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1

Definition: PSInSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSInSAR PSInSAR Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PSInSAR Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses radar signals from a satellite to accurately measure ground displacement. PSInSAR is an improved and more accurate analysis algorithm compared to the InSAR method.[1] Related Terms InSAR References ↑ http://parviztarikhi.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/3psinsar-i-parviz_tarikhi.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:PSInSAR&oldid=682952" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

2

PSInSAR (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSInSAR (Laney, 2005) PSInSAR (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: PSInSAR (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique PSInSAR Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data have been processed and an initial interpretation of the results is

3

PSInSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSInSAR PSInSAR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: PSInSAR Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Radar Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 20.722,072 centUSD 0.0207 kUSD 2.072e-5 MUSD 2.072e-8 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 103.6010,360 centUSD 0.104 kUSD 1.036e-4 MUSD 1.036e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 259.0025,900 centUSD 0.259 kUSD 2.59e-4 MUSD 2.59e-7 TUSD / sq. mile

4

Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Author Parviz Tarikhi Published N/A, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Citation Parviz Tarikhi. Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) [Internet]. 2010. Tunis, Tunisia. N/A. [cited 2013/09/17]. Available from: http://parviztarikhi.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/3psinsar-i-parviz_tarikhi.pdf Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Synthetic_Aperture_Radar_Persistent_Scatterer_Interferometry_(PSInSAR)&oldid=682949"

5

InSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InSAR InSAR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: InSAR Details Activities (11) Areas (10) Regions (2) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Radar Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png InSAR: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that can be used to accurately measure ground displacement. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction InSAR is a radar technique used in geodesy and remote sensing. This geodetic method uses two or more synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to

6

PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

7

Definition: InSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: InSAR Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png InSAR Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that can be used to accurately measure ground displacement.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Interferometric synthetic aperture radar, abbreviated InSAR or IfSAR, is a radar technique used in geodesy and remote sensing. This geodetic method uses two or more synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to generate maps of surface deformation or digital elevation, using differences in the phase of the waves returning to the satellite or aircraft. The technique can potentially measure centimetre-scale changes in deformation over spans of days to years. It has applications for

8

Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Surface deformation analysis over a hydrocarbon reservoir using InSAR with ALOS-PALSAR data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InSAR has been developed to estimate the temporal change on the surface of Earth by combining multiple SAR images acquired over the same area at different times. In the last two decades, in addition to conventional InSAR, ...

?ahin, Sedar Cihan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

InSAR At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006)...

11

Analysis of PS InSAR Monitoring Result of Beijing Subsidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban subsidence causes more concerns in China recently. PS InSAR technique is a very useful method for surface deformation detection. We selected Beijing as study area. Being the capital of China, Beijing suffered from ground subsidence for a long time. ... Keywords: urban subsidence, PS InSAR, COSMO-SkyMed, high resolution

Dong Jiang; Mario Costantini; Tingwu Chen; Zikuan Zhou; Chunqing Ge; Jiangbing Cao

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

InSAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data have been processed and an initial interpretation of the results is

13

InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes InSAR Ground Displacement Analysis, Gary Oppliger and Mark Coolbaugh. This project supports increased utilization of geothermal resources in the Western United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study area (80 km NE of Reno, Nevada) and will serve as a technology template for other geothermal fields. Raw format European Space Agency (ESA) ERS 1/2 satellite synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) radar scenes acquired from 1992 through 2002 are being processed to

14

InSAR At Redfield Campus Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Campus Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2008) Campus Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Redfield Campus Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Redfield Campus Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Along with the GIS, an InSAR deformation study was conducted from a suite of previously created interferograms from 1993-2005. Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Repeat Orbit Interferometry processing software Package (ROI_PAC) was used in the formation of approximately 35 interferograms considered for use in this study. All InSAR pairs were systematically screened to determine those suitable for further processing based on signal-to-noise and data integrity around the Redfield campus and Steamboat

15

InSAR At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » InSAR At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Brady Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes InSAR Ground Displacement Analysis, Gary Oppliger and Mark Coolbaugh. This project supports increased utilization of geothermal resources in the Western United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak

16

InSAR At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » InSAR At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date 2000 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine ground subsidence using satellite radar interferometry Notes Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data collected in the Coso geothermal area, eastern California, during 1993-1999 indicate ground subsidence over a approximately 50 km 2 region that approximately coincides

17

Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production Abstract InSAR is a remote sensing tool that has applications in both geothermal exploration and in the management of producing fields. The technique has developed rapidly in recent years and the most evolved algorithms, now capable of providing precise ground movement measurements with unprecedented spatial density over large areas, allow, among other things, the monitoring of the effects of fluid injection and extraction on surface deformation and the detection of active faults. Multi-interferogram approaches have been used at several geothermal sites in the US and abroad.

18

Monitoring and characterizing natural hazards with satellite InSAR imagery *, Jixian Zhangb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-temporal RADARSAT-1 and ERS backscattering signatures of coastal wetlands at Southeastern Louisiana. Photogrammetric. Monitoring dynamic water-level changes in wetlands improves hydrological modeling predictions-level changes in wetlands Both L-band and C-band InSAR imagery can be used to measure water-level changes

19

InSAR At Salton Sea Area (Eneva And Adams, 2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eneva And Adams, 2010) Eneva And Adams, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Salton Sea Area (Eneva And Adams, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mariana Eneva, David Adams (2010) Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=InSAR_At_Salton_Sea_Area_(Eneva_And_Adams,_2010)&oldid=400447" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

20

InSAR observations of aseismic slip associated with an earthquake swarm in the Columbia River flood basalts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Hanford Site. Data from the seismic network along with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (In of the swarm. By modeling the InSAR deformation data we constructed a model that consists of a shallow thrust detected nearly 40 years ago in and around the Hanford Nuclear Site located in the eastern YFB [Pitt, 1971

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Poniente'. At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system 'Taxco-San Miguel de Allende'. In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the 'kriging' method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Universidad Pedagogica' are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

Avila-Olivera, Jorge A. [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, C.U., 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, C.U., 58030 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Farina, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze (Italy); Garduno-Monroy, Victor H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, C.U., 58030 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Deformation Trend Extraction Based on Multi-Temporal InSAR in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Shanghai is a modern metropolis characterized by high urban density and anthropogenic ground motions. Although traditional deformation monitoring methods, such as GPS and spirit leveling, are reliable to millimeter accuracy, the sparse point subsidence information makes understanding large areas difficult. Multiple temporal space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry is a powerful high-accuracy (sub-millimeter) remote sensing tool for monitoring slow ground deformation for a large area with a high point density. In this paper, the Interferometric Point Target Time Series Analysis method is used to extract ground subsidence rates in Shanghai based on 31 C-Band and 35 X-Band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained by Envisat and COSMO SkyMed (CSK) satellites from 2007 to 2010. A significant subsidence funnel that was detected is located in the junction place between the Yangpu and the Hongkou Districts. A t-test is formulated to judge the agreements between the subsidence results obtained by SAR and by spirit leveling. In addition, four profile lines crossing the subsidence funnel area are chosen for a comparison of ground subsidence rates, which were obtained by the two different band

Jie Chen; Jicang Wu; Lina Zhang; Junping Zou; Guoxiang Liu; Rui Zhang; Bing Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

AUGUST 2008 VOLUME 46 NUMBER 8 IGRSD2 (ISSN 0196-2892) C-band Radarsat-1 InSAR image shows water-level changes over the swamp forest in southeastern Louisiana between May 22 and June 15, 2003.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-level changes of coastal wetlands over southeastern Louisiana. The InSAR image suggests that water-level changes, and other species combine to place the coastal wetlands of Louisiana among the nation's most productive-level changes over the swamp forest in southeastern Louisiana between May 22 and June 15, 2003. In

24

SqueeSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SqueeSAR SqueeSAR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: SqueeSAR Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Radar Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png SqueeSAR: SqueeSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses radar signals from a satellite to accurately measure ground displacement. SqueeSAR is a newer, improved, and more accurate analysis algorithm compared to the PSInSAR method. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

25

A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR Abstract Permanent Scatterer SAR Interferometry (PSInSAR) aims to identify coherent radar targets exhibiting high phase stability over the entire observation time period. These targets often correspond to point-wise, man-made objects widely available over a city, but less present in non-urban areas. To overcome the limits of PSInSAR, analysis of interferometric data-stacks should aim at extracting geophysical parameters not only from point-wise deterministic objects (i.e., PS), but also from distributed scatterers (DS). Rather than developing hybrid processing chains where two or more

26

INVESTIGATION OF CRUSTAL MOTION IN THE TIEN SHAN USING INSAR  

SciTech Connect

The northern Tien Shan of Central Asia is an area of active mid-continent deformation. Although far from a plate boundary, this region has experienced 5 earthquakes larger than magnitude 7 in the past century and includes one event that may as be as large as Mw 8.0. Previous studies based on GPS measurements indicate on the order of 23 mm/yr of shortening across the entire Tien Shan and up to 15 mm/year in the northern Tien Shan (Figure 1). The seismic moment release rate appears comparable with the geodetic measured slip, at least to first order, suggesting that geodetic rates can be considered a proxy for accumulation rates of stress for seismic hazard estimation. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar may provide a means to make detailed spatial measurements and hence in identifying block boundaries and assisting in seismic hazard. Therefore, we hoped to define block boundaries by direct measurement and by identifying and resolving earthquake slip. Due to political instability in Kyrgzystan, the existing seismic network has not performed as well as required to precisely determine earthquake hypocenters in remote areas and hence InSAR is highly useful. In this paper we present the result of three earthquake studies and show that InSAR is useful for refining locations of teleseismically located earthquakes. ALOS PALSAR data is used to investigate crustal motion in the Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia. As part of the work, considerable software development was undertaken to process PALSAR data. This software has been made freely available. Two damaging earthquakes have been imaged in the Tien Shan and the locations provided by ALOS InSAR have helped to refine seismological velocity models. A third earthquake south of Kyrgyzstan was also imaged. The use of InSAR data and especially L band is therefore very useful in providing groundtruth for earthquake locations.

Mellors, R J

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

SAR Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide subsets of SAR data for selected field sites, such as carbon and heat flux tower stations, to increase terrestrial ecology users' understanding of SAR data and promote...

28

Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new element of our [1] multilevel, integrated surveillance and control system: satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (InSAR) images of oil field surface. In particular, we analyze five differential InSAR images of the Belridge Diatomite field, CA, between 11/98 and 12/99. The images have been reprocessed and normalized to obtain the ground surface displacement rate. In return, we have been able to calculate pixel-by-pixel the net subsidence of ground surface over the entire field area. The calculated annual subsidence volume of 19 million barrels is thought to be close to the subsidence at the top of the diatomite. We have also compared the 1999 rate of surface displacement from the satellite images with the surface monument triangulations between 1942 and 1997. We have found that the maximum rate of surface subsidence has been steadily increasing from -0.8 ft/year in 1988-97 to -1 ft/year in 1998-99. The respective rates of uplift of the field fringes also increased from 0.1 ft/year to 0.24 ft/year. In 1999, the observed subsidence rate exceeded by 4.5 million barrels the volumetric deficit of fluid injection.

Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Definition: SqueeSAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png SqueeSAR SqueeSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses radar signals from a satellite to accurately measure ground displacement. SqueeSAR is a newer, improved,...

30

Sandia SAR Information Contacts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAR Presentations Ka-band - Portfolio of Fine Resolution Ka-band SAR Images: Part 1 (pdf) MiniSAR - Review of 4-inch and 1-foot Resolution Ku-Band Imagery (pdf) UAVs - Taking...

31

SAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SAR SAR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: SAR Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Radar Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: create high-resolution DEMs, detect fault and ground movement Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.441,044 centUSD 0.0104 kUSD 1.044e-5 MUSD 1.044e-8 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 59.575,957 centUSD 0.0596 kUSD 5.957e-5 MUSD 5.957e-8 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 673.4067,340 centUSD 0.673 kUSD 6.734e-4 MUSD 6.734e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Time Required Low-End Estimate: 21 days0.0575 years

32

Definition: SAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SAR SAR Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png SAR Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) is a form of radar whose defining characteristic is its use of relative motion, between an antenna and its target region, to provide distinctive long-term coherent-signal variations, that are exploited to obtain finer spatial resolution than is possible with conventional beam-scanning means. It originated as an advanced form of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) is a form of radar whose defining characteristic is its use of relative motion, between an antenna and its target region, to provide distinctive long-term coherent-signal variations, that are exploited to obtain finer spatial resolution than is possible with

33

Sandia SAR Information Contacts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MiniSAR - Miniaturized Synthetic Aperture Radar Fact Sheets: Fact Sheet (pdf) Presentations: A Review of 4-inch and 1-foot Resolution Ku-Band Imagery (pdf) Posters MiniSAR Facts...

34

Sandia SAR Programs -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Programs Synthetic Aperture Radar Programs Sandia National Laboratories has designed, assembled and delivered many different synthetic aperture radar systems and components to a wide variety of customers. A few of the unclassified programs Sandia has participated in are listed below: sar image bullet Miniaturized Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR) -- At any size/weight, the image quality and resolution demonstrated by Sandia SARs remains unequaled. MiniSAR fills a void in current remote sensing technology by providing unprecedented image quality and resolution while achieving a 4 to 5x reduction in size, weight and cost. MiniSAR will give even small UAVs the ability to see through smoke, dust, clouds, and heavy rain. Similarly, the miniSAR sensor will have broad application to all-weather, precision guided weapons. MiniSAR is an in-development program; the initial version will be flight tested in early 2005.

35

Sandia SAR Information Contacts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data Sandia National Laboratories is making available a number of full-resolution complex images for use by non-Sandia researchers. These are available in Sandia's own GFF file format, however utilities are also made available to properly read these files. File reading software can be downloaded in the ZIP file gffquickview.zip. The following reports may be useful in accessing the data sand2006xxxx_Matlab_GFF_viewer.pdf sand2006xxxx_antenna_beam_comp_v07b.pdf SAR image data files currently available: MiniSAR20050519p0010image002.gff MiniSAR20050519p0003image003.gff MiniSAR20050519p0005image003.gff MiniSAR20050519p0009image003.gff MiniSAR20050519p0010image003.gff MiniSAR20050519p0006image004.gff MiniSAR20050519p0002image005.gff MiniSAR20050519p0004image005.gff

36

Sandia SAR Information Contacts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia SAR Information Contacts To request information about Sandia National Laboratories' synthetic aperture radar capabilities, please contact: James J. Hudgens Senior Manager,...

37

Ocean Wind Speed Climatology from Spaceborne SAR Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery can make high-resolution (? 500 m) ocean wind speed measurements. We anticipate re-processing the full decade and a half of Radarsat-1 SAR imagery and generating a SAR wind speed archive. These data will ...

Frank M. Monaldo; Xiaofeng Li; William G. Pichel; Christopher R. Jackson

38

SAR Imagery: Rain Forests, South America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images of Rain Forests in South America Images of Rain Forests in South America The ORNL DAAC now offers a CD-ROM volume containing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the rain forest region of South America, including the Amazon Basin. The images were collected during 1995-1996 as part of an international project led by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) to map the world's rain forest regions to high resolution by means of SAR. The 4-disc volume--entitled "JERS-1 SAR Global Rain Forest Mapping Project: Vol. AM-1, South America"--is made available under the auspices of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). These CDs can be ordered through the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.gov/prepaks.shtml (look for the "LBA" listings).

39

BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. XXX, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/2006JB004763, 2007 Persistent Scatterer InSAR for Crustal Deformation Analysis, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of deformation. The first we model as a contracting pipe-like body, which we interpret to be a crystallizing known to have erupted rhyolite as well as basalt [Geist et al., 1994]. The last known eruption occurred

Segall, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), 2009-07-28 SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological Research Site in Colorado), 2010-12-14 ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News SUMMER 2011 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful i n e n v i r o n m e n t a l research. The ORNL D A A C c u r r e n t l y archives and distributes greater than 900 prod- ucts categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http://daac.ornl.gov/ news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Subsets

42

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interferometric SAR coherence classification utility assessment  

SciTech Connect

The classification utility of a dual-antenna interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is explored by comparison of maximum likelihood classification results for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images and IPSAR intensity and coherence images. The addition of IFSAR coherence improves the overall classification accuracy for classes of trees, water, and fields. A threshold intensity-coherence classifier is also compared to the intensity-only classification results.

Yocky, D.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.  

SciTech Connect

Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

Bielek, Timothy P. (Albuquerque, NM); Thompson, Douglas G. (Albuqerque, NM); Walker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.  

SciTech Connect

Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

SAR Employment Opportunities -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employment Opportunities Employment Opportunities Sandia National Laboratories often offers opportunities for employment in its synthetic aperture radar departments. Desirable skills include one or more of the following: Radar system design and analysis Microwave and RF circuit design and analysis Digital signal processing High-speed digital circuit design and analysis Real-time radar software development Microwave antenna design and analysis A respondent's familiarity with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar, and/or other Doppler radar principles, is desirable but not absolutely required. Those interested in designing, building, and testing the world's highest-performance imaging radar systems as a member of the Sandia team may send their resumes to James Hudgens, Senior Manager.

48

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Continental Shelf Parameters Inferred from SAR Internal Wave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results on the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to extract oceanographic information about the continental shelf. From late spring through early fall the thermocline on the shelf is fully developed and ...

D. L. Porter; D. R. Thompson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Review of SAR for Packaging Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 March 2010 Standard Review Plan (SRP) E n v i r o n m e n t a l M a n a g e m e n t DOE - EM - SRP - 2010 2nd Edition Review of SAR for Packaging Report UCID-21218 Rev. 3 Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings Revision 3 A. A. DiSabatino D. Biswas M. DeMicco L. E. Fischer R. S. Hafner L. B. Hagler J. J. Haslam G. C. Mok C. S. Patel E. W. Russell S. Sitaraman C. K. Syn J. Wen M. H. West LAWRENCE N A T I O N A L LABORATORY LIVERMORE February 2008 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

51

SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers (Issue 15) Dataset Summary Description The SAR Activity Review - By the Numbers is a compilation of numerical data gathered from Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) forms filed by financial institutions. It serves as a companion piece to The SAR Activity Review - Trends, Tips & Issues, which provides information about the preparation, use, and utility of Suspicious Activity Reports. By the Numbers generally is published twice a year to cover two filing periods: January 1 to June 30 and July 1 to December 31. Tags {"Suspicious Activity Report",SAR,FinCEN,"SAR Statistics","Depository Institutions","Money Services Businesses",Casinos,"Card Clubs","Securities and Futures","Bank Secrecy Act",BSA}

52

Wind Class Sampling of Satellite SAR Imagery for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is ...

Merete Badger; Jake Badger; Morten Nielsen; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Alfredo Pea

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Semiannual Report to congress IG SAR 5-09 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

congress IG SAR 5-09 Semiannual Report to congress IG SAR 5-09 Department of Energy, Office of Inspector General, Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2008-March 31, 2009...

54

An econometric analysis of SARS and Avian Flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the impacts of SARS and human deaths arising from Avian Flu on international tourist arrivals to Asia. The effects of SARS and human deaths from Avian Flu are compared directly according to the number of human deaths. The nature of ... Keywords: Avian Flu, Data model, Dynamic panel, International tourism, SARS, Static fixed effects model

Michael McAleer; Bing-Wen Huang; Hsiao-I. Kuo; Chi-Chung Chen; Chia-Lin Chang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

SAR Imagery Segmentation by Statistical Region Growing and Hierarchical Merging  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an approach to accomplish synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation, which are corrupted by speckle noise. Some ordinary segmentation techniques may require speckle filtering previously. Our approach performs radar image segmentation using the original noisy pixels as input data, eliminating preprocessing steps, an advantage over most of the current methods. The algorithm comprises a statistical region growing procedure combined with hierarchical region merging to extract regions of interest from SAR images. The region growing step over-segments the input image to enable region aggregation by employing a combination of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test with a hierarchical stepwise optimization (HSWO) algorithm for the process coordination. We have tested and assessed the proposed technique on artificially speckled image and real SAR data containing different types of targets.

Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Carvalho, E.A.; Medeiros, F.N.S.; Martins, C.I.O.; Marques, R.C.P.; Oliveira, I.N.S.

2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

SAR-based land cover classification of Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orbital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) C-band data acquired by ERS-1/2 in vv-polarization and Radarsat in hh-polarization during the period from 1996 to 1999 were used to evaluate their combined information potential for classification of land cover ...

A. Y. Kwarteng; M. C. Dobson; J. Kellndorfer; R. Williams

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SAR/QSAR methods in public health practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship ((Q)SAR) modeling play an important and active role in ATSDR programs in support of the Agency mission to protect human populations from exposure to environmental contaminants. They are used for cross-chemical extrapolation to complement the traditional toxicological approach when chemical-specific information is unavailable. SAR and QSAR methods are used to investigate adverse health effects and exposure levels, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic properties of hazardous chemical compounds. They are applied as a part of an integrated systematic approach in the development of Health Guidance Values (HGVs), such as ATSDR Minimal Risk Levels, which are used to protect populations exposed to toxic chemicals at hazardous waste sites. (Q)SAR analyses are incorporated into ATSDR documents (such as the toxicological profiles and chemical-specific health consultations) to support environmental health assessments, prioritization of environmental chemical hazards, and to improve study design, when filling the priority data needs (PDNs) as mandated by Congress, in instances when experimental information is insufficient. These cases are illustrated by several examples, which explain how ATSDR applies (Q)SAR methods in public health practice.

Demchuk, Eugene, E-mail: edemchuk@cdc.gov; Ruiz, Patricia; Chou, Selene; Fowler, Bruce A.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

RESEARCH SARS-CoV Infection in a Restaurant from Palm Civet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiologic investigations showed that 2 of 4 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) identified in the winter of 20032004 were a waitress at a restaurant in Guangzhou, China, that served palm civets as food and a customer who ate in the restaurant a short distance from animal cages. All 6 palm civets at the restaurant were positive for SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Partial spike (S) gene sequences of SARS-CoV from the 2 patients were identical to 4 of 5 S gene viral sequences from palm civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SARS-CoV from palm civets in the restaurant was most closely related to animal isolates. SARS cases at the restaurant were the result of recent interspecies transfer from the putative palm civet reservoir, and not the result of continued circulation of SARS-CoV in the human population. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic emerged in 2003 in 6 municipalities in the Pearl River delta region in Guangdong, China. Early casepatients were more likely to be persons with occupational exposure to animals, such as animal sellers or restaurant cooks (1,2). Tracing the source of infection has been complicated, given the sporadic nature of index cases without a clear history of contact with animals. After the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the end of the SARS epidemic, 4 new cases of SARS were reported from

Ming Wang; Meiying Yan; Huifang Xu; Weili Liang; Biao Kan; Bojian Zheng; Honglin Chen; Han Zheng; Yanmei Xu; Enmin Zhang; Hongxia Wang; Jingrong Ye; Guichang Li; Machao Li; Zhigang Cui; Yu-fei Liu; Rong-tong Guo; Xiao-ning Liu; Duan-hua Zhou; Ailan Zhao; Rong Hai; Dongzhen Yu; Yi Guan; Jianguo Xu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.  

SciTech Connect

Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The integration of Human Factors (HF) in the SAR process training course text  

SciTech Connect

This text provides the technical basis for a two-day course on human factors (HF), as applied to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) process. The overall objective of this text and course is to: provide the participant with a working knowledge of human factors-related requirements, suggestions for doing a human safety analysis applying a graded approach, and an ability to demonstrate using the results of the human safety analysis, that human factors elements as defined by DOE (human factors engineering, procedures, training, oversight, staffing, qualifications), can support wherever necessary, nuclear safety commitments in the SAR. More specifically, the objectives of the text and course are: (1) To provide the SAR preparer with general guidelines for doing HE within the context of a graded approach for the SAR; (2) To sensitize DOE facility managers and staff, safety analysts and SAR preparers, independent reviewers, and DOE reviewers and regulators, to DOE Order 5480.23 requirements for HE in the SAR; (3) To provide managers, analysts, reviewers and regulators with a working knowledge of HE concepts and techniques within the context of a graded approach for the SAR, and (4) To provide SAR managers and DOE reviewers and regulators with general guidelines for monitoring and coordinating the work of preparers of HE inputs throughout the SAR process, and for making decisions regarding the safety relevance of HE inputs to the SAR. As a ready reference for implementing the human factors requirements of DOE Order 5480.22 and DOE Standard 3009-94, this course text and accompanying two-day course are intended for all persons who are involved in the SAR.

