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1

Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InstalledCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Installed Capacity (MW) or also known as Total Generator Nameplate Capacity (Rated Power) Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

2

Installed Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Capacity Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Installed Geothermal Capacity International Market Map of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants List of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants Throughout the world geothermal energy is looked at as a potential source of renewable base-load power. As of 2005 there was 8,933 MW of installed power capacity within 24 countries. The International Geothermal Association (IGA) reported 55,709 GWh per year of geothermal electricity. The generation from 2005 to 2010 increased to 67,246 GWh, representing a 20% increase in the 5 year period. The IGA has projected that by 2015 the new installed capacity will reach 18,500 MW, nearly 10,000 MW greater than 2005. [1] Countries with the greatest increase in installed capacity (MW) between

3

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

4

installed capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

installed capacity installed capacity Dataset Summary Description Estimates for each of the 50 states and the entire United States show Source Wind Powering America Date Released February 04th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated April 13th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords annual generation installed capacity usa wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Wind potential data (xls, 102.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments

5

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

6

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andprof id=pjoskow. Capacity Markets for Electricity [13]Utility Commission- Capacity Market Questions, available at

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

WINDExchange: U.S. Installed Wind Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

The animation shows the progress of installed wind capacity between 1999 and 2013. The Energy Department's annual Wind Technologies Market Report provides information about wind...

8

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

9

Help Your Employer Install Electric Vehicle Charging | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Help Your Employer Install Electric Vehicle Charging Help Your Employer Install Electric Vehicle Charging Help Your Employer Install Electric Vehicle Charging Educate your employer...

10

Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spain_Installed_Wind_Capacity_Website&oldid=514562"

11

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

12

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

13

Install Electric Vehicle Charging at Work  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Employers who install workplace charging for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) demonstrate leadership, show a willingness to adopt advanced technology, and increase consumer exposure and access to...

14

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

15

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Installed Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + 1 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + 22 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + 2 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + 10 + MHK Projects/Alaska 36 + 10 + MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project + 16 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + 300 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 0 +

16

Property:EZFeed/InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EZFeed/InstalledCapacity Property Type String Description EZFeed Installed Capacity property Subproperties This property has the following 6079 subproperties: 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) 4 401 Certification (Vermont) A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs (West Virginia) AEP Appalachian Power - Residential Home Retrofit Program (West Virginia)

17

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

18

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

19

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix H. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

20

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: U.S. Installed Wind Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Education Education Printable Version Bookmark and Share Learn About Wind About Wind Power Locating Wind Power Getting Wind Power Installed Wind Capacity Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Installed Wind Capacity This page has maps of the United States that show installed wind capacity by state and its progression. This map shows the installed wind capacity in megawatts. As of September 30, 2012, 51,630 MW have been installed. Alaska, 16 MW; Hawaii, 112 MW; Washington, 2,699 MW; Oregon, 3,153 MW; California, 4,570 MW; Nevada, 152; Idaho, 675 MW; Utah, 325 MW; Arizona, 238 MW; Montana, 395 MW; Wyoming, 1,410 MW; Colorado, 1,805 MW; New Mexico, 778 MW; North Dakota, 1,469 MW; South Dakota, 784 MW; Nebraska, 337 MW; Kansas, 1,877 MW; Oklahoma, 2,400 MW; Texas, 10,929 MW; Minnesota, 2,717 MW; Iowa, 4,536 MW; Missouri, 459 MW; Wisconsin, 636 MW; Illinois, 3,055 MW; Tennessee, 29 MW; Michigan, 515 MW; Indiana, 1,343 MW; Ohio, 420 MW; West Virginia, 583 MW; Pennsylvania, 1,029 MW; Maryland, 120 MW; Delaware, 2 MW; New Jersey, 9 MW; New York, 1,418 MW; Vermont, 46 MW; New Hampshire, 125 MW; Massachusetts, 64 MW; Rhode Island, 3 MW; Maine, 397 MW.

22

Installed Geothermal Capacity/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Geothermal Capacity/Data Installed Geothermal Capacity/Data < Installed Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus Aidlin Geothermal Facility Geothermal Steam Power Plant Calpine Geysers Geothermal Area 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW 2 1989 Amedee Geothermal Facility Binary Cycle Power Plant Amedee Geothermal Venture Honey Lake, California 1.6 MW1,600 kW 1,600,000 W 1,600,000,000 mW 0.0016 GW 1.6e-6 TW 2 1988 BLM Geothermal Facility Double Flash Coso Operating Co. Coso Junction, California, 90 MW90,000 kW 90,000,000 W

23

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

24

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project examples Install new HVAC, electrical, fire protection, and plumbing systems in Mechanical. · Totransformthisspaceandincreaseaccessibility, anelevatorisrequired.Currently,Blakelydoesnot haveone. Replace HVAC and electrical system

Blanchette, Robert A.

25

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 56 Pagination 210 - 220 ISSN 0378-7788 Keywords Advanced Technology Demonstration, building design, Building heat transfer, cool roof, energy efficiency, Energy Performance of Buildings, energy savings, Energy Usage, energy use, Heat Island Abstract Reflective roofs can reduce demand for air conditioning and warming of the atmosphere. Roofs can also host photovoltaic (PV) modules that convert sunlight to electricity. In this study we assess the effects of installing a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof on an office building in Yuma, AZ. The system consists of thin film PV laminated to a white membrane, which lies above a layer of insulation. The solar absorptance of the roof decreased to 0.38 from 0.75 after installation of the BIPV, lowering summertime daily mean roof upper surface temperatures by about 5 °C. Summertime daily heat influx through the roof deck fell to ±0.1 kWh/m2from 0.3-1.0 kWh/m2. However, summertime daily heat flux from the ventilated attic into the conditioned space was minimally affected by the BIPV, suggesting that the roof was decoupled from the conditioned space. Daily PV energy production was about 25% of building electrical energy use in the summer. For this building the primary benefit of the BIPV appeared to be its capacity to generate electricity and not its ability to reduce heat flows into the building. Building energy simulations were used to estimate the cooling energy savings and heating energy penalties for more typical buildings.

26

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

27

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System July 2, 2012 - 8:22pm Addthis Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System What does this mean for me? When installing a wind system, the location of the system, the energy budget for the site, the size of the system, and the height of the tower are important elements to consider. Deciding whether to connect the system to the electric grid or not is also an important decision. If you went through the planning steps to evaluate whether a small wind electric system will work at your location, you will already have a general idea about: The amount of wind at your site The zoning requirements and covenants in your area The economics, payback, and incentives of installing a wind system

28

Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System July 2, 2012 - 8:21pm Addthis When choosing a contractor, ask about their work record, experience, and licenses, and get more than one bid for the installation of your PV system. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. When choosing a contractor, ask about their work record, experience, and licenses, and get more than one bid for the installation of your PV system. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. How does it work? Making sure your home solar electric or PV system is sized, sited, and installed correctly is essential for maximizing its energy performance. As with any mechanical or electrical appliance, PV systems require routine, periodic maintenance.

29

Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Home Solar Electric System July 2, 2012 - 8:21pm Addthis When choosing a contractor, ask about their work record, experience, and licenses, and get more than one bid for the installation of your PV system. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. When choosing a contractor, ask about their work record, experience, and licenses, and get more than one bid for the installation of your PV system. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. How does it work? Making sure your home solar electric or PV system is sized, sited, and installed correctly is essential for maximizing its energy performance. As with any mechanical or electrical appliance, PV systems require routine, periodic maintenance.

30

Permit for Charging Equipment Installation: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Compliance with the following permit will allow the installation and operation of electric vehicle charging equipment at a Compliance with the following permit will allow the installation and operation of electric vehicle charging equipment at a residence in the City, State jurisdiction. This permit addresses one of the following situations: Only an additional branch circuit would be added at the residence A hard-wired charging station would be installed at the residence. The attached requirements for wiring the charging station are taken directly out of the 2011 edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC) NFPA 70, Article 625 Electric Vehicle Charging System. This article does not provide all of the information necessary for the installation of electric vehicle charging equipment. Please refer to the current edition of the electrical code adopted by the local jurisdiction for additional installation requirements. Reference to the 2011 NEC may be

31

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity Anna Creti, LEEERNA, University of Toulouse for Electricity Anna Creti LEEERNA, University of Toulouse Natalia Fabra Universidad Carlos III de Madrid February 2004 Abstract The creation of electricity markets has raised the fundamental question as to whether

California at Berkeley. University of

32

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

33

NSTAR (Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NSTAR (Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program NSTAR (Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program NSTAR (Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 70% of the total project cost Provider NSTAR The NSTAR Small Business Solutions Program offers incentives for business customers whose average monthly demand is 300 kW or less. The first step of the program is a free energy audit to identify potential energy saving

34

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Open versus closed loop capacity equilibria in electricity markets ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 7, 2012 ... Abstract: We consider two game-theoretic models of the generation capacity expansion problem in liberalized electricity markets. The first is an...

S. Wogrin

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

37

Electrical installations in oil shale mines. Open file report 21 Sep 81-13 Aug 83  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents recommended guidelines and regulatory changes applicable to electrical installations in underground oil shale mines. These recommendations are based on information gathered from oil shale operators, government agencies, and other knowledgeable sources familiar with existing plans for mining systems and electrical installations, and on present understanding of the problems and hazards associated with oil shale mining. Additional discussions of specific electrical problems related to oil shale mining include ground fault current levels, permissible electric wheel motors, permissible batteries and electric starting systems, intrinsically safe instrumentation, and applicability of existing test standards.

Gillenwater, B.B.; Kline, R.J.; Paas, N.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Jobs: Electric Vehicle Charging Station Installer | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

-- here an electric vehicle owner uses a local charging station. | Photo Courtesy of the Energy Department. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of...

39

Maximizing the Value of Photovoltaic Installations on Schools in California: Choosing the Best Electricity Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schools in California often have a choice between multiple electricity rate options. For schools with photovoltaic (PV) installations, choosing the right rate is essential to maximize the value of PV generation. The rate option that minimizes a school?s electricity expenses often does not remain the most economical choice after the school installs a PV system. The complex interaction between PV generation, building load, and rate structure makes determining the best rate a challenging task. This report evaluates 22 rate structures across three of California?s largest electric utilities--Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)--in order to identify common rate structure attributes that are favorable to PV installations.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SECTION 01000SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractors responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York) ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Survey: Free Programmable Thermostat: Free Equipment Upgrades Identified in Energy Survey: Con Edison will pay up to 70% of the remaining cost directly to the contractor ConEd is providing free energy surveys to its small business customers. The survey will take 30 to 90 minutes and efficiency opportunities and associated costs will be presented on the spot. If the customer agrees to

42

Betting on Chinese electric cars? analysing BYD's capacity for innovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article will examine some of the reasons why the automobile industry in China has become the subject of so much interest in recent years. In particular, it will focus on its capacity for innovation through an in-depth study of one company: the BYD group. The article will examine the growth of the group and trace the development of the innovative strategies that have helped it to become a significant player in the electric car market. It will highlight three particular levels at which innovation has taken place, the organisational, human resource management and technological levels, and will analyse how these innovations interrelate to the overall breakthrough strategy of BYD. The article concludes with some observations about the capacity of BYD to continue to innovate, prosper and grow using its existing strategy.

Hua Wang; Chris Kimble

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations (Presentation), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations NDIA Joint Service Power Expo Mike Simpson Mike.Simpson@NREL.gov 5 May 2011 NREL/PR-5400-51519 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Agenda 2 1. NREL Transportation Research 2. Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEI) 3. Fort Carson as a Case Study - Vehicles On-Site - Utility Operations - Vehicle Charge Management 4. Full Fleet Simulation 5. Continuing Work NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY NREL is the only national laboratory solely dedicated to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency. Our employees are committed to building a cleaner, sustainable world. Photo Credits: NREL 3 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY What is Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI)? 4 Cross Cutting Enablers Grid / Renewables

44

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Capacity (MW) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro,813 Large Hydro 11,890 11,755 11,755 12,114 12,103 12,194 11,945 12,226 12,226 12,257 12,297 12,297 Small 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Energy (GWh) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro Natural Gas Nuclear Geothermal

45

Capacity Constrained Supply Function Equilibrium Models of Electricity Markets: Stability, Non-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-089 Capacity Constrained Supply Function Equilibrium Models of Electricity Markets: Stability of an electricity market where strategic firms have capacity constraints. We show that if firms have heterogeneous of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;Capacity

California at Berkeley. University of

46

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal electric vehicle (EV) policies in the United States currently include vehicle purchase subsidies linked to EV battery capacity and subsidies for installing charging stations. We assess the cost-effectiveness of increased battery capacity vs. nondomestic charging infrastructure installation for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks, and \\{SUVs\\} in the US. We find across a wide range of scenarios that the least-cost solution is for more drivers to switch to low-capacity plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (short electric range with gasoline backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are needed per vehicle, nondomestic charging infrastructure installation is substantially more expensive than increased battery capacity per gallon saved, and both approaches have higher costs than US oil premium estimates. Cost effectiveness of all subsidies are lower under a binding fuel economy standard. Comparison of results to the structure of current federal subsidies shows that policy is not aligned with fuel savings potential, and we discuss issues and alternatives.

Scott B. Peterson; Jeremy J. Michalek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modelling of an integrated gas and electricity network with significant wind capacity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The large scale integration of wind generation capacity into an electricity network poses technical as well as economic challenges. In this research, three major challenges (more)

Qadrdan, Meysam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra Ignacio;2 Motivation of this work · Deregulation of the electricity markets caused electricity prices to be highly? (retrofit) · Challenge: Multi-scale nature of the problem! Hourly varying electricity prices vs. 10-15 years

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

49

Feature extraction and classification for detecting the thermal faults in electrical installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposed an effort to investigate the suitability of input features and classifier for identifying thermal faults within electrical installations. The features are extracted from the thermal images of electrical equipment and classified using a multilayered perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network and support vector machine (SVM). In the experiments, the classification performances from various input features are evaluated. The commonly used classification performance indices, including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under curve (AUC), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and F-score are employed to identify the most suitable input feature as well as the best configuration of classifiers. The experimental results demonstrate that the combination of features set Tmax, Tdelta and \\{DTbg\\} produce the best input feature for thermal fault detection. In addition, the implementation of SVM using radial basis kernel function (RBF) produces slightly better performance than the MLP artificial neural network.

