Sample records for instantaneous radiative flux

  1. Instantaneous Power Radiated from Magnetic Dipole Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter D. Morley; Douglas J. Buettner

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the power radiated per unit solid angle of a moving magnetic dipole moment, and its instantaneous radiated power, both non-relativistically and relativistically. This is then applied to various interesting situations: solar neutrons, electron synchrotrons and cosmological Dirac neutrinos. Concerning the latter, we show that hypothesized early-universe Big Bang conditions allow for neutrino radiation cooling and provide an energy loss-mechanism for subsequent neutrino condensation.

  2. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  3. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  4. ARM - PI Product - Radiative Flux Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDACProductsRadiative Flux Analysis ARM

  5. Examining How Radiative Fluxes Are Affected by Cloud and Particle...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    How Radiative Fluxes Are Affected by Cloud and Particle Characteristics Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights...

  6. Constructing Instantaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roweis, Sam

    Lecture 3: Constructing Instantaneous Codes Sam Roweis September 19, 2005 Review: Course Content of content). . Both problems involve two distinct tasks: 1) Modeling. We have to represent the stochastic­Zi#,gzip,PPM) which combine modeling and coding together. Review: Mathematical Setup . A stochastic source emits

  7. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  8. Instantaneous stochastic perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Lüscher

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A form of stochastic perturbation theory is described, where the representative stochastic fields are generated instantaneously rather than through a Markov process. The correctness of the procedure is established to all orders of the expansion and for a wide class of field theories that includes all common formulations of lattice QCD.

  9. Effects of Radiative Diffusion on Thin Flux Tubes in Turbulent Solar-like Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Maria A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the combined effects of convection and radiative diffusion on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior. Radiative diffusion is the primary supplier of heat to convective motions in the lower convection zone, and it results in a heat input per unit volume of magnetic flux tubes that has been ignored by many previous thin flux tube studies. We use a thin flux tube model subject to convection taken from a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convection as described by Weber, Fan, and Miesch (2011, Astrophys. J., 741, 11; 2013, Solar Phys., 287, 239), now taking into account the influence of radiative heating on flux tubes of large-scale active regions. Our simulations show that flux tubes of less than or equal to 60 kG subject to solar-like convective flows do not anchor in the overshoot region, but rather drift upward due to the increased buoyancy of the flux tube earlier in its evolution as a result of the inclusion of radiative diffusion. Flux tubes of magnetic fie...

  10. Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Interior Y. Fan National the e ect of radiative heating on the evolution of thin magnetic ux tubes in the solar interior Solar Observatoryy, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719. G. H. Fisher Space Sciences Laboratory, Univ

  11. A Module for Radiation Hydrodynamic Calculations With ZEUS-2D Using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. J. Turner; J. M. Stone

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A module for the ZEUS-2D code is described which may be used to solve the equations of radiation hydrodynamics to order unity in v/c, in the flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation. In this approximation, the tensor Eddington factor f which closes the radiation moment equations is chosen to be an empirical function of radiation energy density. This is easier to implement and faster than full-transport techniques, in which f is computed by solving the transfer equation. However, FLD is less accurate when the flux has a component perpendicular to the gradient in radiation energy density, and in optically thin regions when the radiation field depends strongly on angle. The material component of the fluid is here assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy equations are operator-split, with transport terms, radiation diffusion term, and other source terms evolved separately. Transport terms are applied using the same consistent transport algorithm as in ZEUS-2D. The radiation diffusion term is updated using an alternating-direction implicit method with convergence checking. Remaining source terms are advanced together implicitly using numerical root-finding. However when absorption opacity is zero, accuracy is improved by treating compression and expansion source terms using time-centered differencing. Results are discussed for test problems including radiation-damped linear waves, radiation fronts propagating in optically-thin media, subcritical and supercritical radiating shocks, and an optically-thick shock in which radiation dominates downstream pressure.

  12. ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews :ProductsAerosol Retrievals from

  13. Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatiev, A. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number_sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

  14. Photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatiev, A [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains study results about photodegradation effects in materials exposed to high flux solar and solar simulated radiation. The studies show that high flux photoirradiation of materials can result in significant changes in the stability of materials. Photodesorption and photo-enhanced oxidation were determined to be the major mechanisms. These mechanisms were shown to affect, in extremely adverse ways, the expected thermal stability of solar relevant materials, especially stainless steels, (It is expected that related high temperature alloy steels will be similarly affected.) An analytical expression was generated to predict the flux behavior of the steels using {number sign}304 as a prototypical stainless steel system.

  15. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. M. Cheung; M. Schuessler; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. Implications for the local helioseismology of emerging flux regions are also discussed.

  16. Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

  17. On-chip radiation detection from stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators S. V. Shitov,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallraff, Andreas

    On-chip radiation detection from stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators S. V. Shitov,a) A. V been proposed.7 In this study, we report direct radiation detection experi- ments with stacked double different mutually phase-locked modes of two junctions, the in phase and the out of phase. The radiation

  18. Calculation of thermal fluxes of plasma torch reradiation under the action of laser radiation on a condensed target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, V. V. [Russian Federation Ministry of Defense, 12th Central Scientific Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of laser deposition with allowance for thermal radiation transport inside and outside the laser torch is considered in a multigroup approximation. The energy fluxes of laser torch thermal radiation onto a target in the far and near zones are calculated as functions of time and the character of the exposure. It is shown that absorption of thermal fluxes in the substrate and target in the course of laser deposition results in their substantial heating. The possibility of diagnosing thermal radiation fluxes from the laser torch by using photodetectors is demonstrated.

  19. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

  20. Back-reaction of the Hawking radiation flux on a gravitationally collapsing star II: Fireworks instead of firewalls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A star collapsing gravitationally into a black hole emits a flux of radiation, knowns as Hawking radiation. When the initial state of a quantum field on the background of the star, is placed in the Unruh vacuum in the far past, then Hawking radiation corresponds to a flux of positive energy radiation travelling outwards to future infinity. The evaporation of the collapsing star can be equivalently described as a negative energy flux of radiation travelling radially inwards towards the center of the star. Here, we are interested in the evolution of the star during its collapse. Thus we include the backreaction of the negative energy Hawking flux in the interior geometry of the collapsing star and solve the full 4-dimensional Einstein and hydrodynamical equations numerically. We find that Hawking radiation emitted just before the star passes through its Schwarzschild radius slows down the collapse of the star and substantially reduces its mass thus the star bounces before reaching the horizon. The area radius starts increasing after the bounce. Beyond this point our program breaks down due to shell crossing. We find that the star stops collapsing at a finite radius larger than its horizon, turns around and its core explodes. This study provides a more realistic investigation of the backreaction of Hawking radiation on the collapsing star, that was first presented in [1].

  1. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  2. Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

  3. INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING This study proposes an instantaneous damage identification and localization technique through sparse laser ultrasonic signals are obtained, a damage index (DI) representing the violation of the linear reciprocity

  4. On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Leszek S.

    On Some Properties of Instantaneous Active and Reactive Powers Leszek S. CZARNECKI, Fellow IEEE Louisiana State University, USA Abstract: Some features of the instantaneous active and reactive powers p control. Also it was shown that the instantaneous reactive power q cannot be interpreted as a measure

  5. Contrasting the direct radiative effect and direct radiative forcing of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, which is the instantaneous radiative impact of all atmospheric particles on the Earth's energy balance, is sometimes confused with the direct radiative forcing (DRF), which ...

  6. Instantaneous monitoring of heart beat dynamics during anesthesia and sedation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenza, Gaetano

    Anesthesia-induced altered arousal depends on drugs having their effect in specific brain regions. These effects are also reflected in autonomic nervous system (ANS) outflow dynamics. To this extent, instantaneous monitoring ...

  7. MEASUREMENT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION - STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15, 1976. "Circumsolar Radiation Data for Central Receiverdata on the instantaneous values of circum- solar radiation andradiation over the course of a day, month or year; and 3) detailed data

  8. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  9. Blind Spectral-GMM Estimation for Underdetermined Instantaneous Audio Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind Spectral-GMM Estimation for Underdetermined Instantaneous Audio Source Separation Simon.ozerov@telecom-paristech.fr Abstract. The underdetermined blind audio source separation prob- lem is often addressed in the time. Other approaches which are not blind assume a more structured model, like the Spectral Gaussian Mixture

  10. Investigation of Flux Linkage Profile Measurement Methods for Switched Reluctance Motors and Permanent Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Kaiyuan

    motors without starting cages, changing stator current, induces no rotor current. This implies that most with the winding inductance to determine the instantaneous flux linkage profile. Comparison with the static torque

  11. The instantaneous radial growth rate of stellar discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Boissier, Samuel; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new and simple method to measure the instantaneous mass and radial growth rates of the stellar discs of spiral galaxies, based on their star formation rate surface density (SFRD) profiles. Under the hypothesis that discs are exponential with time-varying scalelengths, we derive a universal theoretical profile for the SFRD, with a linear dependence on two parameters: the specific mass growth rate $\

  12. Cross-Fertilization between Spallation Neutron Source and Third Generation Synchrotron Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebauer, B.; Schulz, Ch.; Alimov, S.S.; Wilpert, Th. [Hahn-Meitner-Instiut Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Levchanovsky, F.V. [Hahn-Meitner-Instiut Berlin, Glienicker Str. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Litvinenko, E.I.; Nikiforov, A.S. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Suffering presently from relatively low source strengths compared to synchrotron radiation investigations, neutron scattering methods will greatly benefit from the increase of instantaneous flux attained at the next generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources. In particular at ESS, the strongest projected source, the counting rate load on the detectors will rise by factors of up to 50-150 in comparison with present generic instruments. For these sources the detector requirements overlap partly with those for modern synchrotron radiation detectors as far as counting rate capability and two-dimensional position resolution are concerned. In this paper, examples of the current and forthcoming detector development, comprising e.g. novel solutions for low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber detectors, for silicon micro-strip detectors and for the related front-end ASICs and data acquisition (DAQ) systems, are summarized, which will be of interest for detection of synchrotron radiation as well.

  13. TEOS 03 Carbon Flux and C Pipe TEOS 03.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    almost instantaneously with a number of factors identified in TEOS 02. For this project, we are using all to bring together complementary sensor streams, such as sap flux and soil respiration, into a consistent Systems Figure 1. Goulden flux tower at the James Reserve Figure 2. Hemispherical photograph of AMARSS

  14. Near-Core and In-Core Neutron Radiation Monitors for Real Time Neutron Flux Monitoring and Reactor Power Level Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas S. McGregor; Marvin L. Adams; Igor Carron; Paul Nelson

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    MPFDs are a new class of detectors that utilize properties from existing radiation detector designs. A majority of these characteristics come from fission chamber designs. These include radiation hardness, gamma-ray background insensitivity, and large signal output.

  15. A Sensitivity Study of Radiative Fluxes at the Top of Atmosphere to Cloud-Microphysics and Aerosol Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; McFarlane, Sally A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Ma, Po-Lun; Yan, Huiping; Bao, Jie

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of net radiative fluxes (FNET) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to 16 selected uncertain parameters mainly related to the cloud microphysics and aerosol schemes in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). We adopted a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling approach to effectively explore the high dimensional parameter space. The output response variables (e.g., FNET) were simulated using CAM5 for each parameter set, and then evaluated using generalized linear model analysis. In response to the perturbations of these 16 parameters, the CAM5-simulated global annual mean FNET ranges from -9.8 to 3.5 W m-2 compared to the CAM5-simulated FNET of 1.9 W m-2 with the default parameter values. Variance-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the relative contributions of individual parameter perturbation to the global FNET variance. The results indicate that the changes in the global mean FNET are dominated by those of cloud forcing (CF) within the parameter ranges being investigated. The size threshold parameter related to auto-conversion of cloud ice to snow is confirmed as one of the most influential parameters for FNET in the CAM5 simulation. The strong heterogeneous geographic distribution of FNET variation shows parameters have a clear localized effect over regions where they are acting. However, some parameters also have non-local impacts on FNET variance. Although external factors, such as perturbations of anthropogenic and natural emissions, largely affect FNET variations at the regional scale, their impact is weaker than that of model internal parameters in terms of simulating global mean FNET in this study. The interactions among the 16 selected parameters contribute a relatively small portion of the total FNET variations over most regions of the globe. This study helps us better understand the CAM5 model behavior associated with parameter uncertainties, which will aid the next step of reducing model uncertainty via calibration of uncertain model parameters with the largest sensitivity.

  16. Development and validation of instantaneous risk model in nuclear power plant's risk monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.; Hu, L. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The instantaneous risk model is the fundament of calculation and analysis in a risk monitor. This study focused on the development and validation of an instantaneous risk model. Therefore the principles converting from the baseline risk model to the instantaneous risk model were studied and separated trains' failure modes modeling method was developed. The development and validation process in an operating nuclear power plant's risk monitor were also introduced. Correctness of instantaneous risk model and rationality of converting method were demonstrated by comparison with the result of baseline risk model. (authors)

  17. Third post-Newtonian angular momentum flux and the secular evolution of orbital elements for inspiralling compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R. Iyer; Siddhartha Sinha

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular momentum flux from an inspiralling binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) order using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism. The 3PN angular momentum flux involves the instantaneous, tail, and tail-of-tails contributions as for the 3PN energy flux, and in addition a contribution due to non-linear memory. We average the angular momentum flux over the binary's orbit using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits. The averaged angular momentum flux provides the final input needed for gravitational wave phasing of binaries moving in quasi-elliptical orbits. We obtain the evolution of orbital elements under 3PN gravitational radiation reaction in the quasi-elliptic case. For small eccentricities, we give simpler limiting expressions relevant for phasing up to order $e^2$. This work is important for the construction of templates for quasi-eccentric binaries, and for the comparison of post-Newtonian results with the numerical relativity simulations of the plunge and merger of eccentric binaries.

  18. Instantaneous Action at a Distance in a Holistic Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Sidharth

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The early work of Lorentz, Abraham and others, evolved through the work of Fokker, Dirac and others to ultimately culminate in the Feynman- Wheeler direct action at a distance theory. However this theory has encountered certain conceptual difficulties like non-locality in time, self force of the electron, pre acceleration and the perfect absorption condition of Feynman and Wheeler, that is the instantaneous action of the remaining charges in the universe on the charge in question. More recently, Hoyle and Narlikar have resurrected this theory, but within the context of a Steady State or Quasi Steady State cosmology. They argue that the theory infact has a better standing than the generally accepted quantum theoretic description. In this article we consider a quantum theoretic description and a cosmology which parallels the Hoyle-Narlikar approach. This leads to a synthesis and justification of the Dirac and Feynman-Wheeler approaches, clarifying the conceptual problems in the process. We deduce a scenario with quantized space-time and a holistic cosmology, consistent with physical and astrophysical data. The non-locality is now seen to be meaningful within the minimum space-time intervals, as also the perfect absorption within the holistic description. Local realism, and the usual causal field theory are seen to have an underpinning of direct action. For example this is brought out by the virtual photons which mediate interactions in Quantum Electro Dynamics, and the emergence of the inverse square law in the above approach from a background Zero Point Field.

  19. A method of obtaining instantaneous plots of antenna field patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillin, John Maurice

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CERTAIN AMOUNT OF POWER AVAILABLE TO BE RADIATED AND SINCE THE RECEIVED ENERGYA UNDER CERTAIN ADVERSE CONDITIONS' AT A GIVEN POINT OF RECEPTION VARIES INVERSELY AS THE FOURTH POWER OF THE DISTANCE/ THE COIvIMERCIAL COMMUNICATION COM- PANIES SOON...

  20. IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2010 1437 Instantaneous Microwave Frequency Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jianping

    accuracy better than 0.2 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. Index Terms--Electronic warfare, instantaneous, polarization modulator. I. INTRODUCTION I N the field of electronic warfare, it is important to analyze

  1. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  2. Simultaneous and instantaneous measurement of velocity and density in rayleigh-taylor mixing layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Wayne Neal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -driven turbulence in a statistically steady gas channel of helium and air ( 6 . 0 03 . 0 ? ? t A ). The capability of the diagnostic to simultaneously and instantaneously measure turbulent velocity and density fluctuations allows for a unique investigation...

  3. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  4. Estimates of the effect of a plasma momentum flux on the free surface of a thin film of liquid metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Gaizer, A.A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of using a flowing thin film of liquid metal (LM) to protect the divertor surface of a tokamak from untimely erosion and radiation damage has gained some attention over the years but has met with criticism on several key issues. One such issue in particular is the effect the momentum flux of a very obliquely incident plasma particle stream on the shape of the free surface of LM. This momentum may push to LM to one side of the duct and cause the formation of dry spots no longer protected from the plasma beam. It is this issue that this paper addresses in the air of a first approximation. Estimates are made of the magnitude and direction of the flux of plasma momentum at the LM divertor surface. The effect of this flux is modeled with a modified version of the ordinary fluid dynamics code RIPPLE, designed for transient free surface fluid flow problems in which surface tension plays an important role. Initial results indicate that in the OHD approximation, ITER-like magnitudes of the momentum flux are comparable to the hydrostatic pressure of a thin LM film. The momentum can have a significant effect on the form of the free surface, causing both significant splashing as well as shifting of the LM to one side of the channel. Due to the inertial nature of this problem, movement of the metal cannot occur instantaneously and a maximum exposure time of the LM to the plasma, as a function of momentum flux magnitude and direction, is defined and estimated from the results of RIPPLE predictions. Full MHD calculations, while beyond the scope of this initial assessment, will be required to more fully and accurately characterize this effect.

