, compact accretion disks are thought to form in a number of astrophysical events, including (1) the merger of a neutron star (NS) with a black hole (BH) or with another NS, and (2) following the accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf to a NS. These disks, termed 'hyper-accreting' due to their large accretion rates of up to several solar masses per second, may power the relativistic jets that produce gamma-ray bursts. I will present time-dependent calculations of the evolution of hyper-accreting disks as they accrete onto the central NS or BH and spread outwards in radius. I will show that a generic

142

Interfacial and Nanscale Science Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Section 2-5-1 Interfacial and Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation focused on the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities available in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution prevention, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, characterization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

143

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) Objective: NS.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. (CR 7) Criterion: An unreviewed safety question (USQ) screen/evaluation has been completed and approved for the installation and use of the DTF for drum treatment in the DTF. Objective: NS.2 The facility systems and procedures, for the DTF and drum treatment activities, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (CR9) Criterion: The DTF and drum treatment activities are adequately described in the documented safety analysis (DSA) or changes have been identified for inclusion in the next annual update.

144

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cygan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

log D -6 Mesoscale Modeling Molecular m atoms Waste Repository PA Requirement -9 Mechanics Quantum Mechanics m min year day Ma ms s ns e nm s ka log Time (s) -15 -12 -9...

145

A NUMERICAL MODEL FOR WATER MIST SUPPRESSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vapor F ig ure 3 . T emepraturecon to urs ( 1 0 0 0 K ) atd if fe rentva lu esofu lt ra fin em is tconcentrat io ns U = 8 4 cm /sec ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enforcing Perpetual Conservation Easements Against Third-Party Violators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commns on Unif. Laws, U NIF . C ONSERVATION E ASEMENT A 700.40 (2011), with U NIF . C ONSERVATION E ASEMENT A CT .emphasis added). 14 . See U NIF . C ONSERVATION E ASEMENT A

Jay, Jessica E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Black Hole Formation from Stellar Collapse Chris L. Fryer x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hypernovae (Nakamura et al. 2001 ), and possibly long-duration gamma-ray bursts (Woosley 1993, Mac the relation between explosion and remnant type: supernovae versus gamma-ray bursts, neutron star (NS) versus

148

Workshop on Macromolecular Separations-by-Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Karen Patrici nanoco Willem Molec Cather Hydro Chrom 0 Break Jack D 0 Karl F ... Room B support of ns?by?Desi ration of Car oom B uctions. ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

table of contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

63-71] S.-H. Jeon, Y.-S. Choi, N.-S. Kim, T. Kang, and H.-J. Sohn. The Southern Peru Ilo Refinery, Design Features, Operation and Improvement [pp. 73-86

150

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in a NW-SE or N-S directions between the Kirsehir and Sivrihisar-Bozdag massifs. The subsidence rate and Paleogeographic evolutions in the basin show that the southeastern sector...

151

Laser-Shock Induced Spalling and Fragmentation in Vanadium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shock pulse was generated by a direct laser drive at energy levels ranging from 11 and 440 J/mm2 and initial pulse durations of 3 and 8 ns...

152

IPFB-4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jitter. A mechanism for aligning the beams to each other which acts during the bunch-train crossing time (260 ns) has been proposed to maintain luminosity in the presence of...

153

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Net load and energy prices on peak days with increasing12 Net load and energy prices on peak days with increasingin hour t ? T (energy price) ? ns,t : nonspinning reserve

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Booster Subharmonic RF Capture Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

require a < (1 40 ns) 25 MHz subharmonic frequency. Due to the difficulty of building high-voltage low-frequency rf cavities, this requirement can be relaxed so that at least...

155

??Novel Phase-Coherent Programmable Clock  

Direct digital synthesis (DDS) technology permits the generation of high frequency-resolved waveforms that can be changed on the nanosecond time scale (4 ns minimum). However when the DDS switches frequency, it occurs at any point in the phase ...

156

Supramolecular nano-stamping : analyzing market potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis was carried out on the process of Supramolecular Nano-Stamping (SuNS) in order to determine whether or not the science involved has market potential in the DNA microarray industry. This industry is rapidly ...

DePalma, Christina Maria

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use renewable wind and solar power to provide a local supplyGlatzmaier et al. , 1998 Solar Power-Tower Electrolysis 200PV Electrolysis n.s. 10 MW of solar power Small-Medium Grid-

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Adaptation of Classical Tidal Harmonic Analysis to Nonstationary Tides, with Application to River Tides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most challenging areas in tidal analysis is the study of nonstationary signals with a tidal component, as they confront both current analysis methods and dynamical understanding. A new analysis tool has been developed, NS_TIDE, adapted ...

Pascal Matte; David A. Jay; Edward D. Zaron

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

SURVEY OF THE LITERATURE ON THE CARBON-HYDROGEN SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Carbon Gasifications," Ind. and Eng. Chern. , ~,Kinetics of Carbon Gasification," Ind. and Eng. Chern. ! I,for cheap BTU gases by gasification of the car150ns with a

Krakowski, R.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

THE TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE Loew, "Measurements of Gradients in the SLAC (PartI)," SLAC AP-26, Nucl. Sci. NS-30. S.F. Jacobs, M.O. Scully,1986 Linear Accel. Conf. , SLAC, Jun 2-6, 1986. R. Marks, "

Sessler, A.M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and stakeholders. 2. "Quick Wins" were recommended for near term improvements as follows: Outfall 200- (a) use of stannous chloride in the NS Pipe to volatilize Hg, (b) addition of...

162

Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

Fridriksson, Joel Karl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ta s Review million gal tank gal of high-lev olution that also which can relea ns of benzene v ntial treatment s organic-beari O) and Fluidize is assessment technology sho 8H...

165

Electron Attachment to CO2 in Supercritical Ethane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 and 100 ns in the high pressure range. The reaction volume changes more than an order of magnitude, from -20.0 to -0.5 lmol, over the pressure and temperature ranges...

166

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past, particularly with regard to solar PV development andNear Term/Future NRC, 2004 Solar PV Electrolysis 1,267 kg/continued) Production Method Solar PV Electrolysis n.s. 10

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

SRS Composite Analysis A Risk Based Management Tool  

B r a n c h U pper T hree R u ns SRS Easting (ft) SRS Northing (ft) 45000 50000 55000 60000 65000 70000 72000 74000 76000 78000 80000 82000 Example: Old (a ...

168

??????????? PowerPoint  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EXPLOSIVES Y.A. Aminov, V.I. Volkov, V.P. Voronina, G.V. Kovalenko, N.S. Eskov, Y.R. Nikitenko The presentation discusses results obtained in the numerical simulation of...

169

U-101: Mozilla Firefox / Thunderbird / SeaMonkey XBL Binding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to a use-after-free error in the "nsXBLDocumentInfo::ReadPrototypeBindings()" method when handling XBL bindings in a hash table and can be exploited to cause a cycle collector to...

170

denora award committee bylaws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS. HE GLOBAL SCIE. ITTORIO DE N n: This prize ns to the redu lobal metallu ates Vittorio ts of the 20 th ve annual aw d certificate. n that year w al Meeting a.

171

Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Value Units electrons fC Volts/pC ns s side of ?gure 3.10acquired TAC signal in volts. Multiple acquisitions, eachAll measurements are made in volts as the charge pulses

Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A MICROCOMPUTER BASED TEST SYSTEM FOR CHARGE COUPLED DEVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the full scale output of 20 volts. Sense re sistors andregisters which sample input volt age every 100 ns. Whenin the range of 2 to 10 volts. The high gain mode is used in

Sidman, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recent progress in understanding larval dispersal: new directions and digressions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal stress marks (Levin and others 1993; Anastasia and others 1998; Thorrold and others 2002 of the manuscript. References Anastasia JR, Morgan SG, Fisher NS. 1998. Tagging crustacean larvae: assimilation

Levin, Lisa

174

DOE Solar Decathlon: Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian State Canada Florida Int'l Hawaii Illinois Maryland Middlebury College New Zealand Ohio State Parsons NS Stevens Purdue SCI-ArcCaltech Team Belgium Team China Team...

175

A Case Study on Asprox Infection Dynamics Youngsang Shin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Holz et al in [13]: FA = NA/nA average single (1) FNS = NNS/nNS average single (2) fNSA = NNSA /nNSA of NS records returned for a single DNS resolution. NNSA is the number of unique A records, that is, IP addresses returned in all DNS resolutions for a DNS server. nNSA average single the average number

Gupta, Minaxi

176

EECEECEECEEC 687/787 Mobile Computing687/787 Mobile Computing687/787 Mobile Computing687/787 Mobile Computing Mobility and TrafficMobility and TrafficMobility and TrafficMobility and Traffic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-v 1 -n 20 -p 2.0 -M 10.0 -t 200 -x 500 -y 500 > scen-v1.tcl setdest -v 2 -n 20 -s 1 -m 1 -M 10.0 -t 200 -P 1 -p 2.0 -x 500 -y 500 > scen-v2.tcl 10 cbrgen.tcl A CBR Traffic Generator What is CBR generator ~ns/indep-utils/cmu-scen-gen/cbrgen.tcl Command format ns cbrgen.tcl [-type ##] [-nn ##] [-seed

Yu, Chansu

177

Molecular characterization and evolutionary plasticity of protein-protein interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.1 Protein modelling pipeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.2.2 Software for predicting the effects of nsSNPs on protein structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 5.2.3 Software for predicting the effects of ns... ) cannot have inter-molecular hydrogen-bonds(B)(scratched environments). . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 4.5 Distribution of ratios of alignment length to mean constituent se- quence length for the original BATON parameter sets (grey) and the latest parameter...

Bickerton, George Richard James

178

Outlook for detection of GW inspirals by GRB-triggered searches in the Advanced detector era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to originate from the coalescence of two neutron stars (NSs) or a NS and a black hole (BH). If this scenario is correct, then short GRBs will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves (GWs), detectable by GW observatories such as LIGO, Virgo, KAGRA, and LIGO-India. As compared with blind, all-sky, all-time GW searches, externally triggered searches for GW counterparts to short GRBs have the advantages of both significantly reduced detection threshold due to known time and sky location and enhanced GW amplitude because of face-on orientation. Based on the distribution of signal-to-noise ratios in candidate compact binary coalescence events in the most recent joint LIGO-Virgo data, our analytic estimates, and our Monte Carlo simulations, we find an effective sensitive volume for GRB-triggered searches that is about 2 times greater than for an all-sky, all-time search. For NS-NS systems, a jet angle of 20 degrees, a gamma-ray satellite field of view of 10% of the sky, and priors with generally precessing spin, this doubles the number of NS-NS short-GRB and NS-BH short-GRB associations, to ~3-4% of all detections of NS-NSs and NS-BHs. We also investigate the power of tests for statistical excesses in lists of subthreshold events, and show that these are unlikely to reveal a subthreshold population until finding GW associations to short GRBs is already routine. Finally, we provide useful formulas for calculating the prior distribution of GW amplitudes from a compact binary coalescence, for a given GW detector network and given sky location.

Alexander Dietz; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Leo Singer; Curt Cutler

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Importance of a measurement of F(L)(X,Q**2) at HERA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, standard perturbation theory is not necessarily reliable in general because of increasing logs at higher orders, e.g. at small x P 1qg ? ?S( 2) P 2qg ? ?2s( 2) x Pnqg ? ?ns ( 2) lnn?2(1/x) x (1) and similarly C1Lg ? ?S( 2) C2Lg ? ?s(2) x CnLg ? ?ns (...

Thorne, Robert S

180

T-duality of curvature terms in D-brane actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the known curvature terms in the DBI part of the D-brane action under the T-duality transformation. Using the compatibility of the action with the standard rules of T-duality at the linear order as a guiding principle, we include the appropriate NS-NS $B$-field terms in the action and show that they reproduce the O(\\alpha'^2) terms of the corresponding disk-level scattering amplitude.

Mohammad R. Garousi

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AP Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation Group's Instrumentation Bruker Avance NMR (400 MHz for 1H). Bruker Kappa Apex II diffractometer. Laser transient absorption facility. Laser excitation in UV and visible: Continuum Leopard SS-10-SV Nd/YAG, 60 ps pulse; Continuum Powerlite 7010 Nd/YAG, 6 ns pulse (266 nm, 355 nm, 532nm), Opotek Vibrant LD 355 II OPO, 6 ns pulse (410 - 2650 nm continuously). Detection in Uv-Vis-NIR at single wavelength with Xe lamp probe (260 - 800 nm, time resolution ca. 100 ps with biplanar tube; 400 - 1600 nm, time resolution 2-3 ns with diode detectors; 260 - 800 nm, time resolution 2-3 ns with PMT). Detection in MIR, spectral region with step-scan FTIR FT-IRS-66/V (4500 - 400 cm-1), time resolution ca. 35 ns, single wavelength with Quantum cascade lasers (2317-2197, 2235-2105, 2230-2020, 2072-1977, 1981-1873, 1903-1774, 1813-1692, 1670-1536, 1395-1306, 1258-1181 and 1135-1051 cm-1), time resolution ca. 5ns. Transient digitizers available: LeCroy HDO4034 350 MHz 12-bit; LeCroy 8620A 6 GHz; Tek DPO 4032 350 MHz; Tek DPO 4054B 500 MHz.

182

Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Testing and Control of a Compliant Wrist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'I'his rcport summarizcs thc cvaluation of a controllable, instrLlmcntcd co~npliatit wrist. 'I'hc dcsign of tlic wrist and tlic concept of;1 rcrnole ccntcr of compliancc (RCC) havc hccn dcscribcd in an carlicr rcport, (C~.1~-H1-~1'11-82-9). 'I'hc wrist is mountcd on a large industrial robot uscd to load prcciscly inachincd parts into jigs and fixturcs on computcr controllcd machine tools. 'l'he robot and thc machinc tools form part of an autornatcd ccll in which inachincd parts can bc produccd with a minimum of human intcrvcntion. I-oading parts into machine tools is cssciitially;in asscmbly opcration in which thc parts arc slid into clamps or fixtures and for this rcason die RCC tcchniqucs that havc bccn dcvelopcd for asscmbly robots can also bc applied to a machining ccll. Thc wrist cmploys sphcrical springs with an adjustable stiffncss that varics bctwccn 33 and 450 Ib/inch (5.8~10 ' and 7.9~10 ~ N/m). 'l'his allows thc ccntcr ofcompliancc to be projcctcd OVCJ a rangc froin 1.0 to 6.2 inches (25 to 157 mm) out from hc uppcr platform of the wrist. 'l'hc wrist has 5; dcgrccs of frccdom, bcing cotnp1i;rnt in cach dircction cxccpt axid cxtcnsion. Ilcflcctions of-+ 0.18 inchcs (4.6 min) in thc radial planc dnd 11.20 inchcs (5.1 mm) in comprcssion arc possible. 'l'hc accuracy of thc sensors ovcr this?vorking range is

John M. Lourtlain; P Iul K. Wright

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

Greenwood, R.E.

185

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effects of Pulse Duration on Bulk Laser Damage in 350-nm Raster-Scanned DKDP  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present the results of bulk damage experiments done on Type-I1 DKDP triple harmonic generator crystals that were raster conditioned with 351-355 nm wavelengths and pulse durations of 4 and 23.2 ns. In the first phase of experiments 20 different scan protocols were rastered into a sample of rapid growth DKDP. The sample was then rastered at damage-causing fluences to determine the three most effective protocols. These three protocols were scanned into a 15-cm sample of conventional-growth DKDP and then exposed to single shots of a I-cm beam from LLNL's Optical Sciences Laser at fluences ranging from 0.5 - 1.5X of the 10% damage probability fluence and nominal pulse durations of 0.1,0.3,0.8,3.2,7.0 and 20 ns. The experiment showed that pulse durations in the 1-3 ns range were much more effective at conditioning than pulses in the 16.3 ns range and that the multiple pass 'peak fluence' scan was more effective than the single pass 'leading edge' scan for 23.2 ns XeF scans.

Runkel, M; Bruere, J; Sell, W; Weiland, T; Milam, D; Hahn, D E; Nostrand, M C

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells  

SciTech Connect

Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

Amundson, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells  

SciTech Connect

Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

Amundson, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100-500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times {<=}400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Particle velocity measurements of the reaction zone in nitromethane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detonation reaction-zone length in neat, deuterated, and chemically sensitized nitromethane (NM) has been measured by using several different laser-based velocity interferometry systems. The experiments involved measuring the particle velocity history at a NM/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) window interface during the time a detonation in the NM interacted with the interface. Initially, Fabry-Perot interferometry was used, but, because of low time resolution (>5 ns), several different configurations of VISAR interferometry were subsequently used. Early work was done with VISARs with a time resolution of about 3 ns. By making changes to the recording system, we were able to improve this to {approx}1 ns. Profiles measured at the NM/PMMA interface agree with the ZND theory, in that a spike ({approx}2.45 mm/{micro}s) is measured that is consistent with an extrapolated reactant NM Hugoniot matched to the PMMA window. The spike is rather sharp, followed by a rapid drop in particle velocity over a time of 5 to 10 ns; this is evidence of early fast reactions. Over about 50 ns, a much slower particle velocity decrease occurs to the assumed CJ condition - indicating a total reaction zone length of {approx}300 {micro}m. When the NM is chemically changed, such as replacing the hydrogen atoms with deuterium or chemically sensitizing with a base, some changes are observed in the early part of the reaction zone.

Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Engelke, R. P. (Raymond P.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Gustavsen, R. L. (Richard L.); Robbins, D. L. (David L.); Stahl, D. B. (David B.); Stacy, H. L. (Howard L.); Whitehead, M. (Michael)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ecloud in PS2, PS+, SPS+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a preliminary but broad assessment of the ecloud build-up for the various proposed upgrades of the LHC and its injectors. The study pertains only to the ecloud in bending dipole magnets, and does not shed any light on the effects of the electrons on the beam. We focus on the ecloud heat load, although we have computed many other quantities of interest. The basic variable used to classify our results is the bunch spacing tb, whose values are 12.5, 25, 50 and 75 ns. The ecloud heat load follows an inverse relation to tb both for the LHC and for the injectors, with tb = 12.5 ns being by far the least favorable case. Although tb = 75 ns is the most favorable case, the 50-ns option comes closely behind. A simulated comparison of copper vs. stainless steel shows a clear advantage of the former over the latter. Somewhat surprisingly, a comparison of gaussian vs. flat longitudinal bunch profile does not show a clear winner, at least for the LHC at tb = 50 ns. We describe the strengths and limitations of ou...

Furman, M A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TEK-sjekk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEK-sjekk TEK-sjekk TEK-sjekk logo Calculates whole-building hourly energy performance and indoor climate for a year. It is an EPBD calculation tool that can be used for checking compliance to the Norwegian building regulations (TEK), the Norwegian passive house standards (NS 3700, prNS 3701), and for energy labelling. The solution algorithm is based upon the hourly method in ISO 13790 and ISO 13791. The calculation method complies with the requirements for dynamic thermal models specified in the Norwegian energy performance calculation standard (NS 3031). Screen Shots Keywords energy performance, indoor climate simulation, code compliance, load calculation, residential and non-residential buildings Validation/Testing Validated against standard EN 15265. Overall result class B. Also validated

193

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) OBJECTIVE NS-1: The nuclear safety program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its reactor interface, sufficient numbers of qualified nuclear safety personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure that nuclear safety services are adequate to support HFIR operation with the CS. The nuclear safety functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented with line management control of safety. The level of knowledge of nuclear safety personnel with respect to operation of HFIR with the CS is adequate. (Core Requirements 1, 2, 4, and 6) Criteria * The nuclear safety program is established and functioning to support HFIR

194

Naval Station Norfolk, VA- Energy Conservation Program UESC Partnership Success Story  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Station Norfolk, VA Station Norfolk, VA Energy Conservation Program UESC Partnership Success Story 20 November 2008 2 Agenda Background Basis for Success Phase I Phase I Mod 01 Phase II Other / Future Program Aspects Why the Partnership Works 3 Background Minimal structured plan for NS Norfolk prior to 2006 Other MidLant Installations had aggressive ESPC programs in place The largest US Navy Installation in the World had only scratched the surface on all the opportunities for energy conservation Decision made to establish long term UESC partnership / program with VNG 4 NS Norfolk Basis for Success Focus on long term partnership with Utility to meet infrastructure needs and energy goals Gear project efforts to support core Mission of NS Norfolk Long term benefits more important than strict

195

Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

Tani, Hidenori [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi [Radioisotope Center, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Miyata, Ryo [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Tsuneda, Satoshi [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Microbial Chemistry Research Center, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Yuji [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Noda, Naohiro [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan)], E-mail: noda-naohiro@aist.go.jp

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Practical fast gate rate InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche photodiodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a practical and easy-to-implement method for high-speed near infrared single-photon detection based on InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche photodiodes (SPADs), combining aspects of both sine gating and self-differencing techniques. At a gating frequency of 921 MHz and temperature of -30 $^{\\circ}$C we achieve: a detection efficiency of 9.3 %, a dark count probability of 2.8$\\times10^{-6}$ ns$^{-1}$, while the afterpulse probability is 1.6$\\times10^{-4}$ ns$^{-1}$, with a 10 ns "count-off time" setting. In principle, the maximum count rate of the SPAD can approach 100 MHz, which can significantly improve the performance for diverse applications.

Jun Zhang; Rob Thew; Claudio Barreiro; Hugo Zbinden

2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Performance of the beamlet laser, a testbed for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present initial performance studies for Beamlet, a single-beam prototype for megajoule-class neodymium-glass laser fusion drivers using a multipass main amplifier, adaptive optics, and efficient, high-fluence conversion to the third harmonic. The Beamlet final amplifier uses Brewsters-angle glass slabs with a square 39 {times} 39 cm{sup 2} aperture and a full-aperture plasma-electrode Pockels cell switch. The laser has been tested at the fundamental wavelength over a range of pulselengths from 1-10 ns up to energies of 5.8 kJ at 10 ns and 17.3 kJ at 10 ns at a beam area of 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}. A 39-actuator deformable mirror system corrects the beam to a Strehl ratio of 0.4.

van Wonterghem, B.M.; Caird, J.A.; Barker, C.E.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Speck, D.R.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

MARITIME REACTOR PROGRAM ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on general support of the NS Savannah, operation of the pressurized-water in-pile loop, and advanced core development. A shield survey, iodine adsorption studies, a bioassay development program, preparation of replacement control rod drives, irradiation testing of pressure-vessel steel, a thermal insulation investigation, and an analysis of primary system components for gamm-emitting elements were carried out in the NS Savannah program. Water- chemistry studies in the pressurized-water in-pile: loop were made to determine the specific activities and the chemical compositions of filterable and nonfilterable impurities in the loop water. Fuel development and irradiation tests and core I lifetime studies were carried out in the NS Savannah advanced core development. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Cosmological constraints in the presence of ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent measurement of full sky cosmic microwave background polarization from WMAP, key cosmological degeneracies have been broken, allowing tighter constraints to be placed on cosmological parameters inferred assuming a standard recombination scenario. Here we consider the effect on cosmological constraints if additional ionizing and resonance radiation sources are present at recombination. We find that the new CMB data significantly improve the constraints on the additional radiation sources, with $\\log_{10}[\\epsilon_{\\alpha}] < -0.5$ and $\\log_{10}[\\epsilon_{i}] <-2.4$ at 95% c.l. for resonance and ionizing sources respectively. Including the generalized recombination scenario, however, we find that the constraints on the scalar spectral index $n_s$ are weakened to $n_s=0.98\\pm0.03$, with the $n_s=1$ case now well inside the 95% c.l.. The relaxation of constraints on tensor modes, scale invariance, dark energy and neutrino masses are also discussed.

Rachel Bean; Alessandro Melchiorri; Joe Silk

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demagnified gravitational waves from cosmological double neutron stars and gravitational wave foreground cleaning around 1 Hz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational waves (GWs) from cosmological double neutron star binaries (NS+NS) can be significantly demagnified by the strong gravitational lensing effect, and the proposed future missions such as the Big Bang Observer or Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory might miss some of the demagnified GW signals below a detection threshold. The undetectable binaries would form a GW foreground, which might hamper detection of a very weak primordial GW signal. We discuss the outlook of this potential problem, using a simple model based on the singular isothermal sphere lens profile. Fortunately, it is expected that, for a presumable merger rate of NS+NSs, the residual foreground would be below the detection limit {omega}{sub GW,lim}{approx}10{sup -16} realized with the Big Bang Observer/Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory by correlation analysis.