Mohd Shawal Jadin; Soib Taib; Kamarul Hawari Ghazali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Open versus closed loop capacity equilibria in electricity markets ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ity expansion problem in liberalized electricity markets. The first is an open loop equilibrium model, where generation companies simultaneously choose.

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

First installation of an electrical submersible pump in a subsea well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As offshore oil fields are being developed towards deeper and deeper waters, new technologies are required to curb capital expenditures. In Brazil, where oil consumption is increasing and huge oil fields lie in high water depths, the issue is particularly pressing. Earlier and higher oil production from those oil fields could be attained by the use of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESP), so far restricted to dry completions. Also longer distances from well to platform would be made practical. For the initial phase of this development, Petrobras worked together with Tronic, Reda, Pirelli, Lasalle, Sade-Vigesa and Cooper. As a result, first-in-the-world ESP installation in a subsea well has been successfully achieved on October/1994 in RJS-221, located at Carapeba Field, Campos Basin, Brazil.

Mendonca, J.E.; Hodge, R.C.; Izetti, R. [Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nicholson, A.; Dwiggins, J.L.; Morrison, D.; Cia, M.; Alfano, P.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Did English generators play cournot? : capacity withholding in the electricity pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pricing and Technology Options: An Analysis of Ontario Electricity Capacity Requirements and GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many jurisdictions face the problem of having to reduce GHG emissions and new electricity capacity requirements. Ontario...2, SO2 and NOx emissions under different technologies. We also introduce transfer of dem...

Pierre-Olivier Pineau; Stephan Schott

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a 66 kV electrical substation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a 66 kV electrical substation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

U.S. Electric Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual net electric summer capacity (in megawatts) for the United States, broken down by renewable energy source (e.g. biomass, solar thermal/pv) and the nonrenewable total. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Electric Capacity geothermal PV solar thermal Summer wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_Net.Summer.Elec_.Capacity_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 11.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

57

Preliminary estimates of electrical generating capacity of slim holes--a theoretical approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of using small geothermal generators (< 1 MWe) for off-grid electrical power in remote areas or for rural electrification in developing nations would be enhanced if drilling costs could be reduced. This paper examines the electrical generating capacity of fluids which can be produced from typical slim holes (six-inch diameter or less), both by binary techniques (with downhole pumps) and, for hotter reservoir fluids, by conventional spontaneous-discharge flash-steam methods. Depending mainly on reservoir temperature, electrical capacities from a few hundred kilowatts to over one megawatt per slim hole appear to be possible.

Pritchett, John W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

58

Solar Power: Using Photovoltaics to Preserve California's Electricity Capacity Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Power Authority (CPA) is committed to increasing the use of renewable energy supplies--such as photovoltaics and wind--as a hedge against price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas. The CPA wants to own and operate an adequate supply of reserve generation that: - Can be deployed quickly in response to severe summer peak loads, unexpected loss of base and intermediate generation units, and failure of critical transmission facilities; - Will minimize the reliance on spot market purchases during periods when the State is most vulnerable to price gouging from private generators.

Herig, C..

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Researches regarding the electric energy quality on high requency electrothermal installation with electromagnetic induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study regarding the functioning of a melting/hardening electrothermal installation with electromagnetic induction from the point of view of generated harmonics in the power distribution. The authors made simulations in scope of ... Keywords: electrothermal installation, harmonic, passive filters, static converter

Raluca Rob; Ioan Sora; Caius Panoiu; Manuela Panoiu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Impacts of unilateral capacity remunerative mechanisms on cross-border electricity trade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the impacts of capacity remunerative mechanisms (CRMs) on electricity cross-border trade. As an example case, we focus on the cross-border electricity trade between the Nordic and Russian electricity markets. These two markets have distinctively different market designs. The Nordic market is an energy-only market that rewards the electricity generators for the output they produce. The Russian market rewards generators for the output and availability of electricity generation. We analyse the prospects for the cross-border electricity trade between the two markets. Our findings suggest that the different market designs notably reduce the cross-border electricity trade between the two markets and also have significant impacts on the distribution of welfare amongst the consumers and producers. These results have significant implications because many European countries are currently considering unilateral CRMs. An obvious threat is that the particularly uncoordinated CRMs cause impediments to the cross-border electricity trade, and result in inefficient use of the interconnectors. Such a development could severely hinder the achievement of the internal electricity market in Europe.

Olga Gore; Satu Viljainen; Kalevi Kyläheiko; Ari Jantunen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MISSION The mission of the Electricity Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in implementing the Energy Policy Act of 2005, executing the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure. ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE GOALS The goals of the Electricity Advisory Committee are to provide advice on: * Electricity policy issues pertaining to the U.S. Department of Energy * Recommendations concerning U.S. Department of Energy electricity programs and initiatives * Issues related to current and future capacity of the electricity delivery system (generation, transmission, and distribution, regionally and nationally)

63

AN OPTIMIZED TWO-CAPACITY ADVANCED ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP S. E. Veyo, Manager, Heat Exchange Systems Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AN OPTIMIZED TWO-CAPACITY ADVANCED ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP S. E. Veyo S. E. Veyo, Manager, Heat Exchange Systems Research Westinghouse Electric Corporation, R&D Center 1310 Beulah Road Pittsburgh, PA 15235 KEYWORDS: heat pump, air conditioner, electric, residential, energy, compressor, fan, blower, heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

64

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there at least intuitively could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATEWIDE ELECTRICITY AND DEMAND CAPACITY SAVINGS FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF IECC CODE IN TEXAS: ANALYSIS FOR SINGLE?FAMILY RESIDENCES 11th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations New York City, October 18 ? 20, 2011 Hyojin...&M University System Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC Code in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 2 Outline Introduction Methodology Base?Case Building Results Summary Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Estimating SCR installation costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EUCG surveyed 72 separate US installations of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired units totalling 41 GW of capacity to identify the systems' major cost drivers. The results, summarized in this article, provide excellent first-order estimates and guidance for utilities considering installing the downstream emissions-control technology. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Marano, M.; Sharp, G. [American Electric Power (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The New 1999 National Electrical Code Coupled with New Standards Clarify Requirements for Installations of Photovoltaic Systems in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Electrical Code@ (NEC@) focuses primarily on electrical system installation requirements in the U.S. The NEC addresses both fire and personnel safety. This paper will describe recent efforts of the PV industry in the U.S. and the resulting requirements in the 1999 National Electrical Code-- Article 690 --Solar Photovoltaic Systems. The Article 690 requirements spell out the PV-unique requirements for safe installations of PV systems in the U.S.A. This paper provides an overview of the most significant changes that appear in Article 690 of the 1999 edition of the NEC. The related and coordinated efforts of the other standards- making groups will also be briefly reviewed.

Bower, W.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceElectrical Engineering and Computer Science Many-to-One Transport Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceElectrical Engineering and Computer Science Daniel Marco, Enrique J. Duarte-Melo Mingyan Liu, David L. Neuhoff Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Michigan, Ann Arbor #12;2 Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceElectrical

Liu, Mingyan

71

High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are neededCost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b

Michalek, Jeremy J.

73

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Capacity mechanisms for the long-term security of supply in electricity markets: an experimental study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??At the first years of deregulation, the academic discussion was first oriented to discuss the short-term efficiency and competitiveness of the electricity markets. Now, after (more)

Lara Arango, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

MEW Efforts in Reducing Electricity and Water Consumption in Government and Private Sectors in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers, membership No. 1715. MEW EFFORTS IN REDUCING ELECTRICITY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN KUWAIT Eng. Iqbal Al-Tayar Manager ? Technical Supervision Department Planning and Training Sector Ministry... of Electricity & Water (MEW) - Kuwait Historical Background - Electricity ? In 1913, the first electric machine was installed in Kuwait to operate 400 lambs for Al-Saif Palace. ? In 1934, two electric generators were installed with a total capacity of 60 k...

Al-Tayar, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

National standards and code compliance for electrical equipment and instruments installed in hazardous locations for the cone penetrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cone penetrometer is designed to measure the material properties of waste tank contents at the Hanford Site. The penetrometer system consists of a skid-mounted assembly, a penetrometer assembly (composed of a guide tube and a push rod), an active neutron moisture measurement probe, decontamination unit, and a support trailer containing a diesel-engine-driven hydraulic pump and a generator. The skid-mounted assembly is about 8 feet wide by 23 feet long and 15 feet high. Its nominal weight is about 40,000 pounds with the provisions to add up to 54,500 pounds of additional ballast. This document describes the cone penetrometer electrical instruments and how it complies with national standards.

Bussell, J.H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

CO2 mitigation costs for new renewable energy capacity in the Mexican electricity sector using renewable energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide mitigation costs for the Mexican power sector are calculated in order to compare the business as usual (BAU) scenario, based on natural gas capacity growth, to a transition scenario where electricity generation growth using natural gas after 2007 is replaced by renewable energies (solar, wind, hydro and biomass). The mitigation costs are obtained using the following parameters: natural gas price, discount rate and technological progress. The latter is expressed in terms of the anticipated decrease in capital costs, as reported in electricity generation technological literature. Our results show that when technological progress is considered, CO2 mitigation costs decrease rapidly from 14 $/tCO2 (in this paper $ express 1997 US dollars and t means metric tons) to zero when the price of natural gas nears 2.68 $/GJ, (for some readers, it can be useful to know that 1.0 US$1997/GJ is 1.19 US$2001/MMBTU) which is almost the same as the 2002 price. This means that for middle natural gas prices a no regrets situation can be achieved. Our results also show that for prices higher than 2.80 $/GJ, the incorporation of the technological progress parameter transforms the transition scenario into a no regrets scenario for all the discount rate values considered in this study.

Jorge Islas; Fabio Manzini; Manuel Mart??nez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Residential Solar Photovoltaic Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Hampshire Electric Co-op (NHEC) is offering rebates for residential, grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems up to one megawatt (MW) in capacity. The rebate is equal to 20% of the installed cost of...

79

Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007 Title Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007 Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2009 Authors Wiser, Ryan H., Galen L. Barbose, and Carla Peterman Pagination 42 Date Published 02/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, power system economics, renewable energy Abstract As installations of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have grown, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of these systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. This report helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems in the United States from 1998 through 2007. The report is based on an analysis of installed cost data from nearly 37,000 residential and non-residential PV systems, totaling 363 MW of capacity, and representing 76% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the U.S. through 2007.

80

Acknowledgments We thank Emily Zhang and Tim Giesbrecht for electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to attach additional solar panels and battery storage, the output load and capacity of the system can of Nyobok-Nkunzesi must travel to neighbouring towns which have access to electricity. Solar electricity has already proven to be a good source of power in the community through the installation of solar powered

Chau, Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scale solar capacity being announced, mainly in Californiasolar capacity installation has largely been dominated by California.

Deshmukh, Ranjit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c vehicles (BEVs), create additional electricity demand, resulting in additional air emissions from powerEstimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce

Michalek, Jeremy J.

84

PNNL Reports Distributed Wind Installations Down, Exports Up...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

soon to be published by DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a cumulative installed capacity of 842 MW at...

85

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER POWER INFRASTRUCTURE, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER POWER INFRASTRUCTURE, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to provide enhanced electrical service to the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) to provide an increased power capacity for future facility computational developments. Location of Action: The electrical service would be installed underground via excavation in the lawn and gravel area between EMSL, room 1145, west toward the northeast comer of the Biological Sciences Facility (BSF), in Richland, Washington. The excavation would also extend north-south for about 450 feet along the property line between EMSL and BSF. Please refer to Figure 1.

86

Tracking the Sun III The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracking the Sun III The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from Tracking the Sun III The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2009 Title Tracking the Sun III The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2009 Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Naïm Darghouth, and Ryan H. Wiser Pagination 54 Date Published 12/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords distributed energy resources (der), electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy markets, photovoltaics Abstract As the deployment of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has increased, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of these systems over time and by location, customer type, system characteristics, and component. This report helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost1 of grid-connected PV systems in the United States from 1998 through 2009 (updating two previous reports with data through 2007 and 2008, respectively), and providing preliminary cost trends for systems installed in 2010. The analysis is based on installed cost data for approximately 78,000 residential and non-residential PV systems, totaling 874 megawatts (MW) and representing 70% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2009.

87

Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment \ Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska U. S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 16 17 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado May 1998 Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska U. S . Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado May 1998 Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Assessment Kotzebue Wind Installation Project Kotzebue, Alaska F'INDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for KOTZEBUE WIND INSTALLATION PROJECT KOTZEBUE, ALASKA AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE is proposing to provide financial .assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska.

88

Life Cycle Environmental Impact of High-Capacity Lithium Ion Battery with Silicon Nanowires Anode for Electric Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The grid electricity used in this analysis is average U.S. electricity mix with 89.56% of nonrenewable energies. ... The results demonstrate that the major opportunity for reducing the life cycle impacts of the battery pack is to use clean energy supply for battery operation, such as solar and wind electricity, which could reduce these environmental impacts significantly. ... All the above analyses including the life cycle inventory analysis, impact analysis, uncertainty, and sensitivity analysis together confirm that the LIB pack using SiNW anode from metal-assisted chemical etching could have environmental impacts comparable with those of conventional battery pack, while significantly increasing the battery energy storage and extending the driving range of EVs in the future. ...

Bingbing Li; Xianfeng Gao; Jianyang Li; Chris Yuan

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Abstract--One of the major problems for the massive applicability of Electric Vehicles (EVs) is the scarce capacity of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this context, solar energy is not a practical solution for satisfying this lack of energy. However Vehicle Electric Propulsion, Solar Energy I. INTRODUCTION NE of the major barriers for the applicability, solar energy [4] is not a practical solution for satisfying this lack of energy, due

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

91

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

92

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

93

Tracking the Sun II The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracking the Sun II The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from Tracking the Sun II The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2008 Title Tracking the Sun II The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2008 Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2009 Authors Wiser, Ryan H., Galen L. Barbose, Carla Peterman, and Naïm Darghouth Pagination 150 Date Published 10/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, power system economics, renewable energy Abstract As the deployment of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has increased, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of these systems over time and by location, customer type, system characteristics, and component. This report helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems in the United States from 1998 through 2008 (updating a previous report with data through 2007). The analysis is based on installed cost data from more than 52,000 residential and non-residential PV systems, totaling 566 MW and representing 71% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the U.S. through 2008.