  5. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  6. EUV mirror based absolute incident flux detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for the in-situ monitoring of EUV radiation flux includes an integrated reflective multilayer stack. This device operates on the principle that a finite amount of in-band EUV radiation is transmitted through the entire multilayer stack. This device offers improvements over existing vacuum photo-detector devices since its calibration does not change with surface contamination.

  7. Fast flux locked loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  8. Instantaneous Control of the linear wave equation Nils Altmuller, Lars Grune, and Karl Worthmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    and Control with Applications in Modern Tech- nologies" within the Elite Network of Bavaria networked control systems". N. Altm¨uller, L. Gr¨une, and K. Worthmann are with the Mathematical DepartmentInstantaneous Control of the linear wave equation Nils Altm¨uller, Lars Gr¨une, and Karl Worthmann

  9. Respiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratoryRespiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts

  10. abscopal radiation effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of symmetry. Numerical calculations in three dimensions of the radiative energy density, flux and pressure created by a stationary shock wave show how the radiation decreases...

  11. High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

  12. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  13. Comparison of Signals from Gravitational Wave Detectors with Instantaneous Time-Frequency Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Stroeer; Lindy Blackburn; Jordan Camp

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time- amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences, and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a chi-square goodness-of-fit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

  14. Seeding optimization for instantaneous volumetric velocimetry. Application to a jet in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambonie, Tristan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every volumetric velocimetry measurements based on tracer (particles, bubbles, etc.) detection can be strongly influenced by the optical screening phenomenon. It has to be taken into account when the the statistical properties associated to the performances of the particle detection and tracking algorithms are significantly affected. It leads to a maximum concentration of particles in the images thus limiting the final spatial resolution of the instantaneous three-dimensional three-components (3D3C) velocity fields. A volumetric velocimetry system based on Defocused Digital Particle Image Velocimetry is used to show that above a critical visual concentration of particles in the images, the concentration and accuracy of the final instantaneous raw velocity vector field drop. The critical concentration depends on physical parameters as well as on the processing algorithms. Three distinct regimes are identified. In the first regime, the concentration is well adapted to volumetric velocimetry, the largest concent...

  15. Transient response of a quantum wave to an instantaneous potential step switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Delgado; H. Cruz; J. G. Muga

    2002-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transient response of a stationary state of a quantum particle in a step potential to an instantaneous change in the step height (a simplified model for a sudden bias switch in an electronic semiconductor device) is solved exactly by means of a semianalytical expression. The characteristic times for the transient process up to the new stationary state are identified. A comparison is made between the exact results and an approximate method.

  16. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 21 JULY 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3711 User-interactive electronic skin for instantaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    diode display with red, green and blue pixels. In this system, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs pressure but also provides an instantaneous visual response through a built-in active-matrix organic light-emitting

  18. High-Flux Stress Testing of Encapsulants for Medium-Concentration CPV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Kilkenny, M.; Moricone, T. J.; Zhang, J. Z.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study involved developing methods to expose transparent encapsulant materials to high (40 to 45 UV suns) optical fluxes of UV radiation to enable rapid evaluation of materials.

  19. Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    coincident hourly sea ice reports, instantaneous cloud radiative forcing and effective cloud optical depth. "Effective" optical depths (for a radiatively equivalent horizontally homogeneous cloud) are classified a characteristic optical depth of 15 at 47°S, increasing to 24 in the region of maximum cloud cover at 58°S

  20. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  1. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)] [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gürcan, Ö. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  2. Instantaneous and efficient surface wave excitation of a low pressure gas or gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, Donald J. (Berkeley, CA); Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for instantaneously ionizing and continuously delivering energy in the form of surface waves to a low pressure gas or mixture of low pressure gases, comprising a source of rf energy, a discharge container, (such as a fluorescent lamp discharge tube), an rf shield, and a coupling device responsive to rf energy from the source to couple rf energy directly and efficiently to the gas or mixture of gases to ionize at least a portion of the gas or gases and to provide energy to the gas or gases in the form of surface waves. The majority of the rf power is transferred to the gas or gases near the inner surface of the discharge container to efficiently transfer rf energy as excitation energy for at least one of the gases. The most important use of the invention is to provide more efficient fluorescent and/or ultraviolet lamps.

  3. Equivalence between free quantum particles and those in harmonic potentials and its application to instantaneous changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ole Steuernagel

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum physics the free particle and the harmonically trapped particle are arguably the most important systems a physicist needs to know about. It is little known that, mathematically, they are one and the same. This knowledge helps us to understand either from the viewpoint of the other. Here we show that all general time-dependent solutions of the free-particle Schroedinger equation can be mapped to solutions of the Schroedinger equation for harmonic potentials, both the trapping oscillator and the inverted 'oscillator'. This map is fully invertible and therefore induces an isomorphism between both types of system, they are equivalent. A composition of the map and its inverse allows us to map from one harmonic oscillator to another with a different spring constant and different center position. The map is independent of the state of the system, consisting only of a coordinate transformation and multiplication by a form factor, and can be chosen such that the state is identical in both systems at one point in time. This transition point in time can be chosen freely, the wave function of the particle evolving in time in one system before the transition point can therefore be linked up smoothly with the wave function for the other system and its future evolution after the transition point. Such a cut-and-paste procedure allows us to describe the instantaneous changes of the environment a particle finds itself in. Transitions from free to trapped systems, between harmonic traps of different spring constants or center positions, or, from harmonic binding to repulsive harmonic potentials are straightforwardly modelled. This includes some time-dependent harmonic potentials. The mappings introduced here are computationally more efficient than either state-projection or harmonic oscillator propagator techniques conventionally employed when describing instantaneous (non-a 1,920 characters

  4. Energy Fluxes optimization for PV integrated Rim.Missaoui, Ghaith.Warkozek, Seddik. Bacha, Stphane.Ploix.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -time simulation I. NOMENCLATURE t Sampling step time, [hour]. Sampling time of the anticipatory layer. i, Ksun, : Constants. heater Heat flux given by the radiator. sun Heat flux of sunlight through the window

  5. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e l Atmosphere ceiling, back panel roof, exposed roof insideSAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A Thesis submitted i no n Convection Exposed Roof Temperature Seasonal Temperature

  6. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  7. INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX B INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura.5455 Los Angeles, 16000 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 11) B.5457 Los Angeles, 8436 West 3rd ST., Roof (10th floor) (pp. 16) #12;#12;B.0466­1 Appendix B.0466 LOS ANGELES, 15250 VENTURA BLVD. Table B

  8. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  9. Radiation Modeling In Fluid Flow Iain D. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Collector #12;4 Fundamentals of Radiation (1) · All matter with non-zero temperature emits thermal radiation with energy flux given by the Stefan-Boltzmann Law: e.g., Sun: T=5800 K, total radiated power = 4 distribution (Planck spectrum) !q =T 4 W/m2 #12;5 Planck Radiation Spectrum #12;6 Solar Radiation Spectrum

  10. IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 21, No.1, Jan. 2006, pp. 362-367. Instantaneous Reactive Power p-q Theory and Power Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Leszek S.

    IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 21, No.1, Jan. 2006, pp. 362-367. Instantaneous Reactive and interpreted by the Instantaneous Reactive Power (IRP) p-q Theory. The paper demonstrates that this theory misinterprets power properties of electrical systems or provides some results that at least defy a common sense

  11. Retention of Tracer Gas from Instantaneous Releases of SF6 in an Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doran, J. C.; Allwine, K Jerry; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a series of instantaneous releases of SF6 tracer during the Joint Urban 2003 study in Oklahoma City have been analyzed to determine characteristic retention times for puffs in an urban environment. Results from nine real-time tracer detectors with a time response of 0.5 seconds were used in the analysis. Distances from the source ranged from less than 200 m to over 1 km. For each individual intensive operating period (IOP), the detector locations were adjusted so that, given the expected wind directions during the releases, the detectors would lie generally downwind of the release point. As a result, building characteristics upwind of the detectors varied from one IOP to the next. Animations of the tracer concentrations show clear evidence of channeling along street canyons approximately parallel to the prevailing wind directions, trapping in street canyons perpendicular to the flow, and other complex circulation patterns. Retention times for individual puffs ranged from a few minutes to over 20 minutes, with a strong mode in the distribution around 11 minutes. There was surprisingly little correlation with wind speed or direction. Comparisons with simple puff models are presented.

  12. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ten-Ming, E-mail: tmw@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  13. advanced radiation detector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the different particles, the radiation flux and the energy channels. Then the detector system based on analysis results were built by the Monte Carlo simulation. Finally,...

  14. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  15. Suggestions for the measurement and derivation of fluxes and flux divergences from a satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man-Li C. Wu (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1990-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical studies shown here indicate that the best bands to measure and derive the total outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), surface downward flux (SDF), and cooling rates (CRs) using linear regression are (1) the band between 800 and 1,200 cm{sup {minus}1} for OLR, (2) the band between 500 and 660 cm{sup {minus}1} or 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for SDF, and (3) the band between 660 and 800 cm{sup {minus}1} for CRs. These results are obtained from scatter plots of total fluxes and cooling rates associated with the various bands. The advanced very high resolution radiometer OLR is damped compared with the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) OLR, which is derived from the broadband, narrow field of view ERB instrument, owing to its use of only one narrow band (centered around the 11-{mu}m window region) measurement.

  16. Photochemistryand Photobiology,2006, 82: 781-786 Environmental Controls of UV-B Radiation in Forested Streams of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    Photochemistryand Photobiology,2006, 82: 781-786 Environmental Controls of UV-B Radiation-B radiation flux and its environmental control within and among streams of northernMichigan. UV- B flux measurement of solar radiation. During the summer of 2004, UV-B flux was measured across depth gradients

  17. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  18. ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cook, David

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  19. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  20. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrndt, Klaus [Albert-Einstein-Institute, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  1. Radiation from Accelerated Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohab Abou-Zeid; Miguel S. Costa

    2000-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

  2. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

  3. Angular Ordering in Gluon Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong B. Choi; Byeong S. Choi; Su K. Lee

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption of angular ordering in gluon radiation is essential to obtain quantitative results concerning gluonic behaviors. In order to prove the validity of this assumption, we have applied our momentum space flux-tube formalism to check out the angular dependences of gluon radiation. We have calculated the probability amplitudes to get new gluon, and have found that the new gluon is generally expected to have the maximum amplitude when it is produced between the momentum directions of the last two partons.

  4. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.

  5. Analytical and experimental determination of radiation and temperature distributions inside solar receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    concentrated solar radiation is modelized, using the diffuse and semi-gray surface hypothesis and the net absorptance for solar radiation. Theoretical thermal efficiency of the cavity. Surface hemispherical emittance PHYSIQUE APPLIQU�E - TS, N° 2, F�VRIER1980 Incident solar flux density. Net radiative flux density. Net

  6. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  7. Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

  8. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  9. RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

  10. Simulation of plasmaneutral dynamics for radiation cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    the heat flux effectively for future power plants. That is, radiation due to impurities will lower and increase the required pumping speed con- siderably in a power plant. In principle, the plasma energySimulation of plasma­neutral dynamics for radiation cooling Bong Ju Lee , F. Najmabadi Fusion

  11. The Directional Dependence of Apertures, Limits and Sensitivity of the Lunar Cherenkov Technique to a UHE Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. James; R. J. Protheroe

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We use computer simulations to obtain the directional-dependence of the lunar Cherenkov technique for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino detection. We calculate the instantaneous effective area of past lunar Cherenkov experiments as a function of neutrino arrival direction, and hence the directional-dependence of the combined limit imposed by GLUE and the experiment at Parkes. We also determine the directional dependence of the aperture of future planned experiments with ATCA, ASKAP and the SKA to a UHE neutrino flux, and calculate the potential annual exposure to astronomical objects as a function of angular distance from the lunar trajectory through celestial coordinates.

  12. Trapped proton fluxes at low Earth orbits measured by the PAMELA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Danilchenko, I A; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above > 70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350-610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.

  13. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  14. Structure and Dynamics of the Instantaneous Water/Vapor Interface Revisited by Path-Integral and Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Jan; Spura, Thomas; Karhan, Kristof; Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Hassanali, Ali A; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and dynamics of the water/vapor interface is revisited by means of path-integral and second-generation Car-Parrinello ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with an instantaneous surface definition [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954 (2010)]. In agreement with previous studies, we find that one of the OH bonds of the water molecules in the topmost layer is pointing out of the water into the vapor phase, while the orientation of the underlying layer is reversed. Therebetween, an additional water layer is detected, where the molecules are aligned parallel to the instantaneous water surface.

  15. Shortwave Radiative Impacts from Aerosol Effects on Marine Shallow Cumuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    is because of the cloud radiation Bony & Dufresne, 2005 #12;ultimately we'll want global (satellite indirect effects, 1) what is the relative radiative importance of cloud microphysical versus macrophysical effects matter to the fluxes for small&thicker clouds) 3D ICA #12;what is the relative radiative

  16. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  17. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  18. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  19. Supporting Information (SI) Section Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    S1 Supporting Information (SI) Section Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties..................................................................................................7 Figure S3. A typical solar and spectral flux density of radiation, D0(), from the irradiation

  20. Posters Mean Fluxes of Visible Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations7197 Posters

  1. The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth'sConnect The Science

  2. Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1, 20121 H( 7radialMHD

  3. Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is TakingDepartmentSensitivities of SCMs

  4. Effective Action and Hawking Flux from Covariant Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Hofmann; W. Kummer

    2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The computation of the radiation flux related to the Hawking temperature of a Schwarzschild Black Hole or another geometric background is still well-known to be fraught with a number of delicate problems. In spherical reduction, as shown by one of the present authors (W. K.) with D.V. Vassilevich, the correct black body radiation follows when two ``basic components'' (conformal anomaly and a ``dilaton'' anomaly) are used as input in the integrated energy-momentum conservation equation. The main new element in the present work is the use of a quite different method, the covariant perturbation theory of Barvinsky and Vilkovisky, to establish directly the full effective action which determines these basic components. In the derivation of W. K. and D.V. Vassilevich the computation of the dilaton anomaly implied one potentially doubtful intermediate step which can be avoided here. Moreover, the present approach also is sensitive to IR (renormalisation) effects. We realize that the effective action naturally leads to expectation values in the Boulware vacuum which, making use of the conservation equation, suffice for the computation of the Hawking flux in other quantum states, in particular for the relevant Unruh state. Thus, a rather comprehensive discussion of the effects of (UV and IR) renormalisation upon radiation flux and energy density is possible.

  5. Corrections to the mean-field model are needed to describe the instantaneous Coulombic interactions among the electrons. This is achieved by including more than one Slater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Chapter 19 Corrections to the mean-field model are needed to describe the instantaneous Coulombic-Fock (UHF) theory in which each spin-orbital i has its own orbital energy i and LCAO-MO coefficients C flexible than the single-determinant HF procedure are needed. In particular, it may be necessary to use

  6. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2003), 129, pp. 239275 doi: 10.1256/qj.01.174 Inferring instantaneous, multivariate and nonlinear sensitivities for the analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to classical linear feedback analysis, we present a nonlinear approach for the determination. Such an approach is valid in a theoretical model where the instantaneous sensitivities can be evaluated directly of statistical estimates of all the pair-wise relationships among the system state variables based on a neural

  7. Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part I: Model Experiments and Transient Thermal Response in the Troposphere*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part I: Model Experiments and Transient Thermal Response in the Troposphere* YUTIAN WU Department of Applied Physics (CO2) by looking into the transient step-by-step adjustment of the circulation. The transient

  8. Multiscale Interactions between Water and Carbon Fluxes and Environmental Variables in A Central U.S. Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Wilson, Cassandra J.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    field in the central U.S. Time-series of the entropy of water and carbon fluxes exhibit pronounced annual cycles, primarily explained by the modulation of the diurnal flux amplitude by other variables, such as the net radiation. Entropies of soil...

  9. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  10. atmosphere radiation budget: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D observations of radiative fluxes seems promising for the observational study of extra-solar metrics for the validation of climate models, as asked for by the Intergovernmental...

  11. Radiative heat transfer in a parallelogram shaped cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dez, V Le

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact analytical description of the internal radiative field inside an emitting-absorbing gray semi-transparent medium enclosed in a two-dimensional parallelogram cavity is proposed. The expressions of the incident radiation and the radiative flux field are angularly and spatially discretized with a double Gauss quadrature, and the temperature field is obtained by using an iterative process. Some numerical solutions are tabulated and graphically presented as the benchmark solutions. Temperature and two components of the radiative flux are finally sketched on the whole domain. It is shown that the proposed method gives perfectly smooth results.