Ryan, T.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1) , Charlotte Bay Hasager(1) , Donald Thompson(2) , Lars Boye Hansen(3) (1) Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory, Technical, Denmark ABSTRACT Wind fields extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are used to analyze

62

Flight path-driven mitigation of wavefront curvature effects in SAR images  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wavefront curvature effect associated with a complex image produced by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be mitigated based on which of a plurality of possible flight paths is taken by the SAR when capturing the image. The mitigation can be performed differently for different ones of the flight paths.

Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing R?GIA T. S. ARA?JO, FÁTIMA an algorithm to detect oil spills in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images that can be used to support sensing of environmental disasters. Spillage of oil in coastal waters can be a catastrophic event

de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

64

A region-based GLRT detection of oil spills in SAR images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the study, we propose a fast region-based method for the detection of oil spills in SAR images. The proposed method combines the image segmentation technique and conventional detection theory to improve the accuracy of oil spills detection. From the ... Keywords: Constant false alarm ratio (CFAR), Generalizes likelihood ratio test (GLRT), Image segmentation, Oil spills, SAR image

Lena Chang; Z. S. Tang; S. H. Chang; Yang-Lang Chang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

increases pressure, leads to measurable uplift; short term leakage leads to subsidence *GPS (point positions, high temporal resolution) and InSAR (high spatial resolution)...

66

Hidden Markov Models for Multi-aperture SAR Target Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL NAME: Flake, Layne R. QUARTER/YEAR: SP 95 DEPARTMENT: Electrical Engineering DEGREE: M. S. ADVISER'S NAME: Krishnamurthy, Ashok K. and Ahalt, Stanley C. TITLE OF THESIS: Hidden Markov Models for Multi-aperture SAR Target Detection This thesis proposes a new multi-aperture synthetic aperture radar (MASAR) automatic target detection (ATD) algorithm that uses hidden Markov models (HMMs) to exploit the anisotropic nature of radar returns from man-made objects. Specific HMM structures are developed to represent target and clutter pixels based on the way their radar returns vary at different aspect angles. The HMM ATD algorithm is subjected to a preliminary evaluation using simulated MASAR imagery. The HMM ATD algorithm displays better detection accuracy than the best alternative ATD method while requiring at least two orders of magnitude less calculations. Adviser's Signature Department of Electrical Engineering Acknowledgments I thank my adviser...

Layne R. Flake; Ashok K. Krishnamurthy; Stanley C. Ahalt; Adviser' s Name Krishnamurthy; Ashok K; Stanley C

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Tracking of Ice Edges and Ice Floes by Wavelet Analysis of SAR Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of wavelet transforms in the tracking of sequential ice features in the ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, especially in situations where feature correlation techniques fail to yield reasonable results. ...

Antony K. Liu; Seelye Martin; Ronald Kwok

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Low-power high-performance SAR ADC with redundancy and digital background calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As technology scales, the improved speed and energy eciency make the successive- approximation-register (SAR) architecture an attractive alternative for applications that require high-speed and high-accuracy analog-to-digital ...

Chang, Albert Hsu Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High Resolution Hurricane Vector Winds from C-band Dual-Polarization SAR Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new approach for retrieving hurricane surface wind vectors utilizing C-band dual-polarization (VV, VH) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. The co-polarized geophysical model function (CMOD5.N) and a new cross-...

Biao Zhang; William Perrie; Jun A. Zhang; Eric W. Uhlhorn; Yijun He

70

UHF-SAR and LIDAR Complementary Sensor Fusion for Unexploded Buried Munitions Detection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Given the UHF bands properties of foliage and round penetration, a UHF-SAR image contains both above- and below-surface scatterers. The problem of detecting sub-surface objects (more)

Depoy, Randy S., Jr.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Project W-320 SAR and process control thermal analyses  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of thermal hydraulic computer modeling supporting Project W-320 for process control and SAR documentation. Parametric analyses were performed for the maximum steady state waste temperature. The parameters included heat load distribution, tank heat load, fluffing factor and thermal conductivity. Uncertainties in the fluffing factor and heat load distribution had the largest effect on maximum waste temperature. Safety analyses were performed for off normal events including loss of ventilation, loss of evaporation and loss of secondary chiller. The loss of both the primary and secondary ventilation was found to be the most limiting event with saturation temperature in the bottom waste reaching in just over 30 days. An evaluation was performed for the potential lowering of the supernatant level in tank 241-AY-102. The evaluation included a loss of ventilation and steam bump analysis. The reduced supernatant level decreased the time to reach saturation temperature in the waste for the loss of ventilation by about one week. However, the consequence of a steam bump were dramatically reduced.

Sathyanarayana, K.

1997-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

72

Waste Facility, WVNS-SAR-023, Rev. 0, Draft C REFERENCE:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Mr. Parrott: Enclosed for your review are ten copies of the PSAR for the Remote Handled Waste Facility. The review schedule that was discussed between you and Thomas J. Vero of my staff indicates that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will begin reviewing this PSAR upon receipt and will provide any comments or questions to the Ohio Field Office West Valley Demonstration Project (OH/WVDP) by June 29, 2000. OH/WVDP will respond to any comments or questions in a manner similar to our responses to the Request for Additional Information on previous Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Following satisfactory resolution of any open issues, NRC will provide a written report on WVNS-SAR-023 to OH/WVDP by August 11, 2000. This schedule will facilitate a September 2000 approval of WVNS-SAR-023 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Ohio Field Office and allow for commencement of construction this fall.

Mr. Jack; D. Parrott; Letter Wd; Barbara A. Mazurowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The role of IT in crisis response: Lessons from the SARS and Asian Tsunami disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on crisis management recognizes the important role of information although few studies of crisis response deal explicitly with information systems. In this paper, we present a case study of Singapore's response to the SARS and Asian Tsunami ... Keywords: Coordination theory, Crisis response, Crisis response information system, Disaster response, Resource based view, Soft positivism

Dorothy E. Leidner; Gary Pan; Shan L. Pan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

0.8W 12-bit SAR ADC sensors interface for RFID applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and first measuring results of an ultra-low power 12 bit successive-approximation ADC for autonomous multi-sensor systems are presented. The comparator and the DAC are optmised for low power consumption. The power consumption is 0.52@mW from ... Keywords: Low power SAR ADC, RFID application, Ultra-low power latched comparator

Daniela De Venuto; David Tio Castro; Youri Ponomarev; Eduard Stikvoort

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Speckle suppression in SAR images using the 2-D GARCH model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel Bayesian-based speckle suppression method for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is presented that preserves the structural features and textural information of the scene. First, the logarithmic transform of the original image is analyzed ... Keywords: 2-D GARCH model, MAP estimation, speckle, statistical modeling, synthetic aperture radar

Maryam Amirmazlaghani; Hamidreza Amindavar; Alireza Moghaddamjoo

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Roskilde, Denmark Email: charlotte.hasager@risoe.dk, morten by Risoe National Laboratory, Dept. of Wind Energy for assessment of offshore wind resource maps based

77

Local Interpolation-based Polar Format SAR: Algorithm, Hardware Implementation and Design Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a local interpolation-based variant of the well-known polar format algorithm used for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation. We develop the algorithm to match the capabilities of the application-specific logic-in-memory ... Keywords: Chip generator, Logic in memory, Synthetic aperture radar

Qiuling Zhu; Christian R. Berger; Eric L. Turner; Larry Pileggi; Franz Franchetti

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sequential Assimilation of ERS-1 SAR Data into a Coupled Land SurfaceHydrological Model Using an Extended Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first attempt to sequentially assimilate European Space Agency (ESA) Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) estimations of surface soil moisture in the production scheme of a lumped rainfallrunoff model has been ...

C. Francois; A. Quesney; C. Ottl

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

White paper Dr. Dmitriy Garmatyuk, garmatd@muohio.edu High-resolution ultrawideband SAR based on OFDM architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White paper ­ Dr. Dmitriy Garmatyuk, garmatd@muohio.edu High-resolution ultrawideband SAR based on OFDM architecture SUMMARY: This white paper addresses the proposal of research aimed at the development

Dollar, Anna

80

Case Study of a Coastal Jet at SpitsbergenComparison of SAR- and Model-Estimated Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of in situ ship measurements, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, and high-resolution numerical modeling was used to investigate a mesoscale coastal jet radiating out from Hinlopenstretet, Norway, on 14 August 1996. In the ...

Anne Dagrun Sandvik; Birgitte Rugaard Furevik

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Draft genome sequence of strain HIMB100, a cultured representative of the SAR116 clade of marine Alphaproteobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strain HIMB100 is a planktonic marine bacterium in the class Alphaproteobacteria. This strain is of interest because it is one of the first known isolates from a globally ubiquitous clade of marine bacteria known as SAR116 ...

Grote, Jana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.  

SciTech Connect

Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comparing SAR measurments of natural oil seeps in the Gulf of Mexico with mineral and biological slicks in the North Sea .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, natural oil seeps in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are studied. The intension is to compare seeps to known oil slicks as (more)

Hanssen, Claes Anders Storm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) for geologic reconnaissance in Arctic regions: An example from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide an additional remote-sensing tool for regional geologic studies in arctic regions. Although SAR data do not yield direct information on rock type and do not replace traditional optical data, SAR data can provide useful geologic information in arctic regions where the stratigraphic column includes a wide range of lithologies, and bedrock exposures have been reduced to rubble by frost action. For example, in ERS-1 SAR data from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) of the northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska, carbonate and clastic rocks can give remarkably different radar responses on minimally reprocessed SAR data. The different radar response of different lithologies can specifically the size and angularity of scree in talus slopes. Additional postacquisition processing can both remove many of the negative terrain effects common in SAR data and enhance contrasts in bedrock lithology. Because of this ability to discriminate between gross lithologic packages, the ERS-1 SAR data can be used to provide a regional view of ANWR and a detailed look at specific areas. A mosaic of ERS-1 SAR data from all of ANWR provides a synoptic view of the regional structural framework, such as the anticlinoria of northern ANWR and the different allochthonous units of central and southern ANWR. Higher resolution ERS-1 SAR data of the Porcupine Lake area can be used to examine specific structural and stratigraphic problems associated with several major structural boundaries.

Hanks, C.L.; Guritz, R.M. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Status of the TOUGH-FLAC simulator and recent applications related to coupled fluid flow and crustal deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is centered on one CO 2 injection well. Figure 4. InSAR dataground uplift above injection wells KB501 and KB503 (1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. The three state-of-

Rutqvist, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mapping Surface Currents and Waves with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar in Coastal Waters: Observations of Wave Breaking in Swell-Dominant Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne and spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radars (InSARs) produce surface velocity measurements at very high spatial resolutions over a large area. The data allow construction of the velocity strain field for highlighting ocean ...

Paul A. Hwang; Jakov V. Toporkov; Mark A. Sletten; Steven P. Menk

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data have been processed and an initial interpretation of the results is ongoing. In particular, we have InSAR stacks for over twenty pairs of

89

Rapid Determination of Near-Fault Earthquake Deformation Using Differential LiDAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GeoEarthScope Airborne LiDAR and Satellite InSAR Imagery,2003). Northern California LIDAR Data: A Tool for MappingSurvey-scale airborne lidar error analysis from parallel

Borsa, Adrian Antal; Minster, Jean Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Spatial Averaging of Fields from Half-wave Dipole Antennas and Corresponding SAR Calculations in the NORMAN Human Voxel Model Betwee n 65 MHz and 2 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Findlay, RP; and Dimbylow, PJ. 2009. Spatial Averaging of Fields from Half-wave Dipole Antennas and Corresponding SAR Calculations in the NORMAN Human Voxel Model Between 65 MHz and 2 GHz. In Physics in Medicine and Biology, Volume 54, Number 8, 2009, pp. 2437-2447. This RF exposure research is the second part of SAR modelling work by the Health Protection Agency in the UK. The paper addresses SAR modelling for non-uniform RF exposure conditions. When an antenna is located clo...

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Definition: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) utilizes SAR images from two different time periods to generate maps of surface deformation. The technique can potentially measure millimeter-scale changes in the Earth's surface.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As InSAR, IfSAR Related Terms Synthetic Aperture Radar, radar, sustainability References ↑ Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation (Burgmann et al. 2000) ↑ Improved Visulaization of Satellite Radar InSAR Observed Structural Controls at Producing Geothermal Field Using Modeled Horizontal Surface Displacements(Opplinger et al. 2006)

92

Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Digital Intermediate Frequency Receiver Module For Use In Airborne Sar Applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital IF receiver (DRX) module directly compatible with advanced radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The DRX can combine a 1 G-Sample/sec 8-bit ADC with high-speed digital signal processor, such as high gate-count FPGA technology or ASICs to realize a wideband IF receiver. DSP operations implemented in the DRX can include quadrature demodulation and multi-rate, variable-bandwidth IF filtering. Pulse-to-pulse (Doppler domain) filtering can also be implemented in the form of a presummer (accumulator) and an azimuth prefilter. An out of band noise source can be employed to provide a dither signal to the ADC, and later be removed by digital signal processing. Both the range and Doppler domain filtering operations can be implemented using a unique pane architecture which allows on-the-fly selection of the filter decimation factor, and hence, the filter bandwidth. The DRX module can include a standard VME-64 interface for control, status, and programming. An interface can provide phase history data to the real-time image formation processors. A third front-panel data port (FPDP) interface can send wide bandwidth, raw phase histories to a real-time phase history recorder for ground processing.

Tise, Bertice L. (Albuquerque, NM); Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Author manuscript, published in "SPARS'09- Signal Processing with Adaptive Sparse Structured Representations (2009)" 1 Compressed sensing based compression of SAR raw data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractDue to their noise-like features, SAR images are difficult to acquire with compressed sensing techniques. However, some parts of the images, typically associated to man-made structures, are compressible and we investigate two techniques exploiting that information to allow a compressive acquisition of the whole image. These techniques result in a significant enhancement of the image quality compared to classical compressed sensing. Moreover, compared to classical sampling and quantisation of the SAR raw data, they allow a significant reduction of bitrate with a limited increase of the distortion. However, their efficiency depends strongly on the presence of compressible parts in the image. I.

Gabriel Rilling; Mike Davies; Bernard Mulgrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

An 8-bit, 10 kHz, 5.1 ?W, 0.18 ?m CMOS SAR ADC for RFID applications with sensing capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An 5.1 ?W, 1.8 V, 8-bit, successive approximation (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using 10 kHz clock was designed and fabricated in a 0.18 ?m CMOS technology for passive UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) applications. The ADC ... Keywords: ADC, Micro power, Noise, RFID, Wireless sensor network

J. Marjonen; O. Vermesan; H. Rustad

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal Field With Satellite Interferometric Radar (Insar)- New Insights Into Reservoir Extent And Structural Controls Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a new example of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar's (InSAR) remarkable utility for defining an operating geothermal reservoir's lateral extent and hydrologically active fracture systems. InSAR reveals millimeter-level surface change due to volume change in the reservoir and overlying aquifer systems caused by fluid pressure reduction

97

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data

98

Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structural studies of the SARS virus Nsp15 endonuclease and the human innate immunity receptor TLR3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional (3D) structural determination of biological macromolecules is not only critical to understanding their mechanisms, but also has practical applications. Combining the high resolution imaging of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and efficient computer processing, protein structures in solution or in two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be determined. The lipid monolayer technique uses the high affinity binding of 6His-tagged proteins to a Ni-nitrilotriacetic (NTA) lipid to create high local protein concentrations, which facilitates 2D crystal formation. In this study, several proteins have been crystallized using this technique, including the SARS virus Nsp15 endonuclease and the human Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 extracellular domain (ECD). Single particle analysis can determine protein structures in solution without the need for crystals. 3D structures of several protein complexes had been solved by the single particle method, including IniA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Nsp15 and TLR3 ECD. Determining the structures of these proteins is an important step toward understanding pathogenic microbes and our immune system.

Sun, Jingchuan

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to Identify and Characterize Overwintering Areas of Fish in Ice-Covered Arctic RIvers: A Demonstration with Broad Whitefish and their Habitats in the Sagavanirktok River, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In northern climates, locating overwintering fish can be very challenging due to thick ice cover. Areas near the coast of the Beaufort Sea provide valuable overwintering habitat for both resident and anadromous fish species; identifying and understanding their use of overwintering areas is of special interest. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from two spaceborne satellites was examined as an alternative to radiotelemetry for identifying anadromous fish overwintering. The presence of water and ice were sampled at 162 sites and fish were sampled at 16 of these sites. From SAR imagery alone, we successfully identified large pools inhabited by overwintering fish in the ice-covered Sagavanirktok River. In addition, the imagery was able to identify all of the larger pools (mean minimum length of 138m (range 15-470 m; SD=131)) of water located by field sampling. The effectiveness of SAR to identify these pools varied from 31% to 100%, depending on imagery polarization, the incidence angle range, and the orbit. Horizontal transmitvertical receive (HV) polarization appeared best. The accuracy of SAR was also assessed at a finer pixel-by-pixel (30-m x30-m) scale. The best correspondence at this finer scale was obtained with an image having HV polarization. The levels of agreement ranged from 54% to 69%. The presence of broad whitefish (the only anadromous species present) was associated with salinity and pool size (estimated with SAR imagery); fish were more likely to be found in larger pools with low salinity. This research illustrates that SAR imaging has great potential for identifying under-ice overwintering areas of riverine fish. These techniques should allow managers to identify critical overwintering areas with relatively more ease and lower cost than traditional techniques.

Brown, Richard S.; Duguay, Claude R.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moulton, Larry; Doucette, Peter J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Glasgow Theses Service http://theses.gla.ac.uk/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wetland loss in many delta regions. Public concern over wetland loss in Louisiana in the 1980s led of significant oil fields (Chen et al., 2012). Increasing human activities like farming and petroleum extraction-estimated. InSAR observations in Xianhe Town in the delta, which is not affected by oil extraction, also #12

Singer, Jeremy

102

Microsoft Word - 651680 SAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

request. The items listed below are included in that report: * an accountant's report; * financial information; * information on payments to service providers; * assets held for...

103

Property:BestPractices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BestPractices BestPractices Jump to: navigation, search Property Name BestPractices Property Type Text Description List of best practices that could be applied while using this technique. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Active Seismic Techniques Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Gravity Survey B Borehole Seismic Techniques C Compound and Elemental Analysis E Exploration Drilling F FLIR F cont. Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Geophysical Techniques I Injectivity Test Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Rock M Microgravity-Hybrid Microgravity O Optical Televiewer P PSInSAR R Radar Refraction Survey S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Spontaneous Potential Well Log SqueeSAR Static Temperature Survey X X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Pages using the property "BestPractices"

104

Applications of Radar Interferometry to Detect Surface Deformation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applications of Radar Interferometry to Detect Surface Deformation in Applications of Radar Interferometry to Detect Surface Deformation in Geothermal Areas of Imperial Valley in Southern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Applications of Radar Interferometry to Detect Surface Deformation in Geothermal Areas of Imperial Valley in Southern California Abstract InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) is applied in Imperial Valley of southern California to detect and characterize surface deformation in existing geothermal fields, possible future geothermal developments, and around faults. The data used are from the Envisat satellite, collected over the period 2003-2010. The specific InSAR technique applied, SqueeSARTM, identifies permanent and distributed scatterers (PS and DS), which play the role of numerous benchmarks

105

Preliminary Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Preliminary Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: To develop a foundation to support future geothermal potential assessment on the Redfield campus property, this project compiled a GIS with the framework coming from existing geologic, hydrologic, and geoscience information. Along with the GIS, an InSAR deformation study was conducted from a suite of previously created interferograms from 1993-2005. Geochemical data were also re-evaluated in the context of fault controlled flow paths and the InSAR data results. Estimates of vertical and horizontal surface displacements associated with production of geothermal fluids were

106

SAR992FINAL.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report to Report to Congress October 1999 DOE/IG-0014 April 1, to September 30, 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General The Honorable Bill Richardson Secretary U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Dear Secretary Richardson: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. The report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending September 30, 1999. The Inspector General Act, as amended, requires you to forward the report to the appropriate congressional oversight committees within 30 days of your receipt of this report. The mission of the OIG is to assist Department managers by identifying opportunities to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Department programs and operations. With this goal in mind, the OIG issued reports on

107

UIC Developing Drug for SARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

but their backbones. When viruses mutate, as they frequently do, thwarting the action of drugs, the mutations typically occur in these sidechains. "By targeting the backbone, we...

108

Property:DataAcquisition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DataAcquisition DataAcquisition Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DataAcquisition Property Type Text Description Information on acquisition, including both collection and lists of data repositories. Subproperties This property has the following 27 subproperties: A Active Seismic Techniques Aeromagnetic Survey C Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Core Analysis D Direct-Current Resistivity Survey E Electrical Techniques F FLIR FMI Log Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Survey G Ground Gravity Survey Ground Magnetics H Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) I Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Rock M Magnetotellurics Mud Logging P PSInSAR R Radar Reflection Survey R cont. Refraction Survey S SRT Self Potential Step-out Well Stereo Satellite Imagery T Telluric Survey Time-Domain Electromagnetics

109

CX-008562: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Categorical Exclusion Determination 62: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008562: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 06/18/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE and recipient cost share funds would be used by US Geothermal Incorporated (USG) to demonstrate and exploration strategy that could lead to the commercial development of the San Emidio geothermal resource area located on public and private lands in Washoe County, Nevada. CX-008562.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1810: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1810: Final Environmental Assessment CX-001827

110

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 12420 of 28,905 results. 11 - 12420 of 28,905 results. Download Microsoft Word- Chapter 10_2006_Jun http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-chapter-102006jun Download CX-008562: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 06/18/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008562-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Special Report: IG-0748 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/special-report-ig-0748 Download State Incentives for Energy Efficiency http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/state-incentives-energy-efficiency

111

IG SAR 10-09.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 30, 2009 The Honorable Dr. Steven Chu Secretary of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit the Office ofInspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. This report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the six month period ending September 30,2009. This report reflects our continuing commitment to focus OIG efforts on the issues and concerns most critical to you, the Administration, the Congress, and the taxpayer. We look forward to working with you on matters of mutual interest. Grego H. Friedman Inspector General Enclosure (i) Printed with soy ink on recycled paper This page intentionally left blank. APRIL 1, 2009 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2009

112

IG SAR 5-09.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11585 11585 A p r i l 3 0 , 2009 'I'ile j-j.i?jlorable Dr. S teverr C'~ILI Secretary of X!nergy Washingtont r 9 1 . 1 20585 1 aul pleased to s ~ & j ~ > i ; tilt: C)ffice of Inspector (;eilc.:-al's (OIC:;) Sl:ni,;i:ifi~?.~csI Kc,nar.l lo IG acfivi%i;:s and ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~L"~II.s during the .c;i>; non nth peri.od er~tjing Mardl 3 1 , 2009. This repn1-t reflc6;ts our con%in.liirrg cornmiirnerlt t.0 f i 3 ~ 1 . i ~ cj]:(:; efforts on issues and corlcerns mix: criticnl to yiju: the Adrnjnistralion, the Congrc;.ess, x~ld the taxp;lyer.. >,{.I .% I f

113

Why Sequence SAR11 Genome Evolution?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon State University and Michael Rapp, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

114

Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Peer Review of a "Synthesis and Assessment Report on a Peer Review of a "Synthesis and Assessment Report on Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations and Review of Integrated Scenario Development and Application" Pursuant to Section V of the "Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review" of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), under the authority of the Information Quality Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-554), the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) announces a plan for a peer review of its Synthesis and Assessment Report 2.1 entitled "Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations and Review of Integrated Scenario Development and Application" The CCSP (see http://www.climatescience.gov for details) integrates federal

115

Microsoft Word - PENSION-SAR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The items listed below are included in that report: 1. an accountant's report; 2. financial information and information on payments to service providers; 3. assets held for...

116

Microsoft Word - SAR-SIP.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The items listed below are included in that report: 1. an accountant's report; 2. financial information and information on payments to service providers; 3. assets held for...