Seto, Naoki [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Forecasting the Bayes factor of a future observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a new procedure to forecast the Bayes factor of a future observation by computing the Predictive Posterior Odds Distribution (PPOD). This can assess the power of future experiments to answer model selection questions and the probability of the outcome, and can be helpful in the context of experiment design. As an illustration, I consider a central quantity for our understanding of the cosmological concordance model, namely the scalar spectral index of primordial perturbations, n_S. I show that the Planck satellite has over 90% probability of gathering strong evidence against n_S = 1, thus conclusively disproving a scale-invariant spectrum. This result is robust with respect to a wide range of choices for the prior on n_S.

Roberto Trotta

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study  

SciTech Connect

The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm{sup 3} foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hund, J.; Paguio, R. R.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

NEMA NU4-2008 performance evaluation for the microPET FOCUS 120 and iodine-124  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the microPET FOCUS 120 in terms of counting rate capability and image quality when using {sup 124}I. The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) index was defined as: NECR = R{sub T}{sup 2}/R{sub P} + R{sub GP} (T = true, P = prompt, GP = gamma prompt). The maximum NECR (48 kcps) value was obtained for the 250-590 keV energy window (EW) with 6 ns time window (TW). The two other EW (350-590 and 350-650 keV) gave comparable maximum NECR of 43 kcps for the 6 ns TW. The 2 ns TW reduced the NECR by 45 to 50 % Scatter and gamma plus scatter fractions were almost not TW dependent. The 250-590 keV window showed the largest scatter fraction with 23% For the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom, coefficients of variation in the uniform part increased from about 8 to 12% when decreasing TW from 6 to 2 ns. The lowest spill-over-ratios (SOR) for the non emitting regions were obtained for the 350-590 and 350-650 keV EW. Recovery coefficients (RC) of the hot rods were the highest for the 350-590 keV EW and 2 ns TW. Scatter correction led to a decrease in RC and occasionally (with FBP or 3DRP) to a negative value for the SOR. The combination of the 350-590 keV energy window with 6 ns time window appeared to be a good compromise between counting rate capability and image quality for the FOCUS 120, especially when MAP reconstruction was used. The scatter correction algorithm provided by the constructor should be used with caution. (authors)

Taleb, D. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Plenevaux, A. [Cyclotron Research Center, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Dartial, N. [Medical imaging laboratory ONIRIS, Nantes (France); Seret, A. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

DOUBLE COMPACT OBJECTS. I. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE COMMON ENVELOPE ON MERGER RATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from population synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include updated wind mass-loss rates (allowing for stellar-mass black holes up to 80 M {sub Sun }), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed {sup m}ass gap{sup )}. Our findings include the following. (1) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (2) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (3) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (4) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate and can be ruled out. (5) Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH 'mass gap', in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper, we will present the detection rates for gravitational-wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.

Dominik, Michal; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Fryer, Christopher [CCS-2, MSD409, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Berti, Emanuele [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Mandel, Ilya [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); O'Shaughnessy, Richard [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Shock-Induced Transformation of Liquid Deuterium into a Metallic Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of shock velocity and optical reflectance at 1064, 808, and 404 nm of a high pressure shock front propagating through liquid deuterium show a continuous increase in reflectance from below 10% and saturating at {approx}(40-60)% in the range of shock velocities from 12 to 20 {mu}m/ns (pressure range 17-50 GPa). The high optical reflectance is evidence that the shocked deuterium reaches a conducting state characteristic of a metallic fluid. Above 20 {mu}m/ns shock velocity (50 GPa pressure) reflectance is constant indicating that the transformation is substantially complete. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Da Silva, L. B.; Gold, D. M.; Cauble, R.; Wallace, R. J.; Foord, M. E.; Hammel, B. A.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biomarkers of Exposure to Foodborne and Environmental Carcinogens: Enterosorbent Intervention in a High Risk Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to assess human exposures to foodborne and environmental carcinogens, particularly in populations at high risk for cancer and disease, has led to the development of chemical-specific biomarkers. Sensitive biomarkers for aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been useful in providing information on population exposure and reducing associated public health impacts. Aflatoxins are fungal metabolites found in a variety of foods. Among these toxins, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most predominant and hepatocarcinogenic. Acutely, AFB1 can cause disease and death, necessitating safe and effective intervention strategies. Inclusion of NovaSil (NS) clay in the diet represents a practical, sustainable approach. NS has been shown to prevent aflatoxicosis in multiple animal species by binding aflatoxins in the gastrointestinal tract, reducing toxin bioavailability. Co-exposure to PAHs, hazardous environmental contaminants, has been shown to increase the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, objectives of this research were to utilize biomarkers to assess aflatoxin and PAH exposures in susceptible populations in Ghana and the U.S. and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NS intervention in Ghana (a population at risk for aflatoxicosis). After 3-month intervention with 3.0g NS/day, median aflatoxin M1 (an AFB1 metabolite) was significantly reduced (up to 58 percent) compared to the placebo group. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in levels of nutrient minerals between NS and placebo groups at baseline and 3-months suggesting NS can be used to effectively sorb AFB1 without affecting serum concentrations of important minerals. PAH biomarker results showed participants in Ghana were significantly exposed to high levels of PAHs based on the presence of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in the majority of urines (98.9 percent). NS treatment had no effect on 1-OHP levels, further confirming the preferential binding of aflatoxins by NS. U.S. population data from a Hispanic community in Texas with an elevated incidence of HCC demonstrated a lower percentage and level of aflatoxin and PAH biomarkers. Aflatoxin M1 excretion, however, was associated with increased consumption of certain foods prone to aflatoxin contamination; thus, some individuals may be more vulnerable to exposure and associated interactions that increase the risk for HCC (e.g., PAHs or hepatitis infection).

Johnson, Natalie Malek

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The impact of King James II on the departments of the royal household  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society, 1886. Bodleian Library, Oxford Bramston, J., The Autobiography of Sir John Bramston. Lord Braybrooke (ed.), Camden Society, XXXII, 1845. Browning, A., Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby and Duke of Leeds, 1632-1712. 3 vols., Glasgow, 1951... Osborne, Earl of Danby and Duke of Leeds, 1632-1712, Glasgow, (1951),11, pp. 76-7, 'Notes upon which my Lord Bathe spoke to the King', 23 Mar 1679; HMC Ormonde, n.s. IV, p. 500, Southwell to Ormond, 22 Mar 1679; HMC Ormonde, n.s. V, Arran to Ormond, 7...

Barclay, Andrew Peter

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

CP-violating Phases in Active-Sterile Solar Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of CP-violating phases in active-sterile solar neutrino oscillations are discussed in a general scheme of 3+N_{s} mixing, without any constraint on the mixing between the three active and the N_{s} sterile neutrinos, assuming only a realistic hierarchy of neutrino mass-squared differences. A generalized Parke formula describing the neutrino oscillation probabilities inside the Sun is calculated. The validity of the analytical calculation and the probability variation due to the unknown CP-violating phases are illustrated with a numerical calculation of the evolution equation in the case of 3+1 neutrino mixing.

H. W. Long; Y. F. Li; C. Giunti

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

NMOS LSI 16*16 multiplier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1.5 MU NMOS 16*16 parallel multiplier designed for a throughput time of less than 40 ns is described. Preliminary measurements suggest a best-case throughput time of 16 ns. The pipelined architecture of the multiplier gives a throughput time of one clock cycle and a total multiply time of two clock cycles. The chip draws 1 w at 4 v, has 7500 transistors, and dimensions of 2800 mu*2500 mu. It was designed to accept and deliver ttl logic levels. This chip was fabricated in an advanced NMOS process with 1.5 mu design rules. X-ray lithography was used on all levels. 2 references.

Wittmer, N.C.; Michejda, J.A.; Gannett, J.W.; Bechtold, P.F.; Taylor, G.W.; Lifshitz, N.; Dennis, D.C.; Bayruns, R.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Stability Criteria for Impulsive Systems with Time Delay and Unstable System Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the above it is su cient to prove that for any A 2 F0, the following holds : IE0 1IAN0;t = IE0 Z t 0 sds1IA0 N;Ft-intensity of fNtg it follows that IE0 N Z t 0 Zs,dNs1IA = IE0 N Z t 0 Zs,sds1IA : But since that IE0 N Z t 0 ZsdNs1IA = IE0 N Z t 0 Zssds1IA : Noting that IE0 N Z t 0 Zssds1IA = N IE0 Z t 0 sds1

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

213

A fast injection kicker system for the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new proton injection kicker system is required for the Tevatron in the Run II era. The new system was designed to supply 1.25 kG-m into a magnetic aperture of 48 mm vertical x 71 mm horizontal x 5 m long with a 396 ns bunch spacing. The system was designed to be upgraded to 132 ns bunch spacing with additional pulse supplies. The system design tradeoffs needed to meet these goals is discussed. These include the system topology, the system impedance and the number of magnets. This system has been installed in the Tevatron.

Chris C. Jensen, Robert E. Reilly and Bruce M. Hanna

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

Shape coexistence and isomeric states in neutron-rich {sup 112}Tc and {sup 113}Tc  

SciTech Connect

Isomeric states in {sup 112}Tc and {sup 113}Tc, with half-lives of 150(17) ns and 500(100) ns, respectively, have been observed following the relativistic fission of {sup 238}U. The fission fragments have been separated in a fragment separator and identified by means of energy-loss and time-of-flight techniques. In both nuclei, the ground-state configuration is calculated to have an oblate shape and the isomerism is proposed to arise due to transitions from a triaxial excited state to a low-lying oblate state.

Bruce, A. M.; Lalkovski, S.; Denis Bacelar, A. M. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Gorska, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Caceres, L.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Tashenov, S.; Wollersheim, H. J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Podolyak, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Cullen, I. J.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Resonant Andreev transmission in two-dimensional array of SNS junctions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an experimental study of transport properties of a large two-dimensional array of superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor (SNS) junctions comprised of the nanopatterned superconducting film, ensuring that NS interfaces of our SNS junctions are highly transparent. We find the anomalously high charge transmission at certain applied voltages commensurate with the magnitude of the gap in superconducting islands. This indicates the nonlocal nature of the charge transfer in multiply connected SNS systems. We propose the mechanism of the correlated transmission of Cooper pairs in large arrays of SNS junctions based on the combined action of the proximity effect and the simultaneous Andreev conversion processes at many NS-interfaces.

Baturina, T. I.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Vinokur, V. M.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Glatz, A.; Nasimov, D. A.; Latyshev, A. V.; Materials Science Division; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; Russian Academy of Science; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Eustress versus distress in swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two experiments were designed to determine Temptress phics. could be differentiated from distress in swine by measuring behavior, cortical, norepinephrine (E), and epinephrine (E). In Exp. 1, four barrows were assigned to two treatment groups: (1) Pigs acclimated to swimming (AS group) and (2) Pigs not acclimated to swimming (NS group). Pigs from both groups swam 6 laps per day (swim trial) for a total of four days (four swim trials; the time interval between each swim trial was 48 h. The schedule for blood sampling and behavior analysis during each swim trial was-10, 1. 15, 3.30, 5.45, 7.00, 10. 15, 12.30, 27.30, 57.30 min. In Exp. 2, the protocol was the same as Exp. 1 except that the time interval between each swim trial was 72 h. In Exp. 1, the differences in cortical AUC values between the NS and AS groups were substantial in the first (1056.93 :1: 96.50) and second (825.51 ::1: 170.62) swim trials. The differences in E AUC values between the NS and AS treatment groups were noticeable in the first (4.22 + .86), second (3.95 :i: .84), and third (3.68 :1: .42) swim trials. The differences in standard error (S.E.) for E between the NS and AS groups decreased over the four swim trials. In Exp. 2, the difference in cortical AUC values between the NS and AS groups was substantial in the second swim trial between the NS and AS groups were noticeable in the first (2.10 :1: .37) and second (2.71 + . 17) swim trials. The differences in S.E. for cortical between the NS and AS groups decreased over the four swim trials. The NS pigs appeared to behaviorally and physiologically acclimate to the swimming stimulus by the fourth swim trials their behavior and physiological profiles became similar to those of the AS pigs. The hormonal differences between treatment groups were associated with cortical and E. It appeared that the model for distress was represented by the psychogenic stress hormones, cortical and E, and that this distress was decreased with acclimation.

Lanier, Emily Kate

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Digital Electronics For The Versatile Array Of Neutron Detectors At Low Energies  

SciTech Connect

A {chi}{sup 2} minimization algorithm has been developed to extract sub-sampling-time information from digitized waveforms, to be used to instrument the future Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low energies. The algorithm performance has been characterized with a fast Arbitrary Function Generator, obtaining time resolution better than 1 ns for signals of amplitudes between 50 mV and 1V, with negligible walk in the whole range. The proof-of-principle measurement of the beta-delayed neutron emission from {sup 89}Br indicates a resolution of 1 ns can be achieved in realistic experimental conditions.

Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Padgett, S. W.; Liddick, S. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bardayan, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Batchelder, J. C.; Matei, C.; Peters, W. A.; Rasco, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 708034 (United States); Cizewski, J. A.; O'Malley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, US (Canada); Goans, R. E. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Raiola, F.; Sarazin, F. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

V. Barger; Patrick Huber; Danny Marfatia

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Summary of Fire Protection Programs for Calendar Year 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF NUCLEAR AND FACILITY SAFETY POLICY (EH-5) October 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS F FO OR RE EW WO OR RD D . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . i ii ii i G GL LO OS SS SA AR RY Y . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . i iv v D DE EF FI IN NI IT TI IO ON NS S. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

220

version 11apr11a Geopolitics of the Global Oil System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternatives: Oil sands, shale oil, Gas and/or Coal to Liquid o "Americas Oil Shale Resource," Office of Deputy: "Oil Shale Resources Technology and Economics." http://www.umich.edu/~twod/oil- ns [Optional] Section 3, "Environmental and Regulatory Issues," pp. 22 ­ 28. [Optional] Appendix B: "Oil Shale

O'Donnell, Tom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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221

More Early Inscriptions from Tibet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with hertwo"5ister Quee ns" 'Bro Khri-mo-Iegs and Cog-ro Brtsan-rgyal, as taking part in the vow of Khri Lde-srong-brtsan to preserve the Buddhist faith which is recorded in the Chos-byung of Opa'-bo Gtsug-!ag phreng ba vol js ff 128-130. The Oge -slong...

Richardson, Hugh

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Resonance Parameters and Uncertainties Derived from Epithermal Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements of Natural Molybdenum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAR. 2010 #12;The zero TOF was determined by fitting 238 U reso- nances from a depleted uranium sample measurement consisted of two molybdenum samples ~2.54 and 6.35 mm!, two depleted uranium samples, 13.2 and 4 tail of the distri- bution was fitted to be 60 ns from depleted uranium capture measurements.13

Danon, Yaron

223

Micropaleontological evidence of large earthquakes in the past  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s, ke nes r wo ven E Re e Sp cim e ns gs ed tic y rit ent iLow L in l a lp en s tic r A cim k e an sh pe S Fi Pl AT el

Jere Lipps

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences NAME:_______________________________________ (Administration Concentration or Human Services minor) UIN:_________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:_______________________________________ Students must have an associate degree in a health-related area or license or certification to practice with CHP 400) The Nature of Science ________8___________________ BIO 108N-109N, CHEM 105N/106N-107N/108NS; PSYC 201S, 203S; SOC201S; WMST 201S Impact of Technology (satisfied in major with CHP 485) Choose

225

Numerical simulation of non-linear wave tank based on the ALE algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Wave Tank NWT becomes more and more prominent in the corresponding scientific research. On the basis of the Navier-Stokes N-S equation, the early application be adopted for discretising and calculating the specific region is by Volume of Fluid ...

Feng Zhu; Weihua Zhu; Y. N. Wang; B. Fang; S. L. Zhao

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Original article Epistatic interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,elanogaster were screened for chromosome inversions and 23 paracentric inversions including 4 common cosmopolitan (In(2L)t, In(2R)NS, In(3L)P and In(3R)P), 2 rare cosmopolitan (In(3R)Mo and In(3R)C) and a recurrent

Recanati, Catherine

227

A 512kb 8T SRAM macro operating down to 0.57V with an AC-coupled sense amplifier and embedded data-retention-voltage sensor in 45nm SOI CMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An 8T SRAM fabricated in 45 nm SOI CMOS exhibits voltage scalable operation from 1.2 V down to 0.57 V with access times from 400 ps to 3.4 ns. Timing variation and the challenge of low-voltage operation are addressed with ...

Qazi, Masood

228

3402 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1984, 106, 3402-3407 Vibration-Induced Electron Detachment in Molecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-5-10" s. These long-lived excited anion states may be observable as sharp features in photodetachment to clarify how our theoretical work can help in the interpretation of the experimental data. We begin-', T -3000 ns, and F -1.0 J/cm2, which are in line3with the experimental conditions of Brauman et al. in ref

Simons, Jack

229

MeaBench: A toolset for multi-electrode data acquisition and on-line analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MeaBench: A toolset for multi-electrode data acquisition and on-line analysis Daniel Wagenaar integration with stimulator systems. We have been able to generate stimulation se- quences in response to live sharing a common library. These programs commu- This work was partially supported by grants NS044134

230

Use of Productivity and Susceptibility Indices to Determine Stock Vulnerability, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fish) should change as a function of spawning biomass of the stock or stock complex. The NS1 guidelines information. Control rules should be designed so that management actions become more conservative as biomass.5 are defined as high and low susceptibility, respectively. Biomass of Spawners: Analogous to fishing mortality

231

Khesbn No. 29, April 1962 - Entire Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n apaiBnsTOpe ria* lirr anp pt pB a*a p"Ti -papa p" nga /tuxnpyaon n'y p^tans g t>anp im tu ,aaA> ms tnjn oyn ,

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

THE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY FLUENCE AND ENERGY SPECTRUM OF GRB 970417a FROM OBSERVATIONS WITH MILAGRITO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the Te tests of GRB models (van Paradijs, Kouveliotou, & Wijers 2000). However, far less is known about, radiating Cerenkov light in the water, caused !100 PMTs to detect light within a 200 ns time interval

California at Santa Cruz, University of

233

A Tool for the Spectral Analysis of the Laser Doppler Anemometer Data of the Cambridge Stratified Swirl Burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XtNR ???? -where kX is the Inverse Fast Fourier transform (IFFT) of nS . The S+H method [3] has been proved to serve as a first-order, low-pass filter: (16) 2 1 1 noise step 23 2 22...

Zhou, Ruigang; Balusamy, Saravanan; Hochgreb, Simone

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Interaction of high power microwave with plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental proposal to investigate the physics of interaction of extremely intense (eEem/m?c ? 1) microwave in an overdense plasma is discussed. The output from a VIRCATOR (2 -- 10 GHz, ? 1 -- 3 GW) based pulse (?30 ns) powered ...

V. P. Anitha; Amita Das; Y. C. Saxena; Anurag Shyam; P. K. Kaw

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ultra-high speed burst-mode imager for multi-frame radiography  

SciTech Connect

A 720 x 720 pixel hybrid-CMOS imager was fabricated by Rockwell Scientific (now Teledyne Imaging Sensors). Several cameras have been in operation for 5 years, in a variety of static and dynamic experiments, at the 800MeV proton radiography (pRAD) facility at the LANSCE accelerator. The cameras can operate with a per-pulse adjustable inter-frame time of 250ns to 2s, and with an exposure/integration-time as short as 150 ns. Given the 800 ms total readout time, the imager can be externally synchronized to 0.1-to-5Hz, 50-ns wide proton beam pulses, and record 1000-frame radiographic movies of 5-to-30 minute duration. The effectiveness and dependence of the global electronic shutter on the pixelated Si photo-sensor bias voltage is discussed. The spatial resolution dependence of the full imaging system on various monolithic and structured scintillators is presented. We also present features of a new-generation 10-frame, 1024 x 1024 pixel, 50-ns exposure, 12-bit dynamic range imager, which is now in the design phase.

Kwiatkowski, Kris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nedrow, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Chris L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Abdy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douance, Vincent [TELEDYNE IMAGING SENSORS; Bal, Yibin [TELEDYNE IMAGING SENSORS; Joshi, Atul [TELEDYNE IMAGING SENSORS; Auyeung, John [TELEDYNE IMAGING SENSORS

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

SaVi: satellite constellation visualization Research Fellow, Centre for Communication Systems Research at the University of Surrey, e-mail: L.Wood@surrey.ac.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Command Language (Tcl). This two-pronged approach allows SaVi to be scriptable. Simple, short, Tcl scripts to the scripts of the network simulator ns-2, which also relies on Tcl. Many scripts simulating, illustrating is presented in Tcl's Toolkit, Tk, which complements Tcl and allows for relatively straightforward creation

Wood, Lloyd

237

PROCEEDINGS O F THE IEEE, VOL.56, NO. 1, JANUARY196837 [`I J. J. Wysocki,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar cells," IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science. vol.NS-13, pp. 168-173, December 1966 damagein semiconductorsXI1: Effects ofhighenergy electrons in silicon and silicon solar cells," Contract NAS 5-3805, May 25, 1966. 14] R. V. Tauke, "Thermal annealing of irradiated n-on-p silicon solar cells

Teich, Malvin C.

238

Canadian Section List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryCanadian Section2013 Members243 Members as of October 1, 2013Abuzaytoun, ReemDalhousie UniversityHalifax, NS, CanadaAcosta, EdgarUniversity of TorontoToronto, ON, CanadaAlfieri, JocelynSilliker Canada CoMarkham, ON, Cana

239

Zofia A. Baumann Curiculum Vitae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Toxicology and Pharmacology 156: 42-50 Madigan, D.J., Baumann Z., and Fisher N.S. 2012. Pacific bluefin tuna&T) Radiocesium in Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis in 2012 validates new tracer technique. Fisher, N) An evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota

Hameed, Sultan

240

Categorizing Biases in High-Confidence High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A to serotonin, followed by product and then CoA The S5/S6 loop creates one wall of a narrow canyon- release., Nilges, M., Pannu, N.S., and Read, Shales, D., Shimizu, K., and Shaw, K.J. (1997). The most frequent R

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 172 (2009) 257267 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from first principles simulations. Phys Chem Chem Phys 12:894­901. doi:10.1039/b915 329b Doert T.05.041 Sankaranarayanan VK, Gajbhiye NS (1989) Thermal decom- position of dysprosium iron citrate. Thermochim Acta 153

Freed, Andrew

242

Low-cost nanosecond electronic coincidence detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple and low-cost implementation of a fast electronic coincidence detector based on PECL logic with a TTL-compatible interface. The detector has negligible dead time and the coincidence window is adjustable with a minimum width of 1 ns. Coincidence measurements of two independent sources of Bose-Einstein distributed photocounts are presented using different coincidence window widths.

Kim, T; Gorelik, P V; Wong, F N C; Kim, Taehyun; Fiorentino, Marco; Gorelik, Pavel V.; Wong, Franco N. C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

LS Note LS-139  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was computed from the yield 0.12 ne, obtained from Bathow et al. (BAT 67) for 6.3 GeV e 12 0.12(ne)4.36 x 10 (e) e .02(100) Q 6 1.97 x 10 ns 4 3.6 x 10 (s) for an assumed 10...

244

Heun.mws - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tqyay]vG[_jL`ZiP=HRqEnyoIt[yMLt^rWhYH]SrVxiy=:::; :xI:b;MA;RNS`yyYyA:YL[ ryyA::::::ZJY`mV`mB:cNDwyyQbyA`yAEQryyqyqV:is AxjG[yyY:::J:<:xI:JaOS?

245

Let G be their greatest common divisor (gcd) - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the correctness of G ' is established by testing if G ' divides A and B. 3 ..... c o lu m ns w ou ld b e r ep lac ed by a sin gle c o lu m n o f c onst a nts . F o r t ha t ca...

246

Whythisantennaisworthitsweightingold whenitcomestofusiondiagnostics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evolution show distinct features at different points in its temporal history. For a time duration of less the plasma during this period in its temporal history. Beyond 55 ns, as shown in Fig. 3, the line to con laser powerdensity Fig. 6. Plot of logarithm of ion emission intensity for: nun,Oil (4072.16 A): O, Nil

247

Memory Controller Policies for DRAM Power Management Xiaobo Fan Carla S. Ellis Alvin R. Lebeck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to transition back to active. Energy e ciency can be improved by placing the chips in a lower power state when spent in the current power state before a transition to a lower state is made. We refer management policies. #12;Power State Power Time Transition mW nS Active Pa = 300 tacc=60 Standby Ps = 180

Lebeck, Alvin R.