  12. Flux-Limited Diffusion Approximation Models of Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Alan P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both core accretion and disk instability appear to be required as formation mechanisms in order to explain the entire range of giant planets found in extrasolar planetary systems. Disk instability is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally-gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk. These clumps can only be expected to contract and survive to become protoplanets if they are able to lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling. Here we present several new three dimensional, radiative hydrodynamics models of self-gravitating protoplanetary disks, where radiative transfer is handled in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We show that while the flux-limited models lead to higher midplane temperatures than in a diffusion approximation model without the flux-limiter, the difference in temperatures does not appear to be sufficiently high to have any significant effect on the formation of self-gravitating clumps. Self-gravitating clumps form rapidly in the models both...

  13. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  14. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  15. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  16. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field Frank M. Lee,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Philip J.,

    = S d2 x pv · ^n , (1) where J = pv is the baroclinic energy flux, p is the perturbed pressure field, v to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P) that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from any two-dimensional velocity field data. PACS

  17. Photospheric Electric Fields and Energy Fluxes in the Eruptive Active Region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazachenko, Maria D; Welsch, Brian T; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How much electromagnetic energy crosses the photosphere in evolving solar active regions? With the advent of high-cadence vector magnetic field observations, addressing this fundamental question has become tractable. In this paper, we apply the "PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal" (PDFI) electric field inversion technique of Kazachenko et al. (2014) to a 6-day HMI/SDO vector magnetogram and Doppler velocity sequence, to find the electric field and Poynting flux evolution in NOAA active region 11158, which produced an X2.2 flare early on 2011 February 15. We find photospheric electric fields ranging up to $1.5$ V/cm. The Poynting fluxes range up to $2\\times10^{10}$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with mean values around $10^8$-$10^9$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. Integrating the instantaneous energy flux over space and time, we find that the total magnetic energy accumulated above the photosphere from emergence to the moment before the X2.2 flare to be $E=10.6\\times10^{32}$ ergs, which is partitioned as $2.0\\times10^{32}$ er...

  18. Influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO 2 and CO 18 O exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface model with BOREAS aspen and jack pine tower fluxes,to diffuse radiation by an aspen-dominated northern hardwood

  19. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  20. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  1. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  2. Instantaneous symmetrical components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salehfar, Hossein

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be traced to Evans and Monseth, who used tham in the detarminaCion of recovery volCages in 1937. Thi- was followed by Pipe's wor'x in 1940 [1]. No systematic approach oased on Che use of inscantaneous symm trical components was not d until Lyon [2...-, pasitive-, &Ojwt i aI(jet) i 2(jwt) = I/3 I a a and negative-sequence components of i (t) ars a 1 ib (t) i (t) (2. 3) The valu s or the phase currents in terms ot the symmacrrcal 10 i 1(jest) ~ l (jet) Zero-time axis i. b1(jm t) iC2(j t) (a...

  3. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  4. Reversal of Hugoniot locus for strong shocks due to radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jiwei; Li Jinghong; Meng Guangwei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock Hugoniot can be used to express the response of a material to shocks, and the compression ratio of the shock can be determined by the Hugoiot locus. When the shock is strong, it will become radiating, and the radiation will affect the Hugoniot. The role of radiation on the Hugoniot condition is studied in the paper. For the radiative flux-dominated shocks, the radiative flux if large enough may render the structure of the shock Hugoniot locus totally different with the case for the pure hydrodynamic shock: the two branches with one in quadrant I and the other in quadrant III are reversed into two in quadrants IV and II, respectively, correspondingly the compression ratio may be larger than the limiting value ({gamma}+1)/({gamma}-1) for ideal gases with index {gamma}. For the radiative shock in which the radiative heat wave propagates supersonically, a threshold value for the net radiative flux to the preshock is also defined which determines whether the Hugoniot locus is reversed and the compression ratio exceeds the limiting value. Numerical results also verify the reversal of the Hugoniot locus of the shocks if the net radiative flux to the preshock exceeds the threshold value.

  5. Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayliss, S.C. [DanShar, Inc., Bosque Farms, NM (United States); Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Project

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

  6. An Analysis of Fluxes by Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Aspinwall

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    M-theory on K3xK3 with non-supersymmetry-breaking G-flux is dual to M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold times a 2-torus without flux. This allows for a thorough analysis of the effects of flux without relying on supergravity approximations. We discuss several dual pairs showing that the usual rules of G-flux compactifications work well in detail. We discuss how a transition can convert M2-branes into G-flux. We see how new effects can arise at short distances allowing fluxes to obstruct more moduli than one expects from the supergravity analysis.

  7. New solar opacities, abundances, helioseismology, and neutrino fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

    2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9% experimental uncertainty and a 16% theoretical uncertainty, 1 sigma errors.

  8. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Daniel S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: dafr@math.utexas.edu; Moore, Gregory W. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Segal, Graeme [All Souls College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z{sub 2}-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  9. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data

  10. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deldar, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  11. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  12. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  13. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  14. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  15. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  16. Flux-Limited Diffusion Approximation Models of Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan P. Boss

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Both core accretion and disk instability appear to be required as formation mechanisms in order to explain the entire range of giant planets found in extrasolar planetary systems. Disk instability is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally-gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk. These clumps can only be expected to contract and survive to become protoplanets if they are able to lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling. Here we present several new three dimensional, radiative hydrodynamics models of self-gravitating protoplanetary disks, where radiative transfer is handled in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We show that while the flux-limited models lead to higher midplane temperatures than in a diffusion approximation model without the flux-limiter, the difference in temperatures does not appear to be sufficiently high to have any significant effect on the formation of self-gravitating clumps. Self-gravitating clumps form rapidly in the models both with and without the flux-limiter. These models suggest that the reason for the different outcomes of numerical models of disk instability by different groups cannot be attributed solely to the handling of radiative transfer, but rather appears to be caused by a range of numerical effects and assumptions. Given the observational imperative to have disk instability form at least some extrasolar planets, these models imply that disk instability remains as a viable giant planet formation mechanism.

  17. Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    The temperature distribution across a flat heat pipe sandwich structure, subjected to an intense localized thermal metal foam wick and distilled water as the working fluid. Heat was applied via a propane torch and radiative heat transfer. A novel method was developed to estimate experimentally, the heat flux distribution

  18. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

  19. Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Kasper O profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Version 1.0 Date April 2012 Status Final #12;#12;Estimation of Advective Fluxes from CO2 Flux Profile Observations at the Cabauw Tower Master of Science Thesis Kasper O

  20. ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  1. A first generation compact microbeam radiation therapy system based on carbon nanotube X-ray technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadsell, M.; Shan, J.; Burk, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang, J.; Chang, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Laganis, P.; Sprenger, F. [XinRay Systems, Inc., 7020 Kit Creek Road, Suite 210, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)] [XinRay Systems, Inc., 7020 Kit Creek Road, Suite 210, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Zhang, L. [Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, H. [Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lu, J.; Zhou, O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a compact microbeam radiation therapy device using carbon nanotube cathodes to create a linear array of narrow focal line segments on a tungsten anode and a custom collimator assembly to select a slice of the resulting wedge-shaped radiation pattern. Effective focal line width was measured to be 131 ?m, resulting in a microbeam width of ?300 ?m. The instantaneous dose rate was projected to be 2 Gy/s at full-power. Peak to valley dose ratio was measured to be >17 when a 1.4 mm microbeam separation was employed. Finally, multiple microbeams were delivered to a mouse with beam paths verified through histology.

  2. Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (Next ReleaseThomasTheories |20

  3. Improvement of low energy atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the JAM nuclear interaction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, and Institute for the Physics and Mathematical of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Faculty of Software and Information Technology, Aomori University, Aomori, 030-0943 Japan (Japan)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes with an interaction model named JAM, which is used in PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System) [K. Niita et al., Radiation Measurements 41, 1080 (2006).]. The JAM interaction model agrees with the HARP experiment [H. Collaboration, Astropart. Phys. 30, 124 (2008).] a little better than DPMJET-III[S. Roesler, R. Engel, and J. Ranft, arXiv:hep-ph/0012252.]. After some modifications, it reproduces the muon flux below 1 GeV/c at balloon altitudes better than the modified DPMJET-III, which we used for the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux in previous works [T. Sanuki, M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043005 (2007).][M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, S. Midorikawa, and T. Sanuki, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).]. Some improvements in the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux are also reported.

  4. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. OVERVIEW OF REGULATIONS, PROTECTION STANDARDS, AND RADIATION SAFETY ORGANIZATION.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 V. BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION PRINCIPLES

  5. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  6. Application of three-dimensional solar radiative transfer to mountains Y. Chen,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Application of three-dimensional solar radiative transfer to mountains Y. Chen,1,2 A. Hall,1 and K November 2006. [1] We developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer model simulating solar fluxes over (2006), Application of three-dimensional solar radiative transfer to mountains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D

  7. Radiation Belt Activity Indices and Solar Proton Event Alarm on the CRATERRE Project Web Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation Belt Activity Indices and Solar Proton Event Alarm on the CRATERRE Project Web Site D--Two Radiation Belt Activity Indices, based on electron flux measurement >300 keV and >1.6 MeV, and one Solar updated. Index Terms- CRATERRE project, Radiation belts activity, Space environment I. INTRODUCTION

  8. Radiative component and combined heat transfer in the thermal calculation of finned tube banks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehlik, P. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering] [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For more exact calculation of combined heat transfer in the case of finned tube banks (e.g., in the convective section of a furnace), the radiative heat transfer cannot be neglected. A new method for relatively simple calculation of total heat flux (convection + radiation + conduction in fins) is fully compatible with that for bare tube banks/bundles developed earlier. It is based on the method of radiative coefficients. However, the resulting value of heat flux must be corrected due to fin thickness and especially due to the fin radiative influence. For this purpose the so-called multiplicator of heat flux was introduced. The applicability of this methods has been demonstrated on a tubular fired heater convective section. A developed computer program based on the method has also been used for an analysis of the influence of selected parameters to show the share of radiation on the total heat flux.

  9. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fobel, Ryan [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada) [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 (Canada); Fobel, Christian [School of Computer Science, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)] [School of Computer Science, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Wheeler, Aaron R. [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada) [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  10. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation

  11. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  12. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  13. Radiative acceleration and transient, radiation-induced electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zampieri; R. Turolla; L. Foschini; A. Treves

    2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiative acceleration of particles and the electrostatic potential fields that arise in low density plasmas hit by radiation produced by a transient, compact source are investigated. We calculate the dynamical evolution and asymptotic energy of the charged particles accelerated by the photons and the radiation-induced electric double layer in the full relativistic, Klein-Nishina regime. For fluxes in excess of $10^{27}$ ${\\rm erg} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$, the radiative force on a diluted plasma ($n\\la 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$) is so strong that electrons are accelerated rapidly to relativistic speeds while ions lag behind owing to their larger inertia. The ions are later effectively accelerated by the strong radiation-induced double layer electric field up to Lorentz factors $\\approx 100$, attainable in the case of negligible Compton drag. The asymptotic energies achieved by both ions and electrons are larger by a factor 2--4 with respect to what one could naively expect assuming that the electron-ion assembly is a rigidly coupled system. The regime we investigate may be relevant within the framework of giant flares from soft gamma-repeaters.

  14. Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

  15. On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

  16. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  17. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  18. Contribution of GRB Emission to the GeV Extragalactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Casanova; B. L. Dingus; Bing Zhang

    2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    TeV gamma rays emitted by GRBs are converted into electron-positron pairs via interactions with the extragalactic infrared radiation fields. In turn the pairs produced, whose trajectories are randomized by magnetic fields, will inverse Compton scatter off the cosmic microwave background photons. The beamed TeV gamma ray flux from GRBs is thus transformed into a GeV isotropic gamma ray flux, which contributes to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background emission. Assuming a model for the extragalactic radiation fields, for the GRB redshift distribution and for the GRB luminosity function, we evaluate the contribution of the GRB prompt and scattered emissions to the measured extragalactic gamma-ray flux. To estimate this contribution we optimistically require that the energy flux at TeV energies is about 10 times stronger than the energy flux at MeV energies. The resulting gamma-ray diffuse background is only a small fraction of what is observed, allowing blazars and other sources to give the dominant contribution.

  19. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  20. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  1. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  2. Gravitational Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard F Schutz

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravity is one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and it is the dominant force in most astronomical systems. In common with all other phenomena, gravity must obey the principles of special relativity. In particular, gravitational forces must not be transmitted or communicated faster than light. This means that when the gravitational field of an object changes, the changes ripple outwards through space and take a finite time to reach other objects. These ripples are called gravitational radiation or gravitational waves. This article gives a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational radiation, including technical material suitable for non-specialist scientists.

  3. Data system for automatic flux mapping applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couch, R.D.; Kasinoff, A.M.; Neuner, J.A.; Oates, R.M.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In an automatic flux mapping system utilizing a microprocessor for control and data information processing, signals from the incore detectors providing the flux mapping operation are converted to a frequency link and are made available to the microprocessor via a programmable timer thus minimizing the participation of the microprocessor so that the microprocessor can be made more available to satisfy other tasks.

  4. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  5. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  6. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  7. AIP/123-QED Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    S is given by, P = S d2 x J · ^n = S d2 x pv · ^n , (1) where J = pv is the baroclinic energy flux, p, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P for two the energy flux and power from any two-dimensional velocity field data. PACS numbers: Valid PACS appear here

  8. Decoherence and Energy Relaxation in the Quantum-Classical Dynamics for Charge Transport in Organic Semiconducting Crystals: an Instantaneous Decoherence Correction Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si, Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore an instantaneous decoherence correction (IDC) approach for the decoherence and energy relaxation in the quantum-classical dynamics of charge transport in organic semiconducting crystals. These effects, originating from environmental fluctuations, are essential ingredients of the carrier dynamics. The IDC is carried out by measurement-like operations in the adiabatic representation. While decoherence is inherent in the IDC, energy relaxation is taken into account by considering the detailed balance through the introduction of energy-dependent reweighing factors, which could be either Boltzmann (IDC-BM) or Miller-Abrahams (IDC-MA) type. For a non-diagonal electron-phonon coupling model, it is shown that the IDC tends to enhance diffusion while energy relaxation weakens this enhancement. As expected, both the IDC-BM and IDC-MA achieve a near-equilibrium distribution at finite temperatures in the diffusion process, while the Ehrenfest dynamics renders system tending to infinite temperature limit. The r...

  9. Radiation Testing of Electronics for the CMS Endcap Muon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bylsma; D. Cady; A. Celik; L. S. Durkin; J. Gilmore; J. Haley; V. Khotilovich; S. Lakdawala; J. Liu; M. Matveev; B. P. Padley; J. Roberts; J. Roe; A. Safonov; I. Suarez; D. Wood; I. Zawisza

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronics used in the data readout and triggering system for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator at CERN are exposed to high radiation levels. This radiation can cause permanent damage to the electronic circuitry, as well as temporary effects such as data corruption induced by Single Event Upsets. Once the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) accelerator upgrades are completed it will have five times higher instantaneous luminosity than LHC, allowing for detection of rare physics processes, new particles and interactions. Tests have been performed to determine the effects of radiation on the electronic components to be used for the Endcap Muon electronics project currently being designed for installation in the CMS experiment in 2013. During these tests the digital components on the test boards were operating with active data readout while being irradiated with 55 MeV protons. In reactor tests, components were exposed to 30 years equivalent levels of neutron radiation expected at the HL-LHC. The highest total ionizing dose (TID) for the muon system is expected at the inner-most portion of the CMS detector, with 8900 rad over ten years. Our results show that Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components selected for the new electronics will operate reliably in the CMS radiation environment.

  10. Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

  11. Coherent Transition Radiation in Askaryan radio detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Krijn D; van Eijndhoven, Nick; Meures, Thomas; O'Murchadha, Aongus; Scholten, Olaf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the coherent transition radiation emitted by a macroscopic bunch of particles with a net charge traversing the boundary of two different media. The obtained expression is compared to the emission from a relativistically moving steady charge, as well the emission from a time-varying charge or current. As a first application, we discuss the transition radiation from high-energy cosmic-ray induced air showers hitting Earth's surface before the cascade has died out in the atmosphere. The induced emission gives rise to a radio signal which should be detectable in the currently operating Askaryan radio detectors built to search for the GZK neutrino flux.

  12. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  13. An Assessment of the Parameterization of Subgrid-Scale Cloud Effects on Radiative Transfer. Part II: Horizontal Inhomogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    in downwelling radiative fluxes at the surface induced by changes in cloud cover and water vapor distributions. 1An Assessment of the Parameterization of Subgrid-Scale Cloud Effects on Radiative Transfer. Part II form 5 January 2005) ABSTRACT The role of horizontal inhomogeneity in radiative transfer through cloud

  14. Signatures of Energy Flux in Particle Production: A Black Hole Birth Cry and Death Gasp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, Michael R R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is recently argued that if the Hawking radiation process is unitary, then a black hole's mass cannot be monotonically decreasing. We examine the time dependent particle count and negative energy flux in the non-trivial conformal vacuum via the moving mirror approach. A new, exactly unitary solution is presented which emits a characteristic above-thermal positive energy burst, a thermal plateau, and negative energy flux. It is found that the characteristic positive energy flare and thermal plateau is observed in the particle outflow. However, the results of time dependent particle production show no overt indication of negative energy flux. Therefore, a black hole's birth cry is detectable by asymptotic observers via particle count, whereas its death gasp is not.