117

IG SAR 10-12.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Horizons Baking Company (NHBC), Metro Regional Transit Authority (MRTA), Forest City Residential Management, Inc., and Timken Company. Otis expressed the opinion that except...

118

IG SAR 5-09.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MARCH 31, 2009 17 SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS I The Department developed a draft Nanotechnology Notice to prescribe safety practices for working with Nanotechnology activities...

119

Sandia SAR Firsts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Firsts Sandia National Laboratories is proud of its history of developing cutting-edge synthetic aperture radar technologies. Below is a short list detailing Sandia's...

120

Sandia SAR Information Contacts -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing E-Magazine The following files are in pdf format: 2006 Quarter 1 2005 Quarter 4 Quarter 3 Quarter 2 Quarter 1 2004 Quarter 4 Quarter 3 If you would like to receive a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sandia SAR Capabilities -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Sandia National Laboratories offers state-of-the-art capability in the design and development of Synthetic Aperture Radars, from system design through system...

122

Review of SAR for Packaging Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material.

123

DOE IG SAR 10-08.qxd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table of Contents Message from the Inspector General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Significant Audits, Inspections, and Other Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Significant Investigative Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Positive Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Highlights Based on Office of Inspector General Work . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Congressional Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Hotline System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Management Referral System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

124

Mine subsidence monitoring using multisource satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- This paper demonstrates the use of differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) for mine subsidence monitoring in Australia. The C-band SAR imagery acquired by ERS-1/2 and Radarsat-1 and L-band data acquired by JERS-1 were tested. As the satellites have different re-visit periods so that the mine subsidence occurred during the intervals of 1, 24, 35 and 44 days can be observed. The C-band InSAR results generally have lower coherence over vegetated areas, but the Radarsat-1 fine-beam mode data demonstrated that decorrelation can be reduced by having finer imaging resolution and shorter temporal separation. Another difficulty of DInSAR for mine subsidence monitoring is to resolve the phase ambiguity in interferogram. The L-band SAR data with comparatively longer wavelength than C-band showed it is more suitable for mining subsidence monitoring where large displacement over a small spatial extent occurs.

Hsing-chung Chang; Linlin Ge; Chris Rizos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depositional Settings, South Belridge Field, Kern County,Surveillance of South Belridge Diatomite. in Proceedings ofSubsidence in the South Belridge Oil Field, California. in

Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization and Waterflood Monitoring. in 2000 SPET. W. SPE 59295: Waterflood surveillance and supervisoryI NTRODUCTION A successful waterflood depends on the proper

Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Geographic Information System At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Brady Hot Springs Geographic Information System At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Brady Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes InSAR Ground Displacement Analysis, Gary Oppliger and Mark Coolbaugh. This project supports increased utilization of geothermal resources in the Western United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study area (80 km NE of Reno, Nevada) and will serve as a technology template for other geothermal fields. Raw format European Space Agency (ESA) ERS 1/2 satellite synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) radar scenes acquired from 1992 through 2002 are being processed to

128

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description Because fractures and faults with sub-commercial permeability can propagate hot fluid and hydrothermal alteration throughout a geothermal reservoir, potential field geophysical methods including resistivity, gravity, heatflow and magnetics cannot distinguish between low-permeability fractures and LAF's (Large Aperature Fractures). USG will develop and test the combination of three-component,long-offset seismic surveying, permanent scatter synthetic aperture radar interferometry (PSInSAR) and structural kinematic analysis as an integrated method for locating and 3-D mapping of LAF's in shallow to intermediate depth (600-4000 feet) geothermal systems. This project is designed to test the methodology on known occurrences of LAF's and then apply the technology to expand an existing production field and find a new production field in a separate but related resource area. A full diameter production well will be drilled into each of the two lease blocks covered by the geophysical exploration program.

129

Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites  

SciTech Connect

Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

131

Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data collected in the Coso geothermal area, eastern California, during 1993-1999 indicate ground subsidence over a approximately 50 km 2 region that approximately

132

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Deformation at Surface Deformation at an Enhanced Oil Recovery Site Tim Dixon University of South Florida Tampa, Florida Surface Deformation - Background * Surface deformation (eg measured by GPS or InSAR) is sensitive to pressure changes in the reservoir at depth * Potentially useful as a low cost tool for monitoring, verification, accounting for CO2 injection and storage (non-invasive) * Surrogate for downhole pressure monitoring? * Challenge - separating signal from a variety of noise sources Study Site: Hastings, Texas Deformation sources in the Gulf Coast * CO2 or saline water injection, oil extraction at the site of interest * Regional ground water table variation associated with wet/dry season * Local ground water variation due to pumping * Extraction of oil, natural gas from adjacent

133

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Model ground subsidence using observations of satellite radar interferometry Notes The InSAR displacement data was inverted for the positions, geometry, and relative strengths of the deformation sources at depth using a nonlinear least squares minimization algorithm. Elastic solutions were used for a prolate uniformly pressurized spheroidal cavity in a semi-infinite body as

134

Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria  

SciTech Connect

In Salah Gas Project in Algeria has been injecting 0.5-1 million tonnes CO{sub 2} per year over the past five years into a water-filled strata at a depth of about 1,800 to 1,900 m. Unlike most CO{sub 2} storage sites, the permeability of the storage formation is relatively low and comparatively thin with a thickness of about 20 m. To ensure adequate CO{sub 2} flow-rates across the low-permeability sand-face, the In Salah Gas Project decided to use long-reach (about 1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing research project we use field data and coupled reservoir-geomechanical numerical modeling to assess the effectiveness of this approach and to investigate monitoring techniques to evaluate the performance of a CO{sub 2}-injection operation in relatively low permeability formations. Among the field data used are ground surface deformations evaluated from recently acquired satellite-based inferrometry (InSAR). The InSAR data shows a surface uplift on the order of 5 mm per year above active CO{sub 2} injection wells and the uplift pattern extends several km from the injection wells. In this paper we use the observed surface uplift to constrain our coupled reservoir-geomechanical model and conduct sensitivity studies to investigate potential causes and mechanisms of the observed uplift. The results of our analysis indicates that most of the observed uplift magnitude can be explained by pressure-induced, poro-elastic expansion of the 20 m thick injection zone, but there could also be a significant contribution from pressure-induced deformations within a 100 m thick zone of shaly sands immediately above the injection zone.

Rutqvist, J.; Vasco, D.W.; Myer, L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modeling Collapse Chimney and Spall Zone Settlement as a Source of Post-Shot Subsidence Detected by Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground surface subsidence resulting from the March 1992 JUNCTION underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) imaged by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) wholly occurred during a period of several months after the shot (Vincent et al., 1999) and after the main cavity collapse event. A significant portion of the subsidence associated with the small (less than 20 kt) GALENA and DIVIDER tests probably also occurred after the shots, although the deformation detected in these cases contains additional contributions from coseismic processes, since the radar scenes used to construct the deformation interferogram bracketed these two later events, The dimensions of the seas of subsidence resulting from all three events are too large to be solely accounted for by processes confined to the damage zone in the vicinity of the shot point or the collapse chimney. Rather, the subsidence closely corresponds to the span dimensions predicted by Patton's (1990) empirical relationship between spall radius and yield. This suggests that gravitational settlement of damaged rock within the spall zone is an important source of post-shot subsidence, in addition to settlement of the rubble within the collapse chimney. These observations illustrate the potential power of InSAR as a tool for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring and on-site inspection in that the relatively broad ({approx} 100 m to 1 km) subsidence signatures resulting from small shots detonated at normal depths of burial (or even significantly overburied) are readily detectable within large geographical areas (100 km x 100 km) under favorable observing conditions. Furthermore, the present results demonstrate the flexibility of the technique in that the two routinely gathered satellite radar images used to construct the interferogram need not necessarily capture the event itself, but can cover a time period up to several months following the shot.

Foxwall, W.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

136

Tectonic Setting of the Wooded Island Earthquake Swarm, Eastern Washington  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic anomalies provide insights into the tectonic implications of a swarm of ?1500 shallow (?1 km deep) earthquakes that occurred in 2009 on the Hanford site,Washington. Epicenters were concentrated in a 2 km2 area nearWooded Island in the Columbia River. The largest earthquake (M 3.0) had first motions consistent with slip on a northwest-striking reverse fault. The swarm was accompanied by 35 mm of vertical surface deformation, seen in satellite interferometry (InSAR), interpreted to be caused by ?50 mm of slip on a northwest-striking reverse fault and associated bedding-plane fault in the underlying Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A magnetic anomaly over exposed CRBG at Yakima Ridge 40 km northwest of Wooded Island extends southeastward beyond the ridge to the Columbia River, suggesting that the Yakima Ridge anticline and its associated thrust fault extend southeastward in the subsurface. In map view, the concealed anticline passes through the earthquake swarm and lies parallel to reverse faults determined from first motions and InSAR data. A forward model of the magnetic anomaly near Wooded Island is consistent with uplift of concealed CRBG, with the top surface <200 m below the surface. The earthquake swarm and the thrust and bedding-plane faults modeled from interferometry all fall within the northeastern limb of the faulted anticline. Although fluids may be responsible for triggering the Wooded Island earthquake swarm, the seismic and aseismic deformation are consistent with regional-scale tectonic compression across the concealed Yakima Ridge anticline.

Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian; Weaver, Craig; Rohay, Alan C.; Wells, Ray E.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

April2002SAR Revised Final 6-3-02.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 October 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002 Office of Inspector General Office of Inspector General The Inspector General's Message - Page 1 The Department's Management Challenges Page 2 Other Significant Accomplishments Page 33 OIG Reports Issued and Followup Action Process - Page 41 Statistical Data-Savings, Questioned Costs, Hotline Statistics, and Fines, Settlements and Recoveries Page 45 United States Department of Energy Report to Congress Semiannual At Your Service Dear Secretary Abraham: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. This Report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending March 31, 2002. The Report reflects our continuing commitment to focus OIG efforts on the issues and

138

Microsoft Word - N01747_Bldg 100 SAR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 LMS/PIN/N01747 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01747 Pinellas County, Florida, Site Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Site Assessment Report August 2012 Doc. No. N01747 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii

139

A highly digital, reconfigurable and voltage scalable SAR ADC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micropower sensor networks have a broad range of applications which include military surveillance, environmental monitoring, chemical detection and more recently, medical monitoring systems. Each node of the sensor network ...

Yip, Marcus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Remote Sensing of Ocean Waves by Polarimetric SAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to measure ocean wave slope spectra using fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR) data was developed without the need for a complex hydrodynamic modulation transform function. There is no explicit use of a hydrodynamic ...

Yijun He; Hui Shen; William Perrie

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The WEMSAR project is co-ordinated at NERSC, Nansen Environmental and Re- mote Sensing Centre, in Bergen. WEMSAR homepages are available at NERSC http://www.nrsc.no/~wemsar/ and at Risø http://www.risoe.dk/vea- atu/remote/wemsar.htm. The partners are · NERSC Norway Professor Ola Johannessen · Risø National Lab

142

The Three Sisters in the Ge-sar Epic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is identified with the three sisters. 9. A.H. Fracke, Der Fruhlings- und Wintermythus der Kesar sage (Memoires de la Societe Finno-Ougrienne, XV, Helsingfurs), reprint Osnabruck 1968 (review S. Hummel in; ZMR, 1971, ~): Der Wintermythus, p.46. '10...

Hummel, Siegbert

1974-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Crystal Structure of SARS Coronavirus Protease Determined Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SGX Collaborative Access Team (SGX-CAT) beamline at sector 31 of the Advanced Photon Source, a national research facility funded by the DOE's Office of Science, Office of...

144

Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Microsoft Word - PeerReviewCCSP.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change...

145

Combining LIDAR and IfSAR: What can you expect?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional mapping products in the form of DEMs (Digital Elevation Models) have become much more accessible in recent years, in part due to the implementation of LIDAR and IFSAR technologies. While there is considerable familiarity with one technology or the other, they are not often examined in terms of their mutually similar characteristics or equally those that are dissimilar. The purpose of this paper is to summarize those factors which will ultimately help to determine whether one technology or the other is appropriate for a particular application. We present two examples to illustrate and suggest that in many ways they can be viewed as complementary rather than competitive technologies.

Bryan Mercer Calgary

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Planned Change Request for Shielded Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as presented in the HalfPACT Safety Analysis Report (SAR), RH-TRU 72-B SAR and the TRUPACT II SAR. The tests

147

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and commercialization and a DOE requirement for the SAR. TheDOE Operations (SAR), established the uniform requirement todocument requirements and updating schedule of the SAR (DOE,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Rob Egan JGI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in jgitoolsbin) Profiling & performance analysis sar sysstats java -jar jgitoolsmiscsoftwarekSarDEFAULTkSar.jar -input cmd:'ssh -C genepool ssh...

149

Mediated urban civic space : info deck of the Hong Kong SAR Government Info-tainment Headquarters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After being a British colony for more than hundred years, Hong Kong's final handover back to China took place 1st July 1997. There are tremendous demands on the new government to reflect her status during this critical ...

Louie, Tak-Wing, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

IG 2002 SAR Rpt to Congress-Print Version.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report to Congress Office of Inspector General United States Department of Energy April 1, 2001, to September 30, 2001 DOE/IG-0023 Statistical Data-Savings, Questioned Costs, H0tline Statistics, and Fines, Settlements, and Recoveries OIG Reports Issued and Followup Action Process Other Noteworthy Accomplishments The Department's Vulnerabilities/Risks in Management Challenges Inspector General's Message - Highlights of Significant Activities The Honorable Spencer Abraham Secretary U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Enclosure Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General October 29, 2001 Dear Secretary Abraham: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual report to Congress. The report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during

151

IG SAR RPT to Congress Content 12-22-03.PUB  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I am pleased to submit the Department of Energy (Department) Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending September 30, 2003. This report, issued in accordance with the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, represents the OIG's accomplishments in identifying areas of Department operations most vulnerable to waste, fraud, and mismanagement. As noted by the special logo appearing throughout this report, the Inspector General community is celebrating the 25 th Anniversary of the Inspector General Act of 1978. We share this special occasion with the 57 cabinet, other executive branch, and independent agency Offices of Inspector General. As a historical note, the Department of Energy OIG actually existed prior to passage of the Inspector General Act, having

152

IG SAR to Congress 11-2002 final version.PUB  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 April 1 to September 30, 2002 Office of Inspector General Inspector General's Message - Page 1 The Department's Management Challenges and Significant OIG Accomplishments Page 3 Other Significant Accomplishments Page 37 OIG Reports Issued and Followup Action Process - Page 46 Statistical Data-Savings, Questioned Costs, Hotline Statistics, and Fines, Settlements and Recoveries Page 53 United States Department of Energy Dear Secretary Abraham: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's for the 6-month period ending September 30, 2002. The Report reflects our continuing commitment to focus the Office of Inspector General efforts on the issues and concerns most critical to you, the Administration, and the Congress. The tragic events of September 11, 2001, have impacted the way this Office

153

Coexistence of Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Boundary Layer Rolls Observed by SAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) and marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) rolls are simultaneously observed on an Environmental Satellite (Envisat) advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) image acquired along the China coast on 22 May ...

Xiaofeng Li; Weizhong Zheng; Xiaofeng Yang; Jun A. Zhang; William G. Pichel; Ziwei Li

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Macau S.A.R. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

155

European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) SAR ATWS Accident Analyses by using 3D Code Internal Coupling Method  

SciTech Connect

Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) accident analyses make part of the Safety Analysis Report of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), covering Risk Reduction Category A (Core Melt Prevention) events. This paper deals with three of the most penalizing RRC-A sequences of ATWS caused by mechanical blockage of the control/shutdown rods, regarding their consequences on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) and core integrity. A new 3D code internal coupling calculation method has been introduced. (authors)

Gagner, Renata; Lafitte, Helene; Dormeau, Pascal [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva - 1, place de la Coupole - 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Stoudt, Roger H. [Framatome ANP, Lynchburg - 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Copyright 2008 by Jehanzeb BurkiFAST CIRCULAR APERTURE SYNTHESIS IN SAR ALL-ASPECT TARGET IMAGING Approved by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIST OF TABLES................................... LIST OF FIGURES.................................. vi

Jehanzeb Burki; Dr. Christopher; F. Barnes; Dr. Hao; Min Zhou; Dr. Justin; K. Romberg; Dr. Douglas; B. William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Using SAR Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Better Understand Coastal Flows in the Gulf of Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steeply rising coastal terrain of southeast Alaska can produce a wide variety of terrain-induced flows such as barrier jets, gap flows, and downslope wind storms. This study uses a combination of satellite remote sensing, field observations, ...

Nathaniel S. Winstead; Brian Colle; Nicholas Bond; George Young; Joseph Olson; Kenneth Loescher; Frank Monaldo; Donald Thompson; William Pichel

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit Safety Analysis Report (LWRHU-SAR). Volume II. Accident model document  

SciTech Connect

Purposes of this volume (AMD), are to: Identify all malfunctions, both singular and multiple, which can occur during the complete mission profile that could lead to release outside the clad of the radioisotopic material contained therein; provide estimates of occurrence probabilities associated with these various accidents; evaluate the response of the LWRHU (or its components) to the resultant accident environments; and associate the potential event history with test data or analysis to determine the potential interaction of the released radionuclides with the biosphere.

Johnson, E.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit Safety Analysis Report (LWRHU-SAR). Volume I. A. Introduction and executive summary. B. Reference Design Document (RDD)  

SciTech Connect

The orbiter and probe portions of the NASA Galileo spacecraft contain components which require auxiliary heat during the mission. To meet these needs, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Special Nuclear Projects (OSNP) has sponsored the design, fabrication, and testing of a one-watt encapsulated plutonium dioxide-fueled thermal heater named the Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU). This report addresses the radiological risks which might be encountered by people both at the launch area and worldwide should postulate mission failures or malfunctions occur, which would result in the release of the LWRHUs to the environment. Included are data from the design, mission descriptions, postulated accidents with their consequences, test data, and the derived source terms and personnel exposures for the various events.

Johnson, E.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A synergetic use of satellite imagery from SAR and optical sensors to improve coastal flood mapping in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Gulf of Mexico Naira Chaouch,1 * Marouane Temimi,1 Scott Hagen,2 John Weishampel,2 Stephen Medeiros2 semi-diurnal low and high water conditions in the northern Gulf of Mexico using high regions, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico area, are often subject to major flooding because

Central Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsets for Selected Field Sites Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a new compilation of ALOS-PALSAR SAR subsets for selected field sites: SAR...

162

Spotlight-Mode Synthetic Aperture Radar: A Signal Processing Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Spotlight-mode Synthetic Aperture Radar: A Signal Processing Approach describes an important mode of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, known as spotlight-mode SAR. By treating the subject via the principles of signal processing, ...

Paul Thompson; Daniel E. Wahl; Paul H. Eichel; Dennis C. Ghiglia; Charles V. Jakowatz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comparison of Synthetic Aperture RadarDerived Wind Speeds with Buoy Wind Speeds along the Mountainous Alaskan Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers the potential for remotely sensing surface wind speed both over the open sea and in close proximity to the coast. The resolution improvement of SAR over scatterometers is of particular ...

C. M. Fisher; G. S. Young; N. S. Winstead; J. D. Haqq-Misra

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar in Finescale Surface Analysis of Synoptic-Scale Fronts at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a tool for finescale marine meteorological surface analyses of synoptic-scale fronts is demonstrated. In particular, it is shown that SAR can reveal the presence of, and the mesoscale and ...

G. S. Young; T. N. Sikora; N. S. Winstead

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Don Atwood Alaska Satellite Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Don Atwood Using SAR in a GIS 1 Don Atwood Alaska Satellite Facility Don Atwood Using SAR in a GIS 2 Optical systems which are angle- based. Optics project points on ground to...

166

Characteristics of Ocean Surface Winds in the Lee of an Isolated Island Observed by Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of ocean surface winds around an isolated island are examined in relation to atmospheric stability using a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and rawinsonde sounding observations. The SAR-derived winds on 22 May 2009 indicate a low-...

Osamu Isoguchi; Masanobu Shimada; Hiroshi Kawamura

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Observations of Bora Events over the Adriatic Sea and Black Sea by Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bora events over the Adriatic Sea and Black Sea are investigated by using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the advanced SAR (ASAR) on board the European satellite Envisat. It is shown that the sea surface roughness patterns ...

Werner Alpers; Andrei Ivanov; Jochen Horstmann

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the TRUPACT-II SAR. At the request of DOE and WTS, NRC has agreed to incorporate shielded containers

169

Since the late 1950s, several areas of Mex-ico City have undergone accelerated ground  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aperture radar (InSAR)­measured subsid- ence magnitude for 2000. Stars show location of PEMEX deep wells

Miami, University of

170

Workshop on Application of Remote Sensing to Disaster Response September 12, 2003, Irvine, CA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban Inventory #12;3 Satellite Optical Sensor/SAR Airborne SAR Aerial Photography Aerial Television 10-12km 1 Satellites Landsat SAR Tools for Field Survey Airborne Remote Sensing High-Resolution Satellites IKONOS damage area Yellow: Severe damage area #12;11 Use of GPS and RS Data for Field Survey Joint Survey

Shinozuka, Masanobu

171

Computational approaches to predicting drug induced toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for externally validated (i.e. only unbiased feature sets were considered, where relevant) selected Winnow models (generated using multiple training cycles, where relevant), compared to QuaSAR-Classify (QC) mean MCC values and Binary QSAR (BQ) MCC values... (s) = Principal component(s) PCA = Principal components analysis PDB = Protein Data Bank PLS = Partial Least Squares Prec. = Precision QC = QuaSAR-Classify (Q)SAR = (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship Rec. = Recall RF = Random Forest...

Marchese Robinson, Richard Liam

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK. Inevaluation of oil spills and wind farms. Keywords: SAR; Winddata to characterize wind farms and their potential energy

Leite, Gladeston C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

WIPP Volume I - ESH - Final 2.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act RCT Radiological Control Technician RWP Radiation Work Permit SAR Safety Analysis Report SRAS Status Report and Assessment Strategy SRID Standards and Requirements...

175

Final Vol 1 Idaho Ops and INEEL.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RWP Radiation Work Permit SAA Satellite Accumulation Area SAR Safety Analysis Report SCI SuspectCounterfeit Item SME Subject Matter Expert SSCs Structures, Systems, and...

176

INL FCF Basis Review Follow-up  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pyrophoric fire interacting with the cadmium spill. TEV-978, "SAR-403 Accident Analysis Scenario Development," was prepared and referenced in Chapter 3. TEV-978...

177

Characterization of an Apically Derived Epithelial Membrane Glycoprotein from Bovine Milk, Which Is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ............ RR--MQND~FU~D Cal RRL~TNSERYI N V N R R G ~ Dro ---QER .................. QNNWQK 811 825 826 840 Sar

Mather, Ian

178

aps_news_template.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The SGX- Collaborative Access Team (SGX-CAT) beamline at sector 31 of the Advanced Photon Source, a national research facility...

179

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE NETL - ORD FE SARS 0134 ORD 20112012 Tom Hand October 2010 - September 2012 NETL Pittsburgh, PA, Building 93 Room 102 Decommission of CERF Laboratory Decommission of the...

180

Radar transponder apparatus and signal processing technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active, phase-coded, time-grating transponder and a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) and signal processor means, in combination, allow the recognition and location of the transponder (tag) in the SAR image and allow communication of information messages from the transponder to the SAR. The SAR is an illuminating radar having special processing modifications in an image-formation processor to receive an echo from a remote transponder, after the transponder receives and retransmits the SAR illuminations, and to enhance tile transponder`s echo relative to surrounding ground clutter by recognizing special transponder modulations from phase-shifted from the transponder retransmissions. The remote radio-frequency tag also transmits information to the SAR through a single antenna that also serves to receive the SAR illuminations. Unique tag-modulation and SAR signal processing techniques, in combination, allow the detection and precise geographical location of the tag, through the reduction of interfering signals from ground clutter, and allow communication of environmental and status information from said tag to be communicated to said SAR.