248

Memory Controller Policies for DRAM Power Management Xiaobo Fan Carla S. Ellis Alvin R. Lebeck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to transition back to active. Energy efficiency can be improved by placing the chips in a lower power state when spent in the current power state before a transition to a lower state is made. We refer management policies. #12; Power State Power Time Transition (mW) (nS) Active Pa = 300 tacc=60 Standby Ps

Lebeck, Alvin R.

249

Shock temperature in calcite (CaCO3) at 95^160 GPa Satish C. Gupta 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock temperature in calcite (CaCO3) at 95^160 GPa Satish C. Gupta 1 , Stanley G. Love 2 , Thomas J The temperatures induced in crystalline calcite (CaCO3) upon planar shock compression (95^160 GPa) are reported are recorded at 1 ns inter- vals and inverted to yield shock temperatures in the 95^160 GPa pressure range

Stewart, Sarah T.

250

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change Dr N.J. EkiNs-DaukEs Executive summary Why are we interested in using solar energy? Sunlight provides the energy source. In developing countries, solar technologies are already in use to enhance the standard of living

251

CDM-based design and performance evaluation of a robust AQM method for dynamic TCP/AQM networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new robust AQM strategy for dynamically varying TCP/AQM networks is proposed and its performance is investigated through computer simulations in MATLAB and ns-2 environments. The developed AQM is designed based on coefficient diagram method (CDM), ... Keywords: Active queue management, Coefficient diagram method, Model reference adaptive control, Recursive parameter estimation

N. Bigdeli; M. Haeri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

lUCRAtORY BEllAVlOR OP VANCOUVEIl CANADA GEESE: /lECOVDY lAD BIAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nolllllisratory vieb SIIIIlU m=bers marae1ns as far lOath as IIOrchern California. Hovevar. baftd recums iDcl1cau Bay. 129 IcII vest of Juneau) and hunt1D& season recoveries hav. totaled 413. Alaska acCOUDtad for 84

253

DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CN-H'-H cooin rjincN r *-i r oscoco fO -* -( jJ CO CO CO *I" CNCNCN rOCNCN sC >-* vn n CN O csicNfN T-T IiS OCNCO vOfN-< fOOO JO C OCOCO COfNsO inCOCT...

254

X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30-40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Ma Hao [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan Ping [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance evaluations of ZigBee in different smart grid environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, ZigBee Smart Energy profile has been developed for various smart grid applications, such as automatic metering, demand response, load control, power fraud detection, fault diagnostics, and distribution automation. In this paper, the performance ... Keywords: IEEE 802.15.4, Ns-2, Smart grid, Wireless sensor networks, ZigBee

B. E. Bilgin; V. C. Gungor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fabio Soldo Interests and Specialties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Improve TCP Performance over Wireless Networks," in Proc. of GLOBECOM `07, Washington DC, USA, Nov. 2007 networks," in Proc. of IEEE MILCOM`06, Washington DC, USA, Oct. 2006 [C01] M. Gerla, B. Zhou, Y.-Z. Lee, F · Network Simulators: NS2, Qualnet · Operating Systems: Mac OS X, Unix, MS Windows Honors and Awards · ACM

Markopoulou, Athina

257

Nonlinear optical response from periodic molecular structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The explicit expressions of all independent components of the molecular crystal nonlinear susceptibility (NS) tensor (of any order) are given through the independent components of hyperpolarizability (HP) tensors of the constituting molecules. This expression ... Keywords: Hartree-Fock time-dependent approach, Hyperpolarizability, Lorentz tensor, Madelung potential, nonlinear susceptibility, reaction field theory

M. Mestechkin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Radiation detection system  

SciTech Connect

A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

-----_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - - - -_ _111 _ _ _ __ HEALTH STATU~S OF VIETNAM VETER~I~NS SUPPLEMENT A LABORATORY METHOD~3 AND QUALITY CONTROL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SEIIVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE Control Vietnam Experience Study January 1989 t t U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

260

td_tev.ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEVATRON B I K E P A T H NS1 IN D U S T R IA L P O N D B U L L R U S H MASTER SUBSTATION TSB NSO PSI, PSO IND. COMPRESSOR BLDG. B2 M A I N R I N G R O A D B48 C0 B4 CDF B1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FORMATION OF STABLE MAGNETARS FROM BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By performing fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of binary neutron star mergers, we investigate the possibility that the end result of the merger is a stable magnetar. In particular, we show that, for a binary composed of two equal-mass neutron stars (NSs) of gravitational mass M {approx} 1.2 M{sub Sun} and equation of state similar to Shen et al. at high densities, the merger product is a stable NS. Such NS is found to be differentially rotating and ultraspinning with spin parameter J/M{sup 2} {approx} 0.86, where J is its total angular momentum, and it is surrounded by a disk of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 M{sub Sun }. While in our global simulations the magnetic field is amplified by about two orders of magnitude, local simulations have shown that hydrodynamic instabilities and the onset of the magnetorotational instability could further increase the magnetic field strength up to magnetar levels. This leads to the interesting possibility that, for some NS mergers, a stable and magnetized NS surrounded by an accretion disk could be formed. We discuss the impact of these new results for the emission of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave signals and for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Published by the Research Policy Office Victoria University of Wellington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Prentice Hall of Australia Pty Ltd, 1999), 856pp. Articles Ashill, Nicholas and Jobber, D., `The Impact, Jonathan, Levine, S., McLeay, E., Roberts, N.S. and Schmidt, H., `The Impact of Public Sector Reform/nzjir/. Crawford, Aaron, Harbridge, Raymond and Walsh, Pat, `Privacy Legislation and Its Impact in the New Zealand

Frean, Marcus

263

Curriculum for B.S. in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curriculum for B.S. in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management FIRST YEAR Fall Spring HUSC., Organization 3 NS 1410, Science of Nutrition 4 RHIM 2310, Intro. to Hospitality Mgmt. 3 RHIM 2308, Hotel, Facilities Management 3 ANSC 3404, Cons. Selec./Util. 4 Oral Communications* 3 RHIM 3390, Purchasing in Hosp

Rock, Chris

264

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UVUV and IRUV hole burning spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UV­UV and IR­UV hole burning spectroscopy E. Nir Department spectroscopy. 1-methylguanine, in which the Keto­Enol tautomerism is blocked, shows hole burning spectra from hole burning SHB by using two counter- propagating dye laser pulses with a delay of about 150 ns

de Vries, Mattanjah S.

265

Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and thermonuclear bursts from Terzan 5: A showcase of burning regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J174802446, located in the globular cluster ...

Linares, M.

266

Surface Features of Winter Monsoon Surges over South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface features associated with two kinds of winter monsoon surges over south China are studied: the easterly surge (ES) and the northerly surge (NS). Surface meteorological parameters over the region 1550N, 90130E for the surges that ...

M. C. Wu; Johnny C. L. Chan

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ASPES 2009, Volume 1, Issue 1 ISSN 1937-7991 Editor: Rafiq Islam, pp. 2008 Nova Science Publishers, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

safe natural gas pipelines. Individual risk is one of the important elements for quantitative risk Publishers, Inc. 33 FLAMMABILITYAND INDIVIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINES M. Enamul Hossain Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington Street, Halifax, NS B3J-2X4, Canada ABSTRACT Natural gas and oil

Hossain, M. Enamul

268

Stability Problems of Transport of Event Data in Realistic Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, wireless sensor networks have a certain degree of spatial redundancy, which means that a high number of nodes can sense the same event at the same time. This redundancy permits to simplify both MAC protocol and the transport of sensed data. ... Keywords: Data Transport, Distortion, Event Detection, Multi-hop Networks, Path stability, Shadowing, Stability, Wireless Sensor Networks, ns-2 Simulations

Giuseppe De Marco; Leonard Barolli

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

------~~~T~~"~cr~~s~-~~a-r~~~C-~~:~"'4r:~~~?4F~~n-I~~~U i~)-----`----------------r~~~t' 1O NCOT T MATCHING OF A FREE PISTON STIRLING ENGINE COUPLED WITH A FREE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine D 2009; published 30 April 2009 A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has s : 02.70.Ns, 05.70.Ln, 47.61. k The Stirling engine, an external combustion engine in- vented almost two

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

270

Emerging Technologies and Moore's Law: Prospects for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electricity Usage 60 80 ns (kWh / Improved Operation B t P ti B t P ti ... 1.896 5,000 Reference Case Billion kWh B illion kWh 4,000 1.242 Billion kWh ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

Double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for distinguishing between gaseous and particulate phase analytes  

SciTech Connect

We explore the use of a combination of double-pulse and single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) methodologies as a means of differentiating between solid-phase and gaseous-phase analytes (namely, carbon) in an aerosol stream. A range of spectral data was recorded for double-pulse and single-pulse configurations, including both ns and fs prepulse widths, while varying the gas-phase mass percentage of the carbon from about 10% to 90% for various fixed carbon concentrations. The carbon emission response, as measured by the peak-to-continuum ratio, was greater for the double-pulse configuration as compared with the single-pulse response and was also enhanced as the percentage of solid-phase carbon was increased. Using a combination of the double-pulse and single-pulse emission signals, a monotonically increasing response function was found to correlate with the percentage of gas-phase analyte. However, individual data points at the measured gas-phase percentages reveal considerable scatter from the predicted trend. Furthermore, the double-pulse to single-pulse ratio was only pronounced with the ns-ns configuration as compared with the fs-ns scheme. Overall, the LIBS methodology has been demonstrated as a potential means to discriminate between gas-phase and particulate-phase fractions of the same elemental species in an aerosol, although future optimization of the temporal parameters should be explored to improve the precision and accuracy of this approach.

Asgill, Michael E.; Brown, Michael S.; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M.; Hahn, David W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analytical Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAnalytical Division2013 Members391 Members as of October 1, 2013Abdurahman, SadegWashington State UniversityPullman, WA, USAAbuzaytoun, ReemDalhousie UniversityHalifax, NS, CanadaAdcock, JacquiDeakin Universityaurn Ponds

273

AUGUST 11, 2010 PACE Status Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.whitehouse.gov/assets/documents/PACE_Principles.pdf 8 http://www1.eere.energy.gov Primer for more information on Commercial PACE: http://www1.eere visit: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/publications/pdfs/building_america/ns/plenary_3

274

Engineering Escherichia coli to Control Biofilm Formation, Dispersal, and Persister Cell Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofilms are formed in aquatic environments by the attachment of bacteria to submerged surfaces, to the air/liquid interface, and to each other. Although biofilms are associated with disease and biofouling, the robust nature of biofilms; for example, their ability to tolerate chemical and physical stresses, makes them attractive for beneficial biotechnology applications such as bioremediation and biofuels. Based on an understanding of diverse signals and regulatory networks during biofilm development, biofilms can be engineered for these applications by manipulating extracellular/intercellular signals and regulators. Here, we rewired the global regulator H-NS of Escherichia coli to control biofilm formation using random protein engineering. H-NS variant K57N was obtained that reduces biofilm formation 10-fold compared with wild-type H-NS (wild-type H-NS increases biofilm formation whereas H-NS K57N reduces it) via its interaction with the nucleoid-associated proteins Cnu and StpA. H-NS K57N leads to enhanced excision of the defective prophage Rac and results in cell lysis through the activation of a host killing toxin HokD. We also engineered another global regulator, Hha, which interacts with H-NS, to disperse biofilms. Hha variant Hha13D6 was obtained that causes nearly complete biofilm dispersal by increasing cell death by the activation of proteases. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are important components of a wide variety of engineered biological devices, since autoinducers are useful as input signals because they are small, diffuse freely in aqueous media, and are easily taken up by cells. To demonstrate that biofilms may be controlled for biotechnological applications such as biorefineries, we constructed a synthetic biofilm engineering circuit to manipulate biofilm formation. By using a population-driven QS switch based on the LasI/LasR system and biofilm dispersal proteins Hha13D6 and BdcAE50Q (disperses biofilms by titrating cyclic diguanylate), we displaced an existing biofilm and then removed the second biofilm. Persisters are a subpopulation of metabolically-dormant cells in biofilms that are resistant to antibiotics; hence, understanding persister cell formation is important for controlling bacterial infections. Here, we engineered toxin MqsR with greater toxicity and demonstrated that the more toxic MqsR increases persistence by decreasing the ability of the cell to respond to antibiotic stress through its RpoS-based regulation of acid resistance, multidrug resistance, and osmotic resistance systems.

Hong, Seok Hoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

XTE J1701-462 AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF SUBCLASSES IN LOW-MAGNETIC-FIELD NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

We report on an analysis of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (NS-LMXB) XTE J1701-462, obtained during its 2006-2007 outburst. The X-ray properties of the source changed between those of various types of NS-LMXB subclasses. At high luminosities, the source switched between two types of Z source behavior and at low luminosities we observed a transition from Z source to atoll source behavior. These transitions between subclasses primarily manifest themselves as changes in the shapes of the tracks in X-ray color-color (CD) and hardness-intensity diagrams (HID), but they are accompanied by changes in the kHz quasi-periodic oscillations, broadband variability, burst behavior, and/or X-ray spectra. We find that for most of the outburst the low-energy X-ray flux is a good parameter to track the gradual evolution of the tracks in CD and HID, allowing us to resolve the evolution of the source in greater detail than before and relate the observed properties to other NS-LMXBs. We further find that during the transition from Z to atoll, characteristic behavior known as the atoll upper banana can equivalently be described as the final stage of a weakening Z source flaring branch, thereby blurring the line between the two subclasses. Our findings strongly suggest that the wide variety in behavior observed in NS-LXMBs with different luminosities can be linked through changes in a single variable parameter, namely the mass accretion rate, without the need for additional differences in the neutron star parameters or viewing angle. We briefly discuss the implications of our findings for the spectral changes observed in NS-LMXBs and suggest that, contrary to what is often assumed, the position along the color-color tracks of Z sources is not determined by the instantaneous mass accretion rate.

Homan, Jeroen; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Lewin, Walter H. G. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Van der Klis, Michiel; Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez, Mariano [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Groningen University, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Lin Dacheng [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Casella, Piergiorgio [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Belloni, Tomaso M., E-mail: jeroen@space.mit.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

RAPID COOLING OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN THE QUIESCENT SUPER-EDDINGTON TRANSIENT XTE J1701-462  

SciTech Connect

We present Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and Swift observations made during the final three weeks of the 2006-2007 outburst of the super-Eddington neutron star (NS) transient XTE J1701-462, as well as Chandra and XMM-Newton observations covering the first {approx_equal}800 days of the subsequent quiescent phase. The source transitioned quickly from active accretion to quiescence, with the luminosity dropping by over 3 orders of magnitude in {approx_equal}13 days. The spectra obtained during quiescence exhibit both a thermal component, presumed to originate in emission from the NS surface, and a non-thermal component of uncertain origin, which has shown large and irregular variability. We interpret the observed decay of the inferred effective surface temperature of the NS in quiescence as the cooling of the NS crust after having been heated and brought out of thermal equilibrium with the core during the outburst. The interpretation of the data is complicated by an apparent temporary increase in temperature {approx_equal}220 days into quiescence, possibly due to an additional spurt of accretion. We derive an exponential decay timescale of {approx_equal}120{sup +30}{sub -20} days for the inferred temperature (excluding observations affected by the temporary increase). This short timescale indicates a highly conductive NS crust. Further observations are needed to confirm whether the crust is still slowly cooling or has already reached thermal equilibrium with the core at a surface temperature of {approx_equal}125 eV. The latter would imply a high equilibrium bolometric thermal luminosity of {approx_equal}5 x 10{sup 33}ergs{sup -1} for an assumed distance of 8.8 kpc.

Fridriksson, Joel K.; Lewin, Walter H. G. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Homan, Jeroen [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wijnands, Rudy; Altamirano, Diego; Degenaar, Nathalie [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mendez, Mariano [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Cackett, Edward M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belloni, Tomaso M., E-mail: joelkf@mit.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

May 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2009 May 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

279

BNL | ATF Beamline Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamline Parameters Beamline Parameters Electron beam energy: 25 to 76 MeV Temporal structure: Macropulse length: 3 microseconds Macropulse repetition rate from under 1 PPS to 3 PPS. Micropulse repetition period 12.25 ns or 24.5 ns. Micropulse length variable from about 1 ps FWHM to 10 ps FWHM. Electron beam charge: continuously variable. Single micropulse charge from zero to a few nanoculombs. Bunch train charge up to about 10 nanoculombs. Emittance: depends on various conditions, e.g. peak current, gun field, microbunch length etc. At 1 nC we have measured the emittance at 2.6 mm mrad (rms normalized) at a bunch length of 10 ps FWHM. The local emittance (Slice Emittance) is smaller, measured 1.4 mm mrad for a slice out of the 1 nC bunch. Stability: (approx.) 1 ps in short term phase, 1% of beam diameter

280

February 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 February 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - DOE-10-010.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 SECTION A. Project Title: Infrastructure and Reactor Upgrade Support to Universities SECTION B. Project Description All of the equipment and instrumentation within the scope of these solicitations support existing research and educational activities. General Infrastructure Support - DE-FOA-0000321 DOE asked for applications for equipment and instrumentation infrastructure to support university nuclear energy-related engineering and science teaching and research laboratories. Infrastructure is defined as equipment and instrumentation that supports Nuclear Scientific & Engineering Research & Development (NS&E R&D) and education programs at U.S. universities and colleges. All equipment and instrumentation requests support NS&E R&D or education. This includes, but is not

282

NAPA Collaboration Project: Worker Dialogue to Improve Worker Health, Safety and Security - Worker Dialogue Frequently Asked Questions and Registration Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

k k Health, Safety and Security . Department of Energy s fety, and Security (HSS) is part duct a g An ome of the Worker Dialogue s DOE partnering with them for this Dialogue? ublic Administration ional leaders ges. As the home of The Collaboration Project, the National Academy in online Dialogues, which are similar to onli this discussion. National Academy ns who work at demy will be viewed as an tcome or result of this dialogue? o harness the "wisdom of the crowd" and provide the HSS leadership s and feedback to inform recommendations for policy changes within y will issue a report from our Panel of Fellows that contains lessons ns on rograms cts that such a report will be highly informative and consequential commendati m other forums, like the HSS Focus Group, where worker es have already been reported? orums have been benefic lishing working relationships between HSS and union leadership,

283

July 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

284

VNIIA-Fedotov.ppt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics, All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow, Russia S.А. Fedotov, L.P. Ryabchikova, N.S. Fedotova Proceedings for the Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science Compared parameters:  conditions of deposition;  concentation of carbon content in coating;  microstructure;  physical & mechanical properties. All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow, Russia Properties research of chemically deposited nickel coatings modified with nano diamonds. S.А. Fedotov, L.P. Ryabchikova, N.S. Fedotova Composition of electrolyte: - NiSO 4 .7H 2 O -20-30 g/l - Sodium hypophosphite - 10-25 g/l - Acetous sodium - 10-15 g/l - Acetic acid - 4-6 g/l - Thiourea - 0,001-0,003 g/l - Temperature - 82-87 о С. All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow, Russia

285

MAH-3 Code: Mixed Cells and Markers to Reconstruct Interfaces  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

MAH-3 Code: Mixed Cells and Markers to Reconstruct Interfaces MAH-3 Code: Mixed Cells and Markers to Reconstruct Interfaces Nina N. Anuchina, Nikolay S. Es'kov, Viatcheslav A. Gordeyhuck, Oleg M. Kozyrev & Vladimir I. Volkov MAH-3 [1, 2] code simulates nonstationary 3D hydrodynamic multi-component flows with strongly distorted interfaces. Following from a priori information, the system to be simulated is presented by a set of computational domains. In each domain, an unstructured hexahedral mesh is used. 1. Anuchina N.N., Volkov V.J., Gordeychuk V.A., Es'kov N.S., Ilytina O.S., Kozurev O.M. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using MAX-3 code. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, vol. 168 (2004), pp. 11-20. 2. Volkov V.I., Gordeychuk V.A., Es'kov N.S., Kozyrev O.M. Numerical

286

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Functional Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NANOMATERIALS SYNTHESIS AND FUNCTIONAL ASSEMBLY (OPTOELECTRONICS) NANOMATERIALS SYNTHESIS AND FUNCTIONAL ASSEMBLY (OPTOELECTRONICS) Synthesis of SWNT's, NT Arrays, NW's, NP's or thin films by CVD, Laser Vaporization, and PLD with in situ diagnostics ns-Laser Vaporization Synthesis of SWNTs, NWs, NPs SWNTs and nanowires are produced by pulsed Nd:YAG laser-irradiation (30 Hz, Q-switched or free-running) of composite pellets in a 2" tube furnace with variable pressure control. Excimer laser ablation of materials into variable pressure background gases is used for nanoparticle generation in proximity of ns-laser diagnostics. High-power ms-laser vaporization bulk production of nanomaterials SWNTs (primarily), SWNH (single-wall carbon nanohorns), nanoparticles and nanowires are produced by robotically-scanned 600W Nd:YAG laser-irradiation

287

Navy Technology Validation (Techval)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Validation (Techval) FUPWG Spring Meeting 2008 April 15, 2008 Destin, FL Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval CURRENT PROJECTS * Cool Roof reflective roof coating  NS Pearl Harbor HI * Thermal Destratifiers  NAS Oceana VA * Boiler Combustion Controls  USNA Annapolis MD * Sand Filters  NAS Lemoore CA * Spectrally Enhanced Lighting  Navy Yard Washington DC * Desuperheater  NS Norfolk VA  NAS North Island CA * HVAC CO2 Controls  NAB Little Creek VA  NAVSUPPACT Mid-South TN  NB Kitsap Bremerton WA *HVAC Occupancy Controls NAS Oceana VA *Electromagnetic Pulse Water Treatment NADEP San Diego CA NSY Puget Sound WA *LED Parking Lot Lighting NBVC Port Hueneme CA Techval

288

May 2010 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

289

Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS All new construction required to follow the provisions of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420. lB, Facility Safety, must comply with national consensus industry standards and the model building codes applicable for the state or region in which the facility is located. Certain individuals in the fire community requested

290

Foreign Invention Rights under DOE Cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OTEMENT OF CONSIDERA)NS OTEMENT OF CONSIDERA)NS Request by McDermott Technology, Inc. for an Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Invention Rights under DOE Cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26- 98FT40007; W(A)-98-023, CH-0992 The Petitioner, McDermott Technology, Inc. (McDermott), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled "Fine Particulate Characterization and Control for Coal-Fired Boilers". McDermott is a subsidiary of McDermott International. McDermott International, although owned by a Panamanian concern, is considered a U.S. company because the Panamanian concern is controlled by United States citizens. The objective of this project is to demonstrate technologies at pilot scale that reduce NO, and PM2.5 emissions, mitigating any

291

A high voltage pulsed power supply for capillary discharge waveguide applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an all solid-state, high voltage pulsed power supply for inducing stable plasma formation (density {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) in gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides. The pulser (pulse duration of 1 {mu}s) is based on transistor switching and wound transmission line transformer technology. For a capillary of length 40 mm and diameter 265 {mu}m and gas backing pressure of 100 mbar, a fast voltage pulse risetime of 95 ns initiates breakdown at 13 kV along the capillary. A peak current of {approx}280 A indicates near complete ionization, and the r.m.s. temporal jitter in the current pulse is only 4 ns. Temporally stable plasma formation is crucial for deploying capillary waveguides as plasma channels in laser-plasma interaction experiments, such as the laser wakefield accelerator.

Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Ganciu, M. [Low Temperature Plasma Department, National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Non-Uniform Switching of the Perpendicular Magnetization in a Spin-Torque Magnetic Nanopillar  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) measurements were performed to study the current-induced magnetization switching mechanism in nanopillars exhibiting strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). This technique provides both short time (70 ps) and high spatial (25 nm) resolution. Direct imaging of the magnetization demonstrates that, after an incubation time of {approx} 1.3 ns, a 100 x 300 nm{sup 2} ellipsoidal device switches in {approx} 1 ns via a central domain nucleation and opposite propagation of two domain walls towards the edges. High domain wall velocities on the order of 100m/s are measured. Micromagnetic simulations are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results and provide insight into magnetization dynamics during the incubation and reversal period.

Bernstein, David

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Versatile 0. 5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed.