  15. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  16. A link between solar events and congenital malformations: Is ionizing radiation enough to explain it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overholt, A C; Atri, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic rays are known to cause biological effects directly and through ionizing radiation produced by their secondaries. These effects have been detected in airline crews and other specific cases where members of the population are exposed to above average secondary fluxes. Recent work has found a correlation between solar particle events and congenital malformations. In this work we use the results of computational simulations to approximate the ionizing radiation from such events as well as longer term increases in cosmic ray flux. We find that the amounts of ionizing radiation produced by these events are insufficient to produce congenital malformations under the current paradigm regarding muon ionizing radiation. We believe that further work is needed to determine the correct ionizing radiation contribution of cosmogenic muons. We suggest that more extensive measurements of muon radiation effects may show a larger contribution to ionizing radiation dose than currently assumed.

  17. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  18. A low cost high flux solar simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel S.

    A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

  19. Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical bulk Richardson number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    as a residual of the energy budget, temperature inversion strength, and wind shear as a function of the bulkSurface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical 2009; accepted 12 August 2009; published 26 November 2009. [1] Routine radiation and meteorological

  20. Constraints on GRB TeV Emission from the GeV Extragalactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, S; Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TeV gamma rays emitted by GRBs are converted into electron-positron pairs via interactions with the extragalactic infrared radiation fields. In turn the pairs produced, whose trajectories are randomized by magnetic fields, will inverse Compton scatter off the cosmic microwave background photons. The beamed TeV gamma ray flux from GRBs is thus transformed into a GeV isotropic gamma ray flux, which contributes to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background emission. Assuming a model for the extragalactic radiation fields, for the GRB redshift distribution and for the GRB luminosity function, we use the measured GeV extragalactic gamma-ray flux to set upper limits on the GRB emission in TeV gamma rays that is predicted in several models.

  1. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

  2. Quantum radiation from a partially reflecting moving mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nistor Nicolaevici

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the quantum radiation from a partially reflecting moving mirror for the massless scalar field in 1+1 Minkowski space. Partial reflectivity is achieved by localizing a delta-type potential at the mirror's position. The radiated flux is exactly obtained for arbitrary motions as an integral functional of the mirror's past trajectory. Partial reflectivity corrections to the perfect mirror result are discussed.

  3. au flux diffus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribution of the GRB prompt and scattered emissions to the measured extragalactic gamma-ray flux. To estimate this contribution we optimistically require that the energy flux...

  4. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape034hsu2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling...

  5. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

  6. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

  7. RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

  8. Tail effects in the third post-Newtonian gravitational wave energy flux of compact binaries in quasi-elliptical orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Luc Blanchet; Bala R Iyer; Moh'd S S Qusailah

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The far-zone flux of energy contains hereditary (tail) contributions that depend on the entire past history of the source. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian wave generation formalism, we propose and implement a semi-analytical method in the frequency domain to compute these contributions from the inspiral phase of a binary system of compact objects moving in quasi-elliptical orbits up to 3PN order. The method explicitly uses the quasi-Keplerian representation of elliptical orbits at 1PN order and exploits the doubly periodic nature of the motion to average the 3PN fluxes over the binary's orbit. Together with the instantaneous (non-tail) contributions evaluated in a companion paper, it provides crucial inputs for the construction of ready-to-use templates for compact binaries moving on quasi-elliptic orbits, an interesting class of sources for the ground based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and Virgo as well as space based detectors like LISA.

  9. Divertor Heat Flux Amelioration in Highly-Shaped Plasma in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Raman, R; Bell, R; Bush, C; Kaita, R; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; Paul, S; Roquemore, A

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and spherical torus (ST) based devices with compact high power density divertors. The ST compact divertor with a small plasma volume, a small plasma-wetted area, and a short parallel connection length can reduce the operating space of heat flux dissipation techniques based on induced edge and/or scrape-off layer (SOL) power and momentum loss, such as the radiative and dissipative divertors and radiative mantles. Access to these regimes is studied in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) with an open geometry horizontal carbon plate divertor in 2-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in a lower single null (LSN) configuration in a range of elongations {kappa} = 1.8-2.4 and triangularities {delta}= 0.40-0.75. Experiments conducted in a lower end {kappa}{approx}1.8-2.0 and {delta}{approx} 0.4-0.5 LSN shape using deuterium injection in the divertor region have achieved the outer strike point (OSP) peak heat flux reduction from 4-6 MW/m2 to a manageable level of 1-2 MW/m2. However, only the high-recycling radiative divertor (RD) regime was found to be compatible with good performance and H-mode confinement. A partially detached divertor (PDD) could only be obtained at a high D2 injection rate that led to an X-point MARFE formation and confinement degradation. Also in the low {kappa}{approx} 2,{delta}{approx} 0.45 shape, peak heat flux q{sub pk} and heat flux width {lambda}{sub q} scaling studies have been conducted. Similar to tokamak divertor studies, q{sub pk} was found to be a strong function of input power PNBI and plasma current Ip, and the heat flux midplane scale length {lambda}{sub q} was found to be large as compared with simple SOL models. In this paper, we report on the first experiments to assess steady-state divertor heat flux amelioration in highly shaped plasmas in NSTX.

  10. Radiative Flow in a Luminous Disk II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Fukue

    2006-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiatively-driven transfer flow perpendicular to a luminous disk is examined in the subrelativistic regime of $(v/c)^1$, taking into account the gravity of the central object. The flow is assumed to be vertical, and the gas pressure is ignored, while internal heating is assumed to be proportional to the gas density. The basic equations were numerically solved as a function of the optical depth, and the flow velocity, the height, the radiative flux, and the radiation pressure were obtained for a given radius, an initial optical depth, and initial conditions at the flow base (disk ``inside''), whereas the mass-loss rate was determined as an eigenvalue of the boundary condition at the flow top (disk ``surface''). For sufficiently luminous cases, the flow resembles the case without gravity. For less-luminous cases, however, the flow velocity decreases, and the flow would be impossible due to the existence of gravity in the case that the radiative flux is sufficiently small. Application to a supercritical accretion disk with mass loss is briefly discussed.

  11. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  12. Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud properties and associated radiative heating rates in the tropical western Pacific James H set of atmospheric remote sensing instruments at sites around the world, including three radiative fluxes and heating rates. Maxima in cloud occurrence are found in the boundary layer and the upper

  13. A Coupled AtmosphereOcean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    of the ocean. Shortwave radiation from the sun contributes most of the heat fluxes that penetrate the airA Coupled Atmosphere­Ocean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation WEI-LIANG LEE AND K. N. LIOU Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California

  14. A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud.-J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud, which computes fluxes at each level. [3] The description of clouds in current LSMs is quite simple: Most

  15. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  16. Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

  17. environmental management radiation protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    EHS environmental management biosafety radiation protection industrial hygiene safety Working: Biosafety, Environmental Management, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection and Safety. Each specialized Management Program, Industrial Hygiene, Radiation Protection Program, and the Safety Program. (http

  18. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (NewSons, Inc. from "Radiation Detection and Measurement," G. F.

  19. Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

  20. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  1. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  2. Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    condensate amount and cloud fraction, has about the same effect on radiative fluxes as does the ad hoc tuning for representing cloud structure in instantaneous calculations and long-term integrations. Shortwave radiation accounting for this effect in the operational radiation scheme. Long simulations with the new model

  3. Shining On: A primer on solar radiation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlap, M.A.; Cook, G. [eds.; Marion, B.; Riordan, C.; Renne, D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a primer on solar radiation data. General uses of solar energy are presented. The manner in which solar radiation data is used to aid engineers in optimizing the use of solar thermal conversion and photovoltaic conversion is discussed. Methods for acquiring and assimilating the solar radiation data are illustrated. This would include the design and use of pyranometers and pyrheliometers. Seasonal and geographical variations in solar flux reaching the earth are evaluated. Other uses of compiled data include the determination of meteorological impacts of atmospheric disturbances such as volcano eruptions.

  4. Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Pei, Wenbing [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses.

  5. Courses on Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

  6. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  7. Radiation Control (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

  8. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, R E; Bush, C; Kaita, R

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0-1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas with a high flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub p} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the lower single null configuration with higher-end elongation 2.2-2.4 and triangularity 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using high magnetic flux expansion and partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates, while good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by a 30-60% increase in divertor plasma radiation, a peak heat flux reduction by up to 70%, measured in a 10 cm radial zone, a five-fold increase in divertor neutral pressure, and a significant volume recombination rate increase.

  9. SYNOPTIC MAPPING OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C. L. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Harvey, J. W.; Pietarila, A., E-mail: cljin@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: jharvey@nso.edu, E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We used daily full-disk Ca II 854.2 nm magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long Term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility to study the chromospheric magnetic field from 2006 April through 2009 November. We determined and corrected previously unidentified zero offsets in the SOLIS magnetograms. By tracking the disk passages of stable unipolar regions, the measured net flux densities were found to systematically decrease from the disk center to the limb by a factor of about two. This decrease was modeled using a thin flux tube model with a difference in signal formation height between the center and limb sides. Comparison of photospheric and chromospheric observations shows that their differences are largely due to horizontal spreading of magnetic flux with increasing height. The north polar magnetic field decreased nearly linearly with time during our study period while the south polar field was nearly constant. We used the annual change in the viewing angle of the polar regions to estimate the radial and meridional components of the polar fields and found that the south polar fields were tilted away from the pole. Synoptic maps of the chromospheric radial flux density distribution were used as boundary conditions for extrapolation of the field from the chromosphere into the corona. A comparison of modeled and observed coronal hole boundaries and coronal streamer positions showed better agreement when using the chromospheric rather than the photospheric synoptic maps.

  10. Energies of Quantum QED Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H Weigel

    2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I present recent studies on vacuum polarization energies and energy densities induced by QED flux tubes. I focus on comparing three and four dimensional scenarios and the discussion of various approximation schemes in view of the exact treatment.

  11. Flux tubes in the SU(3) vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario S. Cardaci; Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Rossella Falcone; Alessandro Papa

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the distribution of the chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum. We find that the transverse profile of the flux tube resembles the dual version of the Abrikosov vortex field distribution and give an estimate of the London penetration length in the confined vacuum.

  12. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR Compiled by S. M. Shapiro I. PICTORIAL with fiberglass insulation and a protective aluminum skin. The reactor vessel is shaped somewhat like a very large at the spherical end. It is located at the center of the reactor building and is surrounded by a lead and steel

  13. Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards Quantum-level Switching V. Savinov1, they require extremely high levels of nanofabrication. Here we introduce a new quantum superconducting properties of the mac- roscopic quantum state of superconducting carriers1 , and essentially plasmonic nature

  14. Additional measurements of the radiation environment at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, D.R.; Reedy, R.C.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foil activation dosimetry experiments were conducted in a ''rabbit'' system at the completed Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The ''raffit'' system contains four tubes spaced radially outward 0.12, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.38 meters off beam centerline. Foils were irradiated for 3 to 62 hours to measure the neutron flux and energy spectrum radially from beam centerline, along the beamline, and the effect of the Isotope Production (IP) target loadings on the neutron flux in the neutron irradiation locations. Irradiations showed a decrease in the radial flux by a factor of 6 in 0.15 meters of iron outside the IP targets. An enchancement was seen in the 24-keV energy region outside 0.15 meters. There was little difference in the shape of the spectra outside the IP targets and the beam stop with the exception of the high energy tail (energies above 20 MeV). The decrease in the high energy tail outside the beam stop is due to the degradation of the energy of the proton beam in the IP targets. Irradiations outside the beam stop with zero and eight IP targets gave the same spectral shape with the exception of the high energy tail. The magnitude of the integral flux decreased by a factor of 2 when eight IP targets were present. Irradiations with five ''rabbits'' stacked on top of each other showed no difference in the integral flux below, on and above beam centerline.

  15. The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todreas, Neil E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

  16. Vacuum Tunneling in an Electroweak Model in Extra Dimensions With an External Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Roy

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the standard system for an SU(2) Higgs field in M_4 X S_1, the top and bottom component of the Higgs spinor have exactly the same coeficients for the quadratic and quadric terms. This makes the vacuum degenerate and thus there are no tunneling effects to zeroth order in radiative corrections of the vector gauge felds in the standard model with this extra dimensional geometry. However, if we include an external magnetic flux that permeates our manifold, then the top component of the Higgs spinor will have an additional term in its coefficient due to this theoretical flux with the usual charge assignments for the standard model. This extra term gives rise to two nondegenerate vacuum states for the resulting potential. We will compute the tunneling probability per unit time per unit volume between these vacuum states for the zero modes of our system as well as investigate the masses for the fields of the model using the false vacuum.

  17. Surface Magnetic Flux Maintenance In Quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Iida

    2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate surface processes of magnetic patches, namely merging, splitting, emergence, and cancellation, by using an auto-detection technique. We find that merging and splitting are locally predominant in the surface level, while the frequencies of the other two are less by one or two orders of magnitude. The frequency dependences on flux con- tent of surface processes are further investigated. Based on these observations, we discuss a possible whole picture of the maintenance. Our conclusion is that the photospheric magnetic field structure, especially its power-law nature, is maintained by the processes locally in the surface not by the interactions between different altitudes. We suggest a scenario of the flux maintenance as follows: The splitting and merging play a crucial role for the generation of the power-law distribution, not the emergence nor cancellation do. This power-law distribution results in another power-law one of the cancellation with an idea of the random convective transport. The cancellation and emergence have a common value for the power-law indices in their frequency distributions, which may suggest a "recycle of fluxes by submergence and re-emergence".

  18. Coupling spin ensembles via superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyin Qiu; Wei Xiong; Lin Tian; J. Q. You

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a hybrid quantum system consisting of spin ensembles and superconducting flux qubits, where each spin ensemble is realized using the nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond crystal and the nearest-neighbor spin ensembles are effectively coupled via a flux qubit.We show that the coupling strengths between flux qubits and spin ensembles can reach the strong and even ultrastrong coupling regimes by either engineering the hybrid structure in advance or tuning the excitation frequencies of spin ensembles via external magnetic fields. When extending the hybrid structure to an array with equal coupling strengths, we find that in the strong-coupling regime, the hybrid array is reduced to a tight-binding model of a one-dimensional bosonic lattice. In the ultrastrong-coupling regime, it exhibits quasiparticle excitations separated from the ground state by an energy gap. Moreover, these quasiparticle excitations and the ground state are stable under a certain condition that is tunable via the external magnetic field. This may provide an experimentally accessible method to probe the instability of the system.

  19. High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark The High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory resides in a pool of water illuminated by the blue...

  20. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  1. Scattering in the inner accretion disk and the waveforms and polarization of millisecond flux oscillations in LMXBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Y. Sazonov; Rashid A. Sunyaev

    2000-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The scattering by the inner accretion disk of X-ray radiation generated near the surface of a spinning neutron star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) has observable effects on the waveforms of millisecond X-ray flux oscillations produced e.g. during type-I bursts or in the millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4--3658. We study these effects in the framework of a simplified model in which there is a single emitting spot on the stellar surface, which is visible both directly and in X-rays scattered from the disk. The main signature of scattering from a thin disk is that the pulse of scattered flux leads (if the star rotates in the same sense as the disk) or lags (in the contrary case) the primary pulse of direct emission by a quarter of a spin cycle. This is caused by Doppler boosting of radiation in the sub-relativistic Keplerian flow. The disk-scattered flux is revealed better in energy-resolved waveforms and the phase dependence of the polarized flux component. The phenomenon discussed permits direct testing of the presence of standard thin disks near the neutron stars in LMXBs and should be observable with future X-ray timing experiments having a few times better sensitivity than RXTE and also with sensitive X-ray polarimeters.

  2. The porous media model for the hydraulic system of a conifer tree: linking sap flux data to1 transpiration rate2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    hydraulic system but also11 requires a direct estimation of its properties. Our proposed PM model play a dominant role in controlling CO2 uptake and4 partitioning of net radiation between latent-atmosphere flux measurement networks6 and free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments require a quantitative

  3. Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford ..................................................................................................................... 17 The Basic Principles of Radiation Protection........................................................... 17 Protection against Radiation Exposure

  4. AmeriFlux Network Data from the ORNL AmeriFlux Website

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AmeriFlux network was established in 1996 to provide continuous observations of ecosystem level exchanges of CO2, water, energy and momentum spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. It is fed by sites from North America, Central America, and South America. DOE's CDIAC stores and maintains AmeriFlux data, and this web site explains the different levels of data available there, with links to the CDIAC ftp site. A separate web-based data interface is also provided; it allows users to graph, query, and download Level 2 data for up to four sites at a time. Data may be queried by site, measurement period, or parameter. More than 550 site-years of level 2 data are available from AmeriFlux sites through the interface.