94

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR INSTALLING A PHOTOVOLTAIC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-PNSO-0657 -PNSO-0657 CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR INSTALLING A PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER GENERATION ARRAY AND ELECTRIC CAR CHARGING STATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL MOLECULAR SCIENCES LABORATORY, PACIFIC NORTHWEST SITE OFFICE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed Action The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to install a photovoltaic power generation array and electric car charging stations. Location of Action The proposed action would occur in a landscaped infiltration swale located immediately

95

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

96

Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Electric Buy Down Program Solar Electric Buy Down Program Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $20,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentives step down over time as installed capacity goals are met. Check program web site for current incentive level. '''Rebate levels as of 9/20/12:''' Residential: $2.00/watt AC Commercial (up to 100 kW): $1.10/watt AC Commercial (>100 kW to 1 MW): $0.15/kWh for 5 years Provider Silicon Valley Power Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers incentives for the installation of new grid-connected solar electric (photovoltaic, or PV) systems. Incentive levels will step down over the life of the program as certain installed

97

Telecommunications Frontier Client Installation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Telecommunications Frontier Client Installation 1. Fax the completed form to 979.847.1111. 2 Signature Date Telecommunications Office Use Only Service Due Date: Installation Cost: Billed To: Print Form

98

SC: Install units produced by the high performance RTU challenge | The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions Teams » Space Conditioning » Install units Technology Solutions Teams » Space Conditioning » Install units produced by the High Performance Rooftop Unit Challenge that meet the high performance rooftop unit specification Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Install units produced by the High Performance Rooftop Unit Challenge that meet the high performance rooftop unit specification In January 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined industry partners in the Better Buildings Alliance to release a design specification for 10-ton capacity commercial air conditioners, also known as rooftop units (RTUs).

99

Installer Issues: Integrating Distributed Wind into Local Communities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A presentation for the WindPower 2006 Conference in Pittsburgh, PA, regarding the issues facing installer of small wind electric systems.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Installation and Acceptance Stage  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter addresses activities required to install the software, data bases, or data that comprise the software product onto the hardware platform at sites of operation.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar installer's training program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Instructions are given for the installation of solar domestic water heating systems, space heating systems, and pool heating systems. The basic procedures for installing any solar heating system are presented with reference to solar domestic hot water systems, and the space and pool systems are taught on that basis. (LEW)

Schmidt, W.J.; Philbin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

103

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

104

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Adoption for Single-Family Residences in Texas (2002-2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report is the continuation of the previous 2011 Statewide Electricity Savings report from code-compliant, single-family residences built between 2002 and 2009. Statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Solar Installation Contractor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternate Title(s):General Contractor, Electrical or Plumbing Contractor, Construction Manager, Project Superintendant

106

HVAC Installed Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HVAC Installed Performance HVAC Installed Performance ESI, Tim Hanes Context * The building envelope has historically been the focus in residential homes. * The largest consumer of energy in residential homes is typically the HVAC system. * Testing the performance of the HVAC system has not been pursued to its full potential. Technical Approach * Currently very little performance testing is being done to the HVAC system. * The only way to know if a HVAC system is operating correctly is to measure the Btu/h. * This should be done at the equipment and at the the system. Recommended Guidance * Training of HVAC technicians, installers, and salespeople is a must. * If only the technician is trained than implementing the change will not happen. * Public awareness of proper installation and its

107

HVAC Installed Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question HVAC proper installation energy savings: over-promising or under-delivering?"

108

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations

109

Electricity investments and development of power generation capacities : An approach of the drivers for investment choices in Europe regarding nuclear energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In a context of growing energy prices and climate change mitigation, the thesis addresses the issues of investments in power generation capacities and in particular (more)

Shoai Tehrani, Bianka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on AddThis.com...

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

114

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

115

Fundamentals of Capacity Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whereas capacity planning determines in advance the capacities required to implement a production program, capacity control determines the actual capacities implemented shortly beforehand. The capacity control...

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Hermann Ldding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The method for determining the ball load and the grinding capacity of a ball-tube mill from the power consumed by its electric motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method for determining the ball load and the grinding capacity from the power consumed by the ball-tube mill under operating and emptying conditions is presented. The implementation of this method when gri...

L. V. Golyshev; I. S. Mysak

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

EEI/DOE Transmission Capacity Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: PRESENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS Eric Hirst Consulting in Electric-Industry Restructuring Bellingham, Washington June 2004 Prepared for Energy Delivery Group Edison Electric Institute Washington, DC Russell Tucker, Project Manager and Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC Larry Mansueti, Project Manager ii iii CONTENTS Page SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: DATA AND PROJECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HISTORICAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CURRENT CONDITIONS . . . . . . .

118

Generation capacity expansion in restructured energy markets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With a significant number of states in the U.S. and countries around the world trading electricity in restructured markets, a sizeable proportion of capacity expansion (more)

Nanduri, Vishnuteja

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Property:USGSMeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Assessment of the United States. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For...

120

Reshaping the electricity supply industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cigre`s Electra magazine published this interview with Alfonso Limbruno, CEO of ENEL S.p.A. To put the interview in perspective, this article begins with a brief overview of ENEL and a biographical sketch of Alfonso Limbruno, and also carries comments from Y. Thomas, secretary general of CIGRE. ENEL is a vertically integrated nationwide electricity company engaged in the generation, transmission, distribution, and sale of electricity, predominantly in Italy. ENEL`s share accounts for approximately 80 percent of Italian electricity demand. Measured by amount of electricity sold, ENEL is the third largest electric utility in the OECD countries and the second largest electric utility in Europe. Measured by revenues, ENEL is one of the largest companies in Italy, with a turnover of Lit. 37,632 billion. In 1995, ENEL served approximately 28.5 million customers and sold 211,607 GWh of electricity. ENEL`s gross installed generating capacity at December 31, 1995 was 55,906 MW. Alfonso Limbruno made all his career in the Italian electricity supply industry (ESI) and has had quite a unique experience: he went through a complete cycle of change of the ESI in his country, the nationalization of the sector in 1962 with the merging in ENEL of over 1,200 undertakings, and now the privatization of the company, along with a far reaching restructuring of the industry. He was appointed CEO of ENEL in August 1992.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

123

electricAl engineering College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encompasses telecommunica- tions, electrical power generation, transmission and distribution, control systems power engineers design and oversee the construction, installation and maintenance of electrical systems modern power electronic devices to control power generation and distribution and build electric drives

Hartman, Chris

124

Influence of the lanthanum deficit on electrical resistivity and heat capacity of silver-doped lanthanum manganites La{sub 1-x}Ag{sub y}MnO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity and heat capacity of the silver-doped lanthanum manganites La{sub 0.80}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.85}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} have been investigated. Despite the nonstoichiometry of the composition, the La{sub 0.80}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganite exhibits a bulk homogeneity and better physical properties from the applied point of view as compared to the La{sub 0.85}Ag{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganite, viz., the former compound has a higher spontaneous magnetoresistance and a larger jump of the heat capacity with a small width of the phase transition, and the anomalies of the heat capacity and electrical resistivity in the vicinity of the Curie point of this compound agree with the fluctuation nature of the second-order phase transition. The behavior of the properties of lanthanum-deficient manganites under investigation in the region of the phase transition is consistent with the classical theory of indirect exchange interaction. The behavior of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity has been analyzed in terms of two models. One of these models is based on the tunneling of charge carriers between ferrons or polarons, and the other model is based on the polaron hopping conduction. Both approaches lead to consistent results, and their combination has made it possible to estimate the tunneling distance of charge carriers. The origin of the influence of technological parameters characterizing the synthesis of La{sub 1-x}Ag{sub y}MnO{sub 3} ceramic materials on their physical properties has been elucidated.

Abdulvagidov, Sh. B., E-mail: abdulvagidov@iwt.ru; Gamzatov, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Amirkhanov Institute of Physics, Dagestan Scientific Center (Russian Federation); Mel'nikov, O. V.; Gorbenko, O. Yu. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Telecommunications Keyless Entry Hardware Install  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Telecommunications Keyless Entry Hardware Install 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you Telecommunications Office Use Only Service Due Date: Installation Cost: Billed To: Print Form #12;

126

Tampa Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Tampa Electric Co is a utility company located in Tampa Bay, Florida. Tampa Electric Co. supplies power to 667,000 customers across residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, and has a generating capacity of 4,400 megawatts of power.[1] Contents 1 News 2 Utility Rate Schedules 3 Average Rates 4 References News http://en.openei.org/wiki/Tampa_Electric_Co_(Florida) Big Bend Coal Station On June 3rd, the Tampa Electric Co announced that it had completed a $1.2 billion upgrade specifically geared toward reducing future emissions from the Big Bend coal station. This marks the end of a 10-year $1.2 billion upgrade program which centers around the installation of selective catalytic reduction devices. These devices take the emissions traveling up

127

Property:Incentive/InstallReqs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstallReqs InstallReqs Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/InstallReqs Property Type Text Description Installation Requirements. Pages using the property "Incentive/InstallReqs" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs (West Virginia) + Self-installed measures with a rebate level greater than $1,000 and all applications over $20,000, and 5% of remaining applicants will be inspected. Funds can be reserved for a period of 180 days as long as the application includes an expected date of project completion. Customer must have an active account in WV with either Wheeling Power Company, American Electric Power or Appalachian Power Company.

128

Installation Guide 1. PREFACE .................................................................................................................................................... 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AoC Installation Guide #12;Contents 1. PREFACE....................................................................................................................................................... 4 3.2 AOC............................................................................................................................................................. 4 3.3 AOC ADMIN

Natvig, Lasse

129

DOE Transmission Capacity Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transmission Capacity Report Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report: Transmission lines, substations, circuit breakers, capacitors, and other equipment provide more than just a highway to deliver energy and power from generating units to distribution systems. Transmission systems both complement and substitute for generation. Transmission generally enhances reliability; lowers the cost of electricity delivered to consumers; limits the ability of generators to exercise market power; and provides flexibility to protect against uncertainties about future fuel prices, load growth, generator construction, and other factors affecting the electric system. DOE Transmission Capacity Report More Documents & Publications Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

130

Solar amp Electric Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

amp Electric Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar & Electric Solutions Place: Santa Cruz, California Zip: 95062 Sector: Solar Product: Small solar installation firm in...

131

GC GUIDANCE ON ELECTRIC VEHICLE RECHARGING STATIONS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Several National Laboratory contractors have asked whether appropriated funds may be used to reimburse cost of installing electric vehicle recharging stations and to pay electricity bill costs...

132

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Highway Electric Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway

133

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

HTAR Client Configuration and Installation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Configuration and Installation Configuration and Installation HTAR Configuration and Installation HTAR is an archival utility similar to gnu-tar that allows for the archiving and extraction of local files into and out of HPSS. Configuration Instructions This distribution has default configuration settings which will work for most environments. If you want to use the default values (recommended) you can skip to the section labeled INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS. In certain environments, for example if your installation is on a machine which has more than one network interface, you may want to change some of these default settings. To help with this, an interactive Configure script is provided. To use it do $ ./Configure prior to installing. Configure will provide a description of the options

135

Energy Secretary Chu Announces Five Million Smart Meters Installed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Announces Five Million Smart Meters Installed Announces Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide as Part of Grid Modernization Effort Energy Secretary Chu Announces Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide as Part of Grid Modernization Effort June 13, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - At a White House Grid Modernization event today, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that more than five million smart meters have been installed nationwide as part of Recovery Act-funded efforts to accelerate modernization of the Nation's electric grid. Smart meters will provide utility companies with greater information about how much electricity is being used throughout their service areas. They will also give consumers access to real-time information about their energy consumption, allowing them to make well-informed decisions about how

136

Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide August 31, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Columbus, OH - At an event today at Battelle headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that two million smart grid meters have been installed across the country, helping to reduce energy costs for families and businesses. As a result of funding from the Recovery Act, smart grid technology is speeding the modernization of the nation's electrical grid, helping to reduce the amount of time needed to respond to energy disruptions and enable consumers to monitor their energy consumption and costs. So far, more than 180,000 smart meters have been installed in Ohio. "As a result of an unprecedented investment from the Recovery Act, smart

137

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

138

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

139

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Planned Community and Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Digg

140

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Renewable energy sources in the Egyptian electricity market: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review paper presents an appraisal of renewable energy RE options in Egypt. An appraisal review of different \\{REs\\} is presented. The study shows that electric energy produced from \\{REs\\} in Egypt are very poor compared with other energy sources. The utilization of the renewable energies can also be a good opportunity to fight the desertification and dryness in Egypt which is about 60% of Egypt territory. The rapid growth of energy production and consumption is strongly affecting and being affected by the Egyptian economy in many aspects. It is evident that energy will continue to play an important role in the development of Egypt's economy in coming years. The total installed electricity generating capacity had reached around 22025MW with a generating capacity reached 22605MW at the end of 2007. Hydropower and coal has no significant potential increase. During the period 1981/822004/05 electricity generation has increased by 500% from nearly 22TWh for the year 1981/1982 to 108.4TWh in the year 2004/2005 at an average annual growth rate of 6.9%. Consequently, oil and gas consumed by the electricity sector has jumped during the same period from around 3.7 MTOE to nearly 21 MTOE. The planned installed capacity for the year 2011/2012 is 28813MW and the required fuel (oil and gas) for the electricity sector is estimated to reach about 29 MTOE by the same year. The renewable energy strategy targets to supply 3% of the electricity production from renewable resources by the year 2010. Electrical Coverage Electrical energy has been provided for around 99.3% of Egypt's population, representing a positive sign for the welfare of the Egyptian citizen due to electricity relation to all development components in all walks of life. The article discusses perspectives of wind energy in Egypt with projections to generate ? 3.5GWe by 2022, representing ?9% of the total installed power at that time (40.2GW). Total renewables (hydro+wind+solar) are expected to provide ?7.4GWe by 2022 representing ? 19% of the total installed power. Such a share would reduce dependence on depleting oil and gas resources, and hence improve country's sustainable development.