Axline, R.M. Jr.; Sloan, G.R.; Spalding, R.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Leveling surveys across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) have documented subsidence that is centered on the summit caldera and decays symmetrically on the flanks of the edifice. Possible mechanisms for this deformation include fluid withdrawal from a subsurface reservoir, cooling/crystallization of subsurface magma, loading by the volcano and dense intrusions, and crustal thinning due to tectonic extension (Dzurisin

182

Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Decker Student Health Services Center PO Box 6000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or volunteered in any homeless shelter, prison/jail, hospital or drug rehabilitation unit? YES NO If so, where steroid (prednisone 15mg/d for more than 1 month)? YES NO f. Illicit intravenous drugs or crack cocaine China China, Hong Kong SAR China, Macao SAR Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, Democratic Republic of Costa

Suzuki, Masatsugu

184

Current Pharmaceutical Design, 2006, 12, 4555-4564 4555 1381-6128/06 $50.00+.00 2006 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China Abstract: The SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase is recognized as a potential drug design target University, Beijing 100871, China and 2 Center for Theoretical Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 design. Due to the lack of potential drugs for the treatment of SARS, the discovery of inhibitors against

Luhua, Lai

185

University Health Service PO Box 6000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. NO Have you ever lived, worked, or volunteered in any homeless shelter, prison/jail, hospital or drug (prednisone 15mg/d for more than 1 month)? YESe. NO Illicit intravenous drugs or crack cocaine? YESf African Republic Chad Chile China China, Hong Kong SAR China, Macao SAR Colombia Comoros Congo Congo

Suzuki, Masatsugu

186

Coastal Wind Jets Flowing into the Tsushima Strait and Their Effect on Wind-Wave Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal wind jets that flow into the Tsushima Strait, Japan, and their effects on wind waves are investigated using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and altimeter-derived wind and waves. The coastal wind jets appear in 7 of 28 SAR-derived ...

Osamu Isoguchi; Hiroshi Kawamura

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Moving target indication via RADARSAT-2 multichannel synthetic aperture radar processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent launches of the German TerraSAR-X and the Canadian RADARSAT-2, both equipped with phased array antennas and multiple receiver channels, synthetic aperture radar, ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI) data are now routinely being ...

S. Chiu; M. V. Dragoevi?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Inhibition of angiotensinogen production by angiotensin II analogues in human hepatoma cell line  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to examine in Hep G2, a human hepatoma-derived cell line, the presence of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and the effect of ANG II and its analogues on angiotensinogen production. The presence of ANG II receptors was demonstrated using a long-acting ANG II analogue, 125I-labeled (Sar1)ANG II. A single class of specific binding sites was identified in these cells with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 2 nM. The number and affinity of these binding sites were not changed by (Sar1)ANG II treatment over 24 h. ANG II showed an inhibitory effect on angiotensinogen production. (Sar1)ANG II also exhibited a similar inhibitory effect as that of ANG II but to a greater extent and therefore was used throughout these studies. (Sar1)ANG II inhibited angiotensinogen production in a dose-dependent manner, exhibiting a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2 nM. Other ANG II analogues showed similar effects on angiotensinogen production. In order of decreasing ability, they were (Sar1)ANG II greater than (Sar1-Ala8)ANG II greater than (Sar1-Val8)ANG II greater than (Sar1-Val5-(Br5)-Phe8)ANG II greater than (Sar1-Val5-DPhe8)ANG II. Results of these studies show that the Hep G2 cell possesses specific ANG II receptors and that (Sar1)ANG II induces a dose-dependent inhibition of angiotensinogen production in this system.

Coezy, E.; Darby, I.; Mizrahi, J.; Cantau, B.; Donnadieu, M.H.; Nussberger, J.; Escher, E.; Chapnick, B.; Corvol, P. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Unite 36 Paris (France))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Synthetic Aperture Radar Applications -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and innovative ideas are developed. While SAR is often used because of its all-weather, day-or-night capability, it also finds application because it renders a different...

190

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.7 - Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (100-year time horizon) Gas GWP SAR 900 Carbon dioxide (CO2) 1 Methane (CH 4 ) 1 21 Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) 310 HFC-23 11,700 HFC-32 650...

191

Reasons for Larger Warming Projections in the IPCC Third Assessment Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of future warming in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report (TAR) are substantially larger than those in the Second Assessment Report (SAR). The reasons for these differences are documented and ...

T. M. L. Wigley; S. C. B. Raper

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Encounter of Foehn Wind with an Atmospheric Eddy over the Black Sea as Observed by the Synthetic Aperture Radar Onboard Envisat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foehn wind blowing through the Kolkhida (Kolkheti) Lowland in the southwestern Caucasus (western Georgia) was observed on an Envisat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image as it encountered an atmospheric cyclonic eddy over the Black Sea on 13 ...

Werner Alpers; Andrei Yu. Ivanov; Knut-Frode Dagestad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Processing Private Queries over Untrusted Data Cloud through Privacy Homomorphism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tong, Hong Kong SAR, China {haibo,xujl,csren,bchoi}@comp.hkbu.edu.hk Abstract--Query processing directory and another on anti-diabetic drugs, together give a higher confidence that the user is probably

Xu, Jianliang

194

Radar Imaging Mechanism of the Seabed: Results of the C-STAR Experiment in 1996 with Special Emphasis on the Relaxation Rate of Short Waves due to Current Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the field experiment of the Coastal Sediment Transport Assessment using SAR imagery project of the Marine Science and Technology program of the European Commission an AirSea Interaction Drift Buoy (ASIB) system was equipped with special ...

Ingo Hennings; Blandine Lurin; Norbert Didden

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Spiral mining using attributes from 3d molecular structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active responses from analysts play an essential role in obtaining insights into structure activity relationships (SAR) from drug data. Experts often think of hypotheses, and they want to reflect these ideas in the attribute generation and selection ...

Takashi Okada; Masumi Yamakawa; Hirotaka Niitsuma

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. ; Feser, F. Relationship between SAR-derived wind vectorsand wind at 10- m height represented by a meososcale model.Yijun, H. Comparison of two wind algorithms of ENVISAT ASAR

Leite, Gladeston C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Participatory epidemiology : harnessing the HealthMap platform for community-based disease outbreak monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to increasing global trade and travel along with a range of environmental factors, emerging infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), drug-resistant tuberculosis, and 2009 HiNi continue to ...

Freifeld, Clark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a com- munity. NAS-NRC: National Academy of Sciences -Regulatory Guide (NRC) - Safety Analysis Report - UnitedICRU LET LWR MPBB MPC NCRP NRC PAG PWR RBE RG SAR UNSCEAR

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of...

200

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QFin Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the surrogate avoidedResource (SAR) Method Used in Idaho QFs up to 10 MW are

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modern approaches to augmented reality Video files associated with this course are available from the citation page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial discusses the Spatial Augmented Reality (SAR) concept, its advantages and limitations. It will present examples of state-of-the-art display configurations, appropriate real-time rendering techniques, details about hardware and software ...

Oliver Bimber; Ramesh Raskar

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Butterfly Algorithm for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In spite of an extensive literature on fast algorithms for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, it is not currently known if it is possible to accurately form an image from N data points in provable near-linear time ...

Demanet, Laurent

203

The Rhine Outflow Plume Studied by the Analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Rhine outflow plume in the proximity of the river mouth is investigated by using remote sensing data and numerical simulations. The remote sensing data consist of 41 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the First ...

Katrin Hessner; Angelo Rubino; Peter Brandt; Werner Alpers

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Stephens, Natural and Fallout Radioactivity in the Sar.Patterson and A. R. Smith, Fallout and Natural Background inVariations in the rate of fallout deposition. 3. Variations

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Synthetic Aperture Radar as a Tool for Investigating Polar Mesoscale Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar mesoscale cyclones are intense vortices that form in cold, marine air masses poleward of major jet streams and frontal zones. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) should be considered as a potential tool for the study of polar mesoscale cyclones ...

Todd D. Sikora; Karen S. Friedman; William G. Pichel; Pablo Clemente-Coln

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of...

207

Manual and Semiautomated Wind Direction Editing for Use in the Generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Wind Speed Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have demonstrated that satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be used as an accurate scatterometer, yielding wind speed fields with subkilometer resolution. This wind speed generation is only possible, however, if a ...

George S. Young; Todd D. Sikora; Nathaniel S. Winstead

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Estimating Urban Canopy Parameters Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a remote sensingbased approach to rapidly derive urban morphological characteristics using radar satellite data. The approach is based on the expectation that the magnitude of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter ...

Indumathi Jeyachandran; Steven J. Burian; Stephen W. Stetson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE NETL - ORD FE SARS 0134 ORD 20112012 Tom Hand October 2010 - September 2012 NETL Pittsburgh, PA Bldg 93 Rm 102 & Roof Decommission of CERF Laboratory Decommission of the...

210

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NETL - ORD FE 0599 NETL ORD 2010 Jimmy Thornton Ongoing Morgantown, WV (B12, B12 test cells) Extreme Drilling Laboratory (XDL) SARS Mod for rock characterization, rock preparation...

211

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of radioactive...

212

Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative  

SciTech Connect

In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI SAR system was an outstanding success and contributed greatly to the security and resiliency of their states. At least one state commented that SERRI's implementation of the MSSI SAR actually 'jump started' and accelerated deployment and acceptance of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI). While all states were enthusiastic about their systems, South Carolina and Tennessee appeared to be the heaviest users of their respective systems. With NSI taking the load of sharing SARs with other states, Tennessee has redeployed the MSSI SAR system within Tennessee to allow SAR sharing between state and local organizations including Tennessee's three Homeland Security Regions, eleven Homeland Security Districts, and more than 500 police and sheriff offices, as well as with other states. In one success story from South Carolina, the Economy SAR System was used to compile similar SARs from throughout the state which were then forwarded to field liaison officers, emergency management personnel, and law enforcement officers for action.

Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Boehmann, Brant [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Influence of variable topsoil replacement depths on soil chemical parameters within a coal mine in northeastern Wyoming, USA  

SciTech Connect

Uniform topsoil replacement depths on coal mine reclaimed areas have been mandated by USA federal and state regulations; however, soils of the premine landscape are not naturally uniform in depth and vary in physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. In addition, uniform topsoil depths may actually hinder the development of diverse reclaimed plant communities. We studied the effect of varying topsoil replacement depth treatments (15, 30, and 56 cm) on soil and backfill pH, electrolytic conductivity (EC), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) within a reclaimed coal mine study area. Backfill material (also known as spoil) at this site did not possess levels of pH, EC, and SAR that were detrimental to plant growth. There was only a slight reduction in pH, EC, and SAR within the upper 15 cm depth in the reclaimed topsoil treatments with a general increase of EC and SAR in the lower portion of the replaced soil profile. Some downward movement of soluble salts within the reclaimed treatments was evident despite low precipitation. For examples, SAR in the 0-15 cm depth over all reclaimed treatments was lower in 2002 than 2000-2001, and the 0-30 cm portion of the reclaimed soil profile had reduced pH and EC, while the 30-60 cm portion had increased EC and SAR. It is anticipated that soil quality differences in terms of pH, EC, and SAR between topsoil depth treatments will be enhanced with time. Comparison of the reclaimed area to the native reference areas suggested numerous depth differences as a result of homogeneity of the replaced topsoil vs. undisturbed soil profiles.

Schladweiler, B.K.; Vance, G.F.; Legg, D.E.; Munn, L.C.; Haroian, R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (US). Dept. of Renewable Resources

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

VVER-440 Containment Thermal Hydraulic Analyses With MELCOR and CONTAIN Codes  

SciTech Connect

In support of the analyses for the Rivne Nuclear Power Plant (RNPP) VVER-440/213 (Ukraine) Safety Analysis Report (SAR), detailed MELCOR and CONTAIN models of the containment were developed. The RNPP containment features a bubble condenser tower with air locks and active and passive spray systems. Code input models were developed to accurately represent the containment volumes, room interconnections, structural masses, and the engineering safety features. Although MELCOR 1.8.3 was the primary tool for the SAR containment analysis, comparison calculations were performed using CONTAIN Version 1.12. Consequently, both the response of the VVER-440 containment to limiting design conditions as well as a comparison of the two codes is presented. In the context of SAR requirements, the present application was performed for design basis accidents with conservative assumptions to compare the containment temperature and pressure with design criteria. The peak containment pressure and temperature were evaluated using the most intensive release of the primary and secondary coolant into the hermetic compartments, in particular, for the large break loss of coolant accident and main steam line break. Conservative coolant release data were evaluated using the RELAP5/Mod3.2 SAR model. The selection of the accident scenario, initial and boundary conditions, and the major results are presented. The results of the analyses will be included in the design basis accident analysis chapter of the RNPP SAR. (authors)

Gromov, Gregory; Lola, Igor; Sholomitsky, Stanislav; Gumenyuk, Dmitry; Shikhabutinov, Valery; Alekseev, Yury [Energorisk Ltd., vul. Radgospna 35-37, Room 707, Kyiv, 252142 (Ukraine); Wagner, K.C. [Scientech Inc. (United States); Dallman, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Design and Risk Analysis Group (D-5), Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

ANNUAL FUNDING NOTICE for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HRD-BEN-2012-0038 HRD-BEN-2012-0038 Date: April 30, 2012 To: All Plan Participants From: SRNS Benefits Administration Re: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Multiple Employer Pension Plan Funding Notices Attached are three pension plan notices of which the wording is very closely regulated by the federal government. Therefore, we are providing a quick overview of the notices here. 2011 Annual Funding Notice: The government previously required the distribution of an abbreviated form of this information and called it the Summary Annual Report (SAR). You may have seen SARs from previous years posted on the SRS Intranet "InSite". The enhanced version of that SAR is called the Annual Funding Notice. This particular notice covers the plan year 2011 and is issued after the

216

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,3 34880,2

217

SALINITY AND SODICITY INTERACTIONS OF WEATHERED MINESOILS IN NORTHWESTERN NEW MEXICO AND NORTH EASTERN ARIZONA  

SciTech Connect

Weathering characteristics of minesoils and rooting patterns of key shrub and grass species were evaluated at sites reclaimed for 6 to 14 years from three surface coal mine operations in northwestern New Mexico and northeastern Arizona. Non-weathered minesoils were grouped into 11 classifications based on electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Comparisons of saturated paste extracts, from non-weathered and weathered minesoils show significant (p < 0.05) reductions in SAR levels and increased EC. Weathering increased the apparent stability of saline and sodic minesoils thereby reducing concerns of aggregate slaking and clay particle dispersion. Root density of four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canascens), alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides), and Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys junceus) were nominally affected by increasing EC and SAR levels in minesoil. Results suggest that saline and sodic minesoils can be successfully reclaimed when covered with topsoil and seeded with salt tolerant plant species.

Brent Musslewhite; Song Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

219

Microsoft Word - Letter - Overview Pension Plan Notices.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HRD-BEN-2011-0057 HRD-BEN-2011-0057 Date: April 29, 2011 To: All Plan Participants From: SRNS Benefits Administration Re: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Multiple Employer Pension Plan Funding Notices Attached are three pension plan notices of which the wording is very closely regulated by the federal government. Therefore, we are providing a quick overview of the notices here. 2010 Annual Funding Notice: The government previously required the distribution of an abbreviated form of this information and called it the Summary Annual Report (SAR). You may have seen SARs from previous years posted on the SRS Intranet "InSite" (formerly known as ShRINE). The enhanced version of that SAR is called the Annual Funding Notice. This particular

220

Structural, Biochemical, and in Vivo Characterization of the First Virally Encoded Cyclophilin from the Mimivirus  

SciTech Connect

Although multiple viruses utilize host cell cyclophilins, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and human immunodeficiency virus type-1(HIV-1), their role in infection is poorly understood. To help elucidate these roles, we have characterized the first virally encoded cyclophilin (mimicyp) derived from the largest virus discovered to date (the Mimivirus) that is also a causative agent of pneumonia in humans. Mimicyp adopts a typical cyclophilin-fold, yet it also forms trimers unlike any previously characterized homologue. Strikingly, immunofluorescence assays reveal that mimicyp localizes to the surface of the mature virion, as recently proposed for several viruses that recruit host cell cyclophilins such as SARS and HIV-1. Additionally mimicyp lacks peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity in contrast to human cyclophilins. Thus, this study suggests that cyclophilins, whether recruited from host cells (ie HIV-1 and SARS) or virally encoded (ie Mimivirus), are localized on viral surfaces for at least a subset of viruses.

Thai,V.; Renesto, P.; Fowler, C.; Brown, D.; Davis, T.; Gu, W.; Pollock, D.; Kern, D.; Raoult, D.; Eisenmesser, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Releases of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere after a potential fire in a cylinder storage yard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), a toxic material, is stored in just over 6200 cylinders at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The safety analysis report (SAR) for cylinder yard storage operations at the plant required the development of accident scenarios for the potential release of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere. In accordance with DOE standards and guidance, the general approach taken in this SAR was to examine the functions and contents of the cylinder storage yards to determine whether safety-significant hazards were present for workers in the immediate vicinity, workers on-site, the general public off-site, or the environment. and to evaluate the significance of any hazards that were found. A detailed accident analysis was performed to determine a set of limiting accidents that have potential for off-site consequences. One of the limiting accidents identified in the SAR was the rupture of a cylinder engulfed in a fire.

Lombardi, D.A.; Williams, W.R.; Anderson, J.C. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1400_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1400_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:49 AM"

224

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" 5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Production",10,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1991" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1990" ,"Data 4","Consumption",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

225

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

226

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_sar_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_sar_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

227

ANNUAL FUNDING NOTICE for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HRD-BEN-2013-0029 HRD-BEN-2013-0029 Date: April 30, 2013 To: All Plan Participants From: SRNS Benefits Administration Re: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Multiple Employer Pension Plan Funding Notices Attached is the pension plan notice of which the wording is very closely regulated by the federal government. Therefore, we are providing a quick overview of the notice here. 2012 Annual Funding Notice: The government previously required the distribution of an abbreviated form of this information and called it the Summary Annual Report (SAR). You may have seen SARs from previous years posted on the SRS Intranet "InSite". The enhanced version of that

228

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1140_sar_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1140_sar_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

229

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Count)" Industrial Consumers (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1561_sar_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1561_sar_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:49:30 PM"

230

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr18sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr18sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

231

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Count)" Residential Consumers (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1501_sar_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1501_sar_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:45:49 PM"

232

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)" Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr16sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr16sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:10:35 PM"

233

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)" Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr12sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr12sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:09:30 PM"

234

,"Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1350_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1350_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:42:27 PM"

235

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)" Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr15sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr15sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:10:18 PM"

236

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processed (MMcf)" Processed (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Processed (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1180_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1180_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 7:02:35 AM"

237

Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Michael Poland, Roland Burgmann, Daniel Dzurisin, Michael Lisowski, Timothy Masterlark, Susan Owen, Jonathan Fink (2006) Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Poland,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386441"

238

Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.  

SciTech Connect

In high-power microwave power amplifiers for radar, distortion in both amplitude and phase should generally be expected. Phase distortions can be readily equalized. Some amplitude distortions are more problematic than others. In general, especially for SAR using LFM chirps, low frequency modulations such as gain slopes can be tolerated much better than multiple cycles of ripple across the passband of the waveform.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Specific Absorption Rate Studies of the Parallel Transmission of Inner-Volume Selective Excitations at 7 Tesla A. C. ZELINSKI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at 7 Tesla A. C. ZELINSKI 1 , L. M. ANGELONE 2 , V. K. GOYAL 1 , G. BONMASSAR 2 , E. ADALSTEINSSON 1 excitations via regional cancellation. Here, we study average and local SAR in a head model at 7 Tesla for 2D

Goyal, Vivek K

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks Naoki Masuda and Norio Konno  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified SARS is estimated to have started in the Guandong province of the People's Republic of China clarified, which mars developments of antiviral drugs or other means of conclusive medication. Under

Masuda, Naoki

242

18 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Newsletter September 2011 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Newsletter · September 2011 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Honolulu, Hawai'i: IEEE, 2000. [27] R. K. Raney, "Hybrid-Polarity SAR Architecture," in CD-ROM Proceedings, IEEE International and Geoscience Remote Sensing Symposium IGARSS, Denver

Fischlin, Andreas

243

ASAP progress and expenditure report for the month of December 1--31, 1995. Joint UK/US radar program  

SciTech Connect

The RAR/SAR is a high-priority radar system for the joint US/UK Program. Based on previous experiment results and coordination with the UK, specifications needed for future radar experiments were identified as follows: dual polarimetric (HH and VV) with medium to high resolution in SAR mode. Secondary airborne installation requirements included; high power (circa 10kw) and SLIER capability to emulate Tupelev-134 type system; initially x-band but easily extendible to other frequencies. In FY96 we intended to enhance the radar system`s capabilities by providing a second polarization (VV), spotlight imaging mode, extended frequency of operation to include S- band, increase power, and interface to an existing infrared sensor. Short term objectives are: continue to evaluate and characterize the radar system; upgrade navigation and real-time processing capability to refine motion compensation; upgrade to dual polarimetry (add VV); and develop a ``spotlight`` mode capability. Accomplishments this reporting period: design specifications for the SAR system polarimetric upgrade are complete. The upgrade is ready to begin the procurement cycle when funds become available. System characterization is one of the highest priority tasks for the SAR. Although the radar is dedicated for our use, Hughes is waiting for contract funding before allowing us access to the hardware

Twogood, R.E.; Brase, J.M.; Chambers, D.H.; Mantrom, D.D.; Miller, M.G.; Newman, M.J.; Robey, H.F.; Vigars, M.L.

1996-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

245

Modeling Electromagnetic Reflectivity of Agbabu Oil Sand from Hyperspectral Infrared Reflectance Spectra and Dielectric Properties at L-, C- and X-Band Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper remote identification of oil sand reservoirs from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is enhanced by accurate modeling of the electromagnetic (EM) reflectivity of Agbabu oil sands. This is demonstrated using a novel combination of hyperspectral ... Keywords: EM Reflectivity, Computer Simulation, Agbabu Oil Sand, Dielectric property, Petroleum Exploration

Maurice Ezeoke, Kenneth Tong

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Accepted by J. Padial: 7 Apr. 2011; published: 25 May 2011 65 ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in Panama City, Panama ANDREW J. CRAWFORD1,2,3 , ROBERTO ALONSO4 , C?SAR A. JARAMILLO A.2,3,5 , SAMUEL SUCRE, and on the Pacific islands of Hawaii and Guam (Heinicke et al. 2011; Somma 2011). This species was not previously Reinhardt & Lütken 1863 1862 and E. johnstonei Barbour 1914, have established populations within Panama City

Crawford, Andrew J.

247

No. of Markers, Genetic Lengths, and Female:Male Length Ratio, for Each Chromosome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) LDmap(LDU) ANT ASH AZO CAU CR ERF FIC FIK FIP NFL SAF SAR Geneticmap(cM) #12;Haploview ­ Ben Fry #12 269 331 209 1.6 3 529 228 270 190 1.4 4 457 212 264 160 1.6 5 480 198 245 151 1.6 6 465 193 254 131 1

Sabatti, Chiara

248

Estimation of Offshore Wind Resources in Coastal Waters off Shirahama Using ENVISAT ASAR Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Offshore wind resource maps for the coastal waters off Shirahama, Japan were made based on 104 images of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the ENVISAT satellite. Wind speed fields were derived from the SAR images with the geophysical model function CMOD5.N. Mean wind speed and energy density were estimated using the Weibull distribution function. These accuracies were examined in comparison with in situ measurements from the Shirahama offshore platform and the Southwest Wakayama buoy (SW-buoy). Firstly, it was found that the SAR-derived 10 m-height wind speed had a bias of 0.52 m/s and a RMSE of 2.33 m/s at Shirahama. Secondly, it was found that the mean wind speeds estimated from SAR images and the Weibull distribution function were overestimated at both sites. The ratio between SAR-derived and in situ measured mean wind speeds at Shirahama is 1.07, and this value was used for a long-termRemote Sens. 2013, 5 2884

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Tomohiro Yamashita; Katsutoshi Kozai; Yasunori Muto; Yasuyuki Baba; Koji Kawaguchi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Evolution of Convective Storms from Their Footprints on the Sea as Viewed by Synthetic Aperture Radar from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) echoes from the sea have previously been shown to be the result of rain and winds produced by convective storms; rain damps the surface waves and causes echo-free holes, while the diverging winds associated ...