  5. Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

  6. WI Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

  7. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  8. Parylene-based active micro space radiator with thermal contact switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Ai; Suzuki, Yuji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal management is crucial for highly functional spacecrafts exposed to large fluctuations of internal heat dissipation and/or thermal boundary conditions. Since thermal radiation is the only means for heat removal, effective control of radiation is required for advanced space missions. In the present study, a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) active radiator using the contact resistance change has been proposed. Unlike previous bulky thermal louvers/shutters, higher fill factor can be accomplished with an array of electrostatically driven micro diaphragms suspended with polymer tethers. With an early prototype developed with parylene MEMS technologies, radiation heat flux enhancement up to 42% has been achieved.

  9. SU(2) Flux Distributions on Finite Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Y; Peng, Yingcai; Haymaker, Richard W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied SU(2) flux distributions on four dimensional euclidean lattices with one dimension very large. By choosing the time direction appropriately we can study physics in two cases: one is finite volume in the zero temperature limit, another is finite temperature in the the intermediate to large volume limit. We found that for cases of beta > beta crit there is no intrinsic string formation. Our lattices with beta > beta crit belong to intermediate volume region, and the string tension in this region is due to finite volume effects. In large volumes we found evidence for intrinsic string formation.

  10. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  11. Resonant absorption in dissipative flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safari, H; Karami, K; Sobouti, Y

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillations of coronal loops are believed to be the primary cause of the solar corona heating. We study the resonant absorbtion of MHD waves in magnetized flux tubes with graded densities across the cross section of the tube. Within the approximation that resistive and viscous processes are operative in thin layers surrounding the singularities of the MHD equations, we give the full spectrum of the eigenfrequencies, damping rates, as well as, the eigenfields of the normal MHD modes of the tube. Both surface and body modes are analyzed and the contribution of each class to heating of the corona is commented on.

  12. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

  13. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  14. Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformationOpenOpenFlux Power

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall- Hemispheric Flux

  16. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  17. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  18. Radiation Processing -an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

  19. COSMOS: A Radiation-Chemo-Hydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Anninos; P. Chris Fragile; Stephen D. Murray

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new massively-parallel radiation-hydrodynamics code (Cosmos) for Newtonian and relativistic astrophysical problems that also includes radiative cooling, self-gravity, and non-equilibrium, multi-species chemistry. Several numerical methods are implemented for the hydrodynamics, including options for both internal and total energy conserving schemes. Radiation is treated using flux-limited diffusion. The chemistry incorporates 27 reactions, including both collisional and radiative processes for atomic hydrogen and helium gases, and molecular hydrogen chains. In this paper we discuss the equations and present results from test problems carried out to verify the robustness and accuracy of our code in the Newtonian regime. An earlier paper presented tests of the relativistic capabilities of Cosmos.

  20. COSMOS A Radiation-Chemo-Hydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anninos, P; Murray, S D; Anninos, Peter; Murray, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new massively-parallel radiation-hydrodynamics code (Cosmos) for Newtonian and relativistic astrophysical problems that also includes radiative cooling, self-gravity, and non-equilibrium, multi-species chemistry. Several numerical methods are implemented for the hydrodynamics, including options for both internal and total energy conserving schemes. Radiation is treated using flux-limited diffusion. The chemistry incorporates 27 reactions, including both collisional and radiative processes for atomic hydrogen and helium gases, and molecular hydrogen chains. In this paper we discuss the equations and present results from test problems carried out to verify the robustness and accuracy of our code in the Newtonian regime. An earlier paper presented tests of the relativistic capabilities of Cosmos.

  1. Impurity feedback control for enhanced divertor and edge radiation in DIII-D discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, G.L.; Staebler, G.M.; Allen, S.L. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long pulse and steady state fusion ignition devices will require a significant radiated power fraction to minimize heat flux to, and sputtering of, the first wall. While impurity gases have been proposed to enhance radiation, precise control of impurity gas injection is essential to achieve an adequate radiative power fraction while maintaining good energy confinement and low central impurity concentration. We report here the first experiments in the DIII-D tokamak using feedback control of the rate of impurity gas injection. These experiments were carried out with active divertor pumping using the in-situ DIII-D cryopump. The radiated power fraction was controlled by sensing either UN edge line radiation (Ne{sup +7}) or mantle radiation from selected bolometer channels and using the DIII-D digital plasma control system to calculate radiated power real-time and generate an error signal to control an impurity gas injector valve.

  2. Numerical Study on In-Situ Prominence Formation by Radiative Condensation in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Takafumi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an in-situ formation model for inverse-polarity solar prominence and demonstrate it using self-consistent 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations, including thermal conduction along magnetic fields and optically thin radiative cooling. The model enables us to form cool dense plasma clouds inside a flux rope by radiative condensation, which is regarded as an inverse-polarity prominence. Radiative condensation is triggered by changes in the magnetic topology, i.e., formation of the flux rope from the sheared arcade field, and by thermal imbalance due to the dense plasma trapped inside the flux rope. The flux rope is created by imposing converging and shearing motion on the arcade field. Either when the footpoint motion is in the anti-shearing direction or when heating is proportional to local density, the thermal state inside the flux rope becomes cooling-dominant, leading to radiative condensation. By controlling the temperature of condensation, we investigate the relationship between the t...

  3. Analysis of the empirical relations between visible solar radiation, the solar altitude and the transparency of the atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Occhipinti, Antonio

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ls determined by a four parameter system including the two parameters which characterize the transmission of the direct solar radiation. The four parameter model ls )ustified in terms of actual measurements for clear sky conditions. The system... Sketch Illustrating Coordinate System, . 39 4, 2 The Coordinate System Used to Describe the Multiple Scattering Radiation Field 41 4, 3 Optical Thickness Coordinate Schematic of the Zv + 2 Radiant Fluxes of the Diffuse Radiation Field Model 47 4. 5...

  4. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer : towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jeremie; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see, that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO2 that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68{\\textdegree}C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. F...

  5. Radiation detector using a bulk high T[sub c] superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Artuso, J.F.; Franks, L.A.; Hull, K.L.; Symko, O.G.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector is provided, wherein a bulk high T[sub c] superconducting sample is placed in a magnetic field and maintained at a superconducting temperature. Photons of incident radiation will cause localized heating in superconducting loops of the sample destroying trapped flux and redistributing the fluxons, and reducing the critical current of the loops. Subsequent cooling of the sample in the magnetic field will cause trapped flux redistributed Abrikosov fluxons and trapped Josephson fluxons. The destruction and trapping of the fluxons causes changes in the magnetization of the sample inducing currents in opposite directions in a pickup coil which is coupled by an input coil to an rf SQUID. 4 figures.

  6. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  8. TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Emily B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

  9. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  10. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  11. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation ({sigma}) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan {gamma}-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of {approx}< 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  12. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V., E-mail: bair@berkeley.edu; Bogy, David B., E-mail: dbogy@berkeley.edu [University of California, Etcheverry Hall, MC 1740, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  13. Turbulent Fluxes in Stably Stratified Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii; 10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T132/014010

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extended version of an invited talk given on the International Conference "Turbulent Mixing and Beyond". The dynamical and statistical description of stably stratified turbulent boundary layers with the important example of the stable atmospheric boundary layer in mind is addressed. Traditional approaches to this problem, based on the profiles of mean quantities, velocity second-order correlations, and dimensional estimates of the turbulent thermal flux run into a well known difficulty, predicting the suppression of turbulence at a small critical value of the Richardson number, in contradiction with observations. Phenomenological attempts to overcome this problem suffer from various theoretical inconsistencies. Here we present an approach taking into full account all the second-order statistics, which allows us to respect the conservation of total mechanical energy. The analysis culminates in an analytic solution of the profiles of all mean quantities and all second-order correlations removing t...

  14. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  15. Permanent-magnet switched-flux machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M.; Qin, Ling

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent-magnet switched-flux (PMSF) device has a ferromagnetic outer stator mounted to a shaft about a central axis extending axially through the PMSF device. Pluralities of top and bottom stator poles are respectively mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly in first and second transverse planes extending from first and second sections of the central axis adjacent to an inner surface of the ferromagnetic outer stator. A ferromagnetic inner rotor is coupled to the shaft and has i) a rotor core having a core axis co-axial with the central axis; and ii) first and second discs having respective outer edges with first and second pluralities of permanent magnets (PMs) mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly from the rotor core axis in the first and second transverse planes. The first and second pluralities of PMs each include PMs of alternating polarity.

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE RADIATION FLUX PROFILE OF THE 100 SUN PROMOTEO FACETTED DISH CONCENTRATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @fe.infn.it 2 Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA on the incident light, the current in a string of identical solar cells will be limited by the cell with the least, due to the need for both a tightly toleranced mirror support structure and a precise solar tracking

  17. Comparison of surface radiative flux data sets over the Arctic Ocean Jiping Liu,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The reduced surface heat loss is partly offset by the reduction of solar heating due to much higher snow of these surface parameters was compared to the high-quality in situ measurements from the Surface Heat Budget; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. However, physical processes in the Arctic are not well understood

  18. Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrence Berkeley Industrial8 Best Estimate

  19. Techniques and Methods Used to Determine the Best Estimate of Radiation Fluxes at SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8,, 20153 To.T. J. Determine

  20. Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

  1. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0 MA and 1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode discharges with a high magnetic flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub t} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the strongly-shaped lower single null configuration with elongation {kappa} = 2.2-2.4 and triangularity {delta} = 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using the inherently high magnetic flux expansion f{sub m} = 16-25 and the partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates. A good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained, while the core carbon concentration and the associated Z{sub eff} were reduced. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by an increase in divertor radiated power, a reduction of ion flux to the plate, and a large neutral compression ratio. Spectroscopic measurements indicated a formation of a high-density, low temperature region adjacent to the outer strike point, where substantial increases in the volume recombination rate and CII, CIII emission rates was measured.

  2. Flux avalanches in superconducting films with periodic arrays of holes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Metlushko, V.; Crabtree, G. W.; Materials Science Division; Inst. of Solid State Physics RAS

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic flux dynamics in Nb films with periodic hole arrays is studied magneto-optically. Flux motion in the shape of microavalanches along {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} directions of the hole lattice is observed. At lower temperatures anisotropic large scale thermo-magnetic avalanches dominate flux entry and exit. At T-T{sub c} critical-state-like field patterns periodically appear at fractions of the matching field.

  3. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  5. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current Source Inverters for HEVs and FCVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wireless Charging Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

  6. antineutrino flux measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Terrestrial Antineutrino Flux Measurements CERN Preprints Summary: Uranium and thorium are the main heat producing elements in the earth. Their quantities and...

  7. analyze magnetic flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 47 Quantitative observation of magnetic flux distribution in new magnetic...

  8. achieve high flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of mass immunization William M. Weiss; Gilbert Burnham; Peter J. Winch 2 Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Fluxes and Their Constraints HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: Applying...

  9. axial flux permanent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 13 Design and analysis aspects of radial flux air-cored permanent magnet wind generator system for direct battery charging applications. Open Access Theses and...

  10. ambipolar particle flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cascade Wehrli, Bernhard 32 Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  11. annual particle flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cascade Wehrli, Bernhard 20 Earth Planets Space, 62, 333345, 2010 Cosmic ray and solar energetic particle flux in paleomagnetospheres Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  12. as4 flux morfologiya: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guido D'Amico; Roberto Gobbetti; Matthew Kleban; Marjorie Schillo 2012-11-14 11 Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes CERN Preprints Summary: The most probable initial magnetic...

  13. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,...

  14. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- relations between surface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  15. airborne flux measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmospheresurface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to...

  16. Ising interaction between capacitively-coupled superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiko Satoh; Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Kosuke Kakuyanagi; Koichi Semba; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Shiro Saito

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we propose a scheme to generate a controllable Ising interaction between superconducting flux qubits. Existing schemes rely on inducting couplings to realize Ising interactions between flux qubits, and the interaction strength is controlled by an applied magnetic field On the other hand, we have found a way to generate an interaction between the flux qubits via capacitive couplings. This has an advantage in individual addressability, because we can control the interaction strength by changing an applied voltage that can be easily localized. This is a crucial step toward the realizing superconducting flux qubit quantum computation.

  17. Gaugino Condensates and Fluxes in N = 1 Effective Superpotentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Pierre Derendinger; Costas Kounnas; P. Marios Petropoulos

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of orbifold compactifications of heterotic and type II orientifolds, we study effective N = 1 supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates. These string solutions display a broad phenomenology which we analyze using the method of N = 4 supergravity gaugings. We give examples in type II and heterotic compactifications of combined fluxes and condensates leading to vacua with naturally small supersymmetry breaking scale controlled by the condensate, cases where the supersymmetry breaking scale is specified by the fluxes even in the presence of a condensate and also examples where fluxes and condensates conspire to preserve supersymmetry.

  18. Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinraide, R.; Moore, C.J.; Jacobs, K.D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M.J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.A.; Gundelach, C.T.; Hansen, R.W.C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R.L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R.A.; Pedley, B. [Synchrotron Radiation Center (United States)] [and others

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

  19. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  20. Analytical Solutions for Radiative Transfer: Implications for Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan P. Boss

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The disk instability mechanism for giant planet formation is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally-gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk, which must lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling if they are to survive and contract to become giant protoplanets. While there is good observational support for forming at least some giant planets by disk instability, the mechanism has become theoretically contentious, with different three dimensional radiative hydrodynamics codes often yielding different results. Rigorous code testing is required to make further progress. Here we present two new analytical solutions for radiative transfer in spherical coordinates, suitable for testing the code employed in all of the Boss disk instability calculations. The testing shows that the Boss code radiative transfer routines do an excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the radial temperature and radiative flux profiles for a spherical cloud with high or moderate optical depths, including the transition from optically thick to optically thin regions. These radial test results are independent of whether the Eddington approximation, diffusion approximation, or flux-limited diffusion approximation routines are employed. The Boss code does an equally excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the vertical (theta) temperature and radiative flux profiles for a disk with a height proportional to the radial distance. These tests strongly support the disk instability mechanism for forming giant planets.

  1. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upton, NY 11973, USA Abstract Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) effects in bunch compressors are analyzed. Schemes for reducing the CSR effects are presented. 1 INTRODUCTION...

  2. Atomic Radiation (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

  3. Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

  4. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

    1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  5. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  6. Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Radiative Characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: An Example from M-PACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Boer, Gijs; Collins, William D.; Menon, Surabi; Long, Charles N.

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

  7. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation doseCOLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 regulations of the Rules of the City of New York, Article 175, Radiation Control, there is a requirement

  8. NIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration NIST Special Publication 250-65 Benjamin K Special Publication 250-65 NIST MEASUREMENT SERVICES: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration Benjamin K. Tsai GAITHERSBURG, MD: 2004 #12;iii PREFACE The calibration and related measurement services of the National

  9. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  10. Anomaly-free representations of the holonomy-flux algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SangChul Yoon

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We work on the uniqueness, gr-qc/0504147, of representations of the holonomy-flux algebra in loop quantum gravity. We argue that for analytic diffeomorphisms, the flux operators can be only constants as functions on the configuration space in representations with no anomaly, which are zero in the standard representation.

  11. Advanced methods of flux identification for clarifierthickener simulation models q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    with mathematical models for the batch and continuous sedimentation of finely divided solid par- ticles dispersed: Solid­liquid separation Thickener simulation Batch sedimentation Flux identification Mathematical modelAdvanced methods of flux identification for clarifier­thickener simulation models q Fernando

  12. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murata, Tomoya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  13. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Murata; Toru Sato

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  14. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  15. Nonclassicality of Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars M. Johansen

    2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that thermal radiation of small occupation number is strongly nonclassical. This includes most forms of naturally occurring radiation. Nonclassicality can be observed as a negative weak value of a positive observable. It is related to negative values of the Margenau-Hill quasi-probability distribution.

  16. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  17. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  18. Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric observations-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer data match closely with those from the Cimel sun- photometer data for two of the sunphotometer to retrieve aerosol optical depths, a, along with observed surface flux data from field campaigns

  19. Interpolation of surface radiative temperature measured from polar orbiting satellites to a diurnal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    . Instruments on polar orbiting satellites, such as advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) or Moderate. This approach is based on the surface energy balance with the soil heat flux being treated by a conventional in temperate and tropical regions, observed empirical relationships between solar radiative energy and skin

  20. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known "magnetic flux problem" can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the pres...

  1. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  2. Coherent radiation from neutral molecules moving above a grating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Belyanin; Federico Capasso; Vitaly Kocharovsky; Vladimir Kocharovsky

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict and study the quantum-electrodynamical effect of parametric self-induced excitation of a molecule moving above the dielectric or conducting medium with periodic grating. In this case the radiation reaction force modulates the molecular transition frequency which results in a parametric instability of dipole oscillations even from the level of quantum or thermal fluctuations. The present mechanism of instability of electrically neutral molecules is different from that of the well-known Smith-Purcell and transition radiation in which a moving charge and its oscillating image create an oscillating dipole. We show that parametrically excited molecular bunches can produce an easily detectable coherent radiation flux of up to a microwatt.