A. Ibrahim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids with high levels of wind power?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Day-ahead load and wind power forecasts provide useful information for operational decision making, but they are imperfect and forecast errors must be offset with operational reserves and balancing of (real time) energy. Procurement of these reserves is of great operational and financial importance in integrating large-scale wind power. We present a probabilistic method to determine net load forecast uncertainty for day-ahead wind and load forecasts. Our analysis uses data from two different electric grids in the US with similar levels of installed wind capacity but with large differences in wind and load forecast accuracy, due to geographic characteristics. We demonstrate that the day-ahead capacity requirements can be computed based on forecasts of wind and load. For 95% day-ahead reliability, this required capacity ranges from 2100 to 5700MW for ERCOT, and 1900 to 4500MW for MISO (with 10 GW of installed wind capacity), depending on the wind and load forecast values. We also show that for each MW of additional wind power capacity for ERCOT, 0.160.30MW of dispatchable capacity will be used to compensate for wind uncertainty based on day-ahead forecasts. For MISO (with its more accurate forecasts), the requirement is 0.070.13MW of dispatchable capacity for each MW of additional wind capacity.

Brandon Mauch; Jay Apt; Pedro M S Carvalho; Paulina Jaramillo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

145

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

146

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

147

Electric Services in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Institution of Electrical Engineers on October 22. In the early days, electrical installations in buildings were for lighting and bells. Wood casing was used, and, so far as ... equipment were placed anywhere where they would be out of sight. Now new and larger buildings are being erected all over the country, and electrical contractors are having difficulty in ...

1936-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Magnet Girder Assembly and Installation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

It takes teamwork to assemble and install magnet girders for the storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source II. NSLS-II is now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential economic benefits of the growing renewable energy sector have led to increased federal, state, and local investments in solar industries, including federal grants for expanded workforce training for U.S. solar installers. However, there remain gaps in the data required to understand the size and composition of the workforce needed to meet the demand for solar power. Through primary research on the U.S. solar installation employer base, this report seeks to address that gap, improving policymakers and other solar stakeholders understanding of both the evolving needs of these employers and the economic opportunity associated with solar market development. Included are labor market data covering current U.S. employment, expected industry growth, and employer skill preferences for solar installation-related occupations. This study offers an in-depth look at the solar installation sectors. A study published by the Solar Foundation in October 2011 provides a census of labor data across the entire solar value chain.

Friedman, B.; Jordan, P.; Carrese, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Foldtrack Installation in C-110  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crews successfully installed a new and improved version of the Foldtrack into tank C-110, a single-shell tank with about 17,200 gallons of waste remaining.

152

Tripling the capacity of wireless communications using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

channels of electric-®eld polarization for wireless communication. In order to make our statements more................................................................. Tripling the capacity of wireless .............................................................................................................................................. Wireless communications are a fundamental part of modern information infrastructure. But wireless bandwidth

153

Definition: Deferred Generation Capacity Investments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Capacity Investments Generation Capacity Investments Utilities and grid operators ensure that generation capacity can serve the maximum amount of load that planning and operations forecasts indicate. The trouble is, this capacity is only required for very short periods each year, when demand peaks. Reducing peak demand and flattening the load curve should reduce the generation capacity required to service load and lead to cheaper electricity for customers.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, peak demand, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Deferred_Generation_Capacity_Investments&oldid=50257

154

Definition: Nameplate Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Nameplate Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Nameplate Capacity The maximum amount of electric energy that a generator can produce under specific conditions, as rated by the manufacturer. Generator nameplate capacity is expressed in some multiple of watts such as megawatts (MW), as indicated on a nameplate that is physically attached to the generator.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Capacity Related Terms electricity generation, power References ↑ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/basic-ref/glossary/generator-nameplate-capacity.html Retr LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Nameplate_Capacity&oldid=480378"

155

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

156

Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs April 2, 2010 - 2:42pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar panels. The new roofs saves $20,000 a year in energy costs. Built on the end of the Mokapu Peninsula on Oahu's northeast coast, the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay gets plenty of sunlight. But harnessing that sunlight to create renewable electricity was considered too expensive to be practical - until 2008. That's when MCBH took advantage of planned maintenance funding to help offset the high cost of installing photovoltaic panels on the base. As a military entity, MCBH can't directly take advantage of federal or state

157

Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider May 29, 2013 - 3:18pm Addthis Home solar systems can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22168. Home solar systems can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22168. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read these considerations for installing a home solar electric system to evaluate whether it is a good choice for your home. Well, it's that time of year! Days are getting longer and the weather is getting warmer. How can you take advantage of longer sunlight hours? Dinner on your porch might be one good solution, but an even better one might be

158

Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs April 2, 2010 - 2:42pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar panels. The new roofs saves $20,000 a year in energy costs. Built on the end of the Mokapu Peninsula on Oahu's northeast coast, the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay gets plenty of sunlight. But harnessing that sunlight to create renewable electricity was considered too expensive to be practical - until 2008. That's when MCBH took advantage of planned maintenance funding to help offset the high cost of installing photovoltaic panels on the base. As a military entity, MCBH can't directly take advantage of federal or state

159

Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider Home Solar Installations: Things to Consider May 29, 2013 - 3:18pm Addthis Home solar systems can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22168. Home solar systems can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22168. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read these considerations for installing a home solar electric system to evaluate whether it is a good choice for your home. Well, it's that time of year! Days are getting longer and the weather is getting warmer. How can you take advantage of longer sunlight hours? Dinner on your porch might be one good solution, but an even better one might be

160

Economic Issues in South American Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dispatch ­ final small consumers (under 2 MW) to receive long term spot price (moving average spot price installed capacity (30% thermo y 70% hydro) 23954 GWh net yearly generation (24,9% thermo & 75,1% hydro) 93% of population Residential / Industrial demand 1290 MW installed capacity (99% thermo y 1% hydro) 6392 GWh net

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

electrical, engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in groundbreaking community solar project PMC-based technology products enter the market Expanding our capacity: new learning educational gaming energy-efficient data storage and computing health informatics haptic education K-12 STEM electrical energy storage thermal energy storage and conversion energy production

Zhang, Junshan

162

Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

Levinson, David M.

163

Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

164

Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

165

Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Installation Labor Installation Labor Market Analysis Barry Friedman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Philip Jordan Green LMI Consulting John Carrese San Francisco Bay Area Center of Excellence Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49339 December 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Solar Installation Labor Market Analysis Barry Friedman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Philip Jordan Green LMI Consulting John Carrese San Francisco Bay Area Center of Excellence

167

Process Improvement at Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pressed, and the cans are then placed on a conveyor belt. On this conveyor belt, which constitutes one of the production bottlenecks, a plastic cap and starter cap is installed in each can. The final steps for each can include installing the lid... each fuse. Load and Packout When the cans arrive at the Load and Packout building, they are manually removed and loaded on to both sides of a conveyor belt. The conveyor transports the cans to the tape and stencil machine where they are hand...

Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

168

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Refinery Capacity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum...

170

Property:Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Capacity Property Type Quantity Description Potential electric energy generation, default units of megawatts. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

171

STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-25-HERS Refrigerant Charge Verification ­ Standard to refrigerant charge verification for compliance, a MECH-24 Certificate (instead of this MECH-25 Certificate) should be used to demonstrate compliance with the refrigerant charge verification requirement. TMAH

172

STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-26-HERS Refrigerant Charge Verification ­ Alternate are specified in Reference Residential Appendix RA3.2. If refrigerant charge verification is requiredR-MECH-26-HERS Refrigerant Charge Verification ­ Alternate Measurement Procedure (Page 2 of 3) Site

173

ADA Requirements for Workplace Charging Installation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Best Practices for installing PEV charging stations in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

174

Electric Power Monthly, June 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The Electric Power Monthly contains information from three data sources: the Form EIA-759, 'Monthly Power Plant Report'; the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, 'Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants{sup ;} and the Form EIA-826, {sup M}onthly Electric Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions'. The Form EIA-759 collects data from all operators of electric utility generating plants (except those having plants solely on standby), approximately 800 of the more than 3,200 electric utilities in the United States. To reduce the reporting burden for utilities, the FERC Form 423 and Form EIA-826 data are based on samples, which cover less than 100 percent of all central station generating utilities. The FERC Form 423 collects data from steam-electric power generating plants with a combined installed nameplate capacity of 50 megawatts or larger (approximately 230 electric utilities). The 50-megawatt threshold was established by FERC. The Form EIA-826 collects sales and revenue data in the residential, commercial, industrial, and other sectors of the economy. Other sales data collected include public street and highway lighting, other sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, and interdepartmental sales. Respondents to the Form EIA-826 were statistically chosen and include approximately 225 privately and publicly owned electric utilities from a universe of more than 3,200 utilities. The sample selection for the Form EIA-826 is evaluated annually. Currently, the Form EIA-826 data account for approximately 83 percent of the electricity sales in the United States. Sources of data are described in more detail in the Technical Notes of the Electric Power Annual (DOE/EIA-0348).

NONE

1988-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Largest On-Campus Solar Facility Being Installed at William Paterson...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a 1.2 million Recovery Act grant, deploying a new fleet of electric cars, and installing light sensors in buildings. Stephen says the energy savings achieved through the solar...

176

Property:PlannedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlannedCapacity PlannedCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PlannedCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The total planned capacity for a given area, region or project. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

177

Property:MeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanCapacity MeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

178

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Installation: up to $5,000 Electric Water Heater and Installation: up to $5,000 Electric Heating Equipment: up to $5,000 Heat Pump Installation: up to $5,000 Weatherization: up to $1,500 Provider Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative

179

Tracking the Sun VII: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the deployment of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has increased, so too has the desire to track the cost and price of these systems. This report helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed price of grid-connected PV systems in the United States from 1998 through 2013, with partial data for the first half of 2014. The analysis is based on project-level data for more than 300,000 individual residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV systems installed across 33 states and representing 80% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2013. It is essential to note at the outset what the data presented within this report represent. First, the data consist of prices paid to project developers or installers (prior to receipt of any incentives), and for a variety of reasons, those prices may differ from the underlying costs borne by project developers/installers. Second, the data are historical, focusing primarily on projects installed through the end of 2013, and therefore do not reflect the price of projects installed more recently (with the exception of the limited set of results presented for systems installed in the first half of 2014); nor are the data indicative of prices currently being quoted for prospective projects to be installed at a later date. For these reasons and others, the results presented in this report may differ from current PV price or cost benchmarks. Third, by focusing on the up-front price paid by the PV system owner prior, the report does not capture trends associated with PV performance or other factors that impact the levelized cost of electricity for PV. Finally, the underlying data collected for this report include third party owned (TPO) projects where either the system is leased to the site-host or the generation output is sold to the site-host under a power purchase agreement. For a subset of TPO systems, the installed price data represent appraised values rather than transaction prices, and those projects were removed from the data sample in order to eliminate any associated bias. The report presents one set of installed price trends for residential and commercial PV systems, and another set for utility-scale PV. In all cases, installed prices are identified in terms of real 2013 dollars per installed watt (DC-STC), prior to receipt of any direct financial incentives or tax credits. This report separately summarizes installed price data for utility-scale PV projects, drawing upon data also presented in LBNLs companion report, Utility Scale Solar 2013: An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost, Performance, and Pricing Trends in the United States. For our purposes, utility-scale PV is defined to consist of ground-mounted projects larger than 5 MW. The sample of installed price data includes 97 projects with commercial operation dates spanning the period 2007- 2013. Several important features of the utility-scale data are worth noting, in addition to those noted earlier for the dataset as a whole. First, the sample includes only fully operational projects for which all individual phases are in operation and treats all phases as a single project with a commercial operation date based on the final phase. Second, installed prices reported for utility-scale projects often reflect transactions that occurred several years before project completion; the prices reported for some of these projects may not fully capture recent reductions in module costs or other changes in market conditions, and thus may exhibit a relatively large temporal lag.

Barbose, Galen; Weaver, Samantha; Darghouth, Naim

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Turbine Electric Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Electric Power Inc Sector: Vehicles Product: US-based, holder of the 'exclusive worldwide rights' to install, sell, market and distribute a new 'high tech' micro turbine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric District No. 3- Solar Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electric District No. 3 of Pinal County (ED3) provides incentives for their residential and business customers to invest in photovoltaics (PV). Residential and commercial customers installing PV...

182

Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from (more)

Rubin, Ofir David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from 2000 (more)

Rubin, Ofir David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

Collaboration/ University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Definition: Capacity Benefit Margin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefit Margin Benefit Margin Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Benefit Margin The amount of firm transmission transfer capability preserved by the transmission provider for Load- Serving Entities (LSEs), whose loads are located on that Transmission Service Provider's system, to enable access by the LSEs to generation from interconnected systems to meet generation reliability requirements. Preservation of CBM for an LSE allows that entity to reduce its installed generating capacity below that which may otherwise have been necessary without interconnections to meet its generation reliability requirements. The transmission transfer capability preserved as CBM is intended to be used by the LSE only in times of emergency generation deficiencies.[1] Related Terms

186

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

187

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

188

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems up to 30 kW have the option of receiving an expected performance based buydown (EPBB) or a performance based incentive (PBI). Systems larger than 30 kW are only eligible for the PBI. EPBB (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $1.40/watt AC Commercial and all PPAs: $0.85/watt AC Non-profits and Government: $1.60/watt AC Income-qualified residential: $4.00/watt PBI (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $0.212/kWh Commercial and all PPAs: $0.129/kWh

189

Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Installation and Performance to Installation and Performance to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Installation and Performance on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Installation and Performance Photo of a group of men moving a rectangular solar panel. Energy Secretary Steven Chu watches members of the Solar Instructor

191

Microsoft Word - NO-MM-827 New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 building).docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MM-827 MM-827 Title: New Orleans Emergency Generator Installation (900 Building) Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to relocate the New Orleans emergency generator at the 900 building, to install a new Automatic Transfer Switch, and to provide generator status alarms. Tasks includes construction of a new concrete slab foundation, relocation of the existing portable generator from the trailer to the foundation, electrical installation of the generator, installation of fencing around the generator, and miscellaneous architectural work. Some of the existing equipment and components being dismantled, removed or demolished have been designated for government salvage. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021)

192

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for

193

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electric Power Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first prototype of a floating...wind turbine was constructed in December 2007. A wind turbine with a capacity of 80 kW was installed on an offshore platform within 10.6 nautical miles of the south Italy coast...