David Atlas; Peter G. Black

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of practical site-specific management methods for reclaiming salt-affected soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustaining irrigated agricultural production systems in semi-arid and arid regions requires consideration of with saline and sodic soil conditions. The spatial variability of these conditions makes soil reclamation an ideal practice in which to apply ... Keywords: DPPC, ECa, ECe, EM38, EMI, ESP, Electrical conductivity, Electromagnetic induction, GIS, SAR, SSM, Saline-sodic soils, Salinity, Soil reclamation

Randy D. Horney; Brock Taylor; Daniel S. Munk; Bruce A. Roberts; Scott M. Lesch; Richard E. Plant

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information concerning: analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU; changes to technical specifications mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; changes in the Safety Analysis Report mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; and copies of all changed pages of the SAR and the technical specifications.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Potentials and limits of secondary spectrum usage by CDMA base stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the progress of transmission technology and fast growing demand for ubiquitous high speed wireless services, it is clear that the pressure towards more flexibility in usage of limited spectrum will increase. With concept of spectrum sharing, in ... Keywords: primary exclusive region (PER), secondary spectrum usage, secondary usage allowable region (SAR), secondary usage prohibitive region (SPR)

Eun-Hee Shin; Dongwoo Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Shi'a Muslims of the United Provinces of India, c 1890-1940  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), p. 82. The Ottoman Sultan 'Abdul Hamid II stated that 'Jamaladdin kindled a rah of' hope for Shii-Sunni unite... this wuld he an enormous accomplishment for Islam. ' Nikki R. Keddie. Sar id Jamal acf-Din . -1/'lrcrrii: ,I political hicraphy...

Jones, Justin Rhys

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

254

Results of dilution studies with waste from tank 241-AN-104  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the completion of the B and W Hanford Company functional and Safety Review Board reviews and the Fluor Daniel Hanford review for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), HNF-SD-CP-SAR-021, Revision 1. The reviews for the FSAR were conducted during the period from December 9, 1998 to January 14, 1999.

HERTING, D.L.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

COMUNICATO STAMPA La Sapienza sale sulla "nuvola" di Google  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMUNICATO STAMPA La Sapienza sale sulla "nuvola" di Google Sarà la più grande comunità di studenti in Europa interconnessa grazie ai servizi cloud Google Apps for Education Roma, 28 febbraio 2012 ­ Google e Internet Google Apps for Education. Ogni studente avrà da subito una propria casella email accessibile da

Di Pillo, Gianni

256

Biotechnology Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryBiotechnology Division2013 Members187 Members as of July 1, 2013Abraham, TimothyCargill IncHopkins, MN, USAAdachi, ShujiKyoto UniversityKyoto, JapanAdnan, MuhammadUniversity of KarachiKarachi, Sindh, PakistanAgustin, Sar

257

The Measurement of Precipitation with Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar equation for the measurement of precipitation by SAR is identical to that for a conventional radar. The achievable synthetic beamwidth, ?s, is proportional to ?v/U, the ratio of the spread of the precipitation Doppler spectrum to the ...

David Atlas; Richard K. Moore

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Macroelectronics: Perspectives on Technology and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alam are with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette conditions such as impact, loading abrasion, op- erator abuse, or neglect. These factors can have serious that they might ultimately lead to an earthquake forecasting capability [2], [3]. These SAR systems will provide

Rogers, John A.

260

Invited Paper Application of Superresolution Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.R. Kosek, and H.C. Stankwitz Environmental Research Institute of Michigan P.O. Box 134001, Ann Arbor, MI Warfare Center (NAWC) REFERENCES 1 . H.C. Stankwitz and M.R. Kosek, "Super-Resolution for SAR/IESAR RCS

Fienup, James R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Regional crop monitoring and discrimination based on simulated ENVISAT ASAR wide swath mode images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper investigates the potential contribution of ENVISAT wide swath (WS) images for discrimination and monitoring of crops at a regional scale. The study was based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired throughout an entire growing ... Keywords: Coarse spatial resolution, Crop discrimination, Crop monitoring, ENVISAT, Synthetic aperture radar, Wide swath-ASAR

X. Blaes; F. Holecz; H. J. C. van Leeuwen; P. Defourny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development and Validation of an Operational Search and Rescue Modeling System for the Yellow Sea and the East & South China Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational search and rescue (SAR) modeling system was developed to forecast the tracks of victims or debris from marine accidents in the marginal seas of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The system is directly linked to a real-time operational ...

Kyoung-Ho Cho; Yan Li; Hui Wang; Kwang-Soon Park; Jin-Yong Choi; Kwang-Il Shin; Jae-Il Kwon

263

Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 31, 2009 [Facility News] July 31, 2009 [Facility News] President of the Regional Government Speaks at Opening Ceremony for Mobile Facility in the Azores Bookmark and Share Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island, Carlos César, President of the Regional Government of the Azores, signs a weather balloon while local media record the event. Photo by Mike Alsop. Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island, Carlos César, President of the Regional Government of the Azores, signs a weather balloon while local media record the event. Photo by Mike Alsop. On June 30, officials from the Regional Government of the Azores recognized the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island during an official opening ceremony held at the site. Notable among the participants

265

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 20600 of 31,917 results. 91 - 20600 of 31,917 results. Download Review of SAR for Packaging Report This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. http://energy.gov/em/downloads/review-sar-packaging-report Download National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information Request, http://energy.gov/management/downloads/national-defense-authorization-act-fiscal-year-2005-information-request Download Construction Project Safety and Health Plan RM The Construction Project Safety and Health Plan (CPSHP) Review Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project readiness in...

266

,"Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","8/1/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","8/1/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","rngr11sar_1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngr11sar_1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:09:14 PM"

267

Definition: Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aperture Radar Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Synthetic Aperture Radar Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) is an active microwave remote sensing technology that measures the phase difference between a radar wave emitted from an antennae attached to a satellite or aircraft to generate high-resolution images of a surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As SAR Related Terms radar References ↑ Synthetic Aperature Radar: Systems and Signal Processing (Curlander and McDonough - 1991 - book) fue LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. l cell, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Synthetic_Aperture_Radar&oldid=493069" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes

268

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Count)" Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1170_sar_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1170_sar_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:58:19 AM"

269

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" 8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_dcu_sar_a.htm"

270

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM"

271

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

High-level waste tank farm set point document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

Anthony, J.A. III

1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

Doerry, A.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery This gallery features movies of Sandia National Laboratories' synthetic aperture radar imagery of Albuquerque, New Mexico and Washington, DC. Sandia's Twin-Otter SAR produced these high-resolution stripmap images in real time. (Note: The movies below have been downsampled greatly to make them suitable for viewing on the world wide web. These movies are not recommended for modems of speeds less than 56 kbps due to their large file sizes.) Albuquerque, NM Area Movies Sandia National Laboratories' Twin-Otter SAR produced these Ku-Band 0.3 and 1.0 meter resolution images of Albuquerque, NM in real time. Synthetic aperture radar movie of west Gibson Blvd 0.3 meter airborne synthetic aperture radar movie from I-25 to Maxwell along Gibson Blvd. (Length: 30 seconds)

278

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 4880 of 9,640 results. 71 - 4880 of 9,640 results. Download Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 2007 Access a Decision and Order issued in 2007. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/oil-overcharge-refund-cases-2007 Download Review of SAR for Packaging Report This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. http://energy.gov/em/downloads/review-sar-packaging-report Download FY 2006 Budget Justification FY 2006 budget justification and supporting documents to reflect the Department of Energy budget requests to Congress http://energy.gov/cfo/downloads/fy-2006-budget-justification Download F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment, Rev 1 Draft Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at

279

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Humboldt University Berlin Computer Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phone, will reconstruct its install jar and then print this jar's size and crc-32. Use the Search button to search for neighbouring devices that oer to accept an obex push and then send a copy of the jar to one-01: Linux-Hardwaretreiber für die HHI CineCard-Familie. Robert Sperling. 37 Seiten. 2. SAR-PR-2005-02, NLE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

JONES, R.A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of irrigation water salinity and sodicity and water table position on water table chemistry beneath Atriplex lentiformis and Hordeum marinum  

SciTech Connect

Coal bed methane (CBM) extraction in Montana and Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) produces large quantities of modestly saline-sodic water. This study assessed effects of irrigation water quality and water table position on water chemistry of closed columns, simulating a perched or a shallow water table. The experiment assessed the potential salt loading in areas where shallow or perched water tables prevent leaching or where artificial drainage is not possible. Water tables were established in sand filled PVC columns at 0.38, 0.76, and1.14 m below the surface, after which columns were planted to one of three species, two halophytic Atriplex spp. and Hordeum marinum Huds. (maritime barley), a glycophyte. As results for the two Atriplex ssp. did not differ much, only results from Atriplex lentiformis (Torn) S. Wats. (big saltbush) and H. marinum are presented. Irrigation water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) (electrolytic conductivity (EC) = 0.19 Sm{sup -1}, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) = 3.5) or CBM water (EC = 0.35 Sm-1, SAR = 10.5). Continuous irrigation with CBM and PR water led to salt loading over time, the extent being proportional to the salinity and sodicity of applied water. Water in columns planted to A. lentiformis with water tables maintained at 0.38 m depth had greater EC and SAR values than those with 0.76 and 1.14 m water table positions. Elevated EC and SAR values most likely reflect the shallow rooted nature of A. lentiformis, which resulted in enhanced ET with the water table close to the soil surface.

Browning, L.S.; Bauder, J.W.; Phelps, S.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

Brumburgh, G.

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

LIVRET D'ENSEIGNEMENT LE MOT DU DIRECTEUR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the result of computation. Manay et al. show the superior performance of this and other integral in- variants curvature is derived by [Hulin and Troyanov 2003], and which is used by [Gelfand et al. 2005] for global is discussed in [Hulin and Troyanov 2003] and [Pottmann et al. 2007]: Vr = 2 3 r3 - H 4 r4 + O(r5 ), SAr = 2r2

Gutkin, Boris

286

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An adaptive color marker for Spatial Augmented Reality environments and visual feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This demonstration presents an adaptive visual marker optimised to improve tracking performance in Spatial Augmented Reality environments. The adaptive marker uses a color light sensor to capture the projected light color from a SAR system. The color ... Keywords: fixed color passive marker, spatial augmented reality, visual feedback, adaptive visual marker, color light sensor, projected light color, optimal tracking, light emitting diode, visible light spectrum, user interface

R T. Smith; M R. Marner; B H. Thomas

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Natural resource appropriation in cooperative artisanal fishing between fishermen and dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Laguna, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Tursiops truncatus) in Laguna, Brazil De´bora Peterson a,*, Natalia Hanazaki a , Paulo Ce´sar Simo/ECZ, Floriano´polis, SC 88010-970, Brazil b Laborato´rio de Mami´feros Aqua´ticos, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, CCB/ECZ, Floriano´polis, SC 88010-970, Brazil a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available

Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

289

i i 'i i WWW--i i http://www.icmp.lviv.ua/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Condensed Matter Physics of the Na- tional Academy of Sciences of Ukraine are distributed to scientific = l, a = b. ii ^HS(t), i- i, i i i ^ Sj i - i i B (r; t) i, Nm i i Rf i f , : ^HS(t) = ^HS - a j ^ Sj · Ba(rj; t), ^HS(t) = ^HS - a dr ^ Sa(r) · Ba(r; t), (2) Ba(rj; t) = B (rj; t) + Nm f

290

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hybrid bio-inspired techniques for land cover feature extraction: A remote sensing perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the theoretical and practical implementations of biogeography have led to the exploration of new bio-inspired techniques which can prove to be the building blocks of hybrid bio-inspired techniques. This aspect was discovered while ... Keywords: ACO, Ant Colony Optimization, BBO, Biogeography, DEM, DN, DPSO, E, FCM, Feature extraction, GA, HSI, I, Image classification, Kappa Coefficient, LISS, MDMC, MIR, MLC, NIR, PSO, Particle Swarm Optimization, RCBBO, RS1, RS2, Remote sensing, SAR, SIV, TSP

Lavika Goel; Daya Gupta; V. K. Panchal

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of an auditable safety analysis in support of a radiological facility classification  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities commonly have been classified as reactor, non-reactor nuclear, or nuclear facilities. Safety analysis documentation was prepared for these facilities, with few exceptions, using the requirements in either DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System; or DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by development of an extensive Safety Analysis Report (SAR), which identifies hazards, assesses risks of facility operation, describes and analyzes adequacy of measures taken to control hazards, and evaluates potential accidents and their associated risks. This process is complicated by analysis of secondary hazards and adequacy of backup (redundant) systems. The traditional SAR process is advantageous for DOE facilities with appreciable hazards or operational risks. SAR preparation for a low-risk facility or process can be cost-prohibitive and quite challenging because conventional safety analysis protocols may not readily be applied to a low-risk facility. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management recognized this potential disadvantage and issued an EM limited technical standard, No. 5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation. This standard can be used for developing documentation for a facility classified as radiological, including preparation of an auditable (defensible) safety analysis. In support of the radiological facility classification process, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has developed an auditable safety analysis document based upon the postulation criteria and hazards analysis techniques defined in DOE Order 5480.23.

Kinney, M.D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States); Young, B. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Natural phenomena evaluations of the K-25 site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards are used for the temporary storage of UF{sub 6} normal assay cylinders and long-term storage of other UF{sub 6} cylinders. The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards consist of six on-site areas: K-1066-B, K-1066-E, K-1066-F, K-1066-J, K-1066-K and K-1066-L. There are no permanent structures erected on the cylinder yards, except for five portable buildings. The operating contractor for the K-25 Site is preparing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) to examine the safety related aspects of the K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards. The SAR preparation encompasses many tasks terminating in consequence analysis for the release of gaseous and liquid UF{sub 6}, one of which is the evaluation of natural phenomena threats, such as earthquakes, floods, and winds. In support of the SAR, the six active cylinder storage yards were evaluated for vulnerabilities to natural phenomena, earthquakes, high winds and tornados, tornado-generated missiles, floods (local and regional), and lightning. This report summarizes those studies. 30 refs.

Fricke, K.E.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document  

SciTech Connect

The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration batch, which included 5%, 50%, and 95% dose likelihood, and the sensitivity of each assumption to the calculated doses. As one would intuitively expect, the doses from the probabilistic assessment for most scenarios were found to be much less than the deterministic assessment. The lower dose of the probabilistic assessment can be attributed to a ''smearing'' of values from the high and low end of the PDF spectrum of the various input parameters. The analysis also found a potential weakness in the deterministic analysis used in the SAR, a detail on drum loading was not taken into consideration. Waste emplacement operations thus far have handled drums from each shipment as a single unit, i.e. drums from each shipment are kept together. Shipments typically come from a single waste stream, and therefore the curie loading of each drum can be considered nearly identical to that of its neighbor. Calculations show that if there are large numbers of drums used in the accident scenario assessment, e.g. 28 drums in the waste hoist failure scenario (CH5), then the probabilistic dose assessment calculations will diverge from the deterministically determined doses. As it is currently calculated, the deterministic dose assessment assumes one drum loaded to the maximum allowable (80 PE-Ci), and the remaining are 10% of the maximum. The effective average of drum curie content is therefore less in the deterministic assessment than the probabilistic assessment for a large number of drums. EEG recommends that the WIPP SAR calculations be revisited and updated to include a probabilistic safety assessment.

Rucker, D.F.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors, Chapter 18, Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions. The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Exchangeable sodium accumulation and replacement in Southeast Texas soils under turfgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many municipal water supplies in Southeast Texas have a relatively high level of Na+ and low total dissolved solids. Most soils of this area are dominated by smectitic clays that respond to wetting by swelling, especially when wetted with high Na waters of low salinity. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation in Southeast Texas soils under irrigated turfgrass, tested models predicting Na accumulation, and evaluated response of sodic soil to amendments. The Ap, E, and Bt horizons of 18 turf soils in 10 municipal water districts were studied. Irrigation water sodicity (SARiw) and salinity (ECiw) were strongly correlated with soil sodicity (SARE) and salinity (ECe). The SAR,W was found to be the best single variable to model soil Na accumulation but exchangeable Na also increased as a function of years of irrigation. The multiple regression equation: SARE =-5.16 + 0.53 SARiw + 4.04 In (yr) (R2 = 0.86) best predicted SARE to a depth of 30 cm. This study also compared gypsum, a common amendment for sodic soil reclamation, to langbeinite. A column leaching experiment using sodic water was conducted on a sodic, non-saline Boonville soil (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Ruptic Vertic Albaqualf) amended with gypsum and langbeinite at rates equivalent to exchangeable Na in soil depths of 15 and 30 cm. The soil water at depths of 7.5, 15 and 22.5 cm and the effluent from each column were collected at intervals of 12 h and analyzed for sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and soluble bases. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was calculated. At the end of the experiment, soil samples were removed from each column in four depth increments. Significantly less exchangeable Na and lower SAR of the soil waters were found in the lower sections of the soil columns, and Ksat was greater for the amended treatments than for the control.

Najjar, Namir Fouad

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A DOE-STD-3009 hazard and accident analysis methodology for non-reactor nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of appropriate consequence evaluation criteria in conjunction with generic likelihood of occurrence data to produce consistent hazard analysis results for nonreactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports (SAR). An additional objective is to demonstrate the use of generic likelihood of occurrence data as a means for deriving defendable accident sequence frequencies, thereby enabling the screening of potentially incredible events (<10{sup {minus}6} per year) from the design basis accident envelope. Generic likelihood of occurrence data has been used successfully in performing SAR hazard and accident analyses for two nonreactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. DOE-STD-3009-94 addresses and even encourages use of a qualitative binning technique for deriving and ranking nonreactor nuclear facility risks. However, qualitative techniques invariably lead to reviewer requests for more details associated with consequence or likelihood of occurrence bin assignments in the test of the SAR. Hazard analysis data displayed in simple worksheet format generally elicits questions about not only the assumptions behind the data, but also the quantitative bases for the assumptions themselves (engineering judgment may not be considered sufficient by some reviewers). This is especially true where the criteria for qualitative binning of likelihood of occurrence involves numerical ranges. Oftentimes reviewers want to see calculations or at least a discussion of event frequencies or failure probabilities to support likelihood of occurrence bin assignments. This may become a significant point of contention for events that have been binned as incredible. This paper will show how the use of readily available generic data can avoid many of the reviewer questions that will inevitably arise from strictly qualitative analyses, while not significantly increasing the overall burden on the analyst.

MAHN,JEFFREY A.; WALKER,SHARON ANN

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Water Infiltration and Permeability of Selected Urban Soils as Affected by Salinity and Sodicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil sodicity is known to affect soil structural stability and permeability. However, the impact differs depending on salinity of irrigation water, soil types as well as irrigation management practices. This study examined water infiltration into two alluvial soils (Torrifluvents), and two upland soils (Paleorthid and Calciorthid, Aridisols) placed in greenhouse pots. For the first experiment, irrigation solutions simulating the Rio Grande water, city potable water, and two sources of reclaimed water (EC of 1.4 and 2.2 dS m-1 and SAR of 6 and 11) were applied twice a week at 1.7 cm per application for a total of 27 irrigation events using 46 cm of water. No significant effect of water quality was detected in Delnorte gravelly loam (Paleorthid) and a small effect on infiltration into Harkey silt loam (Torrifluvent). However, the use of distilled water curtailed infiltration mainly in Harkey soil. In the second greenhouse experiment using a carefully crafted soil packing and water application protocols, the impact of water quality on infiltration into two Torrifluvents, Harkey silt loam and Glendale silty clay loam appeared after water application of 40 to 50 cm (16" - 20"). When saline solutions were applied as deep as 10 cm per application, the infiltration time nearly doubled when SAR of the solution increased from 1 to 6 or 12 in alluvial soils, but not in Turney silty clay loam (Calciorthid, Aridisol). When the irrigation depth per application was reduced to 7.5, 5.0, and 2.5 cm per application, the difference in infiltration rate was markedly reduced. The impact of elevated sodicity (SAR of 6 to 12) on infiltration can be an issue in alluvial soils, but unlikely in upland soils at irrigation water salinity of 1 to 2 dS m-1.

Miyamoto, S.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

MONUMENT VALLEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1 . Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custodv was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the validator's findings. Suspected Anomalies Report (SAR) generated by the UMTRA database system. This report compares the new data set with historical data and designates "suspected anomalies" based on the many criteria listed as footnotes on each page.

305

Implementing 10 CFR Part 830 Subpart B at WIPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implementation of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 830, Subpart B Nuclear Safety Management (1) was accomplished at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in a timely and efficient manner. The primary reason the transition went smoothly was that the existing safety analysis was relatively new, initially developed in 1995, and written in accordance with the safe harbor document DOE-STD-3009 (2). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (3) is kept up-to-date with the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process and thorough oversight and input provided by DOE-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) documented in the annual safety evaluation report (SER) process.

McCormick, J.; Ortiz, C.; Carter, M.; Niemi, B.; Farrell, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Descriution of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the validator's findings. Suspected Anomalies Reports (SAR), which is generated by the UMTM database system. This report compares the new data set with historical data and designates "suspected anomalies" based on the many criteria listed as footnotes on

307

SSRL HEADLINES March 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 March, 2006 9 March, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Two Negatives Make a Positive for Gene Therapy Science Highlight - Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Antibody Science Highlight - Structure of a SARS Protein Teamwork Restores Beam in SPEAR3 SPPS Experiment Concludes in March Progress on New Beam Line for Advanced Micro-crystal Analysis Using X-ray Fluorescence to Reveal Archimedes' Buried Text Department of Energy Officials Visit SLAC SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee to Meet April 17 Upcoming Meetings User Administration Update Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Two Negatives Make a Positive for Gene Therapy

308

MONUMENT VALLEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

0 0 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Descrivtion of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the validator's findings. Suspected Anomalies Report (SAR) generated by the UMTRA database system. This report compares the new data set with historical data and designates "suspected anomalies" based on the many criteria listed as footnotes on each page.

309

Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to plan waste management activities at local scale including waste minimization, collection, treatment, and disposal. At global scale, the MSW generation rates in Turkey are significantly related to unemployment rate and asphalt-paved roads ratio. Yet, significances of these variables may diminish at local scale for some provinces. At local scale, different factors may be important in affecting MSW generation rates.

Keser, Saniye [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Duzgun, Sebnem [Department of Mining Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Geodetic and Geographic Information Technologies, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Aksoy, Aysegul, E-mail: aaksoy@metu.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy and environment. A Sandia technology bulletin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin discusses the following: decontamination of polluted water by using a photocatalyst to convert ultraviolet energy into electrochemical energy capable of destroying organic waste and removing toxic metals; monitoring oil spills with SAR by collecting data in digital form, processing the data, and creating digital images that are recorded for post-mission viewing and processing; revitalization of a solar industrial process heat system which uses parabolic troughs to heat water for foil production of integrated circuits; and an electronic information system, EnviroTRADE (Environmental Technologies for Remedial Actions Data Exchange) for worldwide exchange of environmental restoration and waste management information.

Parrott, L.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility  

SciTech Connect

This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings.

Brehm, J.R.; Deobald, T.L.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

Substituent Effects In a Series of 1,7-C60(RF)2 Compounds (RF = CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, i-C3F7, n-C4F9, s-C4F9, n-C8F17): Electron Affinities, Reduction Potentials, and E(LUMO) Values Are Not Always Correlated  

SciTech Connect

Substituent effects are of paramount importance in virtually all fields of fundamental and applied chemistry. Classical and modern examples can be found in organic chemistry (Hammett parameters and Charton steric parameters), inorganic chemistry (trans effect and trans influence), organometallic chemistry (phosphine cone angles), physical chemistry (linear free energy relationships and DFT), biochemistry (protein tertiary structure), medicinal chemistry (SAR maps and BioMAP analysis), polymer chemistry (nonlinear optical and permeation properties and glass transition temperatures), and materials chemistry (stability and luminescent properties of electroluminescent devices and light-to-power conversion efficiencies of fullerene-derivative-based OPV devices).