  3. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY................................................................................................................I-1 B. Radiation Protection Program...............................................................................I-3 D. Radiation Safety Management

  4. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

  5. Control of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field Weakening Regiori -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    inductance of stator and rotor winding (Ls = L, = L,,, +Lo is assumed here). Rotor speed. Number of pole pairs. Resistances of stator and rotor winding. Rotor time constant. Electromagnetic torque. Load torqueControl of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field

  6. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Psychiatric Institute Radiation Safety Office (Please complete this form within 24 hours and send a copy to your supervisor and The Radiation Safety Office) Your Name

  7. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212: _______________ * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Radiation Safety Office Approval: ______________________ Date: ________________________ Waste containers in place: Yes ___ No ___ Radiation signage on door: Yes ___ No ___ Room monitoring: Dates

  8. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    to Workers; Inspections 27 10 CFR Part 20Standards for Protection Against Radiation 28 10 CFR Part 35Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated

  9. Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hajdas; P. Bühler; C. Eggel; P. Favre; A. Mchedlishvili; A. Zehnder

    2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The INTEGRAL Radiation Environment Monitor (IREM) is a payload supporting instrument on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The monitor continually measures electron and proton fluxes along the orbit and provides this information to the spacecraft on board data handler. The mission alert system broadcasts it to the payload instruments enabling them to react accordingly to the current radiation level. Additionally, the IREM conducts its autonomous research mapping the Earth radiation environment for the space weather program. Its scientific data are available for further analysis almost without delay.

  10. Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation in the southern seas in early spring 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendler, G.; Quakenbush, T. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Science Foundation research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer carried out a cruise to Antarctica in early spring of 1993. It left Punta Arenas, Chile, close to the tip of South America on 11 August 1993. sailed south for 3 days to the tip of The Antarctic Peninsula, stopping at O`Higgens and Palmer Stations, and from there went southwest and into the Bellingshausen sea. On 10 September, it reached the most southerly position, 71{degrees}S, some distance north of the Thurston Island. From there, it went as far as 110{degrees}W before returning to Punta Arenas. The main purpose of the cruise was to investigate the snow- and sea-ice thickness, properties, and structures in this part of the southern oceans. It also allowed us to carry out continuous radiation measurements. We measured the following fluxes: global radiation (Eppley PSP), infrared incoming radiation (Eppley Pyrgeometer PIR), ultraviolet-A radiation (Eppley UV meter), ultraviolet-B radiation (Yankee Environmental Systems), and pitch and roll of the ship (Lucas Sensing Systems, Inc.). All instruments were sampled twice per second (Campbell Scientific, Model 21 X), and a notebook computer (ASI Patriot) stored 1-minute averages of the radiation data and 1-minute standard deviation of the ship`s pitch and roll. Visual observations of cloud cover were also recorded. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Calculation of the scattering function of a multichannel scintillation detector used to record high-energy photon radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zav'yalkin, F.M.; Osipov, S.P.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a method of calculating the scattering function for a linear array of detectors. The authors consider the detector arrangement which in the best way utilizes the radiation flux but which to the greatest extent is affected by the scattering of radiation from one detector to another: optically separated scintillatorsf in the form of parallelepipeds are assumed to be closely packed in a linear array and directed toward the radiation source. In order to obtain estimates of the scattering function with an accuracy of 3-5% for x close to zero at radiation not less than 2 MeV, the leakage of secondary electrons are taken into account.

  13. The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

  14. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yu, E-mail: guojuan@bao.ac.c [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatories, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  15. Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

  16. Varying trends in surface energy fluxes and associated climatebetween 1960-2002 based on transient climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Menon, Surabi

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed reduction in land surface radiation over the last several decades (1960-1990)---the so-called ''dimming effect''--- and the more recent evidence of a reversal in ''dimming'' over some locations beyond 1990 suggest several consequences on climate, notably on the hydrological cycle. Such a reduction in radiation should imply reduced surface temperature (Ts) and precipitation, which have not occurred. We have investigated the possible causes for the above climate features using a climate model coupled to a dynamic ocean model under natural and anthropogenic conditions. To isolate the aerosol influence on surface radiation trends, we have analyzed transient climate simulations from1960 to 2002 with and without anthropogenic aerosols. Based on a linear trend with aerosol effects included, the global mean change in the surface solar radiation absorbed over land is -0.021+-0.0033 Wm-2yr-1. Although the overall trend is negative, we do note a reversal in dimming after 1990, consistent with observations. Without aerosol effects, the surface solar radiation absorbed over land increases throughout 1960 to 2002, mainly due to the decrease in cloud cover associated with increased greenhouse warming. In spite of a simulated increase in Ts of 0.012 Kyr-1 for 1960 to 2002, the global mean latent heat flux and associated intensity of the hydrological cycle decrease overall, however with increases over some land locations due mainly to moisture advection. Simulated changes correspond more closely to observed changes when accounting for aerosol effects on climate.

  17. Benchmarking gyrokinetic simulations in a toroidal flux-tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Parker, S. E.; Wan, W. [University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Bravenec, R. [Fourth-State Research, Austin, Texas 78704 (United States)] [Fourth-State Research, Austin, Texas 78704 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux-tube model is implemented in the global turbulence code GEM [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)] in order to facilitate benchmarking with Eulerian codes. The global GEM assumes the magnetic equilibrium to be completely given. The initial flux-tube implementation simply selects a radial location as the center of the flux-tube and a radial size of the flux-tube, sets all equilibrium quantities (B, ?B, etc.) to be equal to the values at the center of the flux-tube, and retains only a linear radial profile of the safety factor needed for boundary conditions. This implementation shows disagreement with Eulerian codes in linear simulations. An alternative flux-tube model based on a complete local equilibrium solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation [J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 105009 (2009)] is then implemented. This results in better agreement between Eulerian codes and the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The PIC algorithm based on the v{sub ||}-formalism [J. Reynders, Ph.D. dissertation, Princeton University, 1992] and the gyrokinetic ion/fluid electron hybrid model with kinetic electron closure [Y. Chan and S. E. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 18, 055703 (2011)] are also implemented in the flux-tube geometry and compared with the direct method for both the ion temperature gradient driven modes and the kinetic ballooning modes.

  18. PROMINENCE FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH AN EMERGING HELICAL FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Tsuneta, Saku; Katsukawa, Yukio; Suematsu, Yoshinori [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Lites, Bruce W.; Kubo, Masahito [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Berger, Thomas E.; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto, 607-8471 (Japan); Shimizu, Toshifumi [ISAS/JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and evolution process and magnetic configuration of solar prominences remain unclear. In order to study the formation process of prominences, we examine continuous observations of a prominence in NOAA AR 10953 with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. As reported in our previous Letter, we find a signature suggesting that a helical flux rope emerges from below the photosphere under a pre-existing prominence. Here we investigate more detailed properties and photospheric indications of the emerging helical flux rope, and discuss their relationship to the formation of the prominence. Our main conclusions are: (1) a dark region with absence of strong vertical magnetic fields broadens and then narrows in Ca II H-line filtergrams. This phenomenon is consistent with the emergence of the helical flux rope as photospheric counterparts. The size of the flux rope is roughly 30,000 km long and 10,000 km wide. The width is larger than that of the prominence. (2) No shear motion or converging flows are detected, but we find diverging flows such as mesogranules along the polarity inversion line. The presence of mesogranules may be related to the emergence of the helical flux rope. (3) The emerging helical flux rope reconnects with magnetic fields of the pre-existing prominence to stabilize the prominence for the next several days. We thus conjecture that prominence coronal magnetic fields emerge in the form of helical flux ropes that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the prominence.

  19. Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

  20. Colour flux-tubes in static Pentaquark systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Bicudo; Nuno Cardoso; Marco Cardoso

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colour fields created by the static tetraquark and pentaquark systems are computed in quenched SU(3) lattice QCD, with gauge invariant lattice operators, in a 24^3 x 48 lattice at beta=6.2 . We generate our quenched configurations with GPUs, and detail the respective benchmanrks in different SU(N) groups. While at smaller distances the coulomb potential is expected to dominate, at larger distances it is expected that fundamental flux tubes, similar to the flux-tube between a quark and an antiquark, emerge and confine the quarks. In order to minimize the potential the fundamental flux tubes should connect at 120o angles. We compute the square of the colour fields utilizing plaquettes, and locate the static sources with generalized Wilson loops and with APE smearing. The tetraquark system is well described by a double-Y-shaped flux-tube, with two Steiner points, but when quark-antiquark pairs are close enough the two junctions collapse and we have an X-shaped flux-tube, with one Steiner point. The pentaquark system is well described by a three-Y-shaped flux-tube where the three flux the junctions are Steiner points.

  1. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  2. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  3. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  4. The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqi Wang

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

  5. Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  6. Bounded limit for the Monte Carlo point-flux-estimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimesey, R.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Monte Carlo random walk the kernel K(R,E) is used as an expected value estimator at every collision for the collided flux phi/sub c/ r vector,E) at the detector point. A limiting value for the kernel is derived from a diffusion approximation for the probability current at a radius R/sub 1/ from the detector point. The variance of the collided flux at the detector point is thus bounded using this asymptotic form for K(R,E). The bounded point flux estimator is derived. (WHK)

  7. Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

  8. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  9. Finite element analysis of the distortion of a crystal monochromator from synchrotron radiation thermal loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.R.; Hoyer, E.H.; Thompson, A.C.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first crystal of the Brown-Hower x-ray monochromator of the LBL-EXXON 54 pole wiggler beamline at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is subjected to intense synchrotron radiation. To provide an accurate thermal/structural analysis of the existing monochromator design, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed. A very high and extremely localized heat flux is incident on the Si (220) crystal. The crystal, which possesses pronouncedly temperature-dependent orthotropic properties, in combination with the localized heat load, make the analysis ideally suited for finite element techniques. Characterization of the incident synchrotron radiation is discussed, followed by a review of the techniques employed in modeling the monochromator and its thermal/structural boundary conditions. The results of the finite element analysis, three-dimensional temperature distributions, surface displacements and slopes, and stresses, in the area of interest, are presented. Lastly, the effects these results have on monochromator output flux and resolution are examined.

  10. Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groom, D.E. [ed.

    1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

  11. Multiple Scattering of Seismic Waves from Ensembles of Upwardly Lossy Thin Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Chris S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our previous semi-analytic treatment of f- and p-mode multiple scattering from ensembles of thin flux tubes (Hanson and Cally, Astrophys. J. 781, 125; 791, 129, 2014) is extended by allowing both sausage and kink waves to freely escape at the top of the model using a radiative boundary condition there. As expected, this additional avenue of escape, supplementing downward loss into the deep solar interior, results in substantially greater absorption of incident f- and p-modes. However, less intuitively, it also yields mildly to substantially smaller phase shifts in waves emerging from the ensemble. This may have implications for the interpretation of seismic data for solar plage regions, and in particular their small measured phase shifts.

  12. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  13. The Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Ignatov

    2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An example of discontinuity of the energy-momentum tensor moving at superluminal velocity is discussed. It is shown that the gravitational Mach cone is formed. The power spectrum of the corresponding Cherenkov radiation is evaluated.

  14. Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

  15. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  17. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  18. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  19. Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    of External and Internal Doses E. Reports and Notices to Workers Chapter VII: Radiation ProtectionRadiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual

  20. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  1. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  2. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The

  3. A Measurement of the Flux of Cosmic Ray Iron at 5 x 10^13 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Clem; W. Droege; P. A. Evenson; H. Fischer; G. Green; D. Huber; H. Kunow; D. Seckel

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the initial flight of our Balloon Air CHerenkov (BACH) payload. BACH detects air Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray nuclei as coincident flashes in two optical modules. The flight (dubbed PDQ BACH) took place on April 22, 1998 from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. During an exposure of 2.75 hours, with a typical threshold energy for iron nuclei of 2.2$\\times10^{13}$ eV, we observed several events cleanly identifiable as iron group nuclei. Analysis of the data yields a new flux measurement that is fully consistent with that reported by other investigations.

  4. Channeling 5-min photospheric oscillations into the solar outer atmosphere through small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; R. Centeno; M. Collados; J. Trujillo Bueno

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report two-dimensional MHD simulations which demonstrate that photospheric 5-min oscillations can leak into the chromosphere inside small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes. The results of our numerical experiments are compatible with those inferred from simultaneous spectropolarimetric observations of the photosphere and chromosphere obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at 10830 A. We conclude that the efficiency of energy exchange by radiation in the solar photosphere can lead to a significant reduction of the cut-off frequency and may allow for the propagation of the 5 minutes waves vertically into the chromosphere.

  5. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  6. Gravitational Tunneling Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The isolated black hole radiation of both Hawking and Zel'dovich are idealized abstractions as there is always another body to distort the potential. This is considered with respect to both gravitational tunneling, and black hole "no-hair" theorems. The effects of a second body are to lower the gravitational barrier of a black hole and to give the barrier a finite rather than infinite width so tha a particle can escape by tunneling (as in field emission) or over the top of the lowered barrier (as in Schottky emission). Thus radiation may be emitted from black holes in a process differing from that of Hawking radiation, P SH, which has been undetected for over 24 years. The radiated power from a black hole derived here is PR e ^2__ PSH, where e ^2__ is he ransmission probability for radiation through the barrier. This is similar to electric field emission of electrons from a metal in that the emission can in principle be modulated and beamed. The temperature and entropy of black holes are reexamined. Miniscule black holes herein may help explain the missing mass of the universe, accelerated expansion of the universe, and anomalous rotation of spiral galaxies. A gravitational interference effect for black hole radiation similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect is also examined.

  7. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  8. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  9. FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  10. Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., M Ackermann et

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

  12. CO2 and CH4 Fluxes across Polygon Geomorphic Types, Barrow, Alaska, 2006-2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tweedie,Craig; Lara, Mark

    Carbon flux data are reported as Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE), Ecosystem Respiration (ER), and Methane (CH4) flux. Measurements were made at 82 plots across various polygon geomorphic classes at research sites on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), the Biocomplexity Experiment site on the BEO, and the International Biological Program (IBP) site a little west of the BEO. This product is a compilation of data from 27 plots as presented in Lara et al. (2012), data from six plots presented in Olivas et al. (2010); and from 49 plots described in (Lara et al. 2014). Measurements were made during the peak of the growing seasons during 2006 to 2010. At each of the measurement plots (except Olivas et al., 2010) four different thicknesses of shade cloth were used to generate CO2 light response curves. Light response curves were used to normalize photosynthetically active radiation that is diurnally variable to a peak growing season average ~400 umolm-2sec-1. At the Olivas et al. (2010) plots, diurnal patterns were characterized by repeated sampling. CO2 measurements were made using a closed-chamber photosynthesis system and CH4 measurements were made using a photo-acoustic multi-gas analyzer. In addition, plot-level measurements for thaw depth (TD), water table depth (WTD), leaf area index (LAI), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are summarized by geomorphic polygon type.

  13. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase Ag/Ag2O deposition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Abstract: The flux of atomic oxygen generated in a...

  14. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: Measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Lefer, Barry; Hall, Samual R.; Shaw, William J.; Corr, Chelsea A.; Herndon, Scott C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic ?uxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  15. The flux measure of influence in engineering networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwing, Kyle Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to characterize the influence of individual nodes in complex networks. The flux metric developed here achieves this goal by considering the difference between the weighted outdegree and ...

  16. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  17. atmospheric muon flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. Sarcevic 1997-10-15 9 Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the ANTARES detector CERN Preprints Summary: ANTARES is a submarine neutrino telescope deployed in the...

  18. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  19. The Momentum flux in two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andeen, Gerry B.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

  20. Solar Active Region Flux Fragmentation, Subphotospheric Flows, and Flaring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canfield, Richard

    flux is thought to be generated below the convection zone and rise buoy- antly in loops of shape range > 1019 Mx; neither exponential nor power law functions provided a consistent fit

  1. affecting carbon fluxes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IFN) (2 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 43 High Heat Flux Erosion of Carbon Fibre Composite Materials in the TEXTOR Tokamak* Plasma Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: ,. 1. *...

  2. Blade Motion and Nutrient Flux to the Kelp, Eisenia arborea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    , 1988; Hurd and Stevens, 1997). Simple boundary-layer theory also assumes that the plate is rigid- plore the effect of oscillatory pitching on the flux to a flat plate and to two morphologies of the kelp

  3. New constraints on Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE L12807AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE Levin,Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux Z. Yang, 1 R. A.

  4. Coherence characterization with a superconducting flux qubit through NMR approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses a series of experimental studies that investigate the coherence properties of a superconducting persistent-current or flux qubit, a promising candidate for developing a scalable quantum processor. A ...

  5. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at a high chamber-flushing rate, are likely to yield flux measurements closer to the true values. Citation: Amonette JE, JL Barr, RL Erikson, LM Dobeck, JL Barr, and JA...