Dr. Sergey M. Govorushko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Automated solar collector installation design  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON DOE 2012 ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON DOE 2012 ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY JANUARY 2012 The Iowa Utilities Board (Board) is pleased to provide these comments as the Department of Energy (DOE) commences its next transmission congestion study (2012). These comments are organized to give DOE a perspective on electric transmission issues in Iowa - transmission planning, congestion, and siting. Iowa has been a leader in wind generation installation as well as manufacturing of wind turbines. Iowa has the second most installed wind capacity of any state. Since the DOE 2009 congestion study, Iowa added 884 MW of wind generation in 2009 -2010. MidAmerican Energy Company (MidAmerican), an Iowa investor owned utility added 593.5 MW in 2011 and plans to

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Natural gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 38,488 7 Electric Utilities 29,293 3...

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,520 6 Electric Utilities 10,739 26...

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,781 49 Electric Utilities 8 50 Independent...

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alabama Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,547 9 Electric...

203

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MROWECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,057 45 Electric Utilities 3,428 36 Independent...

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRORFCSERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,146 5 Electric Utilities 5,274 34...

205

Environmental assessment: Kotzebue Wind Installation Project, Kotzebue, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE is proposing to provide financial assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska. Like many rural Alaska towns, Kotzebue uses diesel-powered generators to produce its electricity, the high cost of which is currently subsidized by the Alaska State government. In an effort to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce dependence on diesel fuel, and reduce air pollutants, the DOE is proposing to fund an experimental wind installation to test commercially available wind turbines under Arctic conditions. The results would provide valuable information to other Alaska communities experiencing similar dependence on diesel-powered generators. The environmental assessment for the proposed wind installation assessed impacts to biological resources, land use, electromagnetic interference, coastal zone, air quality, cultural resources, and noise. It was determined that the project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Property:GeneratingCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeneratingCapacity GeneratingCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeneratingCapacity Property Type Quantity Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

207

ACS Installation During SM3B Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACS Installation During SM3B Introduction: · Installed during SM3B in March 2002 · Powerful 3rd · Over-voltage Protection kit installed · Optical Control Electronics connected · New Outer Blanket Layer, and coronagraph ­ Solar Blind Channel (SBC) : HST's most sensitive ultraviolet photon-counting detector 115-180 nm

Sirianni, Marco

208

ATLAS Installation Guide R. Clint Whaley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS Installation Guide R. Clint Whaley November 2, 2007 Abstract This note provides a brief overview of ATLAS, and describes how to install it. It includes extensive discussion of common configure to configure and build the ATLAS package, this note also describes how an installer can confirm

Whaley, R. Clint

209

ORISE: Capacity Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

210

A Framework for Modelling Residential Prosumption Devices and Electricity Tariffs for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response, capacity markets, and ancillary services market. However, electricity is a commodity with a high

211

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by...

212

Fort Future: Virtual Installation supports rapidly changing needs of armed forces in the field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and electric utility modeling and planning tools for the Virtual Instal- lation. For water utilities, Argonne uses the Environmental Protection Agency's EPANet software; for the electrical distribution network-252-6727 psydelko@anl.gov National Security Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory

Kemner, Ken

213

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Digg

214

Installation considerations for IGBT AC drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last four years, Adjustable Speed ac Drive (ASD) manufacturers have migrated from Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) semiconductors to Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) as the preferred Output switching device. The advantage of IGBTs over BJTs is that device rise and fall time switching capability is 5 - 10 times faster, resulting in lower device switching loss and a more efficient drive. However, for a similar motor cable length as the BJT drive, the faster output voltage risetime of the IGBT drive may increase the dielectric voltage stress on the motor and cable due to a phenomenon called reflected wave. Faster output dv/dt transitions of IGBT drives also increase the possibility for phenomenon such as increased Common Mode (CM) electrical noise, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) problems and increased capacitive cable charging current problems. Also, recent experience suggests any Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) drive with a steep fronted output voltage wave form may increase motor shaft voltage and lead to a bearing current phenomenon known as fluting. This paper provides a basic understanding of these issues, as well as solutions, to insure a successful drive system installation.

Skibinski, G.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Coproduction of Hydrogen and Electricity (A Developer's Perspective)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connected in parallel to the local electrical grid #12; Current Biogas Fuel Cell Installation #12; Current Biogas Fuel Cell Installation City of Riverside ­ 1 MW Biogas Fuel Cell ­ Dedicated August, `08

216

Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a...

219

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

220

Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study Title Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4190E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Li Xiaolei, and David S. Watson Keywords ancillary services, contingency reserves, demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, dimmable lighting controls, dimming ballasts, lighting, regulation capacity Abstract The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a "fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47% of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Central American electrical interconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technical cooperation grant of $2.25 million, designed to strengthen the capacity of Central American countries to operate their regional interconnected electrical system, was announced by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The grant, extended from the banks Fund for Special Operations, will help improve the capacity of the regions electric power companies to achieve economical, safe operation of the interconnected electric power systems. The funds will also be used to finance regional studies of the accords, procedures, regulations, and supervisory mechanisms for the system, as well as program development and data bases.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

224

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

226

Installation and Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Installation and Performance Photo of a group of men moving a rectangular solar panel. DOE partners with the solar industry to help reduce labor costs and maximize system...

227

Dynamically installed anchors for floating offshore structures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The gradual depletion of shallow water hydrocarbon deposits has forced the offshore oil and gas industry to develop reserves in deeper waters. Dynamically installed anchors (more)

Richardson, Mark Damian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Install an Automatic Blowdown-Control System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This steam tip sheet on installing automatic blowdown controls provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

229

EM, County Install Sewer Line for Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crews are installing a sewer line in the Portsmouth site to connect EMs sewer treatment facility to the Pike County Manufacturing Center, which is being developed.

230

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and pump installation standards in Hawaii. Author State of Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management Published State of Hawaii, 22004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

231

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

232

Insufficient Incentives for Investment in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In theory, competitive electricity markets can provide incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity. We show that if consumers and investors are risk averse, investment is efficient only if investors in generating capacity can sign...

Neuhoff, Karsten; de Vries, Laurens

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nanofluid heat capacities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Significant increases in the heat capacity of heat transfer fluids are needed not only to reduce the costs of liquid heating and cooling processes but also to bring clean energy producing technologies like concentrating solar power (CSP) to price parity with conventional energy generation. It has been postulated that nanofluids could have higher heat capacities than conventional fluids. In this work nano- and micron-sized particles were added to five base fluids (poly-? olefin mineral oil ethylene glycol a mixture of water and ethylene glycol and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate) and the resulting heat capacities were measured and compared with those of the neat base fluids and the weighted average of the heat capacities of the components. The particles used were inert metals and metal oxides that did not undergo any phase transitions over the temperature range studied. In the nanofluids studied here we found no increase in heat capacity upon the addition of the particles larger than the experimental error.

Anne K. Starace; Judith C. Gomez; Jun Wang; Sulolit Pradhan; Greg C. Glatzmaier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Accomodating Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accommodating Electric Vehicles Dave Aasheim 214-551-4014 daasheim@ecotality.com A leader in clean electric transportation and storage technologies ECOtality North America Overview Today ? Involved in vehicle electrification... ECOtality North America Overview Today ?Warehouse Material Handling ? Lift trucks ? Pallet Jacks ? Over 200 Customers ? Over 5,000 Installations ECOtality North America Overview Today ? 1990?s involved in EV1 ? EV Chargers ? Vehicle & battery...

Aasheim, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SunShot Installs Solar Energy System on Local Habitat for Humanity Home  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Working with GRID Alternatives, the nation's largest solar non-profit, DOE's SunShot Initiative team enjoyed a day in the sun on a rooftop in Washington, D.C., where we volunteered to install a solar energy system on a Habitat for Humanity home. GRID installed solar electric systems on 10 affordable homes developed by Habitat for Humanity in the Ivy City neighborhood in Northeast D.C.

236

Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live Largest Solar Panel Installation at a U.S. University Goes Live November 4, 2010 - 6:10pm Addthis Sen. Menendez, Rep. Pascrell, John Lushetsky and other officials at the ribbon cutting. Sen. Menendez, Rep. Pascrell, John Lushetsky and other officials at the ribbon cutting. John Lushetsky A couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to participate in a ribbon cutting event for the largest solar installation on a United States university campus. It was an honor to stand with Senator Robert Menendez, Representative Bill Pascrell, university administrators, faculty and students to celebrate William Paterson University's new solar panels. This project will have the capacity to produce 3.5 megawatts of clean

237

A DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR ELECTROPHYSICAL INSTALLATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR ELECTROPHYSICAL INSTALLATIONS V.R. Kozak Budker Institute There was designed a set of devices for automation systems of physical installations. On this basis approach. KEY WORDS Automation, systems, applications, CANBUS, embedded, controller. 1. Introduction Budker

Kozak, Victor R.

238

Photovoltaic Installations at Williams College Ruth Aronoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation using solar power. Photovoltaic (PV) panel installations are a simple way for the College facilities, it is now evaluating in detail the environmental impact of these actions. In addition to making1 Photovoltaic Installations at Williams College Ruth Aronoff Williams Luce Project SUMMARY

Aalberts, Daniel P.

239

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

240

Arduino Tool: For Interactive Artwork Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of the digital media and computational tools has widened the doors for creativity. The cutting edge in the digital arts and role of new technologies can be explored for the possible creativity. This gives an opportunity to involve arts with technologies to make creative works. The interactive artworks are often installed in the places where multiple people can interact with the installation, which allows the art to achieve its purpose by allowing the people to observe and involve with the installation. The level of engagement of the audience depends on the various factors such as aesthetic satisfaction, how the audience constructs meaning, pleasure and enjoyment. The method to evaluate these experiences is challenging as it depends on integration between the artificial life and real life by means of human computer interaction. This research investigates "How Adriano fits for creative and interactive artwork installations?" using an artwork installation in the campus of NTNU (Norwegian University...

Shaikh, Murtaza Hussain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Demand side management of industrial electricity consumption: Promoting the use of renewable energy through real-time pricing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the installed capacity of wind generation in Ireland continues to increase towards an overall goal of 40% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020, it is inevitable that the frequency of wind curtailment occurrences will increase. Using this otherwise discarded energy by strategically increasing demand at times that would otherwise require curtailment has the potential to reduce the installed capacity of wind required to meet the national 2020 target. Considering two industrial electricity consumers, this study analyses the potential for the implementation of price based demand response by an industrial consumer to increase their proportional use of wind generated electricity by shifting their demand towards times of low prices. Results indicate that while curtailing during peak price times has little or no benefit in terms of wind energy consumption, demand shifting towards low price times is likely to increase a consumers consumption of wind generation by approximately 5.8% for every 10% saved on the consumers average unit price of electricity.

Paddy Finn; Colin Fitzpatrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers rebates for lighting, heat pumps, refrigeration...

243

Advanced Solar Electric Inc ASE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc ASE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Solar Electric Inc (ASE) Place: Thousand Oaks, California Zip: 91320 Product: US-based PV system installer. References: Advanced...

244

Homeowners Guide to Leasing a Solar Electric System (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This updated fact sheet provides an introduction to solar leases for homeowners who are considering installing a solar electric system on their home.

Not Available

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

246

Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Energy Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers January 16, 2014 - 4:19pm Addthis This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the calculator assumptions and definitions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement How many chillers will you purchase? Performance Factors Existing What is the existing design condition? Full Load Partial Load What is the cooling capacity of the existing chiller? tons What is the full-load efficiency of the existing chiller? EER What is the partial-load efficiency of the existing chiller? EER New What is the new design condition? Full Load Partial Load

247

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gigawatthours largely because of the recent, rapid growth in photovoltaic capacity. Solar electricity output in June is a good indicator of the recent growth of the solar...

248

WINDExchange: Wind Potential Capacity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

area with a gross capacity factor1 of 35% and higher, which may be suitable for wind energy development. AWS Truepower LLC produced the wind resource data with a spatial...

249

Panama Canal capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

Bronzini, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Exploration of the integration of renewable resources into California's electric system using the Holistic Grid Resource Integration and Deployment (HiGRID) tool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable resources represent an opportunity for environmentally preferred generation of electricity that supports energy security and independence; however integrating renewable technologies is not without challenges. Renewable resources have limitations that can include location, capacity, cost and availability. California is proactive in the implementation of renewable energy through legislation and execution of a Renewable Portfolio Standard. This work explores key challenges to achieving high penetrations of renewables onto California's grid. The Holistic Grid Resource Integration and Deployment (HiGRID) tool has been developed for this analysis and is verified herein. This tool resolves the hourly operation, performance and cost of renewable and non-renewable generation resources. Three renewable deployment strategies are explored including all wind, all solar photovoltaic, and 50/50 mixture. Initially, wind is the preferred candidate from a cost and required installed capacity perspective; however, as the penetration increases excess wind generation encourages installation of solar. The 50/50 case becomes more cost competitive at high renewable penetrations (greater than 32.4%) and provides the highest system-wide capacity factor and CO2 reduction potential. Results highlight the value of optimizing the renewable deployment strategy to minimize costs and emphasize the importance of considering capacity factor and curtailment when representing the true cost of installing renewables.

Joshua D. Eichman; Fabian Mueller; Brian Tarroja; Lori Smith Schell; Scott Samuelsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electricity - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel consumption, sales, prices and customers. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Summary electricity statistics 2001-2011 › XLS Supply and disposition of electricity 2002-2011 › XLS Electricity overview › Generation, retail sales, electricity trade, losses PDF XLS Consumption for electricity generation › Fossil and renewable fuel consumption for electricity generation PDF XLS Generating capacityElectric net summer capacity by specific energy source more on electricity PDF XLS Monthly electricity overview - back to 1973 CSV PDF XLS Latest month total electric power industry summary statistics › Overview XLS Year-to-date total electric power industry summary statistics ›

252

Energy Conservation Installation Credit | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Conservation Installation Credit Energy Conservation Installation Credit Energy Conservation Installation Credit < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 500 per individual; up to 1,000 for a married couple filing jointly Program Info State Montana Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 25% of cost of capital investment Provider Montana Department of Revenue Individual taxpayers may claim a credit against their tax liability for up to 25% of the costs of investment for energy conservation purposes in a

253

Electric Vehicle Handbook: Electrical Contractors (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electrical Electrical Contractors Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Installing and Maintaining EVSE . . . . . . . 9 EVSE Training for Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Deploy PEV Charging Infrastructure Installing plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charg- ing infrastructure requires unique knowledge and skills . If you need help, contact your local Clean Cities coordinator . Clean Cities is the U .S . Depart- ment of Energy's flagship alternative-transportation deployment initiative . It is supported by a diverse and capable team of stakeholders from private companies, utilities, government agencies, vehicle

254

Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach for small, simplified solar installations or retrofits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural Considerations for Solar Installers provides a comprehensive outline of structural considerations associated with simplified solar installations and recommends a set of best practices installers can follow when assessing such considerations. Information in the manual comes from engineering and solar experts as well as case studies. The objectives of the manual are to ensure safety and structural durability for rooftop solar installations and to potentially accelerate the permitting process by identifying and remedying structural issues prior to installation. The purpose of this document is to provide tools and guidelines for installers to help ensure that residential photovoltaic (PV) power systems are properly specified and installed with respect to the continuing structural integrity of the building.