Ramirez, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Shock Timing Technique for the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Neutron Star in F-sharp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this short introductory commentary on the paper (Hessels et al 2006, Science, 311, 1901) reporting the discovery of the shortest spin period millisecond pulsar (MSP) Ter5-ad in the globular cluster Terzan 5, I also point out a new explanation for possible minimum spin periods, P, of MSPs without requiring gravitational radiation (or other) slow-down torques. If the accretion of matter required to spinup a MSP also reduces (buries) the neutron star (NS) magnetic field, B, as commonly believed, an inverse correlation between neutron star mass, M, and B is expected together with a positive correlation between P and B. Both are suggested for the 4 MSPs with NS mass measures reported (Latimer and Prakash 2004, Science, 304, 536) to have tested when a timing solution is found. If confirmed, the highest spin frequency NSs do not pulse simply because their B fields are too low.

Jonathan E. Grindlay

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Neutron Star Astronomy in the era of the European Extremely Large Telescope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 25 isolated neutron stars (INSs) are now detected in the optical domain, mainly thanks to the HST and to VLT-class telescopes. The European Extremely Large Telescope(E-ELT) will yield {approx}100 new identifications, many of which from the follow-up of SKA, IXO, and Fermi observations. Moreover, the E-ELT will allow to carry out, on a much larger sample, INS observations which still challenge VLT-class telescopes, enabling studies on the structure and composition of the NS interior, of its atmosphere and magnetosphere, as well as to search for debris discs. In this contribution, I outline future perspectives for NS optical astronomy with the E-ELT.

Mignani, Roberto P. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory-University College London (United Kingdom)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Regenerative amplification of picosecond 10-{mu}m pulses in a high-pressure optically pumped CO{sub 2} laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed and numerical calculations are performed for the regenerative amplification of seed picosecond 10-{mu}m radiation pulses in a high-pressure optically pumped CO{sub 2} laser. It is established that by varying the cavity parameters, the conditions of efficient regenerative amplification may be optimised for the case of a relatively short-duration (50 ns) solid-state Cr:Er:YSGG laser and 'long-duration' (250 ns) electrodischarge chemical HF laser. It is shown that the schemes of a CO{sub 2} amplifier with optical pumping presented allow obtaining the pulses with the duration of 3ps, output energy of 1-5 mJ, and peak power of {approx}1 GW at the pump energy of 150-200 mJ. (lasers and amplifiers)

Gordienko, Vyacheslav M; Platonenko, Viktor T [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz  

SciTech Connect

A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being {approx}0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse. (lasers)

Annenkov, V I; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zhidkov, N V; Zubkov, A V; Kalipanov, S V; Kalmykov, N A; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Lapin, S G; Martynenko, S P; Pankratov, V I; Faizullin, V S; Khrustalev, V A; Khudikov, N M; Chebotar, V S [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Divergent antiviral effects of bioflavonoids on the hepatitis C virus life cycle  

SciTech Connect

We have previously demonstrated that quercetin, a bioflavonoid, blocks hepatitis C virus (HCV) proliferation by inhibiting NS5A-driven internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation of the viral genome. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of antiviral activity of quercetin and six additional bioflavonoids. We demonstrate that catechin, naringenin, and quercetin possess significant antiviral activity, with no associated cytotoxicity. Infectious virion secretion was not significantly altered by these bioflavonoids. Catechin and naringenin demonstrated stronger inhibition of infectious virion assembly compared to quercetin. Quercetin markedly blocked viral translation whereas catechin and naringenin demonstrated mild activity. Similarly quercetin completely blocked NS5A-augmented IRES-mediated translation in an IRES reporter assay, whereas catechin and naringenin had only a mild effect. Moreover, quercetin differentially inhibited HSP70 induction compared to catechin and naringenin. Thus, the antiviral activity of these bioflavonoids is mediated through different mechanisms. Therefore combination of these bioflavonoids may act synergistically against HCV.

Khachatoorian, Ronik, E-mail: RnKhch@ucla.edu [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States) [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja, E-mail: VArumugaswami@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States) [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Regenerative Medicine Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Raychaudhuri, Santanu, E-mail: SRaychau@ucla.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Yeh, George K., E-mail: GgYeh@ucla.edu [Molecular Biology Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program (MBIDP), Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Maloney, Eden M., E-mail: EMaloney@ucla.edu [Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); Wang, Julie, E-mail: JulieW1521@ucla.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, CA (United States); and others

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

A web-tool for population synthesis of near-by cooling neutron stars: An on-line test for cooling curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new web-tool - Net-PSICoNS - for population synthesis of isolated near-by cooling neutron stars (NSs). The main aim is to provide an easy test of models of the NS thermal evolution which can be used by groups studying this subject. A user can upload cooling curves for a set of masses, modify the mass spectrum if necessary, change radii to fit the EoS used for cooling curve calculations, and then a population synthesis of close-by isolated cooling NSs is performed. The output includes the Log N -- Log S distribution confronted with the ROSAT observations and several other sets of data. In this paper, we summarize the idea of the test proposed by Popov et al. (2006), and present a user's manual for the web-tool.

Boldin, P A; Tetzlaff, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Dynamic hohlraum experiments on SATURN  

SciTech Connect

The authors have imploded a 17.5 mm diameter 120-tungsten-wire array weighing 450 {mu}g/cm onto a 4 mm diameter silicon aerogel foam weighing 650 {mu}g/cm, using the pulsed power driver SATURN. A peak current of 7.0 MA drives a 48 ns implosion to strike time followed by 8 ns of foam compression until stagnation. The tungsten strikes the foam with a 50 cm/{mu}s implosion velocity. Radiation temperatures were measured from the side and along the axis with filtered x-ray diode arrays. There is evidence of radiation trapping by the optically thick tungsten from crystal spectroscopy. The pinch is open to less than a 1 mm diameter as measured by time-resolved x-ray framing cameras. The radiation brightness temperature in the foam reaches 150 eV before the main radiation burst or stagnation.

Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Uncertainties in parton related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the form ?ns lnn?1(1/x) and ?ns ln2n?1(1? x) in the perturbative expansion. This means that renormalization and factorization scale variation are not a reliable way of estimating higher order effects, e.g., at small x P 1qg ? ?S(2) P 2qg ? ?s(2) x (28... ) whereas Pnqg ? ?nS(2) lnn?2(1/x) x . (29) and scale variations of P 1qg, P 2qg never give an indication of these terms. Hence, in order to investigate the true theoretical error we must consider some way of performing correct large and small x...

Thorne, Robert S

303

Laser breakdown in air at ultrahigh laser pulse repetition rates  

SciTech Connect

Some specific features of interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with air at ultrahigh pulse repetition rates have been experimentally studied. Data on the dynamics of plasma cloud expansion and the plasma electron density on time intervals no longer than 10 ns are obtained by femtosecond interferometry. These data are interpreted in terms of the most likely mechanisms of ionised gas recombination. The effect of ultrahigh-frequency laser radiation on a medium was modelled by double-pulse irradiation with a short delay {Delta}t between the pulses: from 1 ps to 11 ns. A nonmonotonic dependence of the degree of air ionisation by the second pulse on the delay time {Delta}t is found; possible mechanisms of these dependences are discussed in terms of the processes of femtosecond radiation absorption in the residual plasma. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Kononenko, Vitalii V; Kononenko, Taras V; Pashinin, V P; Gololobov, V M; Konov, Vitalii I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient absorption in optical fibers has been studied with emphasis on fast absorption components. Radiation damage was induced with a Febetron 706 electron accelerator, modified to deliver an electron pulse width of 1.1 ns. Dye lasers were synchronized to the accelerator to provide a light pulse through the fiber during the radiation pulse. The output light pulse was detected with a biplanar vacuum photodiode. Four scope traces were used on each electron pulse to monitor the Febetron output, the input drive pulse, and two records of the output pulse on two sweep speeds. Detailed data were acquired for times less than 100 ns after irradiation. An insulated enslosure was used to vary fiber temperature from -30/sup 0/C to + 250/sup 0/C. Several fibers were studied with emphasis on ITT T303 PCS fiber. Data were acquired at 600 and 850 nm. Theoretical modeling of the data is presented.

Looner, L.D.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced Photon Source RF Beam Position Monitor System Upgrade Design and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring mono-pulse rf beam position monitor (BPM) system upgrade. The present rf BPM system requires a large dead time of 400 ns between the measured bunch and upstream bunch. The bunch pattern is also constrained by the required target cluster of six bunches of 7 mA minimum necessary to operate the receiver near the top end of the dynamic range. The upgrade design objectives involve resolving bunches spaced as closely as 100 ns. These design objectives require us to reduce receiver front-end losses and reflections. An improved trigger scheme that minimizes systematic errors is also required. The upgrade is in the final phases of installation and commissioning at this time. The latest experimental and commissioning data and results will be presented.

Lill, R; Singh, O

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

H.H. Khenpo Jigme Phuntsho A Tribute and a Translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buddhas and the one singly heroic in destroying the misfortunes of degenerate age, along with his line of saints, bless Your Majesty. 134 s- o`N-e-bo'i-db/-'PN-dguN-ls-mTo; ;'bNs-i- e`-bo-rN-dbN-bde-dges-'o; ; kun-... -id--bdun-Xi-ONs-+n-'di-ni-Cos-l-oN-bn-Um-po'i-yN- 'dul-Xi-g/g-lg-KN-Cen-por-' ug-l-po-dN--'Kor-n-s-l-mjl-'d-ed-bs- Ng-dbN-o-Oos-m/Ns-med-i-yid-Nor-Sr-b-bZin-mKn-po-bsod-dr-s-is-yi-ge'i- gz/gs-s-p-dge-legs-'Pel; ;rb-uN-bc...

Phuntsho, Karma

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Importance Nested Sampling and the MultiNest Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian inference involves two main computational challenges. First, in estimating the parameters of some model for the data, the posterior distribution may well be highly multi-modal: a regime in which the convergence to stationarity of traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques becomes incredibly slow. Second, in selecting between a set of competing models the necessary estimation of the Bayesian evidence for each is, by definition, a (possibly high-dimensional) integration over the entire parameter space; again this can be a daunting computational task, although new Monte Carlo (MC) integration algorithms offer solutions of ever increasing efficiency. Nested sampling (NS) is one such contemporary MC strategy targeted at calculation of the Bayesian evidence, but which also enables posterior inference as a by-product, thereby allowing simultaneous parameter estimation and model selection. The widely-used MultiNest algorithm presents a particularly efficient implementation of the NS technique for...

Feroz, F; Cameron, E; Pettitt, A N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Driving LED in a Nanosecond Regime by a Fast Operational Amplifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is widely believed that the generation of high speed optical signals is not the job for an LED. However this work is done to show that there are techniques which can be used to produce nanosecond square pulses from a diode. Rise and fall times of a typical 10ns long signal were 1-2 ns and the intensity of the emission could be controlled by the supply voltage. The wavelength of the radiation was 472 nm, which is blue in colour, but any longer or even shorter wavelengths can similarly be used. The consistency of the experiment and its theoretical model was analysed by computer simulations using OrCAD and PSPICE.

Rose, Joachim; Bond, Isabel; Ogden, Paul; Price, Andrew; Oliver, Richard; Khassen, Yerbol Farkhatuly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Broadband optical delay with large dynamic range using atomic dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a tunable all-optical delay line for pulses with optical frequency within the Rb $D_2$ absorption line. Pulses of 10 ns duration are delayed in a 10 cm hot vapour cell by up to 40 ns where the transmission reduces to approximately 10%. Using an optical frequency between absorption components from different isotopes allows the delay to be increased or decreased by optical pumping with a second laser, producing rapid tuning over a range more than 40% of the initial delay. We investigate the frequency and intensity ranges in which this delay line can be realised. Our observations are in good agreement with a numerical model of the system.

Vanner, M R; Sidorov, A I; Hannaford, P; Akulshin, A M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Self-Assessment Standard for DOE Contractor Criticality Safety Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 March 2010 DOE STANDARD SELF-ASSESSMENT STANDARD FOR DOE CONTRACTOR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAMS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1158-2010 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ................................................................................................................... v ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................................................................vi DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................ vii

311

Pr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BN BN L - SM D Page 1/11 Page 2 /11 B, G (T), (T/m) R in , R out (mm) From IP (mm) Coil Length (mm) Magnetic Length (mm) AS1 - 95.1~105.9 630~933 303 - AS2 - 115.4~119.0 1035~1381 346 - AS3 - 95.1~105.9 1474~1590 116 - SCQ 18.744 95.1~108.1 961~1457 496 400 SCB (HCD) 0.543 0.056 108.5~111.8 633~1307 674 400 VCD 0.059 111.9~113.5 904~1514 610 380 SKQ 0.937 113.6~115.2 954~1464 510 400 Operating Current (A) * ** ** 460 495 (50) 24 45 BEPC-II Magnets 12-May-03 * **AS2 and AS3 are in series with AS1 but can have their own independent trim currents. BEPC-II Superconducting IR Magnet Coil Parameter Summary Z (cm) R (cm) 1 / 2 BES- I I IDet ect orw i t h Ant i - Sol enoi d BEPC-II Anti-Solenoid Design Parameter Summary I m ai n = 1120 A N AS1 = 732 t ur ns N AS2 = 260 t ur ns N AS3 = 280 t ur ns N Tot = 1272 t ur ns L Tot = 78 m H Page 3 /11 Page 4 /11 AS1R AS2R AS3R AS1L AS2L AS3L Left Side Right Side A S 1R A S 2R A S 3R I M ai n ∆I I2R ∆I I3R A S 1L A S 2L A

312

The Benefit of Pooling Operating Rooms and Parallel Surgery Processing under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- zijr) , i, j = i, r, (3c) nR r=1 Cikr() = tk + Ik() + preik () + pik () + postik () , k, (3d) nR r=1 Cjr() - nR r=1 Cir() + posti() - sS - pj() - postj() (i, j) : nS k=1 bijk = 1, (10) Ik() = nR r=1 Cikr Cikr = tk + Ik + preik + pik + postik k, (18c) nR r=1 Cir tk + prei + pi + posti (i, k) : n j=1 bjik

Schaefer, Andrew

313

LM75I2CDigitalTemperatureSensorandThermalWatchdog February 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Connection Diagrams SO-8 TL H 12658­2 Order Number LM75CIM-3 LM75CIMX-3 LM75CIM-5 or LM75CIMX-5 See NS Package Number M08A Ordering Information Order Number Supply Supplied As Voltage LM75CIM-3 3 3V LM75CIMX-3 3 3V 2500 Units on Tape and Reel LM75CIM-5 5V LM75CIMX-5 5V 2500 Units on Tape and Reel Pin

Berndt, Richard

314

The frequency and voltage dependent electrical characteristics of Al-TiW-Pd2Si/n-Si structure using I-V, C-V and G/?-V measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forward and reverse bias capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/w-V) characteristics of Al-TiW-Pd"2Si/n-Si structures have been investigated over a wide frequency range of 5kHz-5MHz. These measurements allow to us the determination ... Keywords: 73.30.+y, 73.40.Ns, 73.40.Qv, Frequency dependent, Interface states, MS structure, Pd2Si/n-Si contacts, Series resistance

?. M. Afandiyeva; ?. Dkme; ?. Alt?ndal; L. K. Abdullayeva; Sh. G. Askerov

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Khesbn no. 79-80 - April 1975 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12K)T 9t3p8n9^ia8 n i^k _ 'r^oio pn ]1D ia nyi pk n m jooa px teo iyi . (lyoaso 8 oio*na oy7 -ya P87 0*^*0^0 te*o'o. ons p'o o^sb /i^an oio nn aiasn PK nsi^s ns isi is /

Admin, LAYCC

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Kheshbn No. 112- Fall 1988 - Journall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

px ya3 x ]x n OIK 037T o*x oio ps? V p3xi pi .itan px rrnD^X a pva }xp *px nnDttro H ,OO ivi ps ivoi3 ovn px IT' H3 px p*0*11 pS 0X1 *pQ OIO t7D73W N 013 l>nNS N 7>t UVt .

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Kheshbn No. 20 - January 1960 - Entire Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vx isa8 . ^*? 3as px os n oio *? 88 os 0*118 T X " a omp "0^8t TS PI i s n Y X P K /in oi 8*r- 0811 l i,,l ayn Y X TK8 T osn yosa i y i TS toi /Oions ]ix ynsaass n as"iya i

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

;:.;:.c;:~~go~O'O'~CC~~-~-Q.-.-n=''"1~0r"'crcrn "'nOO"'-~-'='~"""  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r- Eo ~'OIO~iA";i-0~~--, -"'~~=-'" ~~s::~~'O~-;;"~~~ =~III."'.~; Q.° :E"'=OQ Q.~n2'on 8.~rig.~~ 5g0-g0-~~0S~';;~s:~'o-=:~~'iO50n-s2

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

319

Analysis of Seepage from Polygon Channels Bhagu R. Chahar1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Digest of State Water Laws-National Water CornmLs s Lo n , R.L. Dewsnup, D.W. Jensen, R. W. Swenson, May 1973 Water Intelligence Systems, N.S. Grigg, J.W. Labadie, G.L. Smith, D.W. Hill, B.H. Bradford, Colorado of Stream Ecologists, D.W. Cummins, Michigan State University, February 1973. 72. Water Reuse

Chahar, B. R.

320

Stellar Collisions and Ultracompact X-ray Binary Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We report the results of SPH calculations of parabolic collisions between a subgiant or slightly evolved red-giant star and a neutron star (NS). Such collisions are likely to form ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) observed today in old globular clusters. In particular, we compute collisions of a 1.4 Msun NS with realistically modelled parent stars of initial masses 0.8 and 0.9 Msun, each at three different evolutionary stages (corresponding to three different radii R). The distance of closest approach for the initial orbit varies from 0.04 R (nearly head-on) to 1.3 R (grazing). These collisions lead to the formation of a tight binary, composed of the NS and the subgiant or red-giant core, embedded in an extremely diffuse common envelope (CE) typically of mass ~0.1 to 0.3 Msun. Our calculations follow the binary for many hundreds of orbits, ensuring that the orbital parameters we determine at the end of the calculations are close to final. Some of the fluid initially in the envelope of the (sub)giant, from 0.003 to 0.023 Msun in the cases we considered, is left bound to the NS. The eccentricities of the resulting binaries range from about 0.2 for our most grazing collision to about 0.9 for the nearly head-on cases. In almost all the cases we consider, gravitational radiation alone will cause sufficiently fast orbital decay to form a UCXB within a Hubble time, and often on a much shorter timescale. Our hydrodynamics code implements the recent SPH equations of motion derived with a variational approach by Springel & Hernquist and by Monaghan. Numerical noise is reduced by enforcing an analytic constraint equation that relates the smoothing lengths and densities of SPH particles. We present tests of these new methods to help demonstrate their improved accuracy.

J. C. Lombardi Jr.; Z. F. Proulx; K. L. Dooley; E. M. Theriault; N. Ivanova; F. A. Rasio

2005-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Design Notes Last update: 12112008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in docsisVersion.h · TCLdefines.tcl servers as the header file for the tcl scripts · C++ convention: don.h hdrdocsis.h macPhyInterface.h reseqFlowListElement.h serviceFlowObject.h The tcl support code : docsis@CentOS_VM ~/nsallinone2.33/ns2.33/tcl/lan $ The testscripts are located in : docsis

Martin, Jim

322

Actively mode-locked/Q-switched Nd:phosphate glass laser oscillator  

SciTech Connect

Good stability and reliability is achieved in the operation of a laser oscillator with Nd-doped phosphate glass that is actively mode-locked, as well as actively Q-switched. It delivers a single pulse at 1.053 microns with an energy of 140 microJ. Pulse duration is variable between 150 ps and 1.1 ns. The system offers a TTL trigger well related to the single pulse. 9 references.

Roschger, E.W.; Schwarzenbach, A.P.; Balmer, J.E.; Weber, H.P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Uv Thomson scattering from x-ray laser plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Plasmas produced by irradiating massive carbon targets with a 1.064 {mu}m, 1.5 ns laser pulse at incident energies of {approximately}100 J have been investigated. UV thermal Thomson scattering was used to obtain the electron and ion temperatures, as well as drift velocities. The electron density was obtained by optical interferometry. The results are compared to hydrodynamic computer modeling. 6 refs., 6 figs.

La Fontaine, B.; Baldis, H.A.; Villeneuve, D.M.; Bernard, J.E.; Enright, G.D. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)); Rosen, M.D.; Young, P.E.; Matthews, D.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

SciTech Connect

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with < 10%/ns swings during the pulse [J. D. Lindl et al., 'The Physics Basis for Ignition using Indirect Drive Targets on the National Ignition Facility', Physics of Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)]. While drive symmetry during the first 2 ns of the pulse can be inferred by using the re-emission pattern from a surrogate high Z sphere [E. Dewald et al. to be published in Rev. Sci. Inst.] and symmetry during the last 5 ns inferred from the shape of fully imploded capsules [A. Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

POSSIBLE CHANGES OF STATE AND RELEVANT TIMESCALES FOR A NEUTRON STAR IN LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303  

SciTech Connect

The properties of the short, energetic bursts recently observed from the {gamma}-ray binary LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 are typical of those showed by high magnetic field neutron stars (NSs) and thus provide a strong indication in favor of a NS being the compact object in the system. Here, we discuss the transitions among the states accessible to a NS in a system like LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303, such as the ejector, propeller, and accretor phases, depending on the NS spin period, magnetic field, and rate of mass captured. We show how the observed bolometric luminosity ({approx}> few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}) and its broadband spectral distribution indicate that the compact object is most probably close to the transition between working as an ejector all along its orbit and being powered by the propeller effect when it is close to the orbit periastron, in a so-called flip-flop state. By assessing the torques acting onto the compact object in the various states, we follow the spin evolution of the system, evaluating the time spent by the system in each of them. Even taking into account the constraint set by the observed {gamma}-ray luminosity, we found that the total age of the system is compatible with being Almost-Equal-To 5-10 kyr, comparable to the typical spin-down ages of high-field NSs. The results obtained are discussed in the context of the various evolutionary stages expected for a NS with a high-mass companion.

Papitto, A.; Torres, D. F.; Rea, N. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) Campus UAB, Fac. de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Search for low-Mass Higgs states @ BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several types of new-physics models predict the existence of light dark matter candidates and low-mass Higgs states. Previous \\babar searches for invisible light-Higgs decays have excluded large regions of model parameter space. We present searches for a dark-sector Higgs produced in association with a dark gauge boson and searches for a light Higgs in $\\Upsilon (nS)$ decays.

Santoro, Valentina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Volume 131, Number 2 tech.mit.edu Friday, February 4, 2011 Oldest and Largest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. SteelerS Sports staff make their picks for Super Bowl XLV -- can Pittsburgh pull it off against Green Bay's brews ArtS, p. 12 aS CaIrO bUrNS... Tech columnists opine on the situation in the Middle East opiNioN, p of the na- tion's largest, richest, and most influential schools have a big impact on how this town works

328

Graph operations that are good for greedoids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S is a local maximum stable set of a graph G, and we write S@?@J(G), if the set S is a maximum stable set of the subgraph induced by S@?N(S), where N(S) is the neighborhood of S. In Levit and Mandrescu (2002) [5] we have proved that @J(G) is a greedoid ... Keywords: Corona, Greedoid, Local maximum stable set, Zykov sum

Vadim E. Levit; Eugen Mandrescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DARHT : integration of shielding design and analysis with facility design /  

SciTech Connect

The design of the interior portions of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility incorporated shielding and controls from the beginning of the installation of the Accelerators. The purpose of the design and analysis was to demonstrate the adequacy of shielding or to determine the need for additional shielding or controls. Two classes of events were considered: (1) routine operation defined as the annual production of 10,000 2000-ns pulses of electrons at a nominal energy of 20 MeV, some of which are converted to the x-ray imaging beam consisting of four nominal 60-ns pulses over the 2000-ns time frame, and (2) accident case defined as up to 100 2000-ns pulses of electrons accidentally impinging on some metallic surface, thereby producing x rays. Several locations for both classes of events were considered inside and outside of the accelerator hall buildings. The analysis method consisted of the definition of a source term for each case studied and the definition of a model of the shielding and equipment present between the source and the dose areas. A minimal model of the fixed existing or proposed shielding and equipment structures was used for a first approximation. If the resulting dose from the first approximation was below the design goal (1 rem/yr for routine operations, 5 rem for accident cases), then no further investigations were performed. If the result of the first approximation was above our design goals, the model was refined to include existing or proposed shielding and equipment. In some cases existing shielding and equipment were adequate to meet our goals and in some cases additional shielding was added or administrative controls were imposed to protect the workers. It is expected that the radiation shielding design, exclusion area designations, and access control features, will result in low doses to personnel at the DARHT Facility.