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  7. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  8. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  9. Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzi, Kimberly Irene

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed research involves designing, testing, and ics. analyzing a coupled, flux transformer heat pipe system following the patent of Oktay and Peterson (1997). Experiments were conducted utilizing four copper heat pipes, lined with copper mesh...

  10. Working With Radiation For Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    working with radiation The radiation badge is not a protective device It cannot shield you from ­ Negative Exponential Protection From Radiation #12;18 Time Distance Shielding Basic Principles #121 Working With Radiation For Research Thomas Cummings Junior Physicist Environmental Health

  11. Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Radiation Safety Annual Refresher Training Radiation Protection Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety #12;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User;Topics in Radiation Safety (applicable RPD Manual sections indicated) User and Non-user topics Types

  12. RR Flux on Calabi-Yau and Partial Supersymmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Taylor; C. Vafa

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how turning on Flux for RR (and NS-NS) field strengths on non-compact Calabi-Yau 3-folds can serve as a way to partially break supersymmetry from N=2 to N=1 by mass deformation. The freezing of the moduli of Calabi-Yau in the presence of the flux is the familiar phenomenon of freezing of fields in supersymmetric theories upon mass deformations.

  13. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comstock, Jennifer

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  14. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Comstock, Jennifer

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  15. Physics of Intrinsic Rotation in Flux-Driven ITG Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, S; Dimond, P H; Dif-Pradalier, G; Kwon, J M; Sarazin, Y; Hahm, T S; Garbet, X; Chang, C S; Latu, G; Yoon, E S; Ghendrih, Ph; Yi, S; Strugarek, A; Solomon, W

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Global, heat flux-driven ITG gyrokinetic simulations which manifest the formation of macroscopic, mean toroidal flow profiles with peak thermal Mach number 0.05, are reported. Both a particle-in-cell (XGC1p) and a semi-Lagrangian (GYSELA) approach are utilized without a priori assumptions of scale-separation between turbulence and mean fields. Flux-driven ITG simulations with different edge flow boundary conditions show in both approaches the development of net unidirectional intrinsic rotation in the co-current direction. Intrinsic torque is shown to scale approximately linearly with the inverse scale length of the ion temperature gradient. External momentum input is shown to effectively cancel the intrinsic rotation profile, thus confirming the existence of a local residual stress and intrinsic torque. Fluctuation intensity, intrinsic torque and mean flow are demonstrated to develop inwards from the boundary. The measured correlations between residual stress and two fluctuation spectrum symmetry breakers, namely E x B shear and intensity gradient, are similar. Avalanches of (positive) heat flux, which propagate either outwards or inwards, are correlated with avalanches of (negative) parallel momentum flux, so that outward transport of heat and inward transport of parallel momentum are correlated and mediated by avalanches. The probability distribution functions of the outward heat flux and the inward momentum flux show strong structural similarity

  16. Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

  17. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  18. 31. 4-GHz flux density measurements of a complete sample of sources from the 5-GHz S5 survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geldzahler, B.J.; Kuehr, H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements at 31.4-GHz (9.5-mm) are presented for the complete sample of 66 radio sources with declinations greater than +70/sup 0/ and 5-GHz flux densities greater than 0.5 Jy. About half the sources have the flat radio spectra characteristic of objects with compact components radiating most strongly in the mid-centimeter wavelength range, and about one third show evidence of very compact components (theta< or approx. =0.//0001) radiating at short centimeter wavelengths regardless of morphological type. The median spectral index of all the sources, the quasars alone, and the galaxies alone tends to flatten with increasing frequency for steep spectrum sources, whereas a steepening was found with increasing frequency for the flat spectrum sources.

  19. Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collaboration, IceCube; IceCube Collaboration

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics withAtmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics withat- mospheric neutrino ?ux [46] (without any new physics) is

  20. Optimization of superconducting flux qubit readout using near-quantum-limited amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jedediah Edward Jensen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    junctions . . . . . . . 1.4 Superconducting QuantumInterference 1.5 Superconducting qubits . . . . . . . . .2 Superconducting flux qubits 2.1 The one-junction flux

  1. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  2. Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation EffectsProtection

  3. Medipix2/USB Portable Radiation Camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vykydal, Z.; Holy, T.; Jakubek, J.; Platkevic, M.; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague Horska 3a/22, CZ-12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the field of semiconductor technologies in the last years make possible to develop new types of ionizing radiation detectors. The Medipix2 readout ASIC is an example of such a device. It is the hybrid single photon counting imaging chip (sensor and readout chips are fabricated separately). With an appropriate sensor chip on the top, it can count single X-ray photons, without any noise or dark current, at high fluxes (several Gigaphotons per cm{sup 2} per second). It also offers excellent radiation hardness and good position resolution (256x256 pixels, each pixel has a 55x55 {mu}m{sup 2} area). To make the Medipix2 imaging chip more portable for specific applications a microprocessor controlled read-out system based on the USB (Universal Serial Bus) interface has been developed. It integrates all necessary detector support into one compact device (75x46 mm{sup 2}). All power supplies including sensor bias (up to 100 V) are internally derived from the voltage provided by the USB connection.

  4. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  5. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  6. Reply to `Comment on ``Helmholtz Theorem and the V-Gauge in the Problem of Superluminal and Instantaneous Signals in Classical Electrodynamics" by A. Chubykalo Et Al' by J. A. Heras [FOUND. Phys. Lett. vol. 19(6) p. 579 (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chubykalo; A. Espinoza; R. Alvarado-Flores; A. Gutierrez Rodriguez

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the reply to `COMMENT ON ``HELMHOLTZ THEOREM AND THE V-GAUGE IN THE PROBLEM OF SUPERLUMINAL AND INSTANTANEOUS SIGNALS IN CLASSICAL ELECTRODYNAMICS" BY A. CHUBYKALO ET AL' BY J. A. HERAS [FOUND. PHYS. LETT. vol. 19(6) p. 579 (2006)

  7. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  8. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  9. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  10. Measurements and modeling of soot formation and radiation in microgravity jet diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, J.C.; Tong, L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Greenberg, P.S. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Microgravity Combustion Branch

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. On modeling, the authors have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed {beta}-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude-Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar flames and turbulent jet flames. Predicted soot volume fraction results also agree with the data for 1-g and 0-g laminar jet flames as well as 1-g turbulent jet flames.

  11. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  13. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  14. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiationRadiation Safety Work

  15. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  16. Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (q{sub peak} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 15 MW/m{sup 2}), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D{sub 2} or CD{sub 4} gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m{sup 2}, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic 'security' monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

  17. The Synchronic Frame of Photospheric Magnetic Flux: The Improved Synoptic Frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xuepu

    of the middle panel). Because of the differential rotation of magnetic elements, the solar surface distribution from a synoptic chart do not cover the whole solar surface at any time within the period of one solar transpot models to predict better instantaneous photospheric field distribution on the portions of solar

  18. Magnetic field-line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qiang; Krucker, Sam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field-line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. (2011) based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux-rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the differen...

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

  20. The Dynamics of Flux Tubes in a High Beta Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Vishniac

    1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high $\\beta$ turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter the macroscopic properties of the fluid or the large scale magnetic field. In either case we show that the Sweet-Parker reconnection rate is much faster than an eddy turnover time. Realistic stellar plasmas are expected to either be in the ideal limit (e.g. the solar photosphere) or the resistive limit (most of the solar convection zone). All current numerical simulations of three dimensional MHD turbulence are in the viscous regime and are inapplicable to stars or accretion disks.

  1. Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

  2. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  3. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  4. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  5. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  6. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  7. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  8. Electrically-gated near-field radiative thermal transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yue

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we propose a near-field radiative thermal transistor made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. Thick SiC plates serve as the thermal "source" and "drain", while graphene sheets function as the "gate" to modulate the near-field photon tunneling by tuning chemical potential with applied voltage biases symmetrically or asymmetrically. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials, which can tune the coupling between graphene plasmon across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation, switching, and amplification, which are the key features required for a thermal transistor, are theoretically realized and analyzed. This work will pave the way to active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing.

  9. Type II superconductivity and magnetic flux transport in neutrons stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Jones

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to a type II proton superconductor which is believed to occur in a cooling neutron star is accompanied by changes in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and by the formation of proton vortices with quantized magnetic flux. Analysis of the electron Boltzmann equation for this system and of the proton supercurrent distribution formed at the transition leads to the derivation of a simple expression for the transport velocity of magnetic flux in the liquid interior of a neutron star. This shows that flux moves easily as a consequence of the interaction between neutron and proton superfluid vortices during intervals of spin-down or spin-up in binary systems. The differences between the present analysis and those of previous workers are reviewed and an error in the paper of Jones (1991) is corrected.

  10. Analytical model for flux saturation in sediment transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pähtz, T; Kok, J F; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of sediment by a fluid along the surface is responsible for dune formation, dust entrainment and for a rich diversity of patterns on the bottom of oceans, rivers, and planetary surfaces. Most previous models of sediment transport have focused on the equilibrium (or saturated) particle flux. However, the morphodynamics of sediment landscapes emerging due to surface transport of sediment is controlled by situations out-of-equilibrium. In particular, it is controlled by the saturation length characterizing the distance it takes for the particle flux to reach a new equilibrium after a change in flow conditions. The saturation of mass density of particles entrained into transport and the relaxation of particle and fluid velocities constitute the main relevant relaxation mechanisms leading to saturation of the sediment flux. Here we present a theoretical model for sediment transport which, for the first time, accounts for both these relaxation mechanisms and for the different types of sediment entrain...

  11. Triggering of Remote Flares by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yixing

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between (i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and (ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study on the infl...

  12. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

  13. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

  14. Advancements in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle S. Hickmann; Humberto C. Godinez; Carl J. Henney; C. Nick Arge

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Global maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind and therefore are important predictors of geoeffective events. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over approximately half of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time, this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the implementation of the LETKF into ADAPT. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

  15. Fate of False Vacuum in Superconducting Flux Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Izadi Rad; Hesam Zandi; Mehdi Fardmanesh

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a similarity between the scenario of fate of false vacuum in cosmology at early universe and the situation in where the quantum state decays in superconducting Flux qubit. This is due to the fact that both cases have two homogeneous stable equilibrium states in scalar field, which in quantum theory, could penetrate through the barrier in different possibilities and hence considered unstable decaying in time. In quantum computation, decay rate is among the most important factors in characteristics of the system like coherency, reliability, measurement fidelity, etc. In this considered potential, the decay rate from the penetrating (False vacuum) state to the stable (absolute minimum) state is achieved to leading order in Planck constant by the approach of Instanton model. In case of the superconducting flux qubit having thin barrier potential, the decay rate is calculated and its relations with actual set of parameters in flux qubit design are introduced.

  16. Radiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent; Viskanta, Raymond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. L. Drolen, “Thermal radiation in particulate media withRadiation Characteristics of Glass Containing Gas Bubblesthermophysical properties and radiation characteristics of

  17. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Abstract: A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect...

  18. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary Radiation Shielding Design for BOOMERANG R. J.2003 Abstract Preliminary radiation shielding speci?cationsElectron Photon Stray Radiation from a High Energy Electron

  19. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  20. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straume, Tore

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionizing radiation. In: Advances in Medical Physics (A. B.for medical management of radiation casualties. ADVANCES INMedical Center presented the radiation oncology perspective on biomarkers. Advances

  1. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

  2. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  3. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  4. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  5. Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

  7. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  8. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  9. Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuown, Brian C

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flux sampler. A threaded rod was welded perpendicular to the screen, so that it was parallel to the walls of the canister when installed. To set the height of the PGSs from the sampling surface, a bar accommodating 2 PGSs was machined... and soapy water, then dried at 200 C and wrapped in heavy aluminum foil. 23 Active Surface Flux Samplers. Reference samplers used in the field studies were of 2 types, the active tube sampler described in Chapter III, and a full size EIFC as noted...

  10. Eddy heat fluxes at Drake Passage due to mesoscale motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas Recabal, Ricardo Luis

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDDY HEAT FLUKES AT DRAKE PASSAGE DUE TO MESOSCALE MOTIONS A Thesis by RICARDO LUIS ROJAS RECABAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1982 Major Subject: Oceanography EDDY HEAT FLUXES AT DRAKE PASSAGE DUE TO MESOSCALE NOTIONS A Thesis by RICARDO LUIS ROJAS RECABAL Approved as to style and content by: was )W-~ Member em er May 1982 ABSTRACT Eddy Heat Fluxes at Drake Passage...

  11. DRIVING CURRENTS FOR FLUX ROPE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramanian, Prasad [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Sai Trinity Building, Pashan, Pune 411021 (India); Vourlidas, Angelos [Code 7663, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)], E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for measuring electrical currents enclosed by flux rope structures that are ejected within solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Such currents are responsible for providing the Lorentz self-force that propels CMEs. Our estimates for the driving current are based on measurements of the propelling force obtained using data from the LASCO coronagraphs aboard the SOHO satellite. We find that upper limits on the currents enclosed by CMEs are typically around 10{sup 10} A. We estimate that the magnetic flux enclosed by the CMEs in the LASCO field of view is a few times 10{sup 21} Mx.

  12. The influence of stratus, stratocumulus, and altocumulus clouds on the spectral distribution of solar radiation over Antarctic waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettett, James Eugene

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    function of local solar time. 14 Stratus extinction of solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local solar time. 15 Stratocumulus extinction of solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local... solar time . . . ~ . . . . . ~ . ~ . ~ 53 16 Altocumulus extinction of Solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local solar time 55 LIST OP TABLES Tab le Page Per cent of daily total flux contained in three spectral...

  13. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  14. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  15. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  16. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  17. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  18. NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROTECTIONINSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION PROTECTION ·· ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORYENVIRONMENTAL·· NCSRNCSR ""DEMOKRITOSDEMOKRITOS"" ·· INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY & RADIATION

  19. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

  20. 6, 52315250, 2006 Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the short- wave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effects (CRE), but the impact is small: 0.02 W m-2 tests are conducted to evaluate the impact that5 such an over-layer would have on the radiative effects, terrestrial) radiation. The SW "albedo" effect brings about cooling and the LW "greenhouse" effect warming

  1. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  2. Apparatus and method for OSL-based, remote radiation monitoring and spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Leon Eric (Richland, WA); Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA); Bowyer, Theodore W. (Oakton, VA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact, OSL-based devices for long-term, unattended radiation detection and spectroscopy are provided. In addition, a method for extracting spectroscopic information from these devices is taught. The devices can comprise OSL pixels and at least one radiation filter surrounding at least a portion of the OSL pixels. The filter can modulate an incident radiation flux. The devices can further comprise a light source and a detector, both proximally located to the OSL pixels, as well as a power source and a wireless communication device, each operably connected to the light source and the detector. Power consumption of the device ranges from ultra-low to zero. The OSL pixels can retain data regarding incident radiation events as trapped charges. The data can be extracted wirelessly or manually. The method for extracting spectroscopic data comprises optically stimulating the exposed OSL pixels, detecting a readout luminescence, and reconstructing an incident-energy spectrum from the luminescence.

  3. Apparatus And Method For Osl-Based, Remote Radiation Monitoring And Spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA); Smith, Leon Eric (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact, OSL-based devices for long-term, unattended radiation detection and spectroscopy are provided. In addition, a method for extracting spectroscopic information from these devices is taught. The devices can comprise OSL pixels and at least one radiation filter surrounding at least a portion of the OSL pixels. The filter can modulate an incident radiation flux. The devices can further comprise a light source and a detector, both proximally located to the OSL pixels, as well as a power source and a wireless communication device, each operably connected to the light source and the detector. Power consumption of the device ranges from ultra-low to zero. The OSL pixels can retain data regarding incident radiation events as trapped charges. The data can be extracted wirelessly or manually. The method for extracting spectroscopic data comprises optically stimulating the exposed OSL pixels, detecting a readout luminescence, and reconstructing an incident-energy spectrum from the luminescence.