Richards, Elizabeth H.; Schindel, Kay (City of Madison, WI); Bosiljevac, Tom; Dwyer, Stephen F.; Lindau, William (Lindau Companies, Inc., Hudson, WI); Harper, Alan (City of Madison, WI)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electric Currents Electric Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient of resistivity Electric Power: = = = Also, = . So, = = 2 = 2 Unit of Power(P): Watt (WChapter 18 Electric Currents #12;Electric Current: Flow of electric charge Current is flow of positive charge. In reality it's the electron moves in solids- Electron current. #12;Ohm's Law : Resistance

Yu, Jaehoon

256

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

257

File:Install.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Install.pdf Install.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Install.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 86 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:48, 1 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:48, 1 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (86 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=File:Install.pdf&oldid=53281

258

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, Philip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California, 94720 November 2011 Direct funding for this research was provided by the California Energy Commission through Contracts 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. Institutional support is provided to LBNL by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Singer et al., Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer 1

259

Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Cryogenic UHV installation for scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we describe a helium cryostat with an ultrahigh vacuum chamber for placing the STM [H. By means of this installation it is possible to perform sample treatmentin situ (breaking, annealing, ion etchin...

V. S. Edelman; I. N. Khlyustikov

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Peoples Gas Single Family Direct Install (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, and faucet aerators through...

262

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

263

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations September 6, 2011 - 4:28pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy recently issued guidance to its national laboratory management and operating (M&O) contractors on the installation and operation of electric vehicle recharging stations at lab facilities. The guidance explains that lab contractors wishing to install electric vehicle recharging stations or make such stations available to employees and visitors have several options. Lab contractors may install such stations and seek reimbursement from the Department for their use to the extent such installation or use is reasonably required to meet fleet vehicle or demonstration project needs. In addition, lab contractors may install electric vehicle recharging

266

Retrofit SCADA installation combines SCADA and process control functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When Gulf States Utilities Company`s (now part of Entergy Operations, Inc.) River Bend Nuclear Plant, decided to add a closed cooling water system for the plant service water, a new SCADA system was required. Previously the normal service water system shared common cooling towers and flume with the plant`s circulating water system. Closing the system required a new cooling tower with pumps and heat exchangers to be constructed in a remote location. Existing equipment in the area was controlled via a multichannel tone SCADA system that did not have sufficient spare capacity for control of the new components. This paper will discuss how a new SCADA system was designed and installed, that also included process control. It will also address the operational experience to date.

Moffitt, T.O. [Entergy Operations, Inc., St. Francisville, LA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Capacity of steganographic channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An information-theoretic approach is used to determine the amount of information that may be safely transferred over a steganographic channel with a passive adversary. A steganographic channel, or stego-channel is a pair consisting of the channel transition ... Keywords: information spectrum, information theory, steganalysis, steganographic capacity, steganography, stego-channel

Jeremiah J. Harmsen; William A. Pearlman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment [Extended and communications technology accounts for a significant fraction of worldwide electricity consumption. Given inferring the electricity consumption of different components of the installed base of telecommu- nications

Fisher, Kathleen

269

ELECTRICAL HEATERS FOR THERMO-MECHANICAL TESTS AT THE STRIPA MINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5.5 Dewatering Pump 6. ELECTRICAL HEATER CONTROL SYSTEMS 6.1water influx ABSTRACT Electrical heaters were installed atcanister) which houses the electrical heater elements; c. d.

Burleigh, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Vanadium redox-flow batteries Installation at Ris for characterisation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in August 2007. Power systems with high penetration of Wind energy/Renewable energy Renewable energy technologies are being installed at an increasing rate in many countries and regions in order to increase the sustainability of the electricity supply. In some power systems is the level of penetration so high

271

Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

272

Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

273

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

274

Property:PotentialHydropowerCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialHydropowerCapacity PotentialHydropowerCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialHydropowerCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Hydropower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

275

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

276

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Developer Industrial State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region's power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New

277

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Onshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

278

Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from solid biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

279

Palmetto Electric Cooperative- Buried Treasure Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Palmetto Electric Cooperative offers rebates for its members who install ground-source heat pumps through their Buried Treasure Rebate Program. [http://www.palmetto.coop/conserve/tr_cashin.html...

280

Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis The Public Service Commission has the authority to regulate the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SunShot Initiative Installs Solar Energy System | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

SunShot Initiative Installs Solar Energy System SunShot Initiative Installs Solar Energy System Addthis 1 of 10 SunShot Initiative team members install a solar energy system on a...

282

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

284

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

285

Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

Jack Q. Richardson

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Installation of Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

287

Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Utah Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit Form Type...

288

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Lab High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory New high-performance computer system, called Wolf,...

289

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations:...

290

H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: ArvinMeritor...

291

Obama Administration Announces Plans to Install New Solar Panels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plans to Install New Solar Panels on the White House Residence Obama Administration Announces Plans to Install New Solar Panels on the White House Residence October 5, 2010 -...

292

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

293

State Renewable Electricity Profiles  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Xebra Electric Vehicle ZAP stands for Zero Air Pollution.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

among existing EVs. ZAP's Chinese manufacturing partner currently has the manufacturing capacity was carrying no additional load. New tires were installed to make the suspension harder and to minimize

295

Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

supply. Members of the community installed a total of 700 kW of distributed rooftop solar capacity. CES units were added at the substation and distribution circuits, along with...

296

Using energy audits to investigate the impacts of common air-conditioning design and installation issues on peak power demand and energy consumption in Austin, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of a unique dataset of 4971 energy audits performed on homes in Austin, Texas in 20092010. We quantify the prevalence of typical air-conditioner design and installation issues such as low efficiency, oversizing, duct leakage, and low measured capacity, and estimate the impacts that resolving these issues would have on peak power demand and cooling energy consumption. We estimate that air-conditioner use in single-family residences currently accounts for 1718% of peak demand in Austin, and we found that improving equipment efficiency alone could save up to 205MW, or 8%, of peak demand. We estimate that 31% of systems in this study were oversized, leading to up to 41MW of excess peak demand. Replacing oversized systems with correctly sized higher efficiency units has the potential for further savings of up to 81MW. We estimate that the mean system could achieve 18% and 20% in cooling energy savings by sealing duct leaks and servicing their air-conditioning units to achieve 100% of nominal capacity, respectively. Although this analysis is limited to the City of Austin, understanding the methods described herein could allow electric utilities in similar climates to make better-informed decisions when considering efficiency improvement programs.

Joshua D. Rhodes; Brent Stephens; Michael E. Webber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Independent Power Independent Power Producer Financing Co-op Financing Cost of Energy (cents /kWh) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 Installed Wind Turbine Capacity 2 MW 10 MW 50 MW 50 MW Without Federal incentives (current $) With Federal incentives (current $) WIND ECONOMICS AT A GLANCE Wind power is one of mankind's oldest energy sources. In 1700, the most powerful machines in Europe were Dutch windmills. During the 1930s, half a million windmills pumped water on the Great Plains. Today's wind turbine is a far cry from the old water pumpers. By using state-of-the-art engineering, wind turbine manufacturers have produced sleek, highly efficient machines that produce inexpensive electricity, and lots of it. Depending on their size and location, wind farms can produce electricity for 4-6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

298

HOCL Installation Guide Chen WANG, Thierry PRIOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Language) is a chemical programming language. Compu- tations can be seen as chemical reactions which are controlled by a set of chemical rules. We have an HOCL compiler developed in JAVA. This manual shows you how to install Java SDK in your machine. HOCL compiler is developed under Java platform, so

Boyer, Edmond

299

Installing Small Wind Turbines Seminar and Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar and Workshop Installing Small Wind Turbines Seminar and Workshop Location: Murdoch January 2011 Details for Registration and Payment: Mr Daniel Jones, National Small Wind Turbine Test: The National Small Wind Turbine Centre at Murdoch University is holding a Small Wind Turbine short training

300

Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs (October 2014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy investigated the major cost factors that affected PMU installation costs for the synchrophasor projects funded through the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs. The data was compiled through interviews with the nine projects that deployed production grade synchrophasor systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

IEA HPP Annex 36 Installation/Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compiled and reviewed last week during meeting at EdF 10-11 October 2013 Submit final report to IEA HPP Ex#12;IEA HPP Annex 36 ­ Quality Installation/Quality Maintenance Van D. Baxter Oak Ridge National), USA 3 10-11 October 2013 EdF, France 4 12 May 2014 Workshop at IEA Heat Pump conference, Montreal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

303

Offshore Wind Turbines and Their Installation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore winds tend to be higher, more constant and not disturbed by rough terrain, so there is a large potential for utilizing wind energy near to the sea. Compared with the wind energy converters onland, wind turbine components offshore will subject ... Keywords: renewable energy, wind power generation, offshore wind turbines, offshore installation

Liwei Li; Jianxing Ren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Lighting Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 70% of the equipment cost of a qualified efficiency upgrade Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric Central Hudson Gas and Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam utilizes the services of Lime Energy to install new lighting fixtures with Central Hudson covering up to 70% of the cost. The 30 percent of cost remaining can be financed at

305

Solar space heating installed at Kansas City, Kansas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar energy system was constructed with the new 48,800 square feet warehouse to heat the warehouse area of about 39,000 square feet while the auxiliary energy system heats the office area of about 9800 square feet. The building is divided into 20 equal units, and each has its own solar system. The modular design permits the flexibility of combining multiple units to form offices or warehouses of various size floor areas as required by a tenant. Each unit has 20 collectors which are mounted in a single row. The collectors, manufactured by Solaron Corporation, are double glazed flat plate collectors with a gross area of 7800 ft/sup 2/. Air is heated either through the collectors or by the electric resistance duct coils. No freeze protection or storage is required for this system. Extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microsoft Word - CX-Ashe-CGSFiberInstallation_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Debbie Ruckwardt Electrical Engineer - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Installing fiber optic cables between Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's Columbia Generating Station (CGS). Budget Information: Work Order # 00261540 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1864 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The project takes place between BPA's Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's

307

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Title Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5265E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 3 Pagination 224-234 Date Published 06/2012 Keywords carbon monoxide, natural gas burners, nitrogen dioxide, range hood, task ventilation, unvented combustion, indoor environment group, Range Hood Test Facility Abstract The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) - including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances - were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

308

Feed-in tariff promotion and innovative measures for renewable electricity: Taiwan case analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Taiwan, located in a subtropical area, is a high energy-importing nation with approximately 98% of our energy supplied by imported fuels since 2000. In this regard, renewable electricity systems from its richness of solar radiation and strong monsoon are thus becoming attractive due to the energy, economic, and environmental policies for pursuing clean electricity supply, sustainable development and greenhouse gases emission mitigation in Taiwan. The objective of this paper was to present an analysis of profitable promotion and innovative measures for renewable electricity in Taiwan because the photovoltaic (PV) power and wind power systems have rapidly increased the total installed capacity from 2.7MW in 2000 to 1006.2MW in 2013. The description in the paper was thus summarized on an analysis of renewable electricity supply since 2000 and its future goals up to 2030, and then centered on the new promotion legislation (i.e., Renewable Energy Development Act) in the measures of feed-in tariff (FIT) and tax/subsidy incentives. Current subsidiary and innovative programs to promote the development of renewable electricity technologies, including roof-type PV power, off-shore wind power and biogas-to-power, were also described. Due to its innovation promotion for renewable energy exploitation in recent years, Pingtung County, located in the southernmost of Taiwan, was introduced as a case study. Finally, some recommendations for promote renewable electricity development were addressed in the paper.

Wen-Tien Tsai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Stocks Temperate weather throughout the fall has allowed electric power sector coal stocks to replenish from the summer burn. All coal stockpile levels were essentially flat when compared to December 2010 and were a mostly up year-to-date. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was essentially flat compared to last month and remained below levels seen in December of 2010 or 2009. While stockpile levels have recovered from summer lows, the increasing

310

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Stocks Electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in October, though stockpile levels remain well below 2010 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from October 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 12 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was generally flat in October 2011 compared to September of this year. The summer of 2011 saw significant declines in total U.S. stockpile levels, which were replenished in the

311

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Stocks As discussed in this month's feature story, electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in November, though stockpile levels remain below 2010 and 2009 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from November 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 9 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants dropped slightly from last month and remained below levels seen in November of 2010 or 2009. While

312

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the electricity used by equipment that building occupants can control. Data is collected and reported by zones throughout Forrestal's north, south and west buildings. See the Forrestal metering zone map, below, for details on the zones.

313

Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GrossProdCapacity GrossProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GrossProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

314

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

315

Property:NetProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NetProdCapacity NetProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NetProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property SummerPeakNetCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

316

Optimal Residential Solar Photovoltaic Capacity in Grid Connected Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Microgeneration using solar photovoltaic systems is becoming increasingly popular in residential households as such systems allow households to use a renewable energy source, while also reducing their reliance on the electricity grid, to fulfill their electricity demand. In this study, we explore the attractiveness of PV microgeneration systems of different capacities in the absence of incentives and net metering options and under both flat and variable tariff scenarious. Smaller systems that are below 1 kW in capacity are more attractive under such conditions, however, at current cost levels, they still remain economically unattractive. The cost levels which allow for these PV systems to be economically viable are also determined.