Boudrie, R. L. (Richard L.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Gilmore, W. E. (Walter E.); Downing, J. N. (James N.), Jr.; Hack, Alan; McClure, D. A. (Donald A.); Nelson, C. A. (Christine A.); Wadlinger, E. Alan; Zumbro, M. V. (Martha V.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 3, 26 October - 8 November 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]gdf ;+;f]wg ul/Psf] hgfpb} ;Qrf/ ;DaGwL cWofb]z ;+ljwfgsf] wf/ f !,@# / ** -!_ adf]hLd ;'? b]vL g} cdfGo ab/ 3f]lift ug{ dfu /fvL l/6 bfo/ ul/Psf] lyof] . ;dfrf/ ;+sng, laqmL lat/0f tyf ;dfrf/d'ns sfo{qmd k|;f/0fdf /f]s nufpg], a]O{HhtL jf b...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

331

Beta-Gamma Coincidence Counting Using an Yttrium Aluminum Perovskit and Bismuth Germanate Phoswich Scintillator  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Phoswich detectors (two scintillators attached to the same photomultiplier-tube) have been used in the past to measure either betas or gammas separately but were not used to measure beta-gamma coincidence signatures. These coincidence signatures are very important for the detection of many fission products and are exploited to detect four radioxenon isotopes using the Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) [1]. Previous PNNL work with a phoswich detector used a commercially available, thin disk of scintillating CaF2(Eu) and a 2 thick NaI(Tl) crystal in a phoswich arrangement. Studies with this detector measured the beta-gamma coincidence signatures from 133Xe, 214Pb and 214Bi [2]. This scintillator combination worked but was not a good match in scintillation light decay times, 940-ns for CaF2(Eu) and 230 ns for NaI(Tl). Additionally, a 6 mm thick quartz window was placed between the NaI(Tl) and the CaF2 to ensure a hermetic seal for the NaI(Tl) crystal . This dead layer significantly reduced the detection probability of the low energy x-rays and gammas that are part of the coincidence signatures for 214Pb, 214Bi and the radioxenons. Further research showed that Yttrium aluminum perovskit (YAP) and bismuth germanate (BGO) have very good scintillation light characteristics and no hermetic seal requirements. The 27-ns scintillation light decay time of YAP and the 300-ns decay time for BGO are a good match between fast and slow light output. The scintillation light output was measured using XIATM digital signal processing readout electronics, and the fast (YAP) and slow (BGO) light components allowed discrimination between the beta and gamma contributions of the radioactive decays. In this paper we discuss the experimental setup and results obtained with this new phoswich detector and the applications beyond radioxenon gas measurements.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Litke, Kevin E.; Ripplinger, Mike D.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Suarez, Reynold

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

COMPACT BINARY PROGENITORS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy, {epsilon}{sub jet} = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 M{sub Sun }, favoring 'high-mass' binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses {approx}> 1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since 'high-mass' systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of {approx}0.9 or higher.

Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Rezzolla, Luciano [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Potsdam D-14476 (Germany); Troja, Eleonora [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Caliandro, G.A.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Cameron, R.A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Caraveo, P.A.; /Brera Observ.; Casandjian, J.M.; /AIM, Saclay; Cecchi, C.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Charles, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Swedish Acad. Sci. /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /AIM, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville /INFN, Padua; /more authors..

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

On the Construction of Finite Oscillator Dictionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A finite oscillator dictionary which has important applications in sequences designs and the compressive sensing was introduced by Gurevich, Hadani and Sochen. In this paper, we first revisit closed formulae of the finite split oscillator dictionary $\\mathfrak{S}^s$ by a simple proof. Then we study the non-split tori of the group $SL(2,\\mathbb{F}_p)$. Finally, An explicit algorithm for computing the finite non-split oscillator dictionary $\\mathfrak{S}^{ns}$ is described.

Feng, Rongquan; Wang, Zilong; Wu, Hongfeng; Zhou, Kai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode  

SciTech Connect

Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Limitation of the electron emission in an ion diode with magnetic self-insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study of the generation of a pulsed ion beam of gigawatt power formed by a diode with an explosive-emission potential electrode in a mode of magnetic self-insulation are presented. The studies were conducted at the TEMP-4M ion accelerator set in double pulse formation mode: the first pulse was negative (300-500 ns and 100-150 kV) and the second, positive (150 ns and 250-300 kV). The ion current density was 20-40 A/cm{sup 2}; the beam composition was protons and carbon ions. It was shown that plasma is effectively formed over the entire working surface of the graphite potential electrode. During the ion beam generation, a condition of magnetic cutoff of electrons along the entire length of the diode (B/B{sub cr}{>=} 4) is fulfilled. Because of the high drift rate, the residence time of the electrons and protons in the anode-cathode gap is 3-5 ns, while for the C{sup +} carbon ions, it is more than 8 ns. This denotes low efficiency of magnetic self-insulation in a diode of such a design. At the same time, it has been experimentally observed that, during the generation of ion current (second pulse), the electronic component of the total current is suppressed by a factor of 1.5-2 for a strip diode with plane and focusing geometry. A new model of the effect of limiting the electron emission explaining the decrease in the electronic component of the total current in a diode with magnetic self-insulation is proposed.

Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Guselnikov, V. I. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplment au n \\\\, Tome 37., Novembre 1976., page C5-237 THE HEAVY ION FACILITY V I C K S I AT BERLIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- und Strahlenphysik, H a h n - M e i t ~ r I n s t i t u t , Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisbericht 1, 1974-237 THE HEAVY ION FACILITY V I C K S I AT BERLIN VICKSI-Group, presented t>y K. H. Lindenberger Bereich Kern' /3/ D. Hilscher e t a l . , IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-22, No. 3, June 75, p. 1643 /4/ Bereich Kern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Section 54  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eT eT ' A (z T &z b ) )s vT m zT zB wNsN v dz BIR' I z C z B (wNsN v ) dz I z T z C (wNsN v ) dz < BIR max , q wM z T z B q w s v )s vT s v w eB z c BIR max z B BIR max 2 q v Session Papers 227 Development of an Elevated Mixed Layer Model for Parameterizing Altocumulus Cloud Layers S. Liu and S. K. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Altocumulus (Ac) clouds play an important role in the earth's energy budget through their effects on solar and infrared radiation, yet they are typically too thin to be vertically resolved in global climate models. Ac layers have been either neglected or implicitly represented through a "fractional cloudiness" scheme in climate models (Randall et al. 1989). Since such schemes are empirically rather than physically based, they are not suitable for climate change prediction.

339

Microsoft PowerPoint - MolWireH2-jM_JW_BNLworkshop.ppt [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Pulse Experiments on Fast Pulse Experiments on Molecular Processes in Organic Ions hν phase boundary e - 2-200 nm molecular wire Catalytic nanoparticle Energy Capture and Storage Using Nano Objects 10 8 6 4 2 0 x10 -3 3000nm 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 λ (nm) 0.14 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.00 Absorbance R R R R * n n=20 PolyFluorene 20 anion in THF LEAF (300ns) Na reduction 606 nm 2520 nm 80 60 40 20 0 ε (M -1 cm -1 ) x10 -3 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 λ (nm) T3-PPE-T3 and PPE Cations in DCE/Toluene T3PPET3 Cation PPE Cation < 10 ns S R S S R R OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR S R S S R R OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR * The spectrum of the T 3 end-capped polymer is red- shifted relative to that of the parent * The PPE cation radical is trapped by the T 3 end- groups in <10 ns !

340

Experimental investigations of the TE{sub 11} mode radiation from a relativistic magnetron with diffraction output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directly radiating microwaves at TE{sub 11} mode, a relativistic magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) is experimentally investigated. Two important factors, transition section and working condition, significantly affecting the microwave powers, efficiencies, and pulse durations are analyzed. The experimental results on our designed MDO show that the optimized transition section with the parameters, 46 mm in height and 70 mm in length, is beneficial for producing high power TE{sub 11} mode microwaves. Under the low applied voltage condition (less than 650 kV), the power conversion efficiency will be higher than that obtained from the high applied voltage condition. {approx}24 ns of the microwave duration is a typical value under the voltage duration of 56 ns. Pulse shortens will happen if the applied voltage is higher than 650 kV. When the applied voltage reaches 880 kV, the microwave duration is only just {approx}12 ns. Impendence mismatch between the accelerator and the diode is the chief reason causing the pulse shortens.

Li Wei; Liu Yonggui; Zhang Jun; Yang Hanwu; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

Power, John; /Argonne; Conde, Manoel; /Argonne; Gai, Wei; /Argonne; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

An Improved Beam Screen for the LHC Injection Kickers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. Each system is composed of two resonant charging power supplies (RCPSs) and four 5 WW transmission line kicker magnets with matched terminating resistors and pulse forming networks (PFNs). A beam screen is placed in the aperture of the magnets: the screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors on the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the image current of the, high intensity, LHC beam and screen the ferrite against Wake fields. The conductors initially used gave adequately low beam coupling impedance however inter-conductor discharges occurred during pulsing of the magnet: an alternative design was discharge free at the nominal operating voltage but the impedance was too high for the ultimate LHC beam. This paper presents the results of a new development undertaken to meet the often conflicting requireme...

Barnes, M J; Ducimetire, L; Garrel, N; Kroyer, T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Neutron star/supernova remnant associations: the view from Tbilisi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach for studying the neutron star/supernova remnant associations, based on the idea that the supernova remnants (SNRs) can be products of an off-centered supernova (SN) explosion in a preexisting bubble created by the wind of a moving massive star. A cavity SN explosion of a moving star results in a considerable offset of the neutron star (NS) birth-place from the geometrical center of the SNR. Therefore: a) the high transverse velocities inferred for a number of NSs through their association with SNRs can be reduced; b) the proper motion vector of a NS should not necessarily point away from the geometrical center of the associated SNR. Taking into account these two facts allow us to enlarge the circle of possible NS/SNR associations, and could significantly affect the results of previous studies of associations. The possibilities of our approach are illustrated with some examples. We also show that the concept of an off-centered cavity SN explosion could be used to explain the peculiar structures of a number of SNRs and for searches for stellar remnants possibly associated with them.

V. V. Gvaramadze

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion.  

SciTech Connect

The authors present designs of quasi-spherical direction drive z-pinch loads for machines such as ZR at 28 MA load current with a 150 ns implosion time (QSDDI). A double shell system for ZR has produced a 2D simulated yield of 12 MJ, but the drive for this system on ZR has essentially no margin. A double shell system for a 56 MA driver at 150 ns implosion has produced a simulated yield of 130 MJ with considerable margin in attaining the necessary temperature and density-radius product for ignition. They also represent designs for a magnetically insulated current amplifier, (MICA), that modify the attainable ZR load current to 36 MA with a 28 ns rise time. The faster pulse provided by a MICA makes it possible to drive quasi-spherical single shell implosions (QSDD2). They present results from 1D LASNEX and 2D MACH2 simulations of promising low-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules and 1D LASNEX results of high-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules.

VanDevender, J. Pace; Abbott, Lucas M.; Langston, William L.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Nash, Thomas J.; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Silva, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT  

SciTech Connect

Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Joint cosmological parameters forecast from CFHTLS-cosmic shear and CMB data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a prospective analysis of a combined cosmic shear and cosmic microwave background data set, focusing on a Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) type lensing survey and the current WMAP-1 year and CBI data. We investigate the parameter degeneracies and error estimates of a seven parameters model, for the lensing alone as well as for the combined experiments. The analysis is performed using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain calculation, allowing for a more realistic estimate of errors and degeneracies than a Fisher matrix approach. After a detailed discussion of the relevant statistical techniques, the set of the most relevant 2 and 3-dimensional lensing contours are given. It is shown that the combined cosmic shear and CMB is particularly efficient to break some parameter degeneracies. The principal components directions are computed and it is found that the most orthogonal contours between the two experiments are for the parameter pairs (Omega_m,sigma_8), (h,ns) and (ns,nrun), where ns and nrun are the slope of the primordial mass power spectrum and the running spectral index respectively. It is shown that an improvement of a factor 2 is expected on the running spectral index from the combined data sets. Forecasts for error improvements from a wide field space telescope lensing survey are also given.

I. Tereno; O. Dor; L. van Waerbeke; Y. Mellier

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermodynamics of SU(3) Gauge Theory in 2 + 1 Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pressure, and the energy and entropy densities are determined for the SU(3) gauge theory in $2 + 1$ dimensions from lattice Monte Carlo calculations in the interval $0.6 \\leq T/T_c \\leq 15$. The finite temperature lattices simulated have temporal extent $N_\\tau = 2, 4, 6$ and 8, and spatial volumes $N_S^2$ such that the aspect ratio is $N_S/N_\\tau = 8$. To obtain the thermodynamical quantities, we calculate the averages of the temporal plaquettes $P_\\tau$ and the spatial plaquettes $P_S$ on these lattices. We also need the zero temperature averages of the plaquettes $P_0$, calculated on symmetric lattices with $N_\\tau = N_S$. We discuss in detail the finite size ($N_S$-dependent) effects. These disappear exponentially. For the zero temperature lattices we find that the coefficient of $N_S$ in the exponent is of the order of the glueball mass. On the finite temperature lattices it lies between the two lowest screening masses. For the aspect ratio equal to eight, the systematic errors coming from the finite size effects are much smaller than our statistical errors. We argue that in the continuum limit, at high enough temperature, the pressure can be parametrized by the very simple formula $p=a-bT_c/T$ where $a$ and $b$ are two constants. Using the thermodynamical identities for a large homogeneous system, this parametrization then determines the other thermodynamical variables in the same temperature range.

P. Bialas; L. Daniel; A. Morel; B. Petersson

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Proceedings to the 12th Workshop 'What Comes Beyond the Standard Models', Bled, July 14. - 24., 2009, Slovenia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contents: 1. Likelihood Analysis of the Next-to-minimal Supergravity Motivated Model (C. Balazs and D. Carter) 2. The Multiple Point Principle: Characterization of the Possible Phases for the SMG (D.L. Bennett) 3. Does Dark Matter Consist of Baryons of New Stable Family Quarks? (G. Bregar and N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 4. P, C and T for Truly Neutral Particles (V.V. Dvoeglazov) 5. Relativistic Equations for Spin Particles: What Can We Learn From Noncommutativity? (V.V. Dvoeglazov) 6. Radiative Charged Fermion Masses and Quark Mixing (VCKM)4x4 in a SU(3) Gauged Flavor Symmetry Model (A. Hernandez-Galeana) 7. Low Energy Binding of Composite Dark Matter with Nuclei as a Solution for the Puzzles of Dark Matter Searches (M.Yu. Khlopov, A.G. Mayorov and E.Yu. Soldatov) 8. On the Possibilities and Impossibilities of Random Dynamics (A. Kleppe) 9. Spin Connection Makes Massless Spinor Chirally Coupled to Kaluza-Klein Gauge Field After Compactification of $M^{1+5}$ to $M^{1+3}$ x Infinite Disc Curved on $S^2$ (D. Lukman, N.S. Mankoc Borstnik and H.B. Nielsen) 10. Offering the Mechanism for Generating Families - the Approach Unifying Spins and Charges Predicts New Families (N.S. Mankoc Borstnik) 11. Confusions That are so Unnecessary (R. Mirman) 12. - 17. Discussion Sections 18. Presentation of VIA and Bled 2009 Workshop Videoconferences (M.Yu. Khlopov)

C. Balazs; D. L. Bennett; G. Bregar; D. Carter; V. V. Dvoeglazov; A. Hernandez-Galeana; M. Yu. Khlopov; A. Kleppe; D. Lukman; N. S. Mankoc Borstnik; A. G. Mayorov; R. Mirman; H. B. Nielsen; E. Yu. Soldatov

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In the structure task, the goals for this reporting period were to: (1) complete field work on the NNW-SSE transect along the west side of Cayuga Lake; (2) collect data at additional field sites in order to (a) trace structural trends between the two N-S transects and (b) fill in data gaps on the NS transect along the eastern shore of Seneca Lake; (3) enter the data gathered from the summer field work; (4) enter data from the previous field season that still had to be analyzed after a personnel change. We have completed data reduction for all the goals listed above, including the NNW-SSE transect on the west side of Cayuga Lake. In the soil gas task, the goals for this reporting period were to: (1) trace Trenton/Black River fault trends between the two N-S transects; and (2) enter the data gathered from the summer field work. We have completed data reduction for all the goals listed above, and have begun constructing maps that portray the data. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and Landsat lineaments, surface structure, soil gas and seismic allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

ON THE INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE OF A NEUTRON STAR TO A BLACK HOLE BY A TYPE Ib/c SUPERNOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is understood that the supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are of Type Ib/c. The temporal coincidence of the GRB and the SN continues to represent a major enigma of Relativistic Astrophysics. We elaborate here, from the earlier paradigm, that the concept of induced gravitational collapse is essential to explain the GRB-SN connection. The specific case of a close (orbital period <1 hr) binary system composed of an evolved star with a neutron star (NS) companion is considered. We evaluate the accretion rate onto the NS of the material expelled from the explosion of the core progenitor as a Type Ib/c SN and give the explicit expression of the accreted mass as a function of the nature of the components and binary parameters. We show that the NS can reach, in a few seconds, critical mass and consequently gravitationally collapse to a black hole. This gravitational collapse process leads to the emission of the GRB.

Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo, E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: ruffini@icra.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2 6:00-8:00 pm R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d C Co on nt ti in ne en nt ta al l B Br re ea ak kf fa as st t 8:00 am W We el lc co om me e 8:10 am P Pa an ne el l S Se es ss si io on n I I: : L Le es ss so on ns s f fr ro om m t th he e A AF FV V E Ex xp pe er ri ie en nc ce e Moderator: Dan Sperling, UC Davis Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Stephe Yborra, NGV America Joan Ogden, US Davis Discussion 9:25 am B Br re ea ak k 9:40 am P Pa an ne el l S Se es ss si io on n I II I: : L Le es ss so on ns s f fr ro om m H Hy yd dr ro og ge en n S St ta at ti io on n D De em mo on ns st tr ra at ti io on n P Pr ro oj je ec ct ts s Moderator: John Garbak, U.S. Department of Energy Puneet Verma, Chevron

352

Strong converse for the classical capacity of the pure-loss bosonic channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper strengthens the interpretation and understanding of the classical capacity of the pure-loss bosonic channel, first established in [Giovannetti et al., Physical Review Letters 92, 027902 (2004), arXiv:quant-ph/0308012]. In particular, we first prove that there exists a trade-off between communication rate and error probability if one imposes only a mean-photon number constraint on the channel inputs. That is, if we demand that the mean number of photons at the channel input cannot be any larger than some positive number N_S, then it is possible to respect this constraint with a code that operates at a rate g(\\eta N_S / (1-p)) where p is the code's error probability, \\eta\\ is the channel transmissivity, and g(x) is the entropy of a bosonic thermal state with mean photon number x. We then prove that a strong converse theorem holds for the classical capacity of this channel (that such a rate-error trade-off cannot occur) if one instead demands for a maximum photon number constraint, in such a way that mostly all of the "shadow" of the average density operator for a given code is required to be on a subspace with photon number no larger than n N_S, so that the shadow outside this subspace vanishes as the number n of channel uses becomes large. Finally, we prove that a small modification of the well-known coherent-state coding scheme meets this more demanding constraint.

Mark M. Wilde; Andreas Winter

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect

The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

Suleimanov, V. [Insitute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya str. 18, 42008 Kazan (Russian Federation); Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaets-Sternwarte Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, 07745 Jena (Germany); Potekhin, A. Y. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya str., 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Pavlov, G. G. [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab., University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Adelsberg, M. van [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Werner, K. [Insitute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

A thyratron-based pulse generator for fundamental studies of NO{sub x} removal in nonthermal plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In collaboration with the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and McMaster University, the authors are investigating the removal of NOx from engine exhaust streams using nonthermal plasmas (NTPs). The near-term experiments focus on measuring temperature distributions and reactive species concentrations in electric discharge NTP reactors using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), with first experiments on LIF measurements of OH in a pulsed dielectric-barrier discharge. Because the self extinguishing microdischarges in a conventional (low frequency driven) barrier discharge are both short lived (a few to a few tens of nanoseconds) and randomly distributed in the process volume, it is difficult to measure the time-varying properties of the species produced by the plasma. To synchronize the plasma ignition with the optical diagnostics, a thyratron switched, high voltage pulse generator has been constructed to drive a small dielectric-barrier plasma cell. A fast rise time thyratron tube is used in a low inductance geometry to deliver a negative high voltage pulse to the cell. The output voltage pulse has a rise time of 6.5 ns, a peak voltage of 40 kV, and a repetition rate of 20 Hz. A microdischarge streamer occurs between the pin electrode and the glass barrier during the rise time of the voltage pulse. The delay between the input signal and the microdischarge is 250 ns with a jitter of 4 ns, thus allowing repetitive initiation of a microdischarge with low temporal jitter. The energy per pulse is obtained from the voltage and current versus time, v(t) and i(t), measured at the cell. The fast rising pulse also produces a higher E/N at breakdown in the discharge than in conventional NTP cells, which may affect the removal efficiency of pollutants.

Korzekwa, R.A.; Rosocha, L.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SIGNATURES OF PHOTON-AXION CONVERSION IN THE THERMAL SPECTRA AND POLARIZATION OF NEUTRON STARS  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of photons into axions under the presence of a strong magnetic field can dim the radiation from magnetized astrophysical objects. Here we perform a detailed calculation aimed at quantifying the signatures of photon-axion conversion in the spectra, light curves, and polarization of neutron stars (NSs). We take into account the energy and angle dependence of the conversion probability and the surface thermal emission from NSs. The latter is computed from magnetized atmosphere models that include the effect of photon polarization mode conversion due to vacuum polarization. The resulting spectral models, inclusive of the general-relativistic effects of gravitational redshift and light deflection, allow us to make realistic predictions for the effects of photon to axion conversion on observed NS spectra, light curves, and polarization signals. We identify unique signatures of the conversion, such as an increase of the effective area of a hot spot as it rotates away from the observer line of sight. For a star emitting from the entire surface, the conversion produces apparent radii that are either larger or smaller (depending on axion mass and coupling strength) than the limits set by NS equations of state. For an emission region that is observed phase-on, photon-axion conversion results in an inversion of the plane of polarization with respect to the no-conversion case. While the quantitative details of the features that we identify depend on NS properties (magnetic field strength and temperature) and axion parameters, the spectral and polarization signatures induced by photon-axion conversion are distinctive enough to make NSs very interesting and promising probes of axion physics.

Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); Ho, Wynn C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB) (Spain); Van Adelsberg, Matthew [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and School of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

THE MASS-LOSS-INDUCED ECCENTRIC KOZAI MECHANISM: A NEW CHANNEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CLOSE COMPACT OBJECT-STELLAR BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

Over a broad range of initial inclinations and eccentricities, an appreciable fraction of hierarchical triple star systems with similar masses are essentially unaffected by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism (KM) until the primary in the central binary evolves into a compact object. Once it does, it may be much less massive than the other components in the ternary, enabling the 'eccentric Kozai mechanism (EKM)': the mutual inclination between the inner and outer binaries can flip signs driving the inner binary to very high eccentricity, leading to a close binary or collision. We demonstrate this 'mass-loss-induced eccentric Kozai' (MIEK) mechanism by considering an example system and defining an ad hoc minimal separation between the inner two members at which tidal effects become important. For fixed initial masses and semimajor axes, but uniform distributions of eccentricity and cosine of the mutual inclination, {approx}10% of systems interact tidally or collide while the primary is on the main sequence (MS) due to the KM or EKM. Those affected by the EKM are not captured by earlier quadrupole-order secular calculations. We show that fully {approx}30% of systems interact tidally or collide for the first time as the primary swells to AU scales, mostly as a result of the KM. Finally, {approx}2% of systems interact tidally or collide for the first time after the primary sheds most of its mass and becomes a white dwarf (WD), mostly as a result of the MIEK mechanism. These findings motivate a more detailed study of mass loss in triple systems and the formation of close neutron star (NS)/WD-MS and NS/WD-NS/WD binaries without an initial common envelope phase.