  4. Oxy-fuel combustion of coal and biomass, the effect on radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, John P.; Patel, Rajeshriben; Riley, Gerry S. [RWEnpower, Windmill Hill Business Park, Whitehill Way, Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 6PB, England (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on results of co-firing coal and biomass under oxy-fuel combustion conditions on the RWEn 0.5 MWt Combustion Test Facility (CTF). Results are presented of radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout measurements. Two coals were fired: a South African coal and a Russian Coal under air and oxy-fuel firing conditions. The two coals were also co-fired with Shea Meal at a co-firing mass fraction of 20%. Shea Meal was also co-fired at a mass fraction of 40% and sawdust at 20% with the Russian Coal. An IFRF Aerodynamically Air Staged Burner (AASB) was used. The thermal input was maintained at 0.5 MWt for all conditions studied. The test matrix comprised of varying the Recycle Ratio (RR) between 65% and 75% and furnace exit O{sub 2} was maintained at 3%. Carbon-in-ash samples for burnout determination were also taken. Results show that the highest peak radiative heat flux and highest flame luminosity corresponded to the lowest recycle ratio. The effect of co-firing of biomass resulted in lower radiative heat fluxes for corresponding recycle ratios. Furthermore, the highest levels of radiative heat flux corresponded to the lowest convective heat flux. Results are compared to air firing and the air equivalent radiative and convective heat fluxes are fuel type dependent. Reasons for these differences are discussed in the main text. Burnout improves with biomass co-firing under both air and oxy-fuel firing conditions and burnout is also seen to improve under oxy-fuel firing conditions compared to air. (author)

  5. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  6. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  7. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  8. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  9. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  10. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  11. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  12. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  13. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  14. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  15. Sequencing of Seven Haloarchaeal Genomes Reveals Patterns of Genomic Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Sequencing of Seven Haloarchaeal Genomes Reveals Patterns of Genomic Flux Erin A. Lynch1 , Morgan G. Eisen1,3,12,13 *, Marc T. Facciotti1,3,14 * 1 Microbiology Graduate Group, University of California We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula

  16. Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave, Cambridge CB3 0EL, United Kingdom ivasconc@gmail.com Abstract: Existing methods for Green's function extraction give the Green's function from the correlation of field fluctuations recorded at those points

  17. Metabolic Flux Analysis for Succinic Acid Production by Recombinant Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    some pyruvate and succinic acid were accumulated intracellularly. Therefore, a new flux analysis method was proposed by introducing intra- cellular pyruvate and succinic acid pools. By this new method dehydrogenase (Mdh). Malic acid can also be synthesized from pyruvate by the action of malic enzyme (coded

  18. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  19. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  20. CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  1. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  2. CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  3. Flux formulation of loop quantum gravity: Classical framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca Dittrich; Marc Geiller

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently introduced a new representation for loop quantum gravity, which is based on the BF vacuum and is in this sense much nearer to the spirit of spin foam dynamics. In the present paper we lay out the classical framework underlying this new formulation. The central objects in our construction are the so-called integrated fluxes, which are defined as the integral of the electric field variable over surfaces of codimension one, and related in turn to Wilson surface operators. These integrated flux observables will play an important role in the coarse graining of states in loop quantum gravity, and can be used to encode in this context the notion of curvature-induced torsion. We furthermore define a continuum phase space as the modified projective limit of a family of discrete phase spaces based on triangulations. This continuum phase space yields a continuum (holonomy-flux) algebra of observables. We show that the corresponding Poisson algebra is closed by computing the Poisson brackets between the integrated fluxes, which have the novel property of being allowed to intersect each other.

  4. High flux heat transfer in a target environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

  5. Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Eugene

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to November, 2008. These data were supplemented with 621 profiles gathered from an extensive review of the aeolian literature. From the field experiment, the analysis of the grain-size statistics for the flux caught in each trap shows that a reverse in grain...

  6. Confinement and the Short Type I' Flux Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the recent world-sheet analysis of the quantum fluctuations of a short flux tube in type II string theory leads to a simple and precise description of a pair of stuck D0branes in an orientifold compactification of the type I' string theory. The existence of a stable type I' flux tube of sub-string-scale length is a consequence of the confinement of quantized flux associated with the scalar dualized ten-form background field strength *F_{10}, evidence for a -2brane in the BPS spectrum of M theory. Using heterotic-type I duality, we infer the existence of an M2brane of finite width O(\\sqrt{\\alpha'}) in M-theory, the strong coupling resolution of a spacetime singularity in the D=9 twisted and toroidally compactified E_8 x E_8 heterotic string. This phenomenon has a bosonic string analog in the existence of a stable short electric flux tube arising from the confinement of photons due to tachyon field dynamics. The appendix clarifies the appearance of nonperturbative states and enhanced gauge symmetry in toroidal compactifications of the type I' string. We account for all of the known disconnected components of the moduli space of theories with sixteen supercharges, in striking confirmation of heterotic-type I duality.

  7. CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  8. High flux reactor PIK to be at PNPI. Scientific program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    High flux reactor PIK to be at PNPI. Scientific program V.V.Fedorov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Venus Pavilion fire-lookout tower #12;General view of the reactor PIK buildings #12;The project of PIK of 60-th, but till now it does not become out of date and now used for all modern reactors. In 1991

  9. CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING SEDIMENTATION classification: 35L65, 35R30, 65M32 1. Introduction 1.1. Scope. The sedimentation of small particles dispersed length scales (diameter and depth) of the settling vessel. Moreover, sedimentation models

  10. CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING SEDIMENTATION RAIMUND B¨URGERA AND STEFAN DIEHLB, Abstract. Sedimentation of a suspension of small particles dispersed. Introduction 1.1. Scope. The sedimentation of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid under the influence

  11. Rotation in classical zero-point radiation and in quantum vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yefim S. Levin

    2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two reference systems (RS) are defined and used as the basis for investigating thermal effects of rotation through both random classical zero point radiation and quantum vacuum. Both RSs consist of an infinite number of instantaneous global inertial reference frames (RF). The RFs do not accompany the detector and are defined so that at each moment of proper time of the detector there are two RFs belonging with different RSs. These RFs agree momentarily, are connected by a Lorentz transformation with the detector velocity as a parameter, and with origins at the detector location at the same proper time. The two- field correlation functions (CF) measured by the observer rotating through a random classical zero point radiation have been calculated and presented in terms of elementary functions for both electromagnetic and massless scalar fields. If the CFs are periodic with a period of rotation the observer finds the spectrum which is very similar, but not identical, to Plank spectrum. If both fields of such a two-field periodic CF, for both electromagnetic and massless scalar case, are taken at the same point then its convergent part is shown, using Abel-Plana summation formula, to have Planck spectrum with the temperature T= hw/k, where w is an angular velocity of the detector. It is shown that the vacuum of the quantized massless scalar field in rotating RS is not equivalent to the vacuum of the field in the laboratory system because the respective Bogolubov transformation is not a zero.

  12. A convective-radiative heat transfer model for gas core reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Anghaie, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective-radiative heat transfer model is developed and used to predict the temperature distribution in gaseous fuel nuclear reactor cores. The axisymmetric, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with diffusive radiation source term are the basis for this modeling approach. An algebraic turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to model the radiative heat transfer. A hybrid implicit-explicit numerical scheme with Gauss-Seidel iterative process and a highly stretched grid system near wall is employed to solve the governing equations. Several cases with different internal heat generation rates are modeled and analyzed. Results of the temperature distribution, wall heat flux and the associated Nusselt number are presented. The influence of the internal heat generation rate and the wall temperature on the radiative and convective wall heat fluxes are discussed. At gas and wall temperatures close to 3,500 K and 1,600 K, respectively, the radiative and convective heat transfer rates have similar values.

  13. Radiation detector using a bulk high T.sub.c superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Artuso, Joseph F. (Santa Barbara, CA); Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Hull, Kenneth L. (Ventura, CA); Symko, Orest G. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector (10) is provided, wherein a bulk high T.sub.c superconducting sample (11) is placed in a magnetic field and maintained at a superconducting temperature. Photons of incident radiation will cause localized heating in superconducting loops of the sample destroying trapped flux and redistributing the fluxons, and reducing the critical current of the loops. Subsequent cooling of the sample in the magnetic field will cause trapped flux redistributed Abrikosov fluxons and trapped Josephson fluxons. The destruction and trapping of the fluxons causes changes in the magnetization of the sample inducing currents in opposite directions in a pickup coil (12) which is coupled by an input coil (15) to an rf SQUID (16).

  14. Simulations of Pregalactic Structure Formation with Radiative Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marie E. Machacek; Greg L. Bryan; Tom Abel

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the high redshift collapse of pregalactic clouds including feedback effects from a soft H2 photodissociating UV radiation field. The simulations use an Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement technique to follow the nonequilibrium chemistry of nine chemical species with cosmological initial conditions drawn from a popular Lambda-dominated cold dark matter model. The results confirm that the soft UV background can delay the cooling and collapse of small halos (~10^6 Msun). For reasonable values of the photo-dissociating flux, the H2 fraction is in equilibrium throughout most of the objects we simulate. We determine the mass threshold for collapse for a range of soft-UV fluxes and also derive a simple analytic expression. Continuing the simulations beyond the point of initial collapse demonstrates that the fraction of gas which can cool depends mostly on the virial mass of the halo and the amount of soft-UV flux, with remarkably little scatter. We parameterize this relation, for use in semi-analytic models.

  15. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide COURSE...

  16. POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip Lubin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a 45° angle. Radiation whose electric field (polarization)radiation field, it can be uniquely characterized by its electric

  17. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  18. Global aspects of radiation memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Winicour

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

  19. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  20. A GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL FOR GASEOUS EXOPLANETS WITH DOUBLE-GRAY RADIATIVE TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauscher, Emily [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new version of our code for modeling the atmospheric circulation on gaseous exoplanets, now employing a 'double-gray' radiative transfer scheme, which self-consistently solves for fluxes and heating throughout the atmosphere, including the emerging (observable) infrared flux. We separate the radiation into infrared and optical components, each with its own absorption coefficient, and solve standard two-stream radiative transfer equations. We use a constant optical absorption coefficient, while the infrared coefficient can scale as a power law with pressure; however, for simplicity, the results shown in this paper use a constant infrared coefficient. Here we describe our new code in detail and demonstrate its utility by presenting a generic hot Jupiter model. We discuss issues related to modeling the deepest pressures of the atmosphere and describe our use of the diffusion approximation for radiative fluxes at high optical depths. In addition, we present new models using a simple form for magnetic drag on the atmosphere. We calculate emitted thermal phase curves and find that our drag-free model has the brightest region of the atmosphere offset by {approx}12 Degree-Sign from the substellar point and a minimum flux that is 17% of the maximum, while the model with the strongest magnetic drag has an offset of only {approx}2 Degree-Sign and a ratio of 13%. Finally, we calculate rates of numerical loss of kinetic energy at {approx}15% for every model except for our strong-drag model, where there is no measurable loss; we speculate that this is due to the much decreased wind speeds in that model.

  1. Evaluation of GCM Column Radiation Models Under Cloudy Conditions with The Arm BBHRP Value Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Lazaros Oreopoulos and Dr. Peter M. Norris

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of the project was to improve the transfer of solar and thermal radiation in the most sophisticated computer tools that are currently available for climate studies, namely Global Climate Models (GCMs). This transfer can be conceptually separated into propagation of radiation under cloudy and under cloudless conditions. For cloudless conditions, the factors that affect radiation propagation are gaseous absorption and scattering, aerosol particle absorption and scattering and surface albedo and emissivity. For cloudy atmospheres the factors are the various cloud properties such as cloud fraction, amount of cloud condensate, the size of the cloud particles, and morphological cloud features such as cloud vertical location, cloud horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity and cloud shape and size. The project addressed various aspects of the influence of the above contributors to atmospheric radiative transfer variability. In particular, it examined: (a) the quality of radiative transfer for cloudless and non-complex cloudy conditions for a substantial number of radiation algorithms used in current GCMs; (b) the errors in radiative fluxes from neglecting the horizontal variabiity of cloud extinction; (c) the statistical properties of cloud horizontal and vertical cloud inhomogeneity that can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes; (d) the potential albedo effects of changes in the particle size of liquid clouds; (e) the gaseous radiative forcing in the presence of clouds; and (f) the relative contribution of clouds of different sizes to the reflectance of a cloud field. To conduct the research in the various facets of the project, data from both the DOE ARM project and other sources were used. The outcomes of the project will have tangible effects on how the calculation of radiative energy will be approached in future editions of GCMs. With better calculations of radiative energy in GCMs more reliable predictions of future climate states will be attainable, thus affecting public policy decisions with great impact to public life.

  2. SATURATION OF THE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN STRONGLY RADIATION-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Yanfei; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Davis, Shane W. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Toronto, ON M5S3H4 (Canada)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The saturation level of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in a strongly radiation-dominated accretion disk is studied using a new Godunov radiation MHD code in the unstratified shearing box approximation. Since vertical gravity is neglected in this work, our focus is on how the MRI saturates in the optically thick mid-plane of the disk. We confirm that turbulence generated by the MRI is very compressible in the radiation-dominated regime, as found by previous calculations using the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We also find little difference in the saturation properties in calculations that use a larger horizontal domain (up to four times the vertical scale height in the radial direction). However, in strongly radiation pressure dominated disks (one in which the radiation energy density reaches {approx}1% of the rest mass energy density of the gas), we find that Maxwell stress from the MRI turbulence is larger than the value produced when radiation pressure is replaced with the same amount of gas pressure. At the same time, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress is increased by almost a factor of eight compared with the gas pressure dominated case. We suggest that this effect is caused by radiation drag, which acts like bulk viscosity and changes the effective magnetic Prandtl number of the fluid. Radiation viscosity significantly exceeds both the microscopic plasma viscosity and resistivity, ensuring that radiation-dominated systems occupy the high magnetic Prandtl number regime. Nevertheless, we find that radiative shear viscosity is negligible compared to the Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress in the flow. This may have important implications for the structure of radiation-dominated accretion disks.

  3. Systematic errors in ground heat flux estimation and their correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    Incoming radiation forcing at the land surface is partitioned among the components of the surface energy balance in varying proportions depending on the time scale of the forcing. Based on a land-atmosphere analytic continuum ...

  4. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  5. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  6. Solar radiation intensity calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , radiation per unit area per unit time, on a flat-plate collector is given by: I = I cos B (2. 1a) where I is the solar constant. insolation received at one astro- nomical unit from the sun. Since clear sky conditions are assumed I o w i 1 1 b e a.... INSOLATION EQUATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page III. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 25 47 48 52 Vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE I. Optimal Inclination for Ap=O, No Checks for Ip &0 and a Time Independent Solar Constant. II. Optimal...

  7. Radiative ?(1S) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    — wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30— ~ 20— LLI IO— hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

  8. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  9. Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects

  10. Radiation Safety Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation

  11. Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

  12. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  13. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D ? PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  14. Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

  15. Predicting low-frequency radio fluxes of known extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grießmeier, J -M; Spreeuw, H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Close-in giant extrasolar planets (''Hot Jupiters'') are believed to be strong emitters in the decametric radio range. Aims. We present the expected characteristics of the low-frequency magnetospheric radio emission of all currently known extrasolar planets, including the maximum emission frequency and the expected radio flux. We also discuss the escape of exoplanetary radio emission from the vicinity of its source, which imposes additional constraints on detectability. Methods. We compare the different predictions obtained with all four existing analytical models for all currently known exoplanets. We also take care to use realistic values for all input parameters. Results. The four different models for planetary radio emission lead to very different results. The largest fluxes are found for the magnetic energy model, followed by the CME model and the kinetic energy model (for which our results are found to be much less optimistic than those of previous studies). The unipolar interaction model does ...

  16. Solar wind driven plasma fluxes from the Venus ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-de-Tejada, H; Barabash, S; Zhang, T L; Sauvaud, J A; Durand-Manterola, H J; Reyes-Ruiz, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements conducted with the ASPERA-4 instrument and the magnetometer of the Venus Express spacecraft show that the dynamic pressure of planetary O+ ion fluxes measured in the Venus wake can be significantly larger than the local magnetic pressure and, as a result, those ions are not being driven by magnetic forces but by the kinetic energy of the solar wind. Beams of planetary O+ ions with those properties have been detected in several orbits of the Venus Express through the wake as the spacecraft traverses by the noon-midnight plane along its near polar trajectory. The momentum flux of the O+ ions leads to superalfvenic flow conditions. It is suggested that such O+ ion beams are produced in the vicinity of the magnetic polar regions of the Venus ionosphere where the solar wind erodes the local plasma leading to plasma channels that extend downstream from those regions.

  17. Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

  18. Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  19. Explosive flux compression generators for rail gun power sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; King, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of explosive magnetic flux compression generators is described that has been used successfully to power rail guns. A program to increase current magnitudes and pulse lengths is outlined. Various generator loss terms are defined and plans to overcome some of them are discussed. Included are various modifications of the conventional strip generators that are more resistant to undesirable expansion of generator components from magnetic forces. Finally, an integral rail gun is discussed that has coaxial geometry. Integral rail guns utilize the rails themselves as flux compression generator elements and, under ideal conditions, are theoretically capable of driving projectiles to arbitrarily high velocities. Integral coaxial rail guns should be superior in some regards to their square bore counterparts.

  20. Resonance at the Rabi frequency in a superconducting flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Ya. S. [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Il'ichev, E.; Oelsner, G. [common Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Shevchenko, S. N. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, Kharkov, Ukraine and V. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a system composed of a superconducting flux qubit coupled to a transmission-line resonator driven by two signals with frequencies close to the resonator's harmonics. The first strong signal is used for exciting the system to a high energetic state while a second weak signal is applied for probing effective eigenstates of the system. In the framework of doubly dressed states we showed the possibility of amplification and attenuation of the probe signal by direct transitions at the Rabi frequency. We present a brief review of theoretical and experimental works where a direct resonance at Rabi frequency have been investigated in superconducting flux qubits. The interaction of the qubit with photons of two harmonics has prospects to be used as a quantum amplifier (microwave laser) or an attenuator.