Shisheng Huang; Jingjie Xiao; Joseph F. Pekny; Gintaras V. Reklaitis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics July 30, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Text Version Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery. The electricity powers the vehicle's wheels via an electric motor. EVs have limited energy storage capacity, which must be replenished by plugging into an electrical source. In an electric vehicle, a battery or other energy storage device is used to store the electricity that powers the motor. EV batteries must be replenished by plugging the vehicle to a power source. Some EVs have onboard chargers; others plug into a charger located outside the vehicle. Both types use electricity that comes from the power grid. Although

318

Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies'  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut) Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells

319

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA- M068(2002) January 2002. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

320

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA- M068(2001) January 2001. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of Smart Grid Progress Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of Smart Grid Progress June 13, 2011 - 1:55pm Addthis A 21st Century Grid includes increasing the overall efficiency of our generating, transmission and distribution system to facilitate the growth of renewable energy sources. | Energy Department Image A 21st Century Grid includes increasing the overall efficiency of our generating, transmission and distribution system to facilitate the growth of renewable energy sources. | Energy Department Image Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy What does this mean for me? We must have an efficient electricity infrastructure to compete in the global economy.

322

Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of Smart Grid Progress Five Million Smart Meters Installed Nationwide is Just the Beginning of Smart Grid Progress June 13, 2011 - 1:55pm Addthis A 21st Century Grid includes increasing the overall efficiency of our generating, transmission and distribution system to facilitate the growth of renewable energy sources. | Energy Department Image A 21st Century Grid includes increasing the overall efficiency of our generating, transmission and distribution system to facilitate the growth of renewable energy sources. | Energy Department Image Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy What does this mean for me? We must have an efficient electricity infrastructure to compete in the global economy.

323

Small Wind Guidebook/Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

324

On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy is now a mature technology and can be considered as a significant contributor in reducing CO2 emissions and protecting the environment. To meet the wind energy national targets, effective implementation of massive wind power installed capacity in the power supply system is required. Additionally, capacity credit is an important issue for an unstable power supply system as in Greece. To achieve high and reliable wind energy penetration levels into the system, the effect of spatial dispersion of wind energy installations within a very wide area (e.g.national level) on the power capacity credit should be accounted for. In the present paper, a methodology for estimating the effect of spatial dispersion of wind farm installations on the capacity credit is presented and applied for the power supply system of Greece. The method is based on probability theory and makes use of wind forecasting models to represent the wind energy potential over any candidate area for future wind farm installations in the country. Representative wind power development scenarios are studied and evaluated. Results show that the spatial dispersion of wind power plants contributes beneficially to the wind capacity credit.

George Caralis; Yiannis Perivolaris; Konstantinos Rados; Arthouros Zervos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Installing New E85 Installing New E85 Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options Equipment Installation Codes, Standards, & Safety Vehicles Laws & Incentives

326

Homeowners Guide to Financing a Grid-Connected Solar Electric System (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides an overview of the financing options that may be available to homeowners who are considering installing a solar electric system on their house.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar cells and PV systems, as well as future technology.solar PV installation and PV cell production Figure 8: Electricity generation by technology

Deshmukh, Ranjit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

REGULATION AND SYSTEM INTERDEPENDENCE: EFFECTS ON THE SITING OF CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL ENERGY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some interesting problems. In particular, solar energy Forsolar energy to meet their hot water requirements and install electrical backup systems, how should the utilities deal with the problem

Kooser, J.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Wright-Hennepin Cooperative Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wright-Hennepin Cooperative Electric Association provides financial incentives for its residential customers to purchase and install energy efficient HVAC equipment. Rebates are offered for...

330

QER Public Meeting in Denver, CO: Gas-Electricity Interdependencies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and General Manager, Brazos Electric Cooperative - Statement Beth Musich, Director Energy Markets and Capacity Products, Southern California Gas Company and San Diego Gas &...

331

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

User Electrical Inspection Criteria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Electronic and Electrical Equipment Inspection Criteria User Electronic and Electrical Equipment Inspection Criteria Any electrical or electronic equipment users bring to the APS will have to be inspected. In some cases, this inspection will be quite simple, e.g., if the equipment has already been inspected by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) and is used for its designed purpose. Other equipment will require a more thorough inspection (this may include NRTL inspected equipment if it is assembled into an apparatus with other components). The inspection is based on an eight-part list of criteria. Paraphrased, those criteria are: The equipment must be suitable for its intended use (and if appropriate, installation). For example, a heater controller intended to control a 1000W heater cannot be used to control a 2000W heater. The

333

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

334

First mideast capacity planned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kuwait catalyst Co.`s (KCC) plans to build a hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts plant in Kuwait will mark the startup of the first refining catalysts production in the Persian Gulf region. KCC, owned by a conglomerate of Kuwait companies and governmental agencies, has licensed catalyst manufacturing technology from Japan Energy in a deal estimated at more than 7 billion ($62 million). Plant design will be based on technology from Orient Catalyst, Japan Energy`s catalysts division. Construction is expected to begin in January 1997 for production startup by January 1998. A source close to the deal says the new plant will eventually reach a capacity of 5,000 m.t./year of HDS catalysts to supply most of Kuwait`s estimated 3,500-m.t./year demand, driven primarily by Kuwait National Petroleum refineries. KCC also expects to supply demand from other catalyst consumers in the region. Alumina supply will be acquired on the open market. KCC will take all production from the plant and will be responsible for marketing.

Fattah, H.

1996-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

337

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

338

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

339

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

340

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

342

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

343

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

344

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

345

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

346

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

347

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

348

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

349

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

350

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

351

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

352

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

353

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

354

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

355

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

356

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

357

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

358

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

359

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

360

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

362

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

363

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

364

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

365

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

366

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

367

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

368

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

369

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

370

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

371

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

372

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

373

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

374

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

375

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

376

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

377

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

378

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

379

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

380

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

382

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

383

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

384

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

393

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Stocks The unseasonably warm temperatures that the continental United States experienced throughout the winter, coupled with low natural gas prices, caused coal stocks at power plants to increase throughout the winter of 2011 - 2012. During this period, coal stocks usually see a seasonal decline due to the added need for electricity generation from coal plants for spacing heating load. However, it was the sixth straight month that coal stocks increased from the previous month, with this trend likely to continue as the country enters into spring. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

400

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

405

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

419

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

420

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

423

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

424

DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations DOE Issues Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations September 6, 2011 - 4:28pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy recently issued guidance to its national laboratory management and operating (M&O) contractors on the installation and operation of electric vehicle recharging stations at lab facilities. The guidance explains that lab contractors wishing to install electric vehicle recharging stations or make such stations available to employees and visitors have several options. Lab contractors may install such stations and seek reimbursement from the Department for their use to the extent such installation or use is reasonably required to meet fleet vehicle or demonstration project needs.

425

DOE ORDER 5480.14, PHASE I - INSTALLATION ASSESSMENT FOR THE BETTIS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE ORDER 5480.14, PHASE I - INSTALLATION ASSESSMENT FOR THE BETTIS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by Westinghouse Electric Corporation West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 15122-0079 i' Vendor Contract Number: DE-ACll-76PN00014 : IAELE OF CONTENTS I. Executive Summary ............................................. 2. Introduction .................................................. a. Background......;.........................................i b. Authority .......................................................... : ; c. Purpose I ........................................................ 3 d Scope..................................................~..! e: Methodology...............................................! ........

426

Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Solar Thermal and Solar Photovoltaic Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL AND SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLATIONS Juan-Carlos Baltazar Research Associate Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Associate Director Don R. Gilman, P.E. Senior... the potential emission reductions due to the electricity savings from the application of some of the most common solar thermal and solar photovoltaic systems. The methodology to estimate the potential NOx emission reduction integrates legacy analysis tools...

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Efficiency enhancements for evolutionary capacity planning in distribution grids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we tackle the distribution network expansion planning (DNEP) problem by employing two evolutionary algorithms (EAs): the classical Genetic Algorithm (GA) and a linkage-learning EA, specifically a Gene-pool Optimal Mixing Evolutionary Algorithm ... Keywords: capacity planning, distribution networks, electricity, linkage learning, optimal mixing

Ngoc Hoang Luong; Marinus O.W. Grond; Han La Poutr; Peter A.N. Bosman

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 3:55pm Addthis These geothermal heating and cooling units installed in the basement of a new home are tied to a complex array of underground coils to keep indoor temperatures comfortable. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos These geothermal heating and cooling units installed in the basement of a new home are tied to a complex array of underground coils to keep indoor temperatures comfortable. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos What does this mean for me? Installing a geothermal heat pump is not a do-it-yourself job. When you hire a contractor to install your geothermal heat pump, ask for and check references of installations that are several years old.

430

Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps June 24, 2012 - 3:55pm Addthis These geothermal heating and cooling units installed in the basement of a new home are tied to a complex array of underground coils to keep indoor temperatures comfortable. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos These geothermal heating and cooling units installed in the basement of a new home are tied to a complex array of underground coils to keep indoor temperatures comfortable. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos What does this mean for me? Installing a geothermal heat pump is not a do-it-yourself job. When you hire a contractor to install your geothermal heat pump, ask for and check references of installations that are several years old.

431

Energy Department Launches SunShot Prize Competition to Install...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SunShot Prize Competition to Install Solar Energy Systems at a Fraction of Today's Price Energy Department Launches SunShot Prize Competition to Install Solar Energy Systems at a...

432

Helping Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies Helping Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Midwest...

433

Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 The...

434

Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12...

435

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924 43,558 43,049 44,228 44,790 45,297 NPCC 42,551 45,980 47,850 47,859 46,328 48,394 46,185 47,151 44,864 44,172 43,806 46,224 46,312 46,284 46,246 46,246 Balance of Eastern Region 341,158 360,748 357,026 371,011 375,365 385,887 383,779 384,495 399,204 389,351 385,428 384,172 386,823 394,645 398,806 403,949 ECAR 82,831 84,844 86,332

437

RMP Standard PreInstalled Software Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RMP Standard PreInstalled Software Page 1 of 2 Standard Software PreInstalled with RMP Windows@lmu.edu or 310-338-7777 RMP Standard PreInstalled Software Page 2 of 2 · Photo Booth EndNote Apple DVD Player

Dahlquist, Kam D.

438

Coal Gasification for Electric Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...iv) high plant availability...petro-leum and natural gas and the installation...inefficient, low-pressure, low-capacity...atmospheric pressure. It is comnmercially...its low-pressure operation...synthesis gas produced...extremely high temperatures...synthetic natural gas (SNG...

Dwain F. Spencer; Michael J. Gluckman; Seymour B. Alpert

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

Renewable energy capacity and generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

21 21 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281521 Varnish cache server Renewable energy capacity and generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 16, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into electric power capacity and generation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable energy capacity and generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB)

440

Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Energy Audit Suggested Measures: $500 Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump: $150 Water Heater: $100 Energy Audit Suggested Measures: 50% of cost Provider Cookeville Electric Department Cookeville Electric Department, in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers an incentive for residential customers to install energy efficient equipment through the ''energy right'' rebate program. Rebates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Optimum Capacity Allocation of DG Units Based on Unbalanced Three-phase Optimal Power Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of distributed generation (DG). Some positive support benefits of DG installation are system energy loss distribution system planning is necessary. Adnan Anwar and H. R. Pota are with the School of Engineering for determining opti- mum generation capacity of multiple distributed generation (DG) units is presented

Pota, Himanshu Roy

442

Concentrating on Solar Electricity and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...power, pose a storage problem. They...unavailable. Aside from pumped hydropower, large-scale storage of electricity is...Spain already have a storage capacity for 7 to...industrial processes, for seawater desalination, or...

Martin Roeb; Hans Mller-Steinhagen

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

443

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electric power generating facilities with a combined capacity greater than 25 MW, as well as associated transmission lines, may not be constructed or begin operation prior to the issuance of a...

444

,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity ","In-Service",,"Electrical...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TPIT0057","Conceptual","Reliability", 2011,"US","TRE","ERCOT","AC","121-150",,,5,2014,"JORDAN","BARHIL",0.87,"OH",,,8901,"CNP",,100,"14TPIT0058c","Planned","Reliability",...

445

Zero Emission Sources of Electricity: Cost, Capacity, Advantages and Disadvantages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows how much carbon-free energy might ultimately be available at the global scale. It is based on the international reports and incorporates data from our more recent research. The paper examines ...

Oksana Udovyk; Oleg Udovyk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A functional analysis of electrical load curve modelling for some households specific electricity end-uses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic end-uses, the development of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles, the increase of heat pumps heating systems such as heat pumps in new building or which will replace old installed fossil fuels based systems; · integration of new end-uses such as Plug-in Electric Vehicles and an always growing number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

447

NSTX Electrical Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The design of the NSTX electrical power system was tailored to suit the available infrastructure and electrical equipment on site. Components were analyzed to verify their suitability for use in NSTX. The total number of circuits and the location of the NSTX device drove the major changes in the Power system hardware. The NSTX has eleven (11) circuits to be fed as compared to the basic three power loops for TFTR. This required changes in cabling to insure that each cable tray system has the positive and negative leg of cables in the same tray. Also additional power cabling had to be installed to the new location. The hardware had to b e modified to address the need for eleven power loops. Power converters had to be reconnected and controlled in anti-parallel mode for the Ohmic heating and two of the Poloidal Field circuits. The circuit for the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) System had to be carefully developed to meet this special application. Additional Protection devices were designed and installed for the magnet coils and the CHI. The thrust was to making the changes in the most cost-effective manner without compromising technical requirements. This paper describes the changes and addition to the Electrical Power System components for the NSTX magnet systems.

A. Ilic; E. Baker; R. Hatcher; S. Ramakrishnan; et al

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Economics of Steam Electric Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by manufacturers, data available from past installations and recent installations. 7) Labor costs were based on labor rates in ~he Lansing, Michigan area. 8) Power plant labor and supervision costs were based on manning data supplied by the Board of Water...-service. No other figures, including labor, fuel cost, outside services and other costs have been escalated. 12) Operating costs were established, based on steam generation. Credit has been allotted to any program for the electric power generated during...

Ophaug, R. A.; Birget, C. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

450

Neutron scattering instrumentation at reactor based installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past decade neutron scattering techniques have been applied to an increasingly wide range of scientific problems. Concurrently a number of substantial improvements of neutron scattering instrumentation have occurred to stimulate this trend. In this article several such developments which have occurred at reactor?based installations are described. Individual spectrometer components which are discussed in some detail include: neutron?optical devices such as guide tubes supermirrors and multilayer systems; neutronmonochromators with optimum reflectivity mosaic and focusing characteristics; position?sensitive detectors of several types; and equipment required for neutronpolarizationanalysis. Several novel spectrometers which have enhanced the role of neutron scattering during the past ten years are also described. These include spectrometers for small?angle scattering backscattering and neutron spin echo. An extensive bibliography is included which covers both early and more recent developments.