Kuvychko, Igor V.; Whitaker, James B.; Larson, Bryon W.; Folsom, Travis; Shustova, Natalia; Avdoshenko, Stanislav; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wen, Hui; Wang, Xue B.; Dunsch, Lothar; Popov, Alexey A.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Radar interferometry for monitoring land subsidence and coastal change in the Nile Delta, Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land subsidence and coastal erosion are worldwide problems, particularly in densely populated deltas. The Nile Delta is no exception. Currently, it is undergoing land subsidence and is simultaneously experiencing retreat of its coastline. The impacts of these long-term interrelated geomorphic problems are heightened by the economic, social and historical importance of the delta to Egypt. Unfortunately, the current measures of the rates of subsidence and coastal erosion in the delta are rough estimates at best. Sustainable development of the delta requires accurate and detailed spatial and temporal measures of subsidence and coastal retreat rates. Radar interferometry is a unique remote sensing approach that can be used to map topography with 1 m vertical accuracy and measure surface deformation with 1 mm level accuracy. Radar interferometry has been employed in this dissertation to measure urban subsidence and coastal change in the Nile Delta. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of 5.66 cm wavelength acquired by the European Radar Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS- 2) spanning eight years (1993-2000) have been used in this investigation. The ERS data have been selected because the spatial and temporal coverage, as well as the short wavelength, are appropriate to measure the slow rate of subsidence in the delta. The ERS tandem coherence images are also appropriate for coastal change detection. The magnitude and pattern of subsidence are detected and measured using Permanent Scatterer interferometry. The measured rates of subsidence in greater Cairo, Mansura, and Mahala are 7, 9, and 5 mm yr-1, respectively. Areas of erosion and accretion in the eastern side of the delta are detected using the ERS tandem coherence and the ERS amplitude images. The average measured rates of erosion and accretion are -9.57 and +5.44 m yr-1, respectively. These measured rates pose an urgent need of regular monitoring of subsidence and coastline retreat in the delta. This study highlighted the feasibility of applying Permanent Scatterer interferometry in inappropriate environment for conventional SAR interferometry. The study addressed possibilities and limitations for successful use of SAR interferometry within the densely vegetated delta and introduced alternative strategies for further improvement of SAR interferometric measurements in the delta.

Aly, Mohamed Hassan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit final safety analysis report (LWRHU-FSAR): Volume 2: Accident Model Document (AMD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume of the LWRHU SAR, the Accident Model Document (AMD), are to: Identify all malfunctions, both singular and multiple, which can occur during the complete mission profile that could lead to release outside the clad of the radioisotopic material contained therein; Provide estimates of occurrence probabilities associated with these various accidents; Evaluate the response of the LWRHU (or its components) to the resultant accident environments; and Associate the potential event history with test data or analysis to determine the potential interaction of the released radionuclides with the biosphere.

Johnson, E.W.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Seasat satellite investigation of the structure of western Nebraska and its application to the evaluation of geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite imagery was used to interpret the structural framework and, indirectly, the geothermal potential of an area in western Nebraska. Lineaments were mapped from the imagery and then compared to known structure. It was found that Seasat does record surface manifestations of subtle basement structures, particularly faulting. Furthermore, four areas with geothermal potential were delineated using Seasat and other data. It is stressed that more subsurface geology and geophysical data are needed before a final evaluation of the geothermal potential can be made. Seasat imagery is a useful reconnaissance exploration tool in the interpretation of regional structure within areas of little topographic relief.

Stix, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Wireless Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wireless sensor system is proposed for a targeted deployment in civil infrastructures (namely bridges) to help mitigate the growing problem of deterioration of civil infrastructures. The sensor motes are self-powered via a novel magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) energy harvesting material and a low-frequency, low-power rectifier multiplier (RM). Experimental characterizations of the MSMA device and the RM are presented. A study on practical implementation of a strain gauge sensor and its application in the proposed sensor system are undertaken and a low-power successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) is presented. The SAR ADC was fabricated and laboratory characterizations show the proposed low-voltage topology is a viable candidate for deployment in the proposed sensor system. Additionally, a wireless transmitter is proposed to transmit the SAR ADC output using on-off keying (OOK) modulation with an impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) transmitter (TX). The RM and SAR ADC were fabricated in ON 0.5 micrometer CMOS process. An alternative transmitter architecture is also presented for use in the 3-10GHz UWB band. Unlike the IR-UWB TX described for the proposed wireless sensor system, the presented transmitter is designed to transfer large amounts of information with little concern for power consumption. This second method of data transmission divides the 3-10GHz spectrum into 528MHz sub-bands and "hops" between these sub-bands during data transmission. The data is sent over these multiple channels for short distances (?3-10m) at data rates over a few hundred million bits per second (Mbps). An UWB TX is presented for implementation in mode-I (3.1-4.6GHz) UWB which utilizes multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) to encode the information. The TX was designed and fabricated using UMC 0.13 micrometer CMOS technology. Measurement results and theoretical system level budgeting are presented for the proposed UWB TX.

Wardlaw, Jason

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Full-spectrum disease response : beyond just the flu.  

SciTech Connect

Why plan beyond the flu: (1) the installation may be the target of bioterrorism - National Laboratory, military base collocated in large population center; and (2) International Airport - transport of infectious agents to the area - Sandia is a global enterprise and staff visit many foreign countries. In addition to the Pandemic Plan, Sandia has developed a separate Disease Response Plan (DRP). The DRP addresses Category A, B pathogens and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The DRP contains the Cities Readiness Initiative sub-plan for disbursement of Strategic National Stockpile assets.

Knazovich, Michael Ward; Cox, Warren B.; Henderson, Samuel Arthur

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Results of the MCNP analysis of 20/20 LEU fuel for the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo Neutron/Photon (MCNP) code has been used to perform the neutronics analysis required to support revision of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The SAR revision is a necessary part of the preparation of the application for authorization to convert the OSTR core from High Enriched Uranium (HEU) FLIP fuel to a Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Before MCNP was applied to LEU-fueled cores, it was first validated by comparing MCNP calculations on FLIP cores to historical, measured values for these cores. The LEU fuel considered was the 20 wt%, 20 % enriched (20/20) TRIGA fuel approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in NUREG 1282. The results show that the 20/20 fuel is much more reactive than FLIP fuel. A just-critical OSTR FLIP core contains 65 elements, while a just-critical 20/20 core only needs 51 elements. Similarly, the current operational FLIP core consists of 88 elements, whereas a 20/20 core giving the same core excess only requires 65 elements. This presents a significant problem for the OSTR because of potentially significant neutron flux loss in experimental facilities. Further analysis shows that to achieve a full size operational core of about 90 LEU elements the erbium content of the LEU fuel would need to be increased from 0.47 wt% to about 0.85 wt%. (author)

Dodd, B.; Klein, A.C.; Lewis, B.R.; Merritt, P.A

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992  

SciTech Connect

The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning  

SciTech Connect

The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Phase 2 safety analysis report: National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II program was established in order to provide additional space for experiments, and also staging and equipment storage areas. It also provides additional office space and new types of advanced instrumentation for users. This document will deal with the new safety issues resulting from this extensive expansion program, and should be used as a supplement to BNL Report No. 51584 ''National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Report,'' July 1982 (hereafter referred to as the Phase I SAR). The initial NSLS facility is described in the Phase I SAR. It comprises two electron storage rings, an injection system common to both, experimental beam lines and equipment, and office and support areas, all of which are housed in a 74,000 sq. ft. building. The X-ray Ring provides for 28 primary beam ports and the VUV Ring, 16. Each port is capable of division into 2 or 3 separate beam lines. All ports receive their synchrotron light from conventional bending magnet sources, the magnets being part of the storage ring lattice. 4 refs.

Stefan, P. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. This paper discusses the potential macroeconomic implications for Hong Kong SAR of accommodative monetary policy in the United States. It shows, through model simulations, that a resumption of the credit channel in Hong Kong SAR has the potential to create inflation in both goods and asset markets. Expansionary financial conditions will likely have a greater impact in fueling asset price inflation, manifested in the model through a strong increase in equity prices. Higher asset prices could, in turn, through a financial accelerator mechanism, lead to further credit expansion and an upward cycle of asset prices and credit. This cycle, if unchecked, can potentially feed into volatility in consumption, output and employment and complicate macroeconomic management. The simulation results suggest there is a role for countercyclical prudential regulations to mitigate the amplitude of the cycle

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction: Use of a portable exhauster on 241-A-101 tank during salt well pumping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) for the use of a portable exhauster on 241-A-101 single-shell tank (SST) during salt well pumping and other routine activities at the tank. Approval for salt well pumping is not being requested as this is a routine activity performed to manage the waste within the SST Tank System. The primary objective of providing active ventilation to the 241-A-101 tank is to satisfy the requirements of a Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that requires postulated accidents to remain within risk guidelines. It is anticipated that salt well pumping will release gases entrapped within the waste as the liquid level is lowered, because of less hydrostatic force keeping the gases in place. Other routine activities also have the potential to release trapped gases by interrupting gas pockets within the waste. Hanford Site waste tanks must comply with the National Fire Protection Association guidelines, which mandate that flammable gas concentration be less than 25 percent of the lower flammability limits. The LANL SAR indicates that the lower flammability limit may be exceeded during certain postulated accident scenarios. Also, the potentials for electrical (pump motor, heat tracing) and mechanical (equipment installation) spark sources exist. Therefore, because of the presence of ignition sources and the increase in released flammable gases, active ventilation will be required to reduce the ``time at risk`` while performing routine operations at the tank.

Hays, C.B.

1996-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes  

SciTech Connect

The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Agonist-activated angiotensin II receptor is associated with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in bovine adrenal cortex  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have shown that high affinity binding of the agonist Angiotensin II (Ang II) to adrenal cortex receptors was modulated by guanine nucleotides. In contrast, the antagonist (/sup 1/SAR,/sup 8/Ile) Ang II (SARILE) did not display any sensitivity toward guanine nucleotides. The authors have observed already after solubilization in octyl-glucoside and size-exclusion HPLC that agonist (/sup 131/I) (/sup 1/SAR) Ang II (SARANG)-stabilized receptor complex behaved as a larger protein than the antagonist (/sup 125/I)SARILE-stabilized receptor. Their purpose was to assay the direct association of a guanine nucleotide binding protein to the agonist-occupied Ang II receptor using (/sup 35/S) guanosine-thio-triphosphate (GTP-..gamma..-s) as a probe of the regulation protein. Adrenal cortical membrane receptors were activated with 10/sup -6/ M SARANG, solubilized and fraction marked on DEAE-agarose, then on size-exclusion HPLC. Fractionated samples were assayed with (/sup 35/S)-GTP-..gamma..-s. They found that a (/sup 35/S)GTP-..gamma..-s binding protein peak coeluted with the agonist-occupied receptor peak, while it disappeared in absence of agonist and eluted presumably free in a higher elution volume. Their results demonstrated directly the coupling of a guanine-nucleotide binding protein to the agonist-activated Ang II receptor.

Berardi, M.; Ong, H.; De Lean, A.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

Autoradiographic localization and characterization of angiotensin II binding sites in the spleen of rats and mice  

SciTech Connect

Specific binding sites for angiotensin II (Ang II) were localized in the red pulp of the spleen of rats and mice by quantitative autoradiography using /sup 125/I-Sar1-Ang II as a ligand. In the rat, the binding was saturable and specific, and the rank order for Ang II derivatives as competitors of /sup 125/I-Sar1-Ang II binding correlates well with their affinity for Ang II receptors in other tissues. Kinetic analysis in the rat spleen revealed a single class of binding sites with a KD of 1.11 nM and a Bmax value of 81.6 fmol/mg protein. Ang II binding sites were also localized on isolated rat spleen cells with similar affinity but with much lower Bmax, 9.75 fmol/mg protein. Ang II receptors were not detected in thymus sections from rats or mice, or on isolated rat thymocytes. The binding sites described here might represent a functional Ang II receptor with a role in the regulation of splenic volume and blood flow and in the modulation of the lymphocyte function.

Castren, E.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determination of H{sub 2} Diffusion Rates through Various Closures on TRU Waste Bag-Out Bags  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The amount of H{sub 2} diffusion through twist and tape (horse-tail), wire tie, plastic tie, and heat sealed closures on transuranic (TRU) waste bag-out bags has been determined. H{sub 2} diffusion through wire and plastic tie closures on TRU waste bag-out bags has not been previously characterized and, as such, TRU waste drums containing bags with these closures cannot be certified and/or shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since wire ties have been used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1980 to 1991 and the plastic ties from 1991 to the present, there are currently thousands of waste drums that cannot be shipped to the WIPP site. Repackaging the waste would be prohibitively expensive. Diffusion experiments performed on the above mentioned closures show that the diffusion rates of plastic tie and horse-tail closures are greater than the accepted value presented in the TRU-PACT 11 Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Diffusion rates for wire tie closures are not statistically different from the SAR value. Thus, drums containing bags with these closures can now potentially be certified which would allow for their consequent shipment to WIPP.

Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; E. Larry Callis; Kirsten M. Norman

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

Doerry, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Synthetic Aperture Radar Dept.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Early estimation of crop surfaces and agriculture monitoring using RADARSAT data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owing to the success of past experiments carried out using ERS SAR time-series from late fall to late winter [1-6], we herewith evaluate the potential of RADARSAT in substituting optical images for early crop identification and early crop surfaces estimation. This paper outlines the operational feasibility of very early RADARSAT based acreage estimation of noncultivated terrain (set-aside, fallow, bare soils) and economically important crops, already during the winter season. Also the monitoring of growing crops during spring and early summer has been also carried out to investigate RADARSAT potential for cereals discrimination. To this end, this pre-operational project has been carried out in a real-time environment (rapid data acquisition, delivery, processing and exploitation). From May 1997 to January 1998, the test site of the West-Flevoland polder in the Netherlands was monitored in the framework of ADRO Project #581. To discriminate between non-cultivated/cultivated surfaces and to identify the major crop types, the methodology already successfully applied with ERS SAR data [1-6] has been used. 1.

Francis Yakam-simen; Edmond Nezry; Francis Zagolski

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evaluating fusion techniques for multi-sensor satellite image data  

SciTech Connect

Satellite image data fusion is a topic of interest in many areas including environmental monitoring, emergency response, and defense. Typically any single satellite sensor cannot provide all of the benefits offered by a combination of different sensors (e.g., high-spatial but low spectral resolution vs. low-spatial but high spectral, optical vs. SAR). Given the respective strengths and weaknesses of the different types of image data, it is beneficial to fuse many types of image data to extract as much information as possible from the data. Our work focuses on the fusion of multi-sensor image data into a unified representation that incorporates the potential strengths of a sensor in order to minimize classification error. Of particular interest is the fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a single, multispectral image of the best possible spatial resolution. We explore various methods to optimally fuse these images and evaluate the quality of the image fusion by using K-means clustering to categorize regions in the fused images and comparing the accuracies of the resulting categorization maps.

Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

HARRINGTON RA

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Materials physics and device development for improved efficiency of GaN HEMT high power amplifiers.  

SciTech Connect

GaN-based microwave power amplifiers have been identified as critical components in Sandia's next generation micro-Synthetic-Aperture-Radar (SAR) operating at X-band and Ku-band (10-18 GHz). To miniaturize SAR, GaN-based amplifiers are necessary to replace bulky traveling wave tubes. Specifically, for micro-SAR development, highly reliable GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have delivered a factor of 10 times improvement in power performance compared to GaAs, need to be developed. Despite the great promise of GaN HEMTs, problems associated with nitride materials growth currently limit gain, linearity, power-added-efficiency, reproducibility, and reliability. These material quality issues are primarily due to heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on lattice mismatched substrates. Because SiC provides the best lattice match and thermal conductivity, SiC is currently the substrate of choice for GaN-based microwave amplifiers. Obviously for GaN-based HEMTs to fully realize their tremendous promise, several challenges related to GaN heteroepitaxy on SiC must be solved. For this LDRD, we conducted a concerted effort to resolve materials issues through in-depth research on GaN/AlGaN growth on SiC. Repeatable growth processes were developed which enabled basic studies of these device layers as well as full fabrication of microwave amplifiers. Detailed studies of the GaN and AlGaN growth of SiC were conducted and techniques to measure the structural and electrical properties of the layers were developed. Problems that limit device performance were investigated, including electron traps, dislocations, the quality of semi-insulating GaN, the GaN/AlGaN interface roughness, and surface pinning of the AlGaN gate. Surface charge was reduced by developing silicon nitride passivation. Constant feedback between material properties, physical understanding, and device performance enabled rapid progress which eventually led to the successful fabrication of state of the art HEMT transistors and amplifiers.

Kurtz, Steven Ross; Follstaedt, David Martin; Wright, Alan Francis; Baca, Albert G.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Missert, Nancy A.; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Marsh, Phil F.; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Tigges, Christopher P.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

Washington TRU Solutions

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research was to determine the length of time required to reduce the salt levels brought by the storm surge to near pre-hurricane levels. To do this, four sets of samples were taken across two years and analyzed for salinity using the saturated paste extract method. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 79% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 30% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In April 2009, 38% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 13% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 71% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 39% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By December 2009, none of the soils sampled in the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 21% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 33% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By October 2010, all soils sampled had leached sufficient salts to be classified as non-saline to very slightly saline soils. Utilizing the November 2008 data set, 28 random samples were selected for exchangeable Na percent (ESP) in order to develop the ESP-SAR (Na adsorption ratio) predictive equation, ESP= 1.19(SAR)^0.82. The SAR-ESP relationship is statistically significant (95% confidence level), with a correlation coefficient of 0.964 (df=26).

Mueller, Ryan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011 January 2011 Presentation of Questions Associated With the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (Onsite) Multi-Canister Overpack Cask [ARPT-RL-2011-001] The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for Packaging (Onsite) Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Cask HNF-SD-SARP-017, Rev. 3, to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) representatives. The presentation was supported by a detailed document that discussed the individual questions.

338

SRS - Active Employee Benefits News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17/2013 17/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Active Employee Benefits News and Communications 01/16/13 NEW SIP IRS Determination Letter 06/09/11 Building Trades National Medical Screening Program 01/16/13 NEW Pension IRS Determination Letter 04/29/11 Pension Funding Letter & Notices 09/20/12 Income Levelling Communication 03/15/11 Potential Benefit Plan Considerations 05/14/12 2013 Benefits Changes 12/28/10 2011 FICA Reduction 05/02/12 EveMed Vision Insurance Introduces Paperless EOB's 12/15/10 Annual Notices: CHIP-ERRP-Life SARS 05/01/12 New Investment Options - SRNS Defined Contribution Plan 11/30/10 SMM - Life Insurance Revisions 04/10/12 Slides From 2012 Retiree Association Meetinq 11/04/10 Mental Health, Cadillac Plans, Grandfathered Plans

339

DOE-STD-3009-94 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-94 9-94 DOE-STD-3009-94 March 24, 2006 Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, Change Notice No. 3 CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 (January 2000) | CHANGE NOTICE NO. 2 (April 2002) | CHANGE NOTICE NO. 3 (March 2006) This Standard describes a DSA preparation method that is acceptable to the DOE as delineated for those specific facilities listed in Table 2 of Appendix A, "General Statement of Safety Basis Policy", to Subpart B, "Safety Basis Requirements", of 10 CFR 830. It was developed to assist Hazard Category 2 and 3 facilities in preparing SARs that will satisfy the requirements of 10 CFR 830. DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, Change Notice No. 3

340

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. The safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should identify preventive and mitigating measures (systems, procedures, administrative controls, etc.) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. Safety SSCs are defined, and a system to maintain control over their design and is established. (CR-7) Scope: The K Basins SWS activities will be conducted in accordance with the requirements in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, K Basin Final Safety Analysis Report, Revision 6, and SNF-10823, Package Safety Analysis Assessment for Sludge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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342

SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

March 2002 March 2002 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the validator's findings. Suspected Anomalies Report (SAR), which is generated by the UMTRA database system. This report compares the new data set with historical data and designates "suspected anomalies" based on the many criteria listed as footnotes on

343

SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

February 1998 February 1998 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Descrivtion of Contents 1. Site Sampling Lead/ Site Hydrologist Summary 2. Data Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. 3. Data Assessment Summary, which describes problems identified in the data validation process and summarizes the validator's findings. 4. Suspected Anomalies Reports (SAR), which is generated by the UMTRA database system. This report compares the new data set with historical data and designates "suspected anomalies" based on the many criteria listed as footnotes on

344

Methodology assessment and recommendations for the Mars science laboratory launch safety analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has assigned to Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility of producing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the plutonium-dioxide fueled Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) proposed to be used in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) is anticipating a launch in fall of 2009, and the SAR will play a critical role in the launch approval process. As in past safety evaluations of MMRTG missions, a wide range of potential accident conditions differing widely in probability and seventy must be considered, and the resulting risk to the public will be presented in the form of probability distribution functions of health effects in terms of latent cancer fatalities. The basic descriptions of accident cases will be provided by NASA in the MSL SAR Databook for the mission, and on the basis of these descriptions, Sandia will apply a variety of sophisticated computational simulation tools to evaluate the potential release of plutonium dioxide, its transport to human populations, and the consequent health effects. The first step in carrying out this project is to evaluate the existing computational analysis tools (computer codes) for suitability to the analysis and, when appropriate, to identify areas where modifications or improvements are warranted. The overall calculation of health risks can be divided into three levels of analysis. Level A involves detailed simulations of the interactions of the MMRTG or its components with the broad range of insults (e.g., shrapnel, blast waves, fires) posed by the various accident environments. There are a number of candidate codes for this level; they are typically high resolution computational simulation tools that capture details of each type of interaction and that can predict damage and plutonium dioxide release for a range of choices of controlling parameters. Level B utilizes these detailed results to study many thousands of possible event sequences and to build up a statistical representation of the releases for each accident case. A code to carry out this process will have to be developed or adapted from previous MMRTG missions. Finally, Level C translates the release (or ''source term'') information from Level B into public risk by applying models for atmospheric transport and the health consequences of exposure to the released plutonium dioxide. A number of candidate codes for this level of analysis are available. This report surveys the range of available codes and tools for each of these levels and makes recommendations for which choices are best for the MSL mission. It also identities areas where improvements to the codes are needed. In some cases a second tier of codes may be identified to provide supporting or clarifying insight about particular issues. The main focus of the methodology assessment is to identify a suite of computational tools that can produce a high quality SAR that can be successfully reviewed by external bodies (such as the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel) on the schedule established by NASA and DOE.

Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Powers, Dana Auburn; Atcitty, Christopher B.; Robinson, David B; Hewson, John C.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Dodson, Brian W.; Potter, Donald L.; Kelly, John E.; MacLean, Heather J.; Bergeron, Kenneth Donald (Sala & Associates); Bessette, Gregory Carl; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Using architectures for semantic interoperability to create journal clubs for emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In certain types of 'slow burn' emergencies, careful accumulation and evaluation of information can offer a crucial advantage. The SARS outbreak in the first decade of the 21st century was such an event, and ad hoc journal clubs played a critical role in assisting scientific and technical responders in identifying and developing various strategies for halting what could have become a dangerous pandemic. This research-in-progress paper describes a process for leveraging emerging semantic web and digital library architectures and standards to (1) create a focused collection of bibliographic metadata, (2) extract semantic information, (3) convert it to the Resource Description Framework /Extensible Markup Language (RDF/XML), and (4) integrate it so that scientific and technical responders can share and explore critical information in the collections.