Shappee, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Todd A., E-mail: shappee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Center for Cosmology, and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. BOX 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cumming, A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Keek, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56-2011 56-2011 June 2011 DOE STANDARD ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. (Unclassified Unlimited) DOE-STD-1156-2011 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1156-2011 iv TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT v PURPOSE 1 APPLICABILITY 1 IMPLEMENTATION 2 EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS 3 INITIAL QUALIFICATION AND TRAINING 5

359

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

360

April 2011 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3009 3009 Revision * DOE Standard 1066 Revision * New DOE Standards Projects * Incidents of Security Concern Technical Standard * Explosives Safety * Operations Assessment Field Handbook * Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources Program * Occurrence Reporting Causal Analysis Guide * Nuclear Safety-Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2011 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE Standard 3009 Revision The Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance (HS-21), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted workshops in January and March to support a major revision of Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3009, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor

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361

DOE-HDBK-1028-2009; Human Performance Improvement Handbook, Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

028-2009 028-2009 June 2009 DOE STANDARD HUMAN PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT HANDBOOK VOLUME 1: CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES U.S. Department of Energy AREA HFAC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1028-2009 i VOLUME 1: CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES PREFACE ....................................................................................................................... v Reading The Handbook ............................................................................................... vi CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN PERFORMANCE..............1-1

362

Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1104-2009 May 2009 Superseding DOE-STD-1104-96 DOE STANDARD REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFETY BASIS AND SAFETY DESIGN BASIS DOCUMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1104-2009 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards web page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1104-2009 iii CONTENTS FOREWORD .................................................................................................................................. v INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................................

363

July 2011 TSP Newsletter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1020 1020 Revision * DOE Standard 1090 Revision * New DOE Standards Projects * Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard * DOE/EFCOG Chemical Safety & Lifecycle Management Workshop * Nuclear Safety-Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE July 2011 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE Standard 1020 Revision Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 1020-2011, National Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary for implementing the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety,

364

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

365

HMNewsFall07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Simulation Results ................. New Simulation Results ................. 1 Methane Flux from Bering Sea Sediments .......................................... 4 Results for China's First Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition .......... 6 GHOBS Workshop Report ........10 Korean Hydrate Research Results Are Encouraging .............12 Fresh Water Hydrates from Lake Baikal ......................................13 Announcements .......................14 * ICGH2008 Conference * Second Fellowship Award * Updated Publication * Proposal Review Schedule * Interagency Brochure Available Spotlight on Research ............16 Michael Riedel CONTACT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov Methane Hydrate Newsletter 1 New SimulatioNS of the ProductioN

366

For more information, contact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael Ohl, ohlme@ornl.gov, 865.574.8426 Michael Ohl, ohlme@ornl.gov, 865.574.8426 Instrument Scientist: Laura Stingaciu, l.stingaciu@fz-juelich.de, 865.576.9125 Instrument Scientist: Piotr Zolnierczuk, zolnierczukp@ornl.gov, 865.241.0092 neutrons.ornl.gov/nse Neutron spin echo spectrometers provide both the highest resolution and best dynamical range in neutron scattering. Exploiting superconducting technology and developing novel field correction elements, the NSE instrument aims at a maximum achievable Fourier time τ of at least 350 ns. Using wavelengths of 2 Å < λ < 14 Å, this would yield an unprecedented dynamical

367

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation mechanism at work in new materials. I n 2008, tHe totally unexpecteD discov- erY oF A New clAss oF suPercoNductors, the iroN PNictides, set oFF A Feverish international effort to understand them. the instruments and scientists at hFir and sNs are leaders in exploring these exotic materials, scan- ning the subatomic details of their structures and

368

Content of System Design Descriptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-3024-2011 August 2011 ________________________ Superseding DOE-STD-3024-98 DOE STANDARD CONTENT OF SYSTEM DESIGN DESCRIPTIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA EDCO Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3024-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards web page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-3024-2011 iii CONTENTS PAGE Foreword ..................................................................................................................................................... iv 1. PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................................1

369

DOE Technical Standards Program Standards Actions Newsletter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* * New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements * Workshops and Events * The Annual Energy Facility Contractors Group Safety Analysis Workshop * 2012 Chemical Safety and Life Cycle Management Workshop * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2012 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has a challenging mission to solve many problems posed by the legacy of the Cold War, including the transportation of unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste,

370

Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L. (MSU); (UC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Antiprotonic hydrogen in static electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of the static electric field on the splitting and annihilation widths of the levels of antiprotonic hydrogen with a large principal quantum number (n=30) are studied. Non-trivial aspects of the consideration is related with instability of (p\\bar{p})^*-atom in ns and np-states due to coupling of these states with the annihilation channels. Properties of the mixed nl-levels are investigated depending on the value of external static electric field. Specific resonance-like dependence of effective annihilation widths on the strength of the field is revealed.

G. Ya. Korenman; S. N. Yudin

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS logic.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We designed, fabricated and measured the performance of nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) switches. Initial data are reported with one of the switch designs having a measured switching time of 400 ns and an operating voltage of 5 V. The switches operated laterally with unmeasurable leakage current in the 'off' state. Surface micromachining techniques were used to fabricate the switches. All processing was CMOS compatible. A single metal layer, defined by a single mask step, was used as the mechanical switch layer. The details of the modeling, fabrication and testing of the NEMS switches are reported.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wolfley, Steven L.; Baker, Michael Sean; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Kraus, Garth Merlin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Patrizi, Gary A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

INFORMS Journal on Computing Vol. 23, No. 2, Spring 2011, pp. 220237  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ pj + postj - M 1 - zijr i j = i r (3c) nR r=1 Cikr = tk + Ik + preik + pik + postik k (3d) nR r=1 Cjr - nR r=1 Cir + posti - sS - pj -postj i j nS k=1 bijk = 1 (10) Ik = nR r=1 Cikr - tk - preik -pik + postj - M 1 - zijr i j = i r (18b) nR r=1 Cikr = tk + Ik + preik + pik + postik k (18c) nR r=1 Cir tk

Schaefer, Andrew

374

Nonlinear motion of coupled magnetic vortices in ferromagnetic/non-magnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated a coupled motion of two vortex cores in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer cynliders by means of micromagnetic simulation. Dynamic motion of two vortex with parallel and antiparallel relative chiralities of curling spins around the vortex cores have been examined after excitation by 1-ns pulsed external field. With systematic variation in non-magnetic spacer layer thickness from 0 to 20 nm, the coupling between two cores becomes significant as the spacer becomes thinner. Significant coupling leads to a nonlinear chaotic coupled motion of two vortex cores for the parallel chiralities and a faster coupled gyrotropic oscillation for the antiparallel chiralities.

Jun, Su-Hyeong; Shim, Je-Ho; Oh, Suhk-Kun; Yu, Seong-Cho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke; Fischer, Peter

2009-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 6 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-che) , the embodiment of energy, courage and loyalty. The fifth was the Ideal Elehpant (hasti, Tib. gLang-po-che), the embo diment of strength, stability and prosperity. The sixth one ,ns the Ideal Horse (asva, Tib. rTa-mchog), the embo diment of speed... of the general reader with an in terest in Trans-Himabyan art or Mahayana. A glossary in Sanskrit-Tibetan, a key to place names and a note on source material are appended. mu~trated with five colour plates and thirteen monochromes. April, 1962. Notes...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

376

Pipelined Match-Lines and Hierarchical Search-Lines for Low-Power Content-Addressable Memories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a pipelined match-line and a hierarchical search-line architecture to reduce power in content-addressable memories (CAM). The overall power reduction is 60%, with 29% contributed by the pipelined match-lines and 31% contributed by the hierarchical search-lines. This proposed architecture is employed in the design of a 1024x144 bit ternary CAM, achieving 7 ns search cycle time at 2.89 fJ/bit/search in a 0.18 um CMOS process.

Kostas Pagiamtzis; Ali Sheikholeslami

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A search for direct heffalon production using the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first search is reported for direct heffalon production, using 23.3/fb per experiment of delivered integrated luminosity of proton-proton collisions at rootS = 8TeV from the Large Hadron Collider. The data were recorded with the ATLAS and the CMS detectors. Each exotic composite is assumed to be stable on the detector lifetime (tau >> ns). A particularly striking signature is expected. No signal events are observed after event selection. The cross section for heffalon production is found to be less than 64ab at the 95% confidence level.

Alan J. Barr; Christopher G. Lester

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

Saving energy in LAN switches: New methods of packet coalescing for Energy Efficient Ethernet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small or home office (SOHO) Ethernet LAN switches consume about 8 TWh per year in the U.S. alone. Despite normally low traffic load and numerous periods of idleness, these switches typically stay fully powered-on at all times. With the standardization ... Keywords: TCP, packet coalescing, energy efficient Ethernet, small office, home office, SOHO, Ethernet LAN switches, low traffic load, Ethernet interfaces, low power idle mode, idle periods, EEE policy, synchronous coalescing, network hosts, edge routers, energy savings, Ethernet PHY, ns-2 simulation model, Internet traffic

M. Mostowfi; K. Christensen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Shock-timing experiments using double-pulse laser irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The timing of multiple shock waves is crucial to the performance of inertial confinement fusion ignition targets. Presented are measurements of velocities and optical self-emission from shock waves in polystyrene targets driven by two 90-ps pulses separated by 1.5-2 ns. These pulses drive two shock waves that coalesce in the target, and the resultant velocity histories, coalescence times, and transit times are unambiguously observed in both velocity interferometry and self-emission data. These results are in good agreement with one-dimensional hydrodynamics code predictions.

Boehly, T.R.; Vianello, E.; Miller, J.E.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Hicks, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Shock-timing Experiments using double-pulse laser irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The timing of multiple shock waves is crucial to the performance of inertial confinement fusion ignition targets. Presented are measurements of velocities and optical self-emission from shock waves in polystyrene targets driven by two 90-ps pulses separated by 1.5-2 ns. These pulses drive two shock waves that coalesce in the target, and the resultant velocity histories, coalescence times, and transit times are unambiguously observed in both velocity interferometry and self-emission data. These results are in good agreement with one-dimensional hydrodynamics code predictions.

Boehly, T.R.; Vianello, E.; Miller, J.E.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Hicks, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "instr uctio ns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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381

The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

SGARFACE: A Novel Detector For Microsecond Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Short GAmma Ray Front Air Cherenkov Experiment (SGARFACE) is operated at the Whipple Observatory utilizing the Whipple 10m gamma-ray telescope. SGARFACE is sensitive to gamma-ray bursts of more than 100MeV with durations from 100ns to 35us and provides a fluence sensitivity as low as 0.8 gamma-rays per m^2 above 200MeV (0.05 gamma-rays per m^2 above 2GeV) and allows to record the burst time structure.

S. LeBohec; F. Krennrich; G. Sleege

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Theoretical study of proton beam preparation for the g-2 experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam preparation for the g-2 experiment is studied. Because of limited 2.5-MHz rf voltage and the 66-ms limited time duration allowance for the whole process, the Booster batch must be first captured to a lower 2.5-MHz rf voltage followed by a rotation in the 2.5-MHz bucket in order to achieve the required narrow half bunch width of 50 ns. The appearance of bunch tails can be reduced by first rotation by a linear barrier voltage before the adiabatic capture.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The trypanosome transcriptome is remodelled during differentiation but displays limited responsiveness within life stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-likeISG75 SNAREs 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 Qa Qb Qc R Secretory pepidases 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 Aspartic/cysteine Serine Metallo Ras-like small GTPases In te ns ity /a rb itr ar y un its Open reading frame accession A B C D BMC Genomics... SNAREs in BSF, with evidence for limited PCF regulation of the secretory pathway. On average, Qc and R SNAREs are more highly expressed than Qa and Qb SNAREs (Fig- ure 3). The T. brucei N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF, Tb927.1.1560), an ATPase...

Koumandou, V Lila; Natesan, Senthil Kumar A; Sergeenko, Tatiana; Field, Mark C

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Internal Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 mm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple chambers for high energy density physics research.

Payne, S A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Bayramian, A; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Emanuel, M A; Orth, C D; Rothenberg, J. E; Schaffers, K I; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E; Powell, H T

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Mercury and Beyond: Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 pm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple target chambers for high energy density physics research.

Bibeau, C.; Beach, R.J.; Bayramian, A.; Chanteloup, J.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Orth, C.D.; Rothenberg, J.E.; Schaffers, K.I.; Skidmore, J.A.; Sutton, S.B.; Zapata, L.E.; Payne, S.A.; Powell, H.T.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Next-generation laser for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the progress in developing and building the Mercury laser system as the first in a series of a new generation of diode- pumped solid-state Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Mercury will be the first integrated demonstration of a scalable laser architecture compatible with advanced high energy density (HED) physics applications. Primary performance goals include 10% efficiencies at 10 Hz and a 1-10 ns pulse with 1 omega energies of 100 J and with 2 omega/3 omega frequency conversion.

Marshall, C.D.; Deach, R.J.; Bibeau, C. [and others

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Design modeling of the 100-J diode-pumped solid-state laser for Project Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the energy, propagation, and thermal modeling for a diode-pumped solid-state laser called Mercury being designed and built at LLNL using Yb:S-FAP [i.e., Yb{sup 3+}-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F crystals] for the gain medium. This laser is intended to produce 100 J pulses at 1 to 10 ns at 10 Hz with an electrical efficiency of {approximately}10%. Our modeling indicates that the laser will be able to meet its performance goals.

Orth, C., LLNL

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

RITS-3 self-break water switch maintenance.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiographic integrated test stand (RITS-3) is a 5-MV, 160-kA, 70-ns inductive voltage adder accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories used to develop critical understanding of x-ray sources and flash radiographic drivers. On RITS-3 three pulse forming lines (PFLs) are used to drive three inductive voltage adder cavities. Each PFL contains a fast-pulse-charged, self-breakdown annular water switch that is used for initial pulse shaping and timing. Low loss in the switches combined with good synchronization is required for efficient operation of the accelerator. Switch maintenance is closely monitored over time to determine the effects of wear on switch breakdown performance.

Cordova, Steve Ray; Portillo, Salvador; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Wilkins, Frank Lee (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Gignac, Raymond Edward (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences Division, San Leandro, CA); Hahn, Kelly Denise; Molina, Isidro; Maenchen, John Eric

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Combined flux compression and plasma opening switch on the Saturn pulsed power generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 microsecond. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

Felber, Franklin S; Mazarakis, Michael G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A commentary on studies presenting projections of the future prevalence of dementia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013, 13:1 Page 2 of 5 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/1 20 40 60 80 100 120 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 World 5 10 15 20 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Europe 0 5 10 15 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 North America/US 2 4 6 8 10 2000 2010 2020... 2030 2040 2050 Latin America & Caribbean 0 20 40 60 80 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Asia, Africa & Oceania Brookmeyer (1998) Sloane (2002) Wimo (2002) Hebert(2003) Wancata (2003) Ferri (2005) Brookmeyer (2007) Mura (2010) Ca se s (m illio ns ) Figure...

Norton, Sam; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Discovery of the shape coexisting 0+ state in 32Mg by a two neutron transfer reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Island of Inversion nucleus 32Mg has been studied by a (t,p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0+ state in 32Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the DeltaL = 0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low gamma-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0+ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell model calculations.

K. Wimmer; T. Krll; R. Krcken; V. Bildstein; R. Gernhuser; B. Bastin; N. Bree; J. Diriken; P. Van Duppen; M. Huyse; N. Patronis; P. Vermaelen; D. Voulot; J. Van de Walle; F. Wenander; L. M. Fraile; R. Chapman; B. Hadinia; R. Orlandi; J. F. Smith; R. Lutter; P. G. Thirolf; M. Labiche; A. Blazhev; M. Kalkhler; P. Reiter; M. Seidlitz; N. Warr; A. O. Macchiavelli; H. B. Jeppesen; E. Fiori; G. Georgiev; G. Schrieder; S. Das Gupta; G. Lo Bianco; S. Nardelli; J. Butterworth; J. Johansen; K. Riisager

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

APPLICATIONS DDR/DDR2 Memory Power Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchronous Buck Controller (VDDQ) The TPS51116 provides a complete power supply for Wide-Input Voltage Range: 3.0-V to 28-V both DDR/SSTL-2 and DDR2/SSTL-18 memory sys- DCAP Mode with 100-ns Load Step Re-tems. It integrates a synchronous buck controller with a 3-A sink/source tracking linear regulator and sponse buffered low noise reference. The TPS51116 offers Current Mode Option Supports Ceramic the lowest total solution cost in systems where space

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - ??165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

NONEQUILIBRIUM FLUCTUATIONS IN SHOCK COMPRESSION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALPHA-IRON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a numerical study of heterogeneous and nonequilibrium fluctuations in shock compression of {alpha}-iron at the grain level. A quasi-molecular code called DM2 is used to model the interactions of a plane shock wave with grain boundaries and crystal anisotropy over the pressure range of 5-45 GPa. Highly transient eddies that were reported earlier are again observed. We show new features through an elementary statistical analysis. They are (1) a characteristic decay constant for the non-equilibrium fluctuation on the order of 20ns, (2) a resonance phenomenon at an intermediate shock pressure, and (3) a more uniform shock structure for very high pressures.

Y. HORIE; K. YANO

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses. I. Experimental. Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report extensive laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics at 1053 and 526 mm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Solid-State Nanosecond Beam Kicker Modulator Based on the DSRD Switch  

SciTech Connect

A fast solid-state beam kicker modulator is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The program goal is to develop a modulator that will deliver 4 ns, {+-}5 kV pulses to the ATF2 damping ring beam extraction kicker. The kicker is a 50 {Omega}, bipolar strip line, 60 cm long, fed at the downstream end and terminated at the upstream end. The bunch spacing in the ring is 5.6 ns, bunches are removed from the back end of the train, and there is a gap of 103.6 ns before the next train. The modulator design is based on an opening switch topology that uses Drift Step Recovery Diodes as the opening switches. The design and results of the modulator development are discussed. There are many applications that benefit from very fast high power switching. However, at MW power levels and nanosecond time scales, solid state options are limited. One option, the Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD) has been demonstrated as capable of blocking thousands of volts and switching in nanosecond to sub-nanosecond ranges. When used as an opening switch, the DSRD exhibits a very fast turn off transient. The process is described in detail by its pioneers in [5,6]. In essence, charge is pumped into and then extracted from the DSRD under pulsed conditions. The turn off transient occurs precisely when the pumped charge is equal to the extracted charge and the DSRD is switched off. At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a DSRD is being used as an opening switch in the development of a fast kicker modulator. The modulator is designed to create {+-}5kV pulses with <1ns rise and fall time on a 50{Omega} strip line kicker. As is common in beam optics, the absence of power in the kicker before and after the pulse is very important. The entire {+-}5kV kicker modulator is composed of two identical 5kV pulsing circuits, each with its own DSRD component. This paper describes the modulator topology and the status of tests on one of the two 5kV pulse circuits.

Akre, R.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Krasnykh, A.; Tang, T.; /SLAC; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Toward Ultra Short Gamma Ray Burst Ground Based Detection, SGARFACE status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the status and motivation of the Short GAmma Ray Front Air Cherenkov Experiment (SGARFACE) which will be operated parallel to standard Very High Energy gamma-ray observations using the Whipple 10m telescope. SGARFACE is sensitive to 100MeV-10GeV gamma-ray bursts with durations ranging from 100ns to 100us providing a fluence sensitivity as low as few $\\rm 1E-9 erg/cm^2. Preliminary data taking started in November 2002.

Stephan LeBohec; Frank Krennrich; Gary Sleege

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Reinjection laser oscillator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uv preionized CO/sub 2/ oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

McLellan, E.J.

1981-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Driving Rydberg-Rydberg transitions from a co-planar microwave waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coherent interaction between ensembles of helium Rydberg atoms and microwave fields in the vicinity of a solid-state co-planar waveguide is reported. Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, at frequencies between 25 GHz and 38 GHz, have been studied for states with principal quantum numbers in the range 30 - 35 by selective electric-field ionization. An experimental apparatus cooled to 100 K was used to reduce effects of blackbody radiation. Inhomogeneous, stray electric fields emanating from the surface of the waveguide have been characterized in frequency- and time-resolved measurements and coherence times of the Rydberg atoms on the order of 250 ns have been determined.

Hogan, S D; Merkt, F; Thiele, T; Filipp, S; Wallraff, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Plasmons in strongly coupled shock-compressed matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first measurements of the plasmon dispersion and damping in laser shock-compressed solid matter. Petawatt laser produced K-{alpha} radiation scatters on boron targets compressed by a 10 ns-long 400 J laser pulse. In the vicinity of the Fermi momentum, the scattering spectra show dispersionless, collisionally damped plasmons, indicating a strongly coupled electron liquid. These observations agree with x-ray scattering calculations that include both the Born-Mermin approximation to account for electron-ion collisional damping and local field corrections reflecting electron-electron correlations.

Neumayer, P; Fortmann, C; Doppner, T; Davis, P; Falcone, R W; Kritcher, A L; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Lee, R W; Niemann, C; Pape, S L; Glenzer, S H

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report extensive measurements of damage thresholds for fused silica and calcium fluoride at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations [tau] ranging from 270 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated [tau][sup 1/2] scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for [tau][le]10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for [tau][gt]100 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-443, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jrgen Jrgensen; Guggi Kofod

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Polariton Enhanced IR Reflection Spectra of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show ~10x polariton-enhanced infrared reflectivity of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC, in SiC's restrahlen band (8-10um). By fitting measurements to theory, we extract the thickness, N, in monolayers (ML), momentum scattering time, Fermi level position of graphene and estimate carrier mobility. By showing that 1/root(ns), the carrier concentration/ML, we argue that scattering is dominated by short-range interactions at the SiC/graphene interface. Polariton formation finds application in near-field optical devices such as superlenses.

Daas, B K; Sudarshan, T S; Chandrashekhar, M V S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Neutron flux, spectrum, and dose equivalent measurements for a 4500-W(th) /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ general purpose heat source  

SciTech Connect

The total emission rate is (4.5 +- 0.4) 10/sup 7/ n/s, and the average neutron energy is (1.64 +- 0.07) MeV. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to dose equivalent for this spectrum is (3.10 +- 0.24) 10/sup -5/ mRem/n-cm/sup -2/. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to tissue absorbed dose is (3.18 +- 0.26) 10/sup -6/ mRad/n-cm/sup -2/.

Anderson, M.E.

1985-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Importance of secondary-electron collisional ionization (avalanche) for x-ray pulses incident on missiles-in-flight. Technical report, 1 February 1984-14 May 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report present a series of contour plots for both strong and moderate avalanche on the electric field-pressure plane. Plots are given for effective electric field durations from 0.1 to 100 ns, consistent with times corresponding to x-ray pulse widths of interest in nuclear weapon effects. The computations were carried out with special concern for accuracy. The adequacy of the air-chemistry data set is confirmed by comparison with experimental swarm data. The effect of the delay for the avalanche frequency to reach its steady-state value is included in the calculations.

Bloomberg, H.W.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

High-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, 6.151 keV x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics experiments on Sandia's Z accelerator (invited)  

SciTech Connect

When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' 20 MA, 100 ns rise-time Z accelerator [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)], the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV, Mn-He{sub {alpha}} curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for various high-energy-density physics experiments. Enhancements to this imaging system during 2005 have led to the capture of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics images of significantly higher quality. The three main improvements, all leading effectively to enhanced image plane brightness, were bringing the source inside the Rowland circle to approximately double the collection solid angle, replacing direct exposure film with Fuji BAS-TR2025 image plate (read with a Fuji BAS-5000 scanner), and generating a 0.3-0.6 ns, {approx}200 J prepulse 2 ns before the 1.0 ns, {approx}1 kJ main pulse to more than double the 6.151 keV flux produced compared with a single 1 kJ pulse. It appears that the 20{+-}5 {mu}m imaging resolution is limited by the 25 {mu}m scanning resolution of the BAS-5000 unit, and to this end, a higher resolution scanner will replace it. ZBL is presently undergoing modifications to provide two temporally separated images ('two-frame') per Z shot for this system before the accelerator closes down in summer 2006 for the Z-refurbished (ZR) upgrade. In 2008, after ZR, it is anticipated that the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) addition to ZBL will be completed, possibly allowing high-energy 11.2224 and 15.7751 keV K{alpha}{sub 1} curved-crystal imaging to be performed. With an ongoing several-year project to develop a highly sensitive multiframe ultrafast digital x-ray camera (MUDXC), it is expected that two-frame HEPW 11 and 16 keV imaging and four-frame ZBL 6.151 keV curved-crystal imaging will be possible. MUDXC will be based on the technology of highly cooled silicon and germanium photodiode arrays and ultrafast, radiation-hardened integrated circuitry.

Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Wenger, D. F.; Cuneo, M. E.; Adams, R. G.; Barnard, W. J.; Beutler, D. E.; Burr, R. A.; Campbell, D. V.; Claus, L. D.; Foresi, J. S.; Johnson, D. W.; Keller, K. L.; Lackey, C.; Leifeste, G. T.; McPherson, L. A.; Mulville, T. D.; Neely, K. A.; Rambo, P. K.; Rovang, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1106 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 monolayers of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10^9 to 10^10 n/cm^2 of tip array area.

Reichenbach, Birk; Schwoebel, P R; 10.1063/1.2913331

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

Stolz, C J

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Reinjection laser oscillator and method  

SciTech Connect

A uv preionized CO.sub.2 oscillator with integral four-pass amplifier capable of providing 1 to 5 GW laser pulses with pulse widths from 0.1 to 0.5 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM) is described. The apparatus is operated at any pressure from 1 atm to 10 atm without the necessity of complex high voltage electronics. The reinjection technique employed gives rise to a compact, efficient system that is particularly immune to alignment instabilities with a minimal amount of hardware and complexity.

McLellan, Edward J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Micro-nano scale ripples on metallic glass induced by laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

A Zr{sub 47.7}Cu{sub 31}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 12.3} bulk metallic glass was irradiated directly by KrF excimer laser pulses with wavelength 248 nm and duration 10 ns. Scanning electronic microscope photographs indicated that many ripples in micro-nano scale would be generated on the edge of the irradiated area under the action of the higher intensity laser pulse. Detailed observation demonstrated that the ripples exhibited fluidity and became closer and closer out from interior. Theoretical analysis revealed the formation mechanism of the ripples, including melting, subsequent propagation of capillary waves and final solidification.

Liu, W. D.; Ye, L. M. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, K. X. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

The three loop slope of the Dirac form factor and the S Lamb shift in hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order malpha{sup 7}, due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n{sup 3} kHz. Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, the authors extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r{sub p} = 0.883{+-}0.014 fm.

Melnikov, K.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

Propagation of Nd-laser pulses through crystalline silicon wafers  

SciTech Connect

Propagation of pulses from an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength, 1.064 {mu}m; pulse duration, 270 ns; pulse energy, 225 {mu}J) through crystalline silicon wafers is studied experimentally. Mathematical modelling of the process is performed: the heat conduction equation is solved numerically, the temperature dependences of the absorption and refraction of a substance, as well as generation of nonequilibrium carriers by radiation are taken into account. The constructed model satisfactorily explains the experimentally observed intensity oscillations of transmitted radiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Kirichenko, N A; Kuzmin, P G; Shcherbina, M E [Wave Research Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Minichromosome Maintenance Protein 7 is a potential therapeutic target in human cancer and a novel prognostic marker of non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sections from 331 NSCLC patients, who had undergone surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry using an MCM7-specific anti- body showed nuclear localization in cancer tissues, but nothing was detected in normal lung tissues (Figure 1B). Importantly, specific... ;#27; #20; C Normal tissues (n = 11) NSCLC (n = 6) SCLC (n = 3) ** NS* R el at iv e m R N A e xp re ss io n le ve ls o f M CM 7 A Normal lungMCM7 positive ?100 ?200 ?200 ?200 B D MCM7 positive (n = 196) MCM7 negative (n = 135) 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 500...

Toyokawa, Gouji; Masuda, Ken; Daigo, Yataro; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Takawa, Masashi; Hayami, Shinya; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Chino, Makoto; Field, Helen I; Neal, David E; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Ponder, Bruce A J; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Does OPERA probe that the Earth is moving ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The OPERA experiment reported recently a puzzling result. The time of flight of a neutrino beam between the CERN and the Gran Sasso Laboratory has been measured to be slightly shorter than expected. More precisely, an early arrival time of the neutrino with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum of 60.7 ns was measured, with a quite high confidence level. Alternatively, one can conclude that the neutrinos travelled 18.2 m more than light would do in vacuum. In this short paper, we suggest a possible systematic effect that does not appear in the analysis and which can easily been probed to be confirmed.

Dominique Monderen

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Addressing water vaporization in the vicinity of an exploding wire  

SciTech Connect

The phase state of thin ({approx}1 {mu}m) layer of water adjacent to the surface of rapidly heated thin wire 100{+-}50 {mu}m in radius is analyzed by computer hydrodynamic calculation. It is shown that when heating of a wire to a temperature of 420 deg. C is achieved in less than {approx}500 ns, the trajectory of the phase state is contained in the liquid part of the phase diagram. This suggests additional proof of and an explanation for the absence of shunting plasma discharge in fast underwater electrical wire explosions.

Grinenko, A.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Dolinsky, Yu. [Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

GHz Rabi flopping to Rydberg states in hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a timescale below one nanosecond in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ~ 4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room temperature quantum devices. Furthermore the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by three orders of magnitude.

Huber, B; Schlagmller, M; Klle, A; Kbler, H; Lw, R; Pfau, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

GHz Rabi flopping to Rydberg states in hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a timescale below one nanosecond in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ~ 4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room temperature quantum devices. Furthermore the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by three orders of magnitude.

B. Huber; T. Baluktsian; M. Schlagmller; A. Klle; H. Kbler; R. Lw; T. Pfau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characterization of deep weathering and nanoporosity development in shale - a neutron study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS/USANS) to characterize the evolution of nanoscale features in weathering Rose Hill shale within the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Observatory (SSHO). The SANS/USANS techniques, here referred to as neutron scattering (NS), characterize porosity comprised of features ranging from approximately 3 nm to several micrometers in dimension. NS was used to investigate shale chips sampled by gas-powered drilling ('saprock') or by hand-augering ('regolith') at ridgetop. At about 20 m depth, dissolution is inferred to have depleted the bedrock of ankerite and all the chips investigated with NS are from above the ankerite dissolution zone. NS documents that 5--6% of the total ankerite-free rock volume is comprised of isolated, intraparticle pores. At 5 m depth, an abrupt increase in porosity and surface area corresponds with onset of feldspar dissolution in the saprock and is attributed mainly to peri-glacial processes from 15 000 years ago. At tens of centimeters below the saprock-regolith interface, the porosity and surface area increase markedly as chlorite and illite begin to dissolve. These clay reactions contribute to the transformation of saprock to regolith. Throughout the regolith, intraparticle pores in chips connect to form larger interparticle pores and scattering changes from a mass fractal at depth to a surface fractal near the land surface. Pore geometry also changes from anisotropic at depth, perhaps related to pencil cleavage created in the rock by previous tectonic activity, to isotropic at the uppermost surface as clays weather. In the most weathered regolith, kaolinite and Fe-oxyhydroxides precipitate, blocking some connected pores. These precipitates, coupled with exposure of more quartz by clay weathering, contribute to the decreased mineral-pore interfacial area in the uppermost samples. These observations are consistent with conversion of bedrock to saprock to regolith at SSHO due to: (1) transport of reactants (e.g., water, O{sub 2}) into primary pores and fractures created by tectonic events and peri-glacial effects; (2) mineral-water reactions and particle loss that increase porosity and the access of water into the rock. From deep to shallow, mineral-water reactions may change from largely transport-limited where porosity was set largely by ancient tectonic activity to kinetic-limited where porosity is changing due to climate-driven processes.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Mildner, David [ORNL; Duffy, Christopher S [ORNL; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

I:FHare  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MAR 1 MAR 1 7 1932 I:FHare r. OAT( Becht el hatio nal, Inc. AnN: Mr. R. L. Hudolp h PO Box 350 Oak Ridge , Til 37830 Gentle men: CRITER IA FOR RENED IAL ACTION AT ACID/P UEBLO AND BAYD CANYO NS; REQUE ST FOR COST/B ENEFIT ANAlY SES OF RrMEDI AL ACTION OPTION S AT THE CAJIYON S INI T IALSi '0 ~nclos ed are sever"a l pieces of ca.rres ponde nce relate d to Acid/P ueblo and Bayo Canyo ns. First. (P has concu rred with the remed ial action criter ia for the ew Mexico sites that were propos ed to them on Augus t 20. 1981 (with the additi on of a criter ion for Pu-239 added Octob er 20,19 81). In slIDllla ry. the criter ia w1l1 be: Radio nuclid e Soil Limit (pCi/g ) Sr-90 100 80 ,:;; rr, SV DO'~ Cs-137 Th-228 . 50 Th-230 280 Th-232 20 0-234 40 U-238 40 Pu-239 100 Pu-240 100 Pu-241 800

426

Group Publications-Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis (SEE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEE Group Publications 2009 - present SEE Group Publications 2009 - present 2013 Ordered Bilayer Ruthenium-Platinum Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Carbon Monoxide-Tolerant Fuel Cell Catalysts, Y.-C. Hsieh, Y. Zhang, D. Su, V. Volkov, R. Si, L. Wu, Y. Zhu, W. An, P. Liu, P. He, S. Ye, R. R. Adzic, and J.X. Wang, Nature Communications, in press. Pt Monolayer on Au-Stabilized PdNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction, K.A. Kuttiyiel, K. Sasaki, D. Su, M.B. Vukmirovic, N.S. Marinkovic, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, in press. Oxygen Reduction Activity of IrCu Core Platinum Monolayer Shell Nano-electrocatalysts, Y.M. Choi, K.A. Kuttiyiel, J. P. Labis, K. Sasaki, G.-G. Park, T.-H. Yang, R.R. Adzic, Topics in Catalysis, in press. The Role of Rhodium and Tin Oxide in the Platinum-based Electrocatalysts for Ethanol Oxidation to CO2, M. Li, W.-P. Zhou, N.S. Marinkovic, K. Sasaki, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, 104 (2013) 454-461.

427

Integrable Scalar Cosmologies I. Foundations and links with String Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build a number of integrable one--scalar spatially flat cosmologies, which play a natural role in inflationary scenarios, examine their behavior in several cases and draw from them some general lessons on this type of systems, whose potentials involve combinations of exponential functions, and on similar non--integrable ones. These include the need for the scalar to emerge from the initial singularity while climbing up sufficiently steep exponential potentials ("climbing phenomenon") and the inevitable collapse in a big Crunch whenever the scalar tries to settle at negative extrema of the potential. We also elaborate on the links between these types of potentials and "brane supersymmetry breaking", a mechanism that ties together string scale and scale of supersymmetry breaking in a class of orientifold models. We show that, under some assumptions that are spelled out in the text, the extended objects of these vacua can inject inflationary phases with discrete values of the spectral index that are determined by the number of unwrapped dimensions of the branes and by the inverse power with which the string coupling $g_s$ enters their world--volume actions. An NS fivebrane, which is interestingly unstable in this class of models, when wrapped on a small internal cycle would yield a spectral index that is amusingly close to the experimentally favored PLANCK value ns ~ 0.96.

P. Fr; A. Sagnotti; A. S. Sorin

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

DISCOVERY OF RED-SKEWED K {sub {alpha}} IRON LINE IN Cyg X-2 WITH SUZAKU  

SciTech Connect

We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals a presence of the iron K {sub {alpha}} emission line. The line profile shows a significant red wing. This discovery increases the number of NS sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of accreting compact objects. We examine the line profile in terms of models which attribute its production to the relativistic effects due to reflection of X-ray radiation from a cold accretion disk and also as a result of the line formation in the extended wind/outflow configuration. Both models are able to adequately represent the observed line profile. We consider the results of line modeling in the context of subsecond variability. While we were unable to conclusively disqualify one of the models, we find that the wind paradigm has several advantages over the relativistic disk reflection model.

Shaposhnikov, Nikolai [CRESST/NASA GSFC, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States); Titarchuk, Lev [George Mason University/Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Laurent, Philippe [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA/SAp, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: nikolai@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: Lev.Titarchuk@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: plaurent@cea.fr

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

The last stages of evolution of close binaries composed of compact companions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are the most powerful transient phenomena in the Universe. Nowadays dozens of speculations on the origin of GRB were undertaken, but so far a single model for the origin of, in particular, short GRBs does not exist. The black hole (BH) - neutron star (NS) coalescence is a promising candidate source for short GRBs. Most of binary mergers numerical simulations were carried out with the purpose of investigating the emission of gravitational waves. Such a scenario consists of an inspiral, merging and ringdown phase. In this paper we present the comparison of the observational results and analytical predictions for a test particle in a quasicircular orbit around the BH. The emission of gravitational waves causes a rapid decrease of the orbital radius and a rise of a {\\it chirp} of radiation. Matter orbiting the black hole would be expected to produce high-frequency oscillations (HFO). Timescales of the coalescence process are of the order of milliseconds and oscillation frequencies of hundreds Hz for a system with a solar mass BH companion. We report on the detection of HFO in two short gamma-ray bursts in this paper. The frequencies and durations of the oscillations are in agreement with the predicted values. A {\\it chirp} phenomenon is identified also. We therefore argue in favor of BH-NS mergers as a scenario for the production of short gamma-ray bursts.

B. E. Zhilyaev; D. L. Dubinovska

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Prospects of warm dense matter research at HiRadMat facility at CERN using 440 MeV SPS proton beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present numerical simulations of heating of a solid copper cylinder by the 440 GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The beam is made of 288 proton bunches while each bunch comprises of 1.15$1011 so that the total number of protons in the beam is about 1.3$1013. The bunch length is 0.5 ns while two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns so that the beam duration is 7.2 ms. Particle intensity distribution in the transverse direction is a Gaussian and the beam can be focused to a spot size with s 1?4 0.1 mme1.0 mm. In this paper we present results using two values of s, namely 0.2 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The target length is 1.5 m with a radius 1?4 5 cm and is facially irradiated by the beam. The energy deposition code FLUKA and the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code BIG2 are employed using a suitable iteration time to simulate the hydrodynamic and the thermodynamic response of the target. The primary purpose of this work was to design fixed target...

Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Photoinduced Surface Oxidation and Its Effect on the Exciton Dynamics of CdSe Quantum Dots  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With increased interest in semiconductor nanoparticles for use in quantum dot solar cells there comes a need to understand the long-term photostability of such materials. Colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were suspended in toluene and stored in combinations of light/dark and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} to simulate four possible benchtop storage environments. CdSe QDs stored in a dark, oxygen-free environment were observed to better retain their optical properties over the course of 90 days. The excited state lifetimes, determined through femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, of air-equilibrated samples exposed to light exhibit a decrease in average lifetime (0.81 ns) when compared to samples stored in a nitrogen/dark environment (8.3 ns). A photoetching technique commonly used for controlled reduction of QD size was found to induce energetic trap states to CdSe QDs and accelerate the rate of electron-hole recombination. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis confirms surface oxidation, the extent of which is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the ligand shell.

Hines, Douglas A.; Becker, Matthew A.; Kamat, Prashant V. (Notre)

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

ATLAS Upgrade Instrumentation in the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planned upgrades of the LHC over the next decade should allow the machine to operate at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with instantaneous luminosities in the range 5--7e34 cm^-2 s^-1. With these parameters, ATLAS could collect 3,000 fb^-1 of data in approximately 10 years. However, the conditions under which this data would be acquired are much harsher than those currently encountered at the LHC. For example, the number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing will rise from the level of 20--30 per 50 ns crossing observed in 2012 to 140--200 every 25 ns. In order to deepen our understanding of the newly discovered Higgs boson and to extend our searches for physics beyond that new particle, the ATLAS detector, trigger, and readout will have to undergo significant upgrades. In this whitepaper we describe R&D necessary for ATLAS to continue to run effectively at the highest luminosities foreseen from the LHC. Emphasis is placed on those R&D efforts in which US institutions are playing a leading role.

Gustaaf Brooijmans; Hal Evans; Abe Seiden

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

Tumer, Tumay O (Riverside, CA); Clajus, Martin (Los Angeles, CA); Visser, Gerard (Bloomington, IN)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Controlled photon emission and Raman transition experiments with a single trapped atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results on the coherent control of an optical transition in a single rubidium atom, trapped in an optical tweezer. We excite the atom using resonant light pulses that are short (4 ns) compared with the lifetime of the excited state (26 ns). By varying the intensity of the laser pulses, we can observe an adjustable number of Rabi oscillations, followed by free decay once the light is switched off. To generate the pulses we have developed a novel laser system based on frequency doubling a telecoms laser diode at 1560 nm. By setting the laser intensity to make a pi-pulse, we use this coherent control to make a high quality triggered source of single photons. We obtain an average single photon rate of 9600 s-1 at the detector. Measurements of the second-order temporal correlation function show almost perfect antibunching at zero delay. In addition, we present preliminary results on the use of Raman transitions to couple the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of our trapped atom. This will allow us to prepare and control a qubit formed by two hyperfine sub-levels.

M. P. A. Jones; B. Darquie; J. Beugnon; J. Dingjan; S. Bergamini; Y. Sortais; G. Messin; A. Browaeys; P. Grangier

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Trident as an ultrahigh irradiance laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Trident Nd:glass ICF laser at Los Alamos may be operated in a mode that produces high ultrashort pulses by the chirp/compression method. The 125-ps pulses from a standard moderated, ND:YLF oscillator are first frequency-broadened to 3-nm bandwidth, chirped in a quartz fiber, and then compressed with a grating pair to 1.5 ps. A second quartz fiber then provides nonlinear polarization rotation for background and satellite suppression and to further broaden the spectrum to >7 nm. Pulses are chirped again to 1 ns width with a second grating pair and amplified in a ND:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. Millijoule-level output is then amplified through the existing phosphate glass Trident amplifier chain before compression to =}1 J with excellent beam quality and contrast ratio is routinely produced by compressing after three rod amplifier stages. Higher energies are possible by compression further along the amplifier chain. Simultaneous use of long ({approximately}1 ns) pulses for plasma formation is also possible.

Johnson, R.P.; Moncur, N.K.; Cobble, J.A.; Watt, R.G.; Gibson, R.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ionization of Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied an ionization of alkali-metal Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR). The results of the theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs Rydberg atoms are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at the three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependences on n. A Cooper minimum for BBR-induced transitions between bound Rydberg states of Li has been found. The calculated ionization rates are compared with our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with ...

Beterov, I I; Ryabtsev, I I; Entin, V M; Ekers, A; Bezuglov, N N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Interaction of Plasma Discharges with a Flame: Experimental and Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental results and numerical simulations of methane/air non-premixed flame under plasma assistance. Without plasma assistance, the flame blows off at a 28-30 m{center_dot}s{sup -1} bulk velocity (power around 3 kW). When the discharge is on, the flame can be maintained up to a bulk velocity of 53 m{center_dot}s{sup -1}(power around 6 kW), corresponding to +90% gain in power with only a few watt of plasma power. The plasma discharges present short duration current pulses (between 100 ns and 200 ns) and occur non-monotonically (delay between two pulses from 6x10{sup -5} s to 0.1 s). The probability density function of this occurrence is significantly influenced by the mass flow rate or the absence of flame, revealing the strong coupling of the plasma with hydrodynamic and combustion. For the numerical section of this work, we simulated the flame using a Computational Fluid Dynamics code based on Direct Numerical Simulation (direct solving of Navier-Stokes equations), and investigated the thermal and/or chemical effects of discharges on the flame stability.

Vincent-Randonnier, Axel [ONERA, French Aerospace Lab, Palaiseau, F-91761 (France); Teixeira, David [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison, F-92852 (France)

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Four Channel 250 MHz Visual Counter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A visual counter rated at 250 mhz. with a pulse-pair resolution of 2.6 nanoseconds for nuclear instrument module (NIM) signals has been designed. Pulse widths for NIM signals must be equal to or greater than 2 ns. The counter has a separate input for transistor-transistor logic (TTL) signals and for this logic level it operates at rates equal to or less than 190 mhz. TTL pulses must be greater than 4 ns. The design was implemented on a printed circuit card. Four of these cards were packaged into a single unit resulting in a four channel device that can be mounted into a 19 inch rack. Seven units were built; they are presently used in the experimental area and in the Main Control Room of the Bevalac. The counter accepts well defined NIM or TTL signals internally terminated with 50 ohms. All the controls and the signal input connectors are located on the front panel. An Overflow output, Gate, and Reset inputs are located on the back panel. The counters have 8 Light Emitting Diode digit displays which are 20.3 mm high with a viewing distance rating of 10 meters. Light filters are used for the LED displays greatly enhancing their visibility.

Flores, I.; Blando, P.; Crawford, H.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Ko, S.; Krebs, G.; Visser, G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Fine-tuning molecular energy levels by nonresonant laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the shifts imparted to vibrational and rotational levels of a linear molecule by a nonresonant laser field at intensities of up to 10^12 W/cm^2. Both types of shift are found to be either positive or negative, depending on the initial rotational state acted upon by the field. An adiabatic field-molecule interaction imparts a rotational energy shift which is negative and exceeds the concomitant positive vibrational shift by a few orders of magnitude. The rovibrational states are thus pushed downward in such a field. A nonresonant pulsed laser field that interacts nonadiabatically with the molecule is found to impart rotational and vibrational shifts of the same order of magnitude. The nonadiabatic energy transfer occurs most readily at a pulse duration which amounts to about a tenth of the molecule's rotational period, and vanishes when the sudden regime is attained for shorter pulses. We applied our treatment to the much studied 87Rb_2 molecule in the last bound vibrational levels of its lowest singlet and triplet electronic states. Our calculations indicate that 15 ns and 1.5 ns laser pulses of an intensity in excess of 5x10^9 W/cm^2 are capable of dissociating the molecule due to the vibrational shift. Lesser shifts can be used to fine tune the rovibrational levels and thereby to affect collisional resonances by the nonresonant light. The energy shifts may be discernible spectroscopically, at a 10 MHz resolution.

Mikhail Lemeshko; Bretislav Friedrich

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Design and Fabrication of the Lithium Beam Ion Injector for NDCX-II  

SciTech Connect

A 130 keV injector is developed for the NDCX-II facility. It consists of a 10.9 cm diameter lithium doped alumina-silicate ion source heated to {approx}1300 C and 3 electrodes. Other components include a segmented Rogowski coil for current and beam position monitoring, a gate valve, pumping ports, a focusing solenoid, a steering coil and space for inspection and maintenance access. Significant design challenges including managing the 3-4 kW of power dissipation from the source heater, temperature uniformity across the emitter surface, quick access for frequent ion source replacement, mechanical alignment with tight tolerance, and structural stabilization of the cantilevered 27-inch OD graded HV ceramic column. The injector fabrication is scheduled to complete by May 2011, and assembly and installation is scheduled to complete by the beginning of July. The Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) is for the study of high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research utilizing a lithium ion (Li+) beam with a current of 93 mA and a pulse length of 500 ns (compressed to 1 ns at the target). The injector is one of the most complicated sections of the NDCX-II accelerator demanding significant design and fabrication resources. It needs to accommodate a relatively large ion source (10.9 cm), a high heat load (3-4 kW) and specific beam optics developed from the physics model. Some specific design challenges are noted in this paper.

Takakuwa, J.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Film deposition and surface modification using intense pulsed ion beams  

SciTech Connect

High-power pulsed ion beams have been used to ablate material for ultrahigh-rate film deposition and to treat the surfaces of alloys. Pulsed ion beams were provided by the high-power-density Gamble II facility at the Naval Research Laboratory [high voltage ({similar_to}900 keV), short pulse (60 ns)] and the lower-power-density Anaconda facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory [lower voltage ({similar_to}300 keV), longer pulse (400 ns)]. Peak film deposition rates after target ablation reached 1 mm/s. Films of pure Al, pure Ta, YBCO, and Ni--Zn ferrite were deposited on glass and single-crystal substrates, in some cases heated. The film deposition process was studied with framing photography, a bolometer, and other diagnostics to gain an understanding of the ablation, transport, and deposition steps. Stoichiometric deposition of multicomponent targets has been demonstrated. Film morphology remains poor, but has steadily improved, and our present understanding points the way to further improvement. Lower fluences ({similar_to}5 J/cm{sup 2}) were used to investigate rapid thermal processing of metal surfaces for the enhancement of corrosion resistance. The results in this area have been negative, but here again the knowledge gained through these experiments allows us to propose directions for improvement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

Meli, C.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Stephanakis, S.J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams  

SciTech Connect

The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

446

Merger of white dwarf-neutron star binaries: Prelude to hydrodynamic simulations in general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White dwarf-neutron star binaries generate detectable gravitational radiation. We construct Newtonian equilibrium models of corotational white dwarf-neutron star (WDNS) binaries in circular orbit and find that these models terminate at the Roche limit. At this point the binary will undergo either stable mass transfer (SMT) and evolve on a secular time scale, or unstable mass transfer (UMT), which results in the tidal disruption of the WD. The path a given binary will follow depends primarily on its mass ratio. We analyze the fate of known WDNS binaries and use population synthesis results to estimate the number of LISA-resolved galactic binaries that will undergo either SMT or UMT. We model the quasistationary SMT epoch by solving a set of simple ordinary differential equations and compute the corresponding gravitational waveforms. Finally, we discuss in general terms the possible fate of binaries that undergo UMT and construct approximate Newtonian equilibrium configurations of merged WDNS remnants. We use these configurations to assess plausible outcomes of our future, fully relativistic simulations of these systems. If sufficient WD debris lands on the NS, the remnant may collapse, whereby the gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger, and collapse phases will sweep from LISA through LIGO frequency bands. If the debris forms a disk about the NS, it may fragment and form planets.