Roger Pynn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sleeve installations speed pipeline defect repair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repairing defects in pipelines can be a major challenge for pipeline companies or contractors. To reduce cost and eliminate unscheduled shut downs, pipeline operating companies have adopted ``in-service`` repair methods to restore overall integrity of the pipeline without taking it out of service. Interprovincial Pipe Line Co. has undertaken an aggressive approach to this ``in-service`` repair method by using a developed sleeving system for repairing leaking and non-leaking defects. A structural reinforcement sleeve consists of two non-fillet welded collars (one on each side of the defect) and a full encirclement sleeve welded on top of these collars. The annular space between the pipe and sleeve is filled with a hardenable, non-shrinking epoxy. Three different pressure vessel sleeves can be used for repairing certain defects. They can be used in combination with the pre-stressed sleeve or for independent repairs. This paper reviews the performance and installation of these sleeves.

Friedrich, J.; Smith, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electrical insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Material with very low conductivity, which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Electrical Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...Material with very low conductivity which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers (Dissado LA...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

455

Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc - Residential Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Free high efficiency water Heater; $200 installation fee Water heater and timer with normal installation: $2.50 credit for 10 years Timer only: $200 cash payment and $2.50 credit for 10 years New construction contract home: $250 Provider Aiken Electric Cooperative Aiken Electric Cooperative offers residential members rebates for installing high-efficiency electric water heaters and/or timers in their homes. Customers have four rebate options:

456

Too Much Mobility Limits the Capacity of Wireless Ad-hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Too Much Mobility Limits the Capacity of Wireless Ad-hoc Networks Syed Ali Jafar Electrical@ece.uci.edu Abstract-- We consider a ? user isotropic fast fading ad-hoc network with no channel state information determine the capacity region of this ad-hoc network for any partition of the users into transmitters

Jafar, Syed A.

457

Capacity of Fading Gaussian Channel with an Energy Harvesting Sensor Node  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there are inefficiencies in energy storage and the capacity when energy is spent in activities other than transmission. Keywords: Energy harvesting, sensor networks, fading chan- nel, Shannon capacity, inefficiencies in storage) and converts them to electrical energy. Common energy harvesting devices are solar cells, wind turbines

Sharma, Vinod

458

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Process Chart: From Agency to Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

459

Electrification of offshore petroleum installations with offshore wind integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric power supply to oil and gas platforms is conventionally provided by gas turbines located on the platforms. As these gas turbines emit considerable amounts of CO2 and NOx, it is desirable to find alternative solutions. One alternative is to feed the platforms from the onshore power system via subsea power cables, which already have been implemented on some platforms in the Norwegian part of the North Sea. The paper studies a cluster of petroleum installations in this geographic area, connected to the Norwegian onshore power system through an HVDC voltage link. In the study, an offshore wind farm is also connected to the offshore AC power system. The main focus is investigation of transient stability in the offshore power system, and several fault cases have been studied for different levels of wind power generation. Simulations show that faults on the offshore converter platform can be critical due to the dependency of the reactive power delivered by the HVDC link to the offshore AC system. However, it is shown that local wind power production matching the offshore power demand will improve both voltage- and frequency-stability. Further on, it is indicated that offshore reactive power injections or alternative wind farm control topologies could improve voltage stability offshore.

Jorun I. Marvik; Eirik V. ysleb; Magnus Korps

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Estimates of energy consumption by building type and end use at U.S. Army installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the use of LBNL`s End-use Disaggregation Alogrithm (EDA) to 12 US Army installations nationwide in order to obtain annual estimates of electricity use for all major building types and end uses. The building types include barrack, dining hall, gymnasium, administration, vehicle maintenance, hospital, residential, warehouse, and misc. Up to 8 electric end uses for each type were considered: space cooling, ventilation (air handling units, fans, chilled and hot water pumps), cooking, misc./plugs, refrigeration, exterior and interior lighting, and process loads. Through building simulations, we also obtained estimates of natural gas space heating energy use. Average electricity use for these 12 installations and Fort Hood are: HVAC, misc., and indoor lighting end uses consumed the most electricity (28, 27, and 26% of total[3.8, 3.5, and 3.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}]). Refrigeration, street lighting, exterior lighting, and cooking consumed 7, 7, 3, and 2% of total (0.9, 0.9, 0.4, and 0.3 kWh/ft{sup 2})

Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Bandera Electric Cooperative- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bandera Electric Cooperative offers a $200 rebate for the installation of a 15 SEER or higher heat pumps in existing homes. This program is designed to promote energy efficiency in existing...

462

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7% renewable energy installed in their system. Their strategic plan calls for 50% of electricity from renewable energy by 2023. KIUC is well on their way to achieving this goal...

463

Maine: Energy Efficiency Program Helps Generate Town's Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Energy Efficiency program helps municipalities with their energy bills. Thomaston, Maine, was able to install solar panels to generate 13% of the electricity used by the wastewater treatment facility.

464

Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the behavior and failure mode of common joints under extreme lateral loads * Static and shake table tests conducted of pressurized - Threaded, - Brazed, - Mechanical joints Static Testing o Pressurized spool to 150 psi o Steady downward force applied while recording deflections o Grooved clamped mech. joints * 16 tests performed o Threaded joints * 4 tests o Brazed (copper) * 4 tests Grooved Couplings o Catalog items o ASTM A106 Grade B piping o ASTM A 536 couplings o Lateral deflections imposed well above manufacturer's angular installation tolerance

465

Interactive Stereoscopic Installation: A Photographic Collage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Unit DIY Do It Yourself FAT Free Art and Technology GB Giga Bytes GPU Graphics Processing Unit HDR High Dynamic Range IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IR Infrared LAN Local Area Network LED Light-Emitting Diode MSP Max Signal... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 30 20 The Camera Housing Being Printed in the 3D Printer : : : : : : : : 32 21 IR LED?s Attached to the Front Panel. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 33 22 Polarizing Filters to Cut o the Visible Light : : : : : : : : : : : : : 34 23 Eye Tracking...

Kannapurakkaran, Shyam

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Homeowners Guide to Financing a Grid-Connected Solar Electric System (Brochure), Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This guide provides an overview of the financing options that may be available to homeowners who are considering installing a solar electric system on their house.

467

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Stocks In October 2013, total coal stocks increased 0.8 percent from the previous month. This follows the normal seasonal pattern for this time of year as the country begins to build up coal stocks to be consumed during the winter months. Compared to last October, coal stocks decreased 17.7 percent. This occurred because coal stocks in October 2012 were at an extremely high level. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The total bituminous supply decreased from 85 days the previous month to 78 days in October 2013, while the total subbituminous supply decreased from 63 days in September 2013 to

468

Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave energy community. Key words: Wave energy, offshore wind turbines, marine energy 1 Introduction Marine renewables installations of a few kW like small wind turbines or photovoltaic cells installed to provide electricity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

470

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

471

World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Maintaining Generation Adequacy in a Restructuring U.S. Electricity Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, decisions on the amounts, locations, types, and timing of investments in new generation have been made by vertically integrated utilities with approval from state public utility commissions. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, these decisions are being fragmented and dispersed among a variety of organizations. As generation is deregulated and becomes increasingly competitive, decisions on whether to build new generators and to retire, maintain, or repower existing units will increasingly be made by unregulated for-profit corporations. These decisions will be based largely on investor assessments of future profitability and only secondarily on regional reliability requirements. In addition, some customers will choose to face real-time (spot) prices and will respond to the occasionally very high prices by reducing electricity use at those times. Market-determined generation levels will, relative to centrally mandated reserve margins, lead to: (1) more volatile energy prices; (2) lower electricity costs and prices; and (3) a generation mix with more baseload, and less peaking, capacity. During the transition from a vertically integrated, regulated industry to a deintegrated, competitive industry, government regulators and system operators may continue to impose minimum-installed-capacity requirements on load-serving entities. As the industry gains experience with customer responses to real-time pricing and with operation of competitive intrahour energy markets, these requirements will likely disappear. We quantitatively analyzed these issues with the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch model (ORCED). Model results show that the optimal reserve margin depends on various factors, including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices (load shapes and system load factor). Because the correct reserve margin depends on these generally unpredictable factors, mandated reserve margins might be too high, leading to higher electricity costs and prices. Absent mandated reserve margins, electricity prices and costs decline with increasing customer response to prices during high-demand periods. The issues discussed here are primarily transitional rather than enduring. However, the transition from a highly regulated, vertically integrated industry to one dominated by competition is likely to take another five to ten years.

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This study showed that advanced energy technologies are economical for many customers on the two SCE circuits analyzed, providing certain customers with considerable energy cost savings. Using reasonable assumptions about market penetration, the study showed that adding distributed generation would reduce peak demand on the two circuits enough to defer the need to upgrade circuit capacity. If the DE is optimally targeted, the deferral could economically benefit SCE, with cost savings that outweigh the lost revenues due to lower sales of electricity. To a lesser extent, economically justifiable energy-efficiency, photovoltaic technologies, and demand response could also help defer circuit capacity upgrades by reducing demand.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Multifamily Energy Evaluation: Free assessment, installation of up to ten CFLs/unit, water efficiency measures, hot water pipe and tank wrap, and a $300 rebate for refrigerator replacement costs. Provider National Grid Residential Upstate Efficiency Programs National Grid residential electric customers in Upstate New York are

475

Gasket and snap ring installation tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tool for installing a gasket and a snap ring including a shaft, a first plate attached to the forward end of the shaft, a second plate slidably carried by the shaft, a spring disposed about the shaft between the first and second plates, and a sleeve that is free to slide over the shaft and engage the second plate. The first plate has a loading surface with a loading groove for receiving a snap ring and a shoulder for holding a gasket. A plurality of openings are formed through the first plate, communicating with the loading groove and approximately equally spaced about the groove. A plurality of rods are attached to the second plate, each rod slidable in one of the openings. In use, the loaded tool is inserted into a hollow pipe or pipe fitting having an internal flange and an internal seating groove, such that the gasket is positioned against the flange and the ring is in the approximate plane of the seating groove. The sleeve is pushed against the second plate, sliding the second plate towards the first plate, compressing the spring and sliding the rods forwards in the openings. The rods engage the snap ring and urge the ring from the loading groove into the seating groove.

Southerland, Jr., James M. (Aiken, SC); Barringer, Jr., Curtis N. (Orangeburg, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Solar Hot Water | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Solar Hot Water New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Solar Hot Water New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Solar Hot Water < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,500 Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20% of installed costs Provider New Hampshire Electric Co-Op New Hampshire Electric Co-Op (NHEC) offers rebates to residential customers who install qualified solar water-heating systems. The rebate is equal to 20% of installed system costs, with a maximum award of $1,500. Systems must be pre-approved, and installed in NHEC's service territory by a qualified installer. Program funds are available on a first-come, first-served basis. See the program web site listed above for more information, an application

477

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

478

East Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Rebate Program | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

East Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Rebate Program East Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Rebate Program East Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Replacement ground source heat pump - $150 per ton Complete system (unit and ground loop) - $750 per ton Electric water heater - $150 Energy Star Room AC - $50 Energy Star clothes washer - varies depending on cost Energy Star dishwasher - varies depending on cost Provider East Central Electric Cooperative East Central Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers to install energy-efficient ground source heat pumps, electric water

479

Gibson Electric Membership Corporation - Residential Energy Efficient Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gibson Electric Membership Corporation - Residential Energy Gibson Electric Membership Corporation - Residential Energy Efficient Water Heater Loan Program Gibson Electric Membership Corporation - Residential Energy Efficient Water Heater Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate No financing cap for water heater. Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Electric-to-Electric Water Heater Installation: up to $100 Gas-to-Electric Energy Heater Installation: up to $175 Provider Gibson Electric Membership Corporation Gibson Electric Membership Corporation provides loans to its residential customers to finance new, energy efficient water heaters. The loans are interest-free and can be paid off in as many as 3 years. To participate,

480

Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation June 12, 2012 - 11:59am Addthis Sunrun is a home solar installation company based in San Francisco. | Photo by Francis Fine Art Photography. Sunrun is a home solar installation company based in San Francisco. | Photo by Francis Fine Art Photography. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Tillie Peterson works at Sunrun a home solar installation company based in San Francisco. As Director of Operations, Tillie works to get solar panels up and running for homeowners as simply and quickly as possible. Our Solar Industry At Work Series shares the personal success of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "installed electricity capacity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Analytical model for solar PV and CSP electricity costs: Present LCOE values and their future evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we first make a review of the past annual production of electricity and the cumulative installed capacity for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. This together with the annual costs of PV modules and CSP systems allows us the determination of the experience curves and the corresponding learning rates. Then, we go over a rigorous exposition of the methodology employed for the calculation of the value of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for PV and CSP. Based on this knowledge, we proceed to establish a mathematical model which yields closed-form analytical expressions for the present value of the LCOE, as well as its future evolution (20102050) based on the International Energy Agency roadmaps for the cumulative installed capacity. Next, we explain in detail how specific values are assigned to the twelve independent variables which enter the LCOE formula: solar resource, discount and learning rates, initial cost and lifetime of the system, operational and maintenance costs, etc. With all this background, and making use of a simple computer simulation program, we can generate the following: sensitivity analysis curves, graphs on the evolution of the LCOE in the period 20102050, and calculations of the years at which grid parities will be reached. These representations prove to be very useful in energy planning policies, like tariff-in schemes, tax exemptions, etc., and in making investment decisions, since they allow, for a given location, to directly compare the costs of PV vs CSP power generation technologies for the period 20102050. Among solar technologies, PV seems always more appropriate for areas located in middle to high latitudes of the Earth, while CSP systems, preferably with thermal storage incorporated, yield their best performance in arid areas located at relatively low latitudes.

J. Hernndez-Moro; J.M. Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

DoD Energy Innovation on Military Installations  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

LPG Other Test Bed Focus 4 Smart Secure Installation Energy Management * Microgrids * Energy Storage * Ancillary Service Markets Efficient Integrated Buildings * Design,...

483

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:January 2015 All...

484

Focus Series: MaineResidential Direct Install Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Focus Series: MaineResidential Direct Install Program: Residential Air Sealing Program Drives Maine Home Energy Savings Through the Roof.

485

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet recommends installing waste heat recovery systems for fuel-fired furnaces to increase th