Powell, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Linn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Mark L B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-001827: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a 3-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Washoe County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 26, 2010 CX-001951: Categorical Exclusion Determination Preparation of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy CX(s) Applied: A8, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/26/2010 Location(s): Perth Amboy, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 26, 2010 CX-001950: Categorical Exclusion Determination Preparation of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Application CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1

347

INL FCF Basis Review Follow-up  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Independent Review Report Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility Safety Basis Review Follow-up PURPOSE The purpose of this follow-up review was to verify how and to what extent Idaho National Laboratory (INL) addressed the Significant Issues that were identified in the April 2010 Independent Oversight report on the INL Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) safety basis review, as well as the consideration given to the recommendations that were made. Significant Issues were defined in that report as problems or concerns that affected the validity of the FCF safety basis documentation. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) fulfilled this objective by reviewing the draft Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the FCF,

348

CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Categorical Exclusion Determination 65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006865: Categorical Exclusion Determination Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Biofuels with the Mcgyan Process CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B3.8 Date: 10/12/2011 Location(s): Anoka; Isanti, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to the Sartec Corporation (SarTec) to facilitate the production and harvest of 2,500 acres of pennycress and camelina mustard seed plants and processing biofuel from oil pressed from plant seeds. Non-oil pressing residues would be used as fuel or feed. This renewable energy research would be conducted at farms selected by the principle investigator (PI). CX-006865.pdf

349

DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:_ :_ "'·) , u.s. DEP_~ThIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DET11IU.nNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT: US Geothermal, Inc. STATE: NV PROJECf TlTL.E: Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas using a Three- Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR And Kinematic Structural Analysis Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOO109 DE-EEOOO2847 GFO-OOO2847-OO3 G02847 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, a5 NEPA Compliance Officer (autbori7.ed under DOE Order 451.1A),1 have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and

350

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

351

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 6310 of 26,764 results. 01 - 6310 of 26,764 results. Download Semiannual Report to Congress April 1, 2008- September 30, 2008 Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, DOE/IG-SAR-10-08 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/semiannual-report-congress-april-1-2008-september-30-2008 Download Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office- April 2012 Los Alamos Site Office Nuclear Maintenance Management Program Oversight Self-Assessment [HIAR-LANL-2011-11-18] http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/independent-activity-report-los-alamos-site-office-april-2012 Page EIS-0436: I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project, Multnomah County, Oregon and Cowlitz and Clark Counties, Washington This EIS will evaluate a proposal by BPA to build a 500-kilovolt (kV) lattice-steel-tower transmission line that would run from a new 500-kV

352

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of Washington, D.C. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program:

353

u.s. DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:SarTec Corporation Page I of2 STATE: MN PROJECf TITLE : Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Bioruels with the Mcgyan Process Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procuremenllnstrument Number NEPA Control Number em NumbeT DE-FOA-000380 DE-EEOOO3127 GF()"()()()3127 -001 EE3127 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Off'tCer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I han made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.8 Outdoor ecological and other environmental research (including siting , oonstruction , and operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing building for sample analysis) in a small area (generally less

354

DOE-STD-3009-94 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-94 09-94 DOE-STD-3009-94 May 30, 2005 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 (January 2000) | CHANGE NOTICE NO. 2 (April 2002) This Standard describes a DSA preparation method that is acceptable to the DOE as delineated for those specific facilities listed in Table 2 of Appendix A, "General Statement of Safety Basis Policy", to Subpart B, "Safety Basis Requirements", of 10 CFR 830. It was developed to assist Hazard Category 2 and 3 facilities. in preparing SARs that will satisfy the requirements of 10 CFR 830. DOE STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis DOE STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy

355

CX-001827: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27: Categorical Exclusion Determination 27: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001827: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a 3-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Washoe County, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office DOE and recipient cost share funds would be used by US Geothermal Incorporated (US Geothermal) to demonstrate an exploration strategy that may lead to the commercial development of the San Emidio geothermal resource area on Bureau of Land Management, Winnemucca District, Black Rock Field Office in Washoe County, Nevada. US Geothermal plans to drill up to

356

Microsoft Word - SGP CART Safety Orientation.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-002 4-002 SGP CART SAFETY ORIENTATION Page 1 of 1 SGP CART SAFETY ORIENTATION Revised 10/14/04 1 INTRODUCTION Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) manages this U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site. It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable. 2 VISITOR SIGN-IN AND SIGN-OUT All visitors to the SGP CART site are required to complete a Site Access Request (SAR) form before visiting the site.

357

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

358

Two LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-15 Data Sets Released LC-15 Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere- Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar, 1- km Mosaic, Amazon Basin: 1995-1996 . Data set prepared by S.S. Saatchi, B. Nelson, E. Podest, and J. Holt. This data set contains two image mosaics of L-band radar backscatter and two images of derived first order texture. The mosaics were created from 1,500 images collected by the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) over the Amazon River Basin as part of the Global Rainforest Mapping Project (GRMP). Backscatter image mosaics were developed for the dry season of 1995 and the wet season

359

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-03: Limitation of 10 CFR Part 830 to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Limitation of 10 CFR Part : Limitation of 10 CFR Part 830 to Equipment Referenced in the Safety Analysis Report Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-03: Limitation of 10 CFR Part 830 to Equipment Referenced in the Safety Analysis Report Recently this Office received a reply to a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV), although not denying any facts or conclusions in the PNOV and agreeing to pay the full imposed Civil Penalty, included arguments that some of the equipment cited in the PNOV was not, in their view, subject to the requirements of Part 830. The contractor argued that only equipment referenced in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) or Technical Specifications should come under the requirements of Part 830. The attached is DOE's response to denying that

360

EA-1755: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1755: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1755: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1755: Final Environmental Assessment Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Eddy County, New Mexico The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of reconstructing the existing south access road (SAR) - currently maintained by the County as CR 802 - and widening the driving prism and ROW width to accommodate WIPP haulage trucks, and improve the overall quality of the current road condition. In addition, a construction lay down yard is being proposed, to be converted into a rallying point upon completion of the road construction. The proposed action is sought to fill the need of having a second route to the WIPP for waste haulage activities via a southerly

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361

DOE-DP-STD-3016-99 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DP-STD-3016-99 DP-STD-3016-99 DOE-DP-STD-3016-99 February 26, 1999 DOE-DP-STD-3016-99: Limited Standard; Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations Replaced by DOE-NA-3016-2006 This technical standard applies to the conduct of hazard analyses and preparation of hazard analysis reports (HARs) for nuclear explosive operations (NEOs) conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE). This standard addresses operation-specific HARs and their interface with facility safety basis documents (Safety Analysis Reports [SARs] or other DOE-approved safety basis documents). DOE-DP-STD-3016-99, Limited Standard; Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRs/DEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002

362

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbents 1 Sorbents 1 Energy Integrated CO 2 Capture L. E. Hakka, John Sarlis, Karl Stephenne Cansolv Technologies Inc. May 2-5, 2005, Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria Virginia CTI Technology Enables You To: * Meet "zero" emission requirements for all pollutants * Earn CO 2 credits * Position your company as "green" * Evaluate new business opportunities from byproducts - e.g. EOR with CO 2 * Use inexpensive fuels * Save capital and operating cost Presentation Outline * CANSOLV Process descriptions - Regenerable SO 2 capture - Amine solvent CO 2 capture - Wet DeNOx - Wet mercury capture * DeSOx + CO 2 Capture * Multipollutant + CO 2 Capture * Cost comparisons to benchmark processes * CO 2 Capture cost per tonne Cansolv Technologies Inc. * CTI founded in 1997 as management buyout

363

CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

563: Categorical Exclusion Determination 563: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office Temple University would utilize DOE and cost share funds to develop an integrated set of tools to monitor the evolution of permeability and fluid flow within an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) during both the stimulation and production phases to infer the location, geometry and pore pressure distribution within the subsurface fracture network. CX-007563.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

364

Enforcement Guidance Supplement - EGS 99-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 October 20, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE and Contractor PAAA Coordinators FROM: R. Keith Christopher Director Office of Enforcement and Investigation SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-03: Limitation of 10 CFR Part 830 to Equipment Referenced in the Safety Analysis Report Recently this Office received a reply to a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV), although not denying any facts or conclusions in the PNOV and agreeing to pay the full imposed Civil Penalty, included arguments that some of the equipment cited in the PNOV was not, in their view, subject to the requirements of Part 830. The contractor argued that only equipment referenced in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), Technical

365

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of selected aspects of the 105-KW Basin Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. HSS's review of the K-West Basin FSAR found it to be generally adequate with respect to the scope of this review. However, some aspects of the FSAR accident analyses of two events may warrant further review: MCO transport cask drop into the K-Basin, and the fire accident event involving the cask

366

Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

K Basin safety analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility supporting data and calculation database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a database of supporting calculations for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The database was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, ''Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility'', Phase 2, ''Supporting Installation of Processing Systems'' (Garvin 1998). The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements'', Rev. 2, and the CVDF Summary Design Report. The database contains calculation report entries for all process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This database has been developed for the SNFP CVDF Engineering Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Revue dEtudes Tibtaines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: dj le fort n'est plus si clos puisqu'on n'emploie plus l'expression "sgo med", puisqu'on parle de ses portes (p. 122 et 135), et qu'il est bien indiqu dans une sorte de rsum de l'pisode (p. 144) que Ge- sar pour ouvrir la porte du Dharma de l'Inde... , pera d'une flche la porte de la "Citadelle de Fer". De fait, le moyen a de l'importance dans le rcit, mais pas une importance essentielle. Ce qui compte, plus que les portes, c'est la finalit de l'opration, qui veut la destruction des Mu stegs pa. L...

Achard, Jean-Luc

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

A Potent Peptidomimetic Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Has a Very Different Conformation Than SNAP-25 Substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A is the most lethal of all known toxins. Here, we report the crystal structure, along with SAR data, of the zinc metalloprotease domain of BoNT/A bound to a potent peptidomimetic inhibitor (Ki = 41 nM) that resembles the local sequence of the SNAP-25 substrate. Surprisingly, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation around the cleavage site, in contrast to the extended conformation of the native substrate. The backbone of the inhibitor's P1 residue displaces the putative catalytic water molecule and concomitantly interacts with the 'proton shuttle' E224. This mechanism of inhibition is aided by residue contacts in the conserved S1' pocket of the substrate binding cleft, and the induction of new hydrophobic pockets, which are not present in the apo form, especially for the P2' residue of the inhibitor. Our inhibitor is specific for BoNT/A as it does not inhibit other BoNT serotypes or thermolysin.

Zuniga, J.E.; Schmidt, J.J.; Fenn, T.; Burnett, J.C.; Arac, D.; Gussio, R.; Stafford, R.G.; Badie, S.S.; Bavari, S.; Brunger, A.T.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Safety review advisor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Tennessee's Nuclear Engineering Department, in cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), is evaluating the feasibility of utilizing an expert system to aid in 10CFR50.59 evaluations. This paper discusses the history of 10CFR50.59 reviews, and details the development approach used in the construction of a prototype Safety Review Advisor (SRA). The goals for this expert system prototype are to (1) aid the engineer in the evaluation process by directing his attention to the appropriate critical issues, (2) increase the efficiency, consistency, and thoroughness of the evaluation process, and (3) provide a foundation of appropriate Safety Analysis Report (SAR) references for the reviewer. 6 refs., 2 figs.

Boshers, J.A.; Alguindigue, I.E.; Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Burnett, C.G. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Progra

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PAT-2 (Plutonium Air-Transportable Model 2) safety analysis report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PAT-2 package is designed for the safe transport of plutonium and/or uranium in small quantities. The PAT-2 package is resistant to severe accidents, including that of a high-speed jet aircraft crash, and is designed to withstand such environments as extreme impact, crushing, puncturing and slashing loads, severe hydrocarbon-fueled fires, and deep underwater immersion, with no escape of contents. The package meets the requirements of 10 CFR 71 for Fissile Class I packages with a cargo of 15 grams of Pu-239, or other isotopic forms described herein, not to exceed 2 watts of thermal activity. This SAR presents design and oprational information including evaluations and analyses, test results, operating procedures, maintenance, and quality assurance information.

Andersen, J.A.; Davis, E.J.; Duffey, T.A.; Dupree, S.A.; George, O.L. Jr.; Ortiz, Z.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Atmospheric Dispersion Analysis using MACCS2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.145 requires an evaluation of the offsite atmospheric dispersion coefficient, {Chi}/Q, as a part of the acceptance criteria in the accident analysis. In it, it requires in sequence computations of (1) the overall site 95th percentile {Chi}/Q, (2) the maximum of the sixteen sector 99.5th percentile {Chi}/Q, and (3) comparison and selection of the worst of the two values for reporting in the safety analysis report (SAR). In all cases, the site-specific meteorology and sector-specific site boundary distances are employed in the evaluation. There are sixteen 22.5-sectors, the nearest site boundary of which is determined within the 45-arc centered on each of the sixteen compass directions.

Glaser, R; Yang, J M

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

378

Decreased angiotensin II binding affinity and binding capacity in the anterior pituitary gland of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (ANG) binding sites were quantified in single pituitary glands from 4-week-old and 14-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched male normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats after incubation with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/)-ANG, autoradiography with computerized densitometry, and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. The maximum binding capacity (B/sub max/) decreased while the dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ANG increased in 14-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched WKY control rats. Conversely, no difference between rat strains was found in 4-week-old animals. Our results suggest that pituitary ANG binding sites may play a role in the pathophysiology of established genetic hypertension.

Gutkind, J.S.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

380

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian MacDonald

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nonlinear image filtering within IDP++  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IDP++, image and data processing in C++, is a set of a signal processing libraries written in C++. It is a multi-dimension (up to four dimensions), multi-data type (implemented through templates) signal processing extension to C++. IDP++ takes advantage of the object-oriented compiler technology to provide ``information hiding.`` Users need only know C, not C++. Signals or data sets are treated like any other variable with a defined set of operators and functions. We here some examples of the nonlinear filter library within IDP++. Specifically, the results of MIN, MAX median, {alpha}-trimmed mean, and edge-trimmed mean filters as applied to a real aperture radar (RR) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data set.

Lehman, S.K.; Wieting, M.G.; Brase, J.M.

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

Wilson, Wayne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

385

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 13550 of 28,905 results. 41 - 13550 of 28,905 results. Download SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE- October 9, 2013 Southeastern Federal Power Alliance meeting was held on October 9, 2013 at the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia http://energy.gov/sepa/downloads/southeastern-federal-power-alliance-october-9-2013 Download Audit Report: OAS-RA-12-12 The Department of Energy's Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Vehicle Grant Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-ra-12-12 Download Semiannual Report to Congress April 1, 2008- September 30, 2008 Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress, DOE/IG-SAR-10-08 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/semiannual-report-congress-april-1-2008-september-30-2008 Download Audit Report: IG-0876

386

U.S. DEPARTI\IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTI\IENT OF ENERGY DEPARTI\IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV IINATION RECIPIENT:US Geothermal. Inc, STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE : Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas using a 3·Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR & Kinematic Structural Analysis Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000109 DE-EEOOOO2847 GFO-10-254 G02847 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order45l.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

387

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to Monitoring and Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage Award # DE-FE0002184 Peter Swart University of Miami Tim Dixon University of South Florida U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * What is the Award For? * What Research Work is being Supported? * Geochemical Research What is the Award For? * Provides Support for the Training of Two Graduate Students - Student 1: Involved in analysis of SAR images - Student 2: Involved in modeling of sub-surface geochemistry and application of models for policy decisions

388

Nuclear source term evaluation for launch accident environments  

SciTech Connect

When United States space missions involve launching vehicles carrying significant quantities of nuclear material, US law requires that prior to launch the mission be approved by the Office of the President. This approval is to be based on an evaluation of the nuclear safety risks associated with the mission and the projected benefits. To assist in the technical evaluation of risks for each mission, an Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) is instituted to provide an independent assessment of the mission risks. INSRP`s assessment begins with a review of the safety analysis for the mission completed by the organization proposing the mission and documented in a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). In addition, INSRP may execute other analyses it deems necessary. Results are documented and passed to the decision maker in a Safety Evaluation Report (SER). The INSRP review and evaluation process has been described in some detail in a number of papers.

McCulloch, W.H.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Observations on a Montana water quality proposal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2005, a group of petitioners led by the Northern Plains Resource Council (NPRC) submitted a petition to revise water quality requirements to the Montana Board of Environmental Review (BER). Under Montana law, the BER had to consider the petition and either reject it or propose it as a new regulation. In September 2005, the BER announced proposed changes to the Montana water quality regulations. The proposal, which included almost the exact language found in the petition, was directed toward discharges of water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production. The key elements of the proposal included: (1) No discharges of CBNG water are allowed to Montana surface waters unless operators can demonstrate that injection to aquifers with the potential for later recovery of the water is not feasible. (2) When operators can demonstrate the injection is not feasible, the CBNG water to be discharged must meet very strict technology-based limits for multiple parameters. (3) The Montana water quality standards for the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electrical conductivity (EC) would be evaluated using the 7Q10 flow (lowest 7-consecutive-day flow in a 10-year period) rather than a monthly flow that is currently used. (4) SAR and EC would be reclassified as ''harmful parameters'', thereby greatly restricting the ability for CBNG discharges to be allowed under Montana's nondegradation regulations. The proposed regulations, if adopted in their current form, are likely to substantially reduce the amount of CBNG production in Montana. The impact also extends to Wyoming CBNG production through much greater restrictions on water quality that must be met at the interstate border.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues  

SciTech Connect

In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation code RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 was utilized to model General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor plant. The model of the plant was subjected to a small break loss of coolant accident occurring from a guillotine shear of the vessel's 2 inch bottom drain line while operating at full power. The accident was compounded by disabling the plant's isolation condenser system and as an initial condition, the loss of site power. The ability of the plant's passive safety systems to respond to this type of accident, and the code's ability to accurately predict the accidents phenomena was investigated. The overall conclusion was that the modeled plant maintained all relevant safety parameters within specifications supplied by General Electric (GE) in their Standard Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the term of investigation (I 5,500 real time seconds). While no safety related parameters were exceeded, certain trends appearing near the end of the calculation suggest the need for further investigation. Both containment temperature and pressure were increasing when the transient was terminated. The RELAP5 code was able to simulate a representative model of the plant. Calculated steady state parameters for power, flow rates, recirculation ratio, and mass balance were within I% of those specified in the SAR. However the ability of the code to accurately model low flow, condensation heat transfer, in the presence of noncondensable gases should be verified. It is concluded that the simulation's results seem to pass an intuitive engineering inspection. That is to say, flow and heat transfer data calculated by the RELAP5 code reflect expected values and relational interactions are maintained, but that no quantitative significance could be justified. The uniqueness of the plant's design and the interactive nature of the transient, suggest Additional experimental data from test facilities is needed to validate the calculations.

Faust, Christophor Randall

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Potential Impacts of Desalination Concentrate on Salinity of Irrigation Water: A Case Study in the El Paso Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winter returnflow has not been fully utilized for crop irrigation in the El Paso Valley. There are, however, emerging interests in utilizing it for urban water supply through desalting. This study examined the potential impact of concentrate discharge on salinity, sodicity, and ionic composition of irrigation water supply, using historical or published records. The analyses performed consisted of the estimate of riverflow rates on river water quality, a review of concentrate and permeate quality from nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), and the impacts of dilution or blending on water quality. Riverflow and quality data from the U.S. Section, International Boundary and Water Commission (US-IBWC) were examined first. This analysis has shown that salinity and ionic composition of riverflow can be described by a simple power function as related to the momentary riverflow rate when water samples were taken for chemical analyses. This method provides more accurate estimates of monthly salinity than the use of monthly average flow which has a high degree of variation. In addition, this approximation technique allows for the estimation of river salinity and ionic compositions at any riverflow rates of interest. A review of published articles on NF processes indicates that there are essentially two types of membranes: one has a low rejection rate for Na and Cl, and the other has a high rejection rate. If the objective is to minimize Na and Cl ions while maximizing Ca and Mg concentrations in the concentrate, the first type is preferred. However, the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) of concentrate from the first type of NF membrane is also influenced by feed water quality. Typically, the SAR of the concentrate does not change appreciably in water that is rich in SO4, as the rejection rate of SO4 is high, and SO4 ions remain in the concentrate along with accompanying cations. The SAR of the concentrate is not necessarily lower than that of feed water, due to the salt concentration effect on SAR. The SAR value which directly impacts the cation exchange reaction in soils decreases with dilution, but increases due to the increased formation of sulfate-divalent cation ion-pairs. Sodicity of the concentrate from the second type is higher than the sodicity of feed water or that of the concentrate from the first type, and approaches the concentrate composition from a RO process. The most significant changes that take place in the concentrate composition from the first type are an increase in TDS and divalent cations and anions, whereas sodicity and chloride concentrations remain more or less the same as those of feed water. Permeate from the first type of NF membrane is likely to be higher in Na, Cl, and TDS than from the second type. These elevated salt levels limit the opportunity for blending with the river water, which has elevated salinity and SO4 concentrations, especially at a low riverflow of 5 Mm3/mo or less. Sodicity and the concentrations of Na and Cl in the permeate could also exceed the unofficial water quality guidelines for irrigating urban landscape. If the RO process or the second type of NF membrane is used, the permeate can be blended with river water at nearly a 1:1 ratio. This means that a lesser quantity of water needs to be treated when a RO process is used. If river water high in Na and Cl concentrations is used for blending, the salt load of the concentrate from the NF process can actually be greater than that from the RO process, because of the limited blending possibility. If the NF option is to be retained, a NF membrane with some rejection of Cl ions may be warranted, unless blending water low in Cl is available at or near the site. Assuming that flow and salinity monitoring data at the Courchesne Bridge are realistic, the disposal of NF concentrate from 5 and 10 MGD membrane processes at a riverflow rate of 5 Mm3/mo may increase salinity of riverwater by around 7 and 16%, respectively, over the existing salinity. This estimate is for a NF membrane with a low

Miyamoto, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this revision of ''Evaluation of the Applicability of Biosphere-Related Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs)'' (BSC 2001) is to document the screening analysis of biosphere-related primary FEPs, as identified in ''The Development of Information Catalogued in REV00 of the YMP FEP Database'' (Freeze et al. 2001), in accordance with the requirements of the final U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR Part 63. This database is referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) FEP Database throughout this document. Those biosphere-related primary FEPs that are screened as applicable will be used to develop the conceptual model portion of the biosphere model, which will in turn be used to develop the mathematical model portion of the biosphere model. As part of this revision, any reference to the screening guidance or criteria provided either by Dyer (1999) or by the proposed NRC regulations at 64 FR 8640 has been removed. The title of this revision has been changed to more accurately reflect the purpose of the analyses. In addition, this revision will address Item Numbers 19, 20, 21, 25, and 26 from Attachment 2 of ''U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission/U.S. Department of Energy Technical Exchange and Management Meeting on Total System Performance Assessment and Integration (August 6 through 10, 2001)'' (Reamer 2001). This Scientific Analysis Report (SAR) does not support the current revision to the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001). Subsequent to the release of the YMP FEP Database (Freeze et al. 2001), a series of reviews was conducted on both the FEP processes used to support Total System Performance Assessment for Site Recommendation and to develop the YMP FEP Database. In response to observations and comments from these reviews, particularly the NRC/DOE TSPA Technical Exchange in August 2001 (Reamer 2001), several Key Technical Issue (KTI) Agreements were developed. ''The Enhanced Plan for Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) at Yucca Mountain'' (BSC 2002a), herein referred to as the Enhanced FEP Plan, was developed to directly address KTI Agreement TSPAI 2.05, and to generally address other KTI Agreements and issues (BSC 2002a, pp. 16 to 18). The Enhanced FEP Plan addresses the regulatory requirements of 10 CFR Part 63, identifies and implements specific enhancements, and supports the License Application (BSC 2002a, p. 2). This SAR is not intended to implement any of the enhancements identified in the Enhanced FEP Plan, although it does consider the intent of the Enhanced FEP Plan to simplify the screening analysis. This SAR is one of nine technical reports containing the documentation for the biosphere model being developed, its input parameters, and the application of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). Figure 1 shows the anticipated interrelationship between these nine technical reports and the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), commonly referred to as the biosphere model. The biosphere model belongs to the series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application. Specifically, the biosphere model provides the performance assessment with the capability to perform dose assessment.