Vasileios Paschalidis; Morgan MacLeod; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Stuart L. Shapiro

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: copper/water axially-grooved heat pipe topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the major accomplishments for the development, fabrication, and testing of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes for Selenide Isotopic Generator (SIG) applications. The early development consisted of chemical, physical, and analytical studies to define an axially-grooved tube geometry that could be successfully fabricated and provide the desired long term (up to seven years) performance is presented. Heat pipe fabrication procedures, measured performance and accelerated life testing of heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 conducted at B and K Engineering are discussed. S/N AL-5 was the first axially-grooved copper/water heat pipe that was fabricated with the new internal coating process for cupric oxide (CuO) and the cleaning and water preparation methods developed by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Heat pipe S/N LT-57 was fabricated along with sixty other axially-grooved heat pipes allocated for life testing at Teledyne Energy Systems. As of June 25, 1979, heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 have been accelerated life tested for 13,310 and 6,292 respectively, at a nominal operating temperature of 225/sup 0/C without any signs of thermal performance degradation. (TFD)

Strazza, N.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

ON THE RARITY OF X-RAY BINARIES WITH NAKED HELIUM DONORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paucity of known high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with naked He donor stars (hereafter He star) in the Galaxy has been noted over the years as a surprising fact, given the significant number of Galactic HMXBs containing H-rich donors, which are expected to be their progenitors. This contrast has further sharpened in light of recent observations uncovering a preponderance of HMXBs hosting loosely bound Be donors orbiting neutron stars (NSs), which would be expected to naturally evolve into He-HMXBs through dynamical mass transfer onto the NS and a common-envelope (CE) phase. Hence, reconciling the large population of Be-HMXBs with the observation of only one He-HMXB can help constrain the dynamics of CE physics. Here, we use detailed stellar structure and evolution models and show that binary mergers of HMXBs during CE events must be common in order to resolve the tension between these observed populations. We find that, quantitatively, this scenario remains consistent with the typically adopted energy parameterization of CE evolution, yielding expected populations which are not at odds with current observations. However, future observations which better constrain the underlying population of loosely bound O/B-NS binaries are likely to place significant constraints on the efficiency of CE ejection.

Linden, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Optimal control of the silicon-based donor electron spin quantum computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in Si semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high-fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and explicitly find its digitized control sequences by optimizing its fidelity over the external controls of the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. This high-fidelity CNOT gate has an error of about $10^{-6}$, below the error threshold required for fault-tolerant quantum computation, and its operation time of 100ns is about 3 times faster than 297ns of the proposed global control scheme. It also relaxes significantly the stringent distance constraint of two neighboring donor atoms of 10~20nm as reported in the original Kane's proposal to about 30nm in which surface A and J gates may be built with current fabrication technology. The effects of the control voltage fluctuations, the dipole-dipole interaction and the electron spin decoherence on the CNOT gate fidelity are also discussed.

Dong-Bang Tsai; Po-Wen Chen; Hsi-Sheng Goan

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

451

Spike deceleration and bubble acceleration in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear evolutions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with preheat is investigated by numerical simulation (NS). A new phase of the spike deceleration evolution in the nonlinear ablative RTI (ARTI) is discovered. It is found that nonlinear evolution of the RTI can be divided into the weakly nonlinear regime (WNR) and the highly nonlinear regime (HNR) according to the difference of acceleration velocities for the spike and the bubble. With respect to the classical RTI (i.e., without heat conduction), the bubble first accelerates in the WNR and then decelerates in the HNR while the spike holds acceleration in the whole nonlinear regime (NR). With regard to the ARTI, on the contrary, the spike first accelerates in the WNR and then decelerates in the HNR while the bubble keeps acceleration in the whole NR. The NS results indicate that it is the nonlinear overpressure effect at the spike tip and the vorticity accumulation inside the bubble that lead to, respectively, the spike deceleration and bubble acceleration, in the nonlinear ARTI. In addition, it is found that in the ARTI the spike saturation velocity increases with the perturbation wavelength.

Ye, W. H.; He, X. T. [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and LCP, Institute of Applied Physics Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, L. F. [CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and LCP, Institute of Applied Physics Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); SMCE, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1lambda. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

Wang, L. F. [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Ye, W. H. [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Y. J. [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Improvements in Modeling Au Sphere Non-LTE X-ray Emission  

SciTech Connect

We've previously reported on experiments at the Omega laser at URLLE, in which 1.0 mm in diameter, Au coated, spheres, were illuminated at either 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} (10 kJ/3 ns) or at 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} (30 kJ/1 ns). Spectral information on the 1 keV thermal x-rays, as well as the multi-keV M-band were obtained. We compared a variety of non-LTE atomic physics packages to this data with varying degrees of success. In this paper we broaden the scope of the investigation, and compare the data to newer models: (1) An improved Detailed Configuration Accounting (DCA) method; and (2) This model involves adjustments to the standard XSN non-LTE model which lead to a better match of coronal emission as calculated by XSN to that calculated by SCRAM, a more sophisticated stand-alone model. We show some improvements in the agreement with Omega data when using either of these new approaches.

Rosen, M D; Scott, H A; Suter, L J; Hansen, S B

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

O-d energetics scaling models for Z-pinch-driven hohlraums  

SciTech Connect

Wire array Z-pinches on the Z accelerator provide the most intense laboratory source of soft x-rays in the world. The unique combination of a highly-Planckian radiation source with high x-ray production efficiency (15% wall plug), large x-ray powers and energies ( >150 TW, {ge}1 MJ in 7 ns), large characteristic hohlraum volumes (0.5 to >10 cm{sup 3}), and long pulse-lengths (5 to 20 ns) may make Z-pinches a good match to the requirements for driving high-yield scale ICF capsules with adequate radiation symmetry and margin. The Z-pinch driven hohlraum approach of Hammer and Porter [Phys.Plasmas, 6, 2129(1999)] may provide a conservative and robust solution to the requirements for high yield, and is currently being studied on the Z accelerator. This paper describes a multiple region, 0-d hohlraum energetic model for Z-pinch driven hohlraums in four configurations. The authors observe consistency between the models and the measured x-ray powers and hohlraum wall temperatures to within {+-}20% in flux, for the four configurations.

CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; VESEY,ROGER A.; HAMMER,J.H.; PORTER,JOHN L.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

455

Scaling studies and time-resolved microwave measurements on a relativistic backward-wave oscillator  

SciTech Connect

The authors built a relativistic backward-wave oscillator (BWO) operating at a frequency near 8 GHz. In the experiments, the parameters of the 60-ns electron beam driving this microwave source were varied over the ranges 0.8--1.5 MV and 2--10 kA. Also, they tried several different annular cathodes for launching the electron beam varying the outer radius and shape. The axial magnetic field guiding the beam through the BWO was varied between 0.6 and 3 T. Finally, they investigated the power transfer downstream to an output waveguide as a function of the shape of the transition from the BWO to the waveguide. They discuss the scaling of the output power and frequency with these variations. In addition, they show time-resolved measurements of 2-ns-long segments of the microwave output. In observations of the microwave signal, they found the frequency shifted as the output power envelope passed through a sharp dip; they propose that this shift corresponds to a change in the longitudinal operating mode of the BWO.

Swegle, J.A.; Anderson, R.A.; Camacho, J.F.; Poole, B.R.; Rhodes, M.A.; Rosenbury, E.T.; Shaeffer, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method and apparatus for fast laser pulse detection using gaseous plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The method and device of the instant invention is a detector of pulsed laser radiation which utilizes the electromotive force generated by the plasma formed when such radiation is focused onto a surface (1). Measurements are made with a 10.6 .mu.m CO.sub.2 laser capable of producing peak intensities of 10.sup.13 W/cm.sup.2 when directed through a converging lens (2). Evacuated detector response to such laser intensity is 1 kV signal peak amplitude and subnanosecond risetimes into a 50.OMEGA. load (3). Detector performance is found to be greatly altered with the introduction of a background gas (4). For example, with one atmosphere of air, the detector produces prompt signals of the order of 1 V with subnanosecond response for pulse trains lasting 100 ns. With argon, krypton, or zenon at pressures of the order of 10 torr, the detector generates "trigger pulses" of about 250 V amplitude and 0.2 ns risetimes. Such detectors are quite robust when irradiated with high intensity laser radiation and are useful for qualitative laser beam monitoring.

McLellan, Edward J. (Los Alamos, NM); Webb, John A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

High Power Testing Results of the X-band Mixed-mode RF Windows for Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we summarize the high power testing results of the X-band mixed-mode RF windows at KEK and SLAC for linear colliders. The main feature of these windows is that the combination of modes on the surface of the ceramic significantly decreases the electric and magnetic fields in the junction between the ceramic and the metal. So far two types of high power windows (with the diameter of 53 mm and 64 mm) have been fabricated. A high power model of the smaller type window was fabricated and tested in a resonant ring at KEK. A maximum circulating power of 81 MW with 300 ns duration or 66 MW with 700 ns duration was achieved. Light emission was observed for a power level of over 10 MW. Later, both windows were shipped to SLAC for even higher power testing using combined power from two klystrons. The first window (53 mm diameter) achieved a transmitted power of 80 MW with 1.5 microsec duration at 30 Hz repetition. It was not destroyed during the testing. The testing of the second window was carried out next to the small type and achieved 62 MW with 1.5 microsec duration with 10 Hz repetition. The final results of both windows are presented in this report.

Loewen, Roderick J

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

Boonstra, R.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Optimization of Extinction Efficiency in the 8-GeV Mu2e Beam Line  

SciTech Connect

A muon-to-electron conversion experiment at Fermilab, Mu2e, is being designed to probe for new physics beyond the standard model at mass scales up to 10{sup 4} TeV. For this experiment, the advance in experimental sensitivity will be four orders of magnitude when compared to existing data on charged lepton flavor violation. The muon beam will be produced by delivering a proton beam contained in short 100-ns bunches onto a muon production target, with an inter-bunch separation of about 1700 ns. A critical requirement of the experiment is to ensure a low level of background at the muon detector consistent with the required sensitivity. To meet the sensitivity requirement, protons that reach the target between bunches must be suppressed by an enormous factor, so that an extinction factor, defined as a number of background protons between main bunches per proton in such a bunch, should not exceed 10{sup -9}. This paper describes the advanced beam optics and results of numerical modeling with STRUCT and MARS codes for a beam line with a collimation system that allows us to achieve the experimental extinction factor of one per billion.

Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Johnstone, C.; Mokhov, N.V.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Nike electron-beam-pumped KrF laser amplifiers  

SciTech Connect

Nike is a recently completed multikilojoule krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. The two final amplifiers of the Nike laser are both electron-beam-pumped systems. This paper describes these two amplifiers, with an emphasis on the pulsed power. The smaller of the two has a 20 x 20 cm aperture, and produces an output laser beam energy in excess of 100 J. This 20 cm Amplifier uses a single 12 kJ Marx generator to inject two 300 kV, 75 kA, 140 ns flat-top electron beams into opposite sides of the laser cell. The larger amplifier in Nike has a 60 x 60 cm aperture, and amplifies the laser beam up to 5 kJ. This 60 cm amplifier has two independent electron beam systems. Each system has a 170 kJ Marx generator that produces a 670 kV, 540 kA, 240 ns flat-top electron beam. Both amplifiers are complete, fully integrated into the laser, meet the Nike system requirements, and are used routinely for laser-target experiments.

Sethian, J.D.; Pawley, C.J.; Obenschain, S.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Z: A Fast Pulsed Power Generator for Ultra-High Magnetic Field Generation  

SciTech Connect

Advances in fast, pulsed-power technologies have resulted in the development of very high current drivers that have current rise times - 100 ns. The largest such pulsed power drive r today is the new Z accelerator located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Z is capable of delivering more than 20 MA with a time-to-peak of 105 ns to low inductance (- 1 nH)loads. Such large drivers are capable of directly generating magnetic fields approaching 3 kT in small, 1 -cm3, volumes. In addition to direct field generation, Z can be used to compress an applied, axial seed field with a plasma. Flux compression scheme~: are not new and are, in fact, the basis of all explosive flux-compression generators but we propose the use of plasma armatures rather than solid, conducting armatures. We will present experimental results from the Z accelerator in which magnetic fields - 2 kT are generated and measured with several diagnostics. Issues such as energy loss in solid conductors and dynamic response of current-carrying conductors to very large magnetic fields will be reviewed in context with Z experiments. We will describe planned flux-compression experiments that are expected to create the highest-magnitude uniform-field volumes yet attained in the laboratory.

Asay, J.R.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.; Hall, C.A.; McDaniel, D.H.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Signals of Inflation in a Friendly String Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following Freivogel {\\it et al} we consider inflation in a predictive (or `friendly') region of the landscape of string vacua, as modeled by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Kachru. In such a region the dimensionful coefficients of super-renormalizable operators unprotected by symmetries, such as the vacuum energy and scalar mass-squareds are freely scanned over, and the objects of study are anthropically or `environmentally' conditioned probability distributions for observables. In this context we study the statistical predictions of (inverted) hybrid inflation models, where the properties of the inflaton are probabilistically distributed. We derive the resulting distributions of observables, including the deviation from flatness $|1-\\Omega|$, the spectral index of scalar cosmological perturbations $n_s$ (and its scale dependence $dn_s/d\\log k$), and the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations $r$. The environmental bound on the curvature implies a solution to the $\\eta$-problem of inflation with the predicted distribution of $(1-n_s)$ indicating values close to current observations. We find a relatively low probability ($<3%$) of `just-so' inflation with measurable deviations from flatness. Intermediate scales of inflation are preferred in these models.

John March-Russell; Francesco Riva

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nanosecond Time Resolved and Steady State Infrared Studies of Photoinduced Decomposition of TATB at Ambient and Elevated Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The timescale and/or products of photo-induced decomposition of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) were investigated at ambient pressure and compared with products formed at elevated pressure (i.e. 8 GPa). Ultrafast time-resolved infrared and steady state Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopies were used to probe TATB and its products after photoexcitation with a 5 ns pulse of 532 nm light. At ambient pressure, transient spectra of TATB indicate that the molecule has significantly decomposed within 60 ns; transient spectra also indicate that formation of CO{sub 2}, an observed decomposition product, is complete within 30-40 s. Proof of principle time resolved experiments at elevated pressures were performed and are discussed briefly. Comparison of steady-state FTIR spectra obtained at ambient and elevated pressure (ca. 8 GPa) indicate that the decomposition products vary with pressure. We find evidence for water as a decomposition product only at elevated pressure.

Glascoe, E A; Zaug, J M; Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Grant, C D; Fried, L E

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

465

Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e  

SciTech Connect

For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

Neal, Justin N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

On tadpoles and vacuum redefinitions in String Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tadpoles accompany, in one form or another, all attempts to realize supersymmetry breaking in String Theory, making the present constructions at best incomplete. Whereas these tadpoles are typically large, a closer look at the problem from a perturbative viewpoint has the potential of illuminating at least some of its qualitative features in String Theory. A possible scheme to this effect was proposed long ago by Fischler and Susskind, but incorporating background redefinitions in string amplitudes in a systematic fashion has long proved very difficult. In the first part of this paper, drawing from field theory examples, we thus begin to explore what one can learn by working perturbatively in a ``wrong'' vacuum. While unnatural in Field Theory, this procedure presents evident advantages in String Theory, whose definition in curved backgrounds is mostly beyond reach at the present time. At the field theory level, we also identify and characterize some special choices of vacua where tadpole resummations terminate after a few contributions. In the second part we present a notable example where vacuum redefinitions can be dealt with to some extent at the full string level, providing some evidence for a new link between IIB and 0B orientifolds. We finally show that NS-NS tadpoles do not manifest themselves to lowest order in certain classes of string constructions with broken supersymmetry and parallel branes, including brane-antibrane pairs and brane supersymmetry breaking models, that therefore have UV finite threshold corrections at one loop.

E. Dudas; G. Pradisi; M. Nicolosi; A. Sagnotti

2004-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

470

The luminescence characteristics of CsI(Na) crystal under {alpha} and X/{gamma} excitation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the effective decay time characteristic of CsI(Na) crystal under {sup 239}Pu alpha particle and {sup 137}Cs gamma-ray excitation using a single photon counting decay time measurement system. The measurement system employs a silicon optical fiber to couple and transit single photon. The slow decay time component of CsI(Na) crystal is 460-550 ns. We observe a 15 ns fast decay component under alpha particle excitation. In addition, we find that the primary stage of the falling edge in the decay time curve is non-exponential and drops rapidly when CsI(Na) crystal is excited by {sup 239}Pu alpha particles. Since the high density of self-trapped-excitons (STEs) is produced in alpha particle excitation process, we propose that the fast falling edge is corresponding to the quenching process of STEs which transit with non-radiation in the case of high excitation density. To prove this proposal, we excited the CsI(Na) crystal with sub-nanosecond intensive pulsed X-ray radiation. Our X-ray impinging results show that the fast falling edge also exists under low energy (average 100 keV) bremsstrahlung X-ray excitation.

Liu Jinliang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu Fang [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Ouyang Xiaoping [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Liu Bin [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Chen Liang; Ruan Jinlu; Zhang Zhongbing; Liu Jun [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

471

The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the large-scale two-point correlation function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu <...

Sanchez, Ariel G; Ross, A J; Percival, W; Manera, M; Montesano, F; Mazzalay, X; Cuesta, A J; Eisenstein, D J; Kazin, E; McBride, C K; Mehta, K; Montero-Dorta, A D; Padmanabhan, N; Prada, F; Rubino-Martin, J A; Tojeiro, R; Xu, X; Magana, M Vargas; Aubourg, E; Bahcall, N A; Bailey, S; Bizyaev, D; Bolton, A S; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, J R; Gott, J Richard; Hamilton, J C; Ho, S; Honscheid, K; Labatie, A; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; Maraston, C; Muna, D; Nichol, R C; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Ross, N P; Roe, N A; Reid, B A; Schlegel, D J; Shelden, A; Schneider, D P; Simmons, A; Skibba, R; Snedden, S; Thomas, D; Tinker, J; Wake, D A; Weaver, B A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Zehavi, I; Zhao, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Faraday cup with nanosecond response and adjustable impedance for fast electron beam characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A movable Faraday cup design with simple structure and adjustable impedance is described in this work. This Faraday cup has external adjustable shunt resistance for self-biased measurement setup and 50 {Omega} characteristic impedance to match with 50 {Omega} standard BNC coaxial cable and vacuum feedthroughs for nanosecond-level pulse signal measurements. Adjustable shunt resistance allows self-biased measurements to be quickly acquired to determine the electron energy distribution function. The performance of the Faraday cup is validated by tests of response time and amplitude of output signal. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the Faraday cup signal fall time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 10 ns. The percent difference of the Faraday cup signal pulse width is below 6.7% for pulse widths greater than 10 ns. A pseudospark-generated electron beam is used to compare the amplitude of the Faraday cup signal with a calibrated F-70 commercial current transformer. The error of the Faraday cup output amplitude is below 10% for the 4-14 kV tested pseudospark voltages. The main benefit of this Faraday cup is demonstrated by adjusting the external shunt resistance and performing the self-biased method for obtaining the electron energy distribution function. Results from a 4 kV pseudospark discharge indicate a ''double-humped'' energy distribution.

Hu Jing; Rovey, Joshua L. [Missouri University of Science and Technology (Formerly University of Missouri-Rolla), Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Delayed Feedback and Chaos on the Driven Diode-Terminated Transmission Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of a distributed, non-linear circuit that produces chaos at GHz frequencies is introduced and tested experimentally. The model circuit is a driven diode-terminated transmission line with the transmission line impedance mismatched to that of the source. Experiments were performed with sinusoidal driving frequencies of 10 MHz to 1.2 GHz, driving powers of -30 to +50 dBm and transmission line delay times from 3 to 20 ns. Diode reverse recovery times ranged from 4 to 100 ns. As a result of many experiments, it was found that chaotic behavior was strongly dependent on the unbiased, small-signal reactance of the system as seen by the driving source, and influenced by an applied DC voltage-bias across the diode. In the experiments that showed period-doubling and / or chaos, the reverse recovery times of the diodes were on the order of both the driving period and the delay time of the circuits. Comparisons between theory and experiment are in general agreement. Chaos produced with a driving frequency of 1.105 GHz has been observed experimentally.

Vassili Demergis; Alexander Glasser; Marshal Miller; Thomas M. Antonsen Jr.; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem applied to refinements of the atomic pair distribution function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have systematically studied the optimal real-space sampling of atomic pair distribution (PDF) data by comparing refinement results from oversampled and resampled data. Based on nickel and a complex perovskite system, we show that not only is the optimal sampling bounded by the Nyquist interval described by the Nyquist-Shannon (NS) sampling theorem as expected, but near this sampling interval, the data points in the PDF are minimally correlated, which results in more reliable uncertainty estimates in the modeling. Surprisingly, we find that PDF refinements quickly become unstable for data on coarser grids. Although the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem is well known, it has not been applied to PDF refinements, despite the growing popularity of the PDF method and its adoption in a growing number of communities. Here, we give explicit expressions for the application of NS sampling theorem to the PDF case, and establish through modeling that it is working in practice, which lays the groundwork for this to become more widely adopted. This has implications for the speed and complexity of possible refinements that can be carried out many times faster than currently with no loss of information, and it establishes a theoretically sound limit on the amount of information contained in the PDF that will prevent over-parametrization during modeling.

Farrow, Christopher L.; Shaw, Margaret; Kim, Hyunjeong; Juhs, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L. (NIAIST); (Columbia); (Princeton)

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

PSR J0737-3039B: A PROBE OF RADIO PULSAR EMISSION HEIGHTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, the strong wind produced by pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B. The influence of these distortions on the orbital-dependent emission properties of pulsar B can be used to determine the location of the coherent radio emission generation region in the pulsar magnetosphere. Using a model of the wind-distorted magnetosphere of pulsar B and the well-defined geometrical parameters of the system, we determine the minimum emission height to be {approx}20R{sub NS} in the two bright orbital longitude regions. We can determine the maximum emission height by accounting for the amount of deflection of the polar field line with respect to the magnetic axis using the analytical magnetic reconnection model of Dungey and the semi-empirical numerical model of Tsyganenko. Both of these models estimate the maximum emission height to be {approx}2500R{sub NS}. The minimum and maximum emission heights we calculate are consistent with those estimated for normal isolated pulsars.

Perera, B. B. P.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lomiashvili, D.; Gourgouliatos, K. N.; Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Horizons cannot save the Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions with anti-D3 branes in a Klebanov-Strassler geometry with positive charge dissolved in fluxes have a certain singularity corresponding to a diverging energy density of the RR and NS-NS three-form fluxes. There are many hopes and arguments for and against this singularity, and we attempt to settle the issue by examining whether this singularity can be cloaked by a regular event horizon. This is equivalent to the existence of asymptotically Klebanov-Tseytlin or Klebanov-Strassler black holes whose charge measured at the horizon has the opposite sign to the asymptotic charge. We find that no such KT solution exists. Furthermore, for a large class of KS black holes we considered, the charge at the horizon must also have the same sign as the asymptotic charge, and is completely determined by the temperature, the number of fractional branes and the gaugino masses of the dual gauge theory. Our result suggests that antibrane singularities in backgrounds with charge in the fluxes are unphysical, which in turn raises the question as to whether antibranes can be used to uplift AdS vacua to deSitter ones. Our results also point out to a possible instability mechanism for the antibranes.

Iosif Bena; Alex Buchel; Oscar J. C. Dias

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption proces