J. J. Tappen

2003-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R&D) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes, such as standards maintenance, performance measures, assessments, corrective actions, lessons-learned, and training. In conjunction with the Directives Program, the use of the voluntary environmental management system, ISO 14001, was evaluated. This includes the only international environmental management standard to which an entity can be certified. NETL is using the specifications and guidance from this standard to identify an effective environmental management system for the NETL sites. An outside consultant performed an environmental management system assessment (also referred to as an initial environmental review), as referenced in ISO 14004. The objective of the assessment was to determine the degree to which NETL's existing integrated safety management system (ISMS), safety analysis review system (SARS), and environmental management programs conformed with the ISO14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) standard and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Code of Environmental Management Principles. A performance measurement system continued to be maintained during 2001 to assist in evaluating how effectively activities at NETL meet mission-critical goals and how well missions and strategies are connected in the DOE strategic plan. This system also provides data to assist in gauging performance against the DOE critical success factors, that is, performance against technical objectives. Various environmental milestones can be tracked to completion, thus giving NETL measures by which to gauge the sites' goals of remaining in regulatory compliance and achieving best-in-class environmental performance.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "insar psinsar sar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Subsurface Drip Irrigation As a Methold to Beneficiallly Use Coalbed Methane Produced Water: Initial Impacts to Groundwater, Soil Water, and Surface Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) currently accounts for >8% of US natural gas production. Compared to traditional sources, CBM co-produces large volumes of water. Of particular interest is CBM development in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, the 2nd largest CBM production field in the US, where CBM produced waters exhibit low to moderate TDS and relatively high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR) that could potentially impact the surface environment. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is an emerging technology for beneficial use of pre-treated CBM waters (injectate) which are emitted into the root zone of an agricultural field to aid in irrigation. The method is designed to minimize environmental impacts by storing potentially detrimental salts in the vadose zone. Research objectives include tracking the transport and fate of the water and salts from the injected CBM produced waters at an SDI site on an alluvial terrace, adjacent to the Powder River, Johnson County, Wyoming. This research utilizes soil science, geochemical, and geophysical methods. Initial results from pre-SDI data collection and the first 6-months of post-SDI operation will be presented. Substantial ranges in conductivity (2732-9830 {micro}S/cm) and dominant cation chemistry (Ca-SO{sub 4} to Na-SO{sub 4}) have been identified in pre-SDI analyses of groundwater samples from the site. Ratios of average composition of local ground water to injectate demonstrate that the injectate contains lower concentrations of most constituents except for Cr, Zn, and Tl (all below national water quality standards) but exhibits a higher SAR. Composition of soil water varies markedly with depth and between sites, suggesting large impacts from local controls, including ion exchange and equilibrium with gypsum and carbonates. Changes in chemical composition and specific conductivity along surface water transects adjacent to the site are minimal, suggesting that discharge to the Powder River from groundwater underlying the SDI fields is negligible. Findings from this project provide a critical understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM produced water. The information obtained can be used to improve SDI and other CBM produced water use/disposal technologies in order to minimize adverse impacts.

Engle, M.A.: Bern, C: Healy, R: Sams, J: Zupancic, J.: Schroeder, K.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Statistical Framework for Microbial Source Attribution: Measuring Uncertainty in Host Transmission Events Inferred from Genetic Data (Part 2 of a 2 Part Report)  

SciTech Connect

This report explores the question of whether meaningful conclusions can be drawn regarding the transmission relationship between two microbial samples on the basis of differences observed between the two sample's respective genomes. Unlike similar forensic applications using human DNA, the rapid rate of microbial genome evolution combined with the dynamics of infectious disease require a shift in thinking on what it means for two samples to 'match' in support of a forensic hypothesis. Previous outbreaks for SARS-CoV, FMDV and HIV were examined to investigate the question of how microbial sequence data can be used to draw inferences that link two infected individuals by direct transmission. The results are counter intuitive with respect to human DNA forensic applications in that some genetic change rather than exact matching improve confidence in inferring direct transmission links, however, too much genetic change poses challenges, which can weaken confidence in inferred links. High rates of infection coupled with relatively weak selective pressure observed in the SARS-CoV and FMDV data lead to fairly low confidence for direct transmission links. Confidence values for forensic hypotheses increased when testing for the possibility that samples are separated by at most a few intermediate hosts. Moreover, the observed outbreak conditions support the potential to provide high confidence values for hypothesis that exclude direct transmission links. Transmission inferences are based on the total number of observed or inferred genetic changes separating two sequences rather than uniquely weighing the importance of any one genetic mismatch. Thus, inferences are surprisingly robust in the presence of sequencing errors provided the error rates are randomly distributed across all samples in the reference outbreak database and the novel sequence samples in question. When the number of observed nucleotide mutations are limited due to characteristics of the outbreak or the availability of only partial rather than whole genome sequencing, indel information was shown to have the potential to improve performance but only for select outbreak conditions. In examined HIV transmission cases, extended evolution proved to be the limiting factor in assigning high confidence to transmission links, however, the potential to correct for extended evolution not associated with transmission events is demonstrated. Outbreak specific conditions such as selective pressure (in the form of varying mutation rate), are shown to impact the strength of inference made and a Monte Carlo simulation tool is introduced, which is used to provide upper and lower bounds on the confidence values associated with a forensic hypothesis.

Allen, J; Velsko, S

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant TruDock crane system analysis  

SciTech Connect

The WIPP TruDock crane system located in the Waste Handling Building was identified in the WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), November 1995, as a potential accident concern due to failures which could result in a dropped load. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the frequency of failure of the TruDock crane system resulting in a dropped load and subsequent loss of primary containment, i.e. drum failure. The frequency of dropped loads was estimated to be 9.81E-03/year or approximately one every 102 years (or, for the 25% contingency, 7.36E-03/year or approximately one every 136 years). The dominant accident contributor was the failure of the cable/hook assemblies, based on failure data obtained from NUREG-0612, as analyzed by PLG, Inc. The WIPP crane system undergoes a rigorous test and maintenance program, crane operation is discontinued following any abnormality, and the crane operator and load spotter are required to be trained in safe crane operation, therefore it is felt that the WIPP crane performance will exceed the data presented in NUREG-0612 and the estimated failure frequency is felt to be conservative.

Morris, B.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Carter, M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_lsum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:41:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

405

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_snd_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:08:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition) " "Sourcekey","N9070US2","NA1160_SAL_2","NA1160_SAK_2","NA1160_SAZ_2","NA1160_SAR_2","NA1160_SCA_2","NA1160_SCO_2","NA1160_SFL_2","NA1160_R3FM_2","NA1160_SIL_2","NA1160_SIN_2","NA1160_SKS_2","NA1160_SKY_2","NA1160_SLA_2","NA1160_SMD_2","NA1160_SMI_2","NA1160_SMS_2","NA1160_SMO_2","NA1160_SMT_2","NA1160_SNE_2","NA1160_SNV_2","NA1160_SNM_2","NA1160_SNY_2","NA1160_SND_2","NA1160_SOH_2","NA1160_SOK_2","NA1160_SOR_2","NA1160_SPA_2","NA1160_SSD_2","NA1160_STN_2","NA1160_STX_2","NA1160_SUT_2","NA1160_SVA_2","NA1160_SWV_2","NA1160_SWY_2"

406

b  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

b b ., '.\ 1'. :.So+ material8, + :slag, raste.Ume and,graphite~bbtained im the :. pro&otion of.metal at Iora',State, Coll&$d$ing the early period.of operation' in.&942~aad~sarly'l943 mere~disoarded &n.an area~called the Imw+ State College :,dump instead of being:aaved,fbr:recpvery.operations(.;,~~.'~e ,&nner of 1943 it WELE realLzed~'by this 'offics~thst.'cormidera~le~.~arii~-bssrlng mater&al, mu Lpiobably present,in this'dump .and:should.be recovered.. ,b,~the Pall of 1943 ~-..%p~r0dmately~260'tona of mat&i&l w@:retioved &A the',dump,,barreled,, a@ :~ Sb$ppdtO t&e du:Pont &GYmry~Plaat.~ ,The,riohest deposita,rere recovered and,operatiolrs :nere 'co&i&d to a airy;16 Bmall area in.,tha dump where it maa

407

FIlea  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FIlea FIlea THRU: R. L. Kirk and 3. N. ?%l.mxe Hr. Brandgun of Health CC Safety ?M.sion and the wrfte~! tisited -de onJamwy 8,19% to lnvastl@ethe aause of tbs fire In aSJlvenio sarap nhipmnttoHWat St. Lauis. The per&x13 ccmtactod vere I-I. Grleb, W. J. Danahue, and A. A. cannon of Sylv@a. On DeoemSar 23, 1953, Sylvnnla, S-de, supped 809 &i. of uranium acrap,wtich vas identlfled on SF 1Ol Fona 110. 4 - SYL tg MX 83 urcminmbar and&de scrap. I On Saturday, hxnh~r 26, 1953, MIX vaa notified tv the American ibllvay Express Coqanythata orate of12 08118 ofradlo-actlve material fmzaSylvanl.avaa on ftiintheir dovntwnteminal. The f'ire vaa put out by the &press so@. Hovever, v&en it ves reaelved at XX, one of the cane vae still smoking. 'The contents

408

Evolution of Safety Basis Documentation for the Fernald Site  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Closure Project (FCP), in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio, is to safely complete the environmental restoration of the Fernald site by 2006. Over 200 out of 220 total structures, at this DOE plant site which processed uranium ore concentrates into high-purity uranium metal products, have been safely demolished, including eight of the nine major production plants. Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) for these facilities have gone through a process of simplification, from individual operating Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) to a single site-wide Authorization Basis containing nuclear facility Bases for Interim Operations (BIOs) to individual project Auditable Safety Records (ASRs). The final stage in DSA simplification consists of project-specific Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs) and Nuclear Health and Safety Plans (N-HASPs) that address all aspects of safety, from the worker in the field to the safety basis requirements preserving the facility/activity hazard categorization. This paper addresses the evolution of Safety Basis Documentation (SBD), as DSAs, from production through site closure.

Brown, T.; Kohler, S.; Fisk, P.; Krach, F.; Klein, B.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, ''Hazard Analysis Database Report''. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, ''Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report'' (FSAR). (5)Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, ''Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements'' (TSR). Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition.

GOETZ, T.G.

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Petitioners ' Response To Comments Submitted Regarding the September 7,2006 Petition To Establish A New Generic Sub-Class for Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following comments and additional information ('Petitioners ' Response) regarding (a) the 48 supportive comments submitted by carpet retailers and professionals, an independent testing laboratory, and a large Italian manufacturer of yarns and fabrics that support Petitioner's September 7, 2006 Petition (the "Petition") for the designation of a new generic subclass for fibers made from PIT, (b) the sole opposing comment submitted on November 9, 2007 by Invista S.a.r.!.', and (c) the proposed new generic names submitted with the Petition. a) Petitioners ' Comments Regarding Letters Submitted By Carpet Retailers and Professionals Petitioners submit that the 48 comments submitted to the FTC in support of the Petition demonstrate that the scientific evidence submitted by Petitioners correlates well with observations by carpet professionals, an independent testing laboratory, and a fabric manufacturer regarding the performance of carpet and fabric produced from PIT fibers. 1 At page 7 of Invista's comments, lnvista raises an issue unrelated to the Issues raised In the Petition regarding Mohawk's labeling of carpets manufactured from PIT fibers. Since DuPont and PIT Canada are

Made From Ptt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An Independent Planet Search In The Kepler Dataset. I. A hundred new candidates and revised KOIs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the SARS pipeline to search for planetary transits only in a small subset of the Kepler targets - the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), which are already known to include at least one promising planet candidate. Although the KOIs represent less than 1% of the Kepler dataset we are able to significantly update the overall statistics of planetary multiplicity: we find 84 new transit signals on 64 systems on these light curves (LCs) only, nearly doubling the number of transit signals in these systems. 41 of the systems were singly-transiting systems that are now multiply-transiting, significantly reducing the chances of false positive in them. Notable among the new discoveries are KOI 435 as a new 6-candidate systems (where only Kepler-11 was known before), KOI 277 which includes two candidates in a 6:7 period commensurability and with anti-correlated TTVs -- all but validating the system, KOIs 719 and 1574 that have small planet candidates (1.29 R_Earth and 2.05 R_Earth respectively) in the habitable zo...

Ofir, Aviv

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Authorization basis supporting documentation for plutonium finishing plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification and definition of the authorization basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility and operations are essential for compliance to DOE Order 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions. The authorization basis, as defined in the Order, consists of those aspects of the facility design basis, i.e., the structures, systems and components (SSCS) and the operational requirements that are considered to be important to the safety of operations and are relied upon by DOE to authorize operation of the facility. These facility design features and their function in various accident scenarios are described in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), Chapter 9, `Accident Analysis.` Figure 1 depicts the relationship of the Authorization Basis to its components and other information contained in safety documentation supporting the Authorization Basis. The PFP SSCs that are important to safety, collectively referred to as the `Safety Envelope` are discussed in various chapters of the FSAR and in WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements. Other documents such as Criticality Safety Evaluation Reports (CSERS) address and support some portions of the Authorization Basis and Safety Envelope.

King, J.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models  

SciTech Connect

One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

Suter, G.W. II

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The World is Full of BANANAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better ways to fight diseases such as cancer, AIDS and SARS, the development of new drugs to improve our quality of life, the creation of new and improved jobs to generate products that make our lives easier, safer and more productive, the assurance of safety in our homes from fire, theft and adversity, an abundant and safe food supply, and a reliable source of energy that does not pollute our environment or destroy the ozone layer are but a few of the goals that we all continually strive to achieve. Our ability to provide each of these has been made easier through the use of radioactive materials. Unavoidably, when we use radioactive materials, like anything else, we end up with some waste that needs to be managed in a safe, efficient and effective manner. This presentation reviews the experiences of the Appalachian Compact Users of Radioactive Isotopes (ACURI) in helping to site a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Pennsylvania to serve the four-state compact of

Presenter Ken Miller; Kenneth L. Miller; Presenter Mr; Rodney Teague; R. Teague; J. G Young; Presenter Ms; Carolyn Thomas

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Quantifying the severity of criticality limit violations  

SciTech Connect

Since August of 1994, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix for determining the need for and level of reporting criticality safety limit violations. The LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix is DOE approved, and is cited in a DOE approved SAR for the LANL Plutonium Facility as the method used to determine whether a criticality limit violation is reportable to DOE via 5000.3B ``Occurrence Categorization, notification and Reporting Requirements`` (replaced by DOE O 232.1). The use of the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix provides a framework that allows criticality limit violations to be objectively reviewed in terms of what were the consequences of the criticality safety limit violation. Using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix helps the criticality safety engineer and line supervision explain to others, in a quantifiable manner, the significance of the criticality limit violation, the levels of margin of safety built into operations, and demonstrate the difference between evaluated conditions and working conditions.

Vessard, S.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Steele, C.M. [Dept. of Energy, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Los Alamos Area Office

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993--September 22, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

A summary of recent refinements to the WAKE dispersion model, a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original WAKE dispersion model a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite, is based on Shell Research Ltd.`s HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 and was developed by the US Department of Energy for use in estimating downwind dispersion of materials due to accidental releases from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings. The model is applicable to scenarios involving both ground-level and elevated releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. Over the 2-year period since its creation, the WAKE model has been used to perform consequence analyses for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) associated with gaseous diffusion plants in Portsmouth (PORTS), Paducah (PGDP), and Oak Ridge. These applications have identified the need for additional model capabilities (such as the treatment of complex terrain and time-variant releases) not present in the original utilities which, in turn, has resulted in numerous modifications to these codes as well as the development of additional, stand-alone postprocessing utilities. Consequently, application of the model has become increasingly complex as the number of executable, input, and output files associated with a single model run has steadily grown. In response to these problems, a streamlined version of the WAKE model has been developed which integrates all calculations that are currently performed by the existing WAKE, and the various post-processing utilities. This report summarizes the efforts involved in developing this revised version of the WAKE model.

Yambert, M.W.; Lombardi, D.A.; Goode, W.D. Jr.; Bloom, S.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evidence for selective expression of angiotensin II receptors on atretic follicles in the rat ovary: an autoradiographic study  

SciTech Connect

Ovarian angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors display a cyclical pattern of variation during the rat estrous cycle. Ang II receptors, estimated by the specific binding of the Ang II receptor antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodo-(Sar1,Ile8) Ang II to ovarian membranes, were lowest at estrus (binding site density (Bmax) = 35 +/- 2 fmol/mg; binding site affinity (KD) = 2.0 +/- 0.2 nM) and highest at diestrus I (Bmax = 59 +/- 3 fmol/mg; KD = 1.6 +/- 0.1 nM). We have previously shown that Ang II receptors in the rat ovary predominantly exist on the granulosa cell layer of a subpopulation of follicles. Our present studies show that the Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary are mainly atretic (approximately 80%) or show signs of early atresia (approximately 15%) during all stages of the estrous cycle. A small number of Ang II receptor-containing follicles were healthy (approximately 5%). In contrast to the Ang II receptor-containing follicles, the FSH receptor-containing follicles were predominantly healthy (greater than 90%). Follicles which contained both Ang II receptors and FSH receptors were mainly early atretic. Since Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary were mainly atretic these studies suggest that in the rat Ang II may be a major factor in regulating the function of atretic ovarian follicles.

Daud, A.I.; Bumpus, F.M.; Husain, A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus  

SciTech Connect

Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. (Univ. of Melbourne (Australia) Univ. of Sydney (Australia))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain  

SciTech Connect

The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

Rogulja, I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. (Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effects of angiotensin II and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rat proximal tubule  

SciTech Connect

Microperfusion of proximal convoluted tubule(PCT) and peritubular capillaries was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin II(Ang II) and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption. Bicarbonate was determined by microcalorimetry and C-14 inulin was used as a volume marker. The rates of bicarbonate absorption (JHCO/sub 3/) was 143 peq/min x mm and fluid absorption(Jv) was 2.70 nl/min x mm, when PCT and capillary perfusate contained normal Ringer solution. Addition of Ang II (10/sup -6/M) to the capillary perfusate caused reductions of JHCO/sub 3/ and Jv by 35%. A similar effect was observed when ionomycin was added to the capillary perfusate. Ang II antagonist, (Sar/sup 1/, Ile/sup 8/)-Angiotensin II(10/sup -6/M), completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Removal of calcium from both luminal and capillary perfusate did not change the effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Our results indicate that Ang II inhibits the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the proximal tubule via interacting with angiotensin receptor. The mechanism of Ang II action may involve mobilization of intracellular calcium.

Chatsudthipong, V.; Chan, Y.L.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Sea ice mapping method for seawinds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractA sea ice mapping algorithm for SeaWinds is developed that incorporates statistical and spatial a priori information in a modified maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework. Spatial a priori data are incorporated in the loss terms of a Bayes risk formulation. Conditional distributions and priors for sea ice and ocean statistics are represented as empirical histograms that are forced to conform to a set of expected histograms via principal component filtering. Tuning parameters for the algorithm allow adjustments in the algorithms performance. Results of the algorithm exhibit high correlation with the RemundLong sea ice mapping algorithm for SeaWinds and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager National Aeronautics and Space Administration Team 30 % ice edge, and are verified with RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR imagery. The resulting sea ice maps exhibit high edge detail, preserve polynyas and ice bodies disjoint from the primary ice sheet, and thus are suitable for use with wind retrieval and sea ice studies. Principles employed in the algorithm may be of interest in other classification studies. Index TermsBayes method, maximum a posteriori (MAP), principal components, QuikSCAT, scatterometer, sea ice extent, SeaWinds. I.

Hyrum S. Anderson; Student Member; David G. Long; Senior Member

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

2008-26 The determinants of economic growth in European regions ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to evaluate the robustness of determinants of economic growth in a new dataset of 255 European regions in the 1995-2005 period. We use three different specifications based on (1) the cross-section of regions, (2) the cross-section of regions with country fixed effects and (3) the cross-section of regions with a spatial autoregressive (SAR) structure. We investigate the existence of parameter heterogeneity by allowing for interactions of potential explanatory variables with geographical dummies as extra regressors. We find remarkable differences between the determinants of economic growth implied by differences between regions and those within regions of a given country. In the cross-section of regions, we find evidence for conditional convergence with speed around two percent. The convergence process between countries is dominated by the catching up process of regions in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), whereas convergence within countries is mostly a characteristic of regions in old EU member states. We also find robust evidence of positive growth of capital cities, a highly educated workforce and a negative effect of population density.

Jesus Crespo Cuaresma; Martin Feldkircher; Jesus Crespo Cuaresma; Martin Feldkircher; Oesterreichische Nationalbank

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D. [Nez Perce Tribe

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Optical and electron transport properties of reactively sputtered Cu/sub x/S  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of Cu/sub x/S were deposited on glass slides by sputtering Cu in a reactive H/sub 2/S/Ar environment. Optical transmittance and reflectance measurements were used to explore the infrared absorption spectra of the material. Analysis of the absorption edge characteristics resulted in the identification of an indirect bandgap at 1.15 (+-.05) eV, a direct bandgap at 1.30 (+-.05) eV, and an electron effective mass of 1.0 (+-0.2) m/sub 0/. Electrical data consisting of resistivity and Hall effect measurements from liquid nitrogen to room temperature were analyzed to determine the dominant scattering mechanisms limiting the hole mobility in the material. Ionized impurity scattering was the dominant mechanism at low temperatures (T < 100/sup 0/K) and polar optical phonon scattering was most effective at high temperatures (T > 150/sup 0/K). All films were p-type. Effects of sputtering gas pressure, heat treatments, and temperature on the properties were studied.

Leong, J.Y.C.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Drilling fluid effects on crop growth and iron and zinc availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste drilling fluids are often land-farmed following completion of an oil or gas well in Colorado. This material usually contains production water, bentonitic clays, formation cuttings, barite, Na compounds, and synthetic organic polymers. The authors investigated the effects of 5 to 60 dry g drilling fluid kg{sup {minus}1} soil on the growth and trace metal concentration of sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench DeKalb ST-6-S sudanense) in the greenhouse. A nonlinear regression exponential-rise model fit the increased plant total dry matter yield response to increasing drilling fluid rates. Increased plant tissue Fe concentration and uptake indicated that increased plant-available Fe was primarily responsible for the yield response, but increased Zn availability was also suspected. Results from a second greenhouse study confirmed that drilling fluid can also correct Zn deficiency in corn (Zea mays L.). Soil SAR (sodium adsorption ratio) was higher with increasing drilling fluid, but was still sorghum-sudangrass and provided evidence that land application is an acceptable method of disposal.

Bauder, T.A.; Barbarick, K.A.; Ayers, P.D.; Chapman, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Shanahan, J.F. [Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Structural Studies of Bacteriophage Lysins and their Implication in Human Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural biology lays the molecular foundation for the modern field of life sciences. In this thesis, X-ray crystallography is the primary resource for atomic detail structural information and is the major technology employed in our research. Three examples show how structural biology addresses the basic processes of life. Firstly, two crystal structures of R21, corresponding to two biological states, reveal a new activation mechanism of SAR-endolysin, which not only complements the previous model, but is also more generally applicable to the endolysin family. The structural information was further corroborated by NMR data in solution. The second example is the crystal structure of mycobacteriophage lysin B, which identified the function of the protein, and tackles the unique problem of how mycobacteriophage circumvent the mycolic acid-rich outer membrane of mycobacterium. The last example is the homology modeling of the Plasmodium ribosomal L4 protein. The action mode for the drug in Plasmodium was proposed based on that, which accounts for the anti-malaria effect of azithromycin.

Sun, Qingan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

431

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to explore a new desulfurization system concept, which consists of efficient separation of the refractory sulfur compounds from diesel fuel by selective adsorption, and effective hydrodesulfurization of the concentrated fraction of the refractory sulfur compounds in diesel fuels. Our approaches focused on (1) selecting and developing new adsorbents for selective adsorption of sulfur or sulfur compounds in commercial diesel fuel; (2) conducting the adsorption desulfurization of model fuels and real diesel fuels by the selective-adsorption-for-removing-sulfur (PSUSARS) process over various developed adsorbents, and examining the adsorptive desulfurization performance of various adsorbents; (3) developing and evaluating the regeneration methods for various spent adsorbent; (4) developing new catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of the refractory sulfur existing in the commercial diesel fuel; (5) on the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, further confirming and improving the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel Three types of adsorbents, the metal-chloride-based adsorbents, the activated nickel-based adsorbents and the metal-sulfide-based adsorbents, have been developed for selective adsorption desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons. All of three types of the adsorbents exhibit the significant selectivity for sulfur compounds, including alkyl dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in diesel fuel. Adsorption desulfurization of real diesel fuels (regular diesel fuel (DF), S: 325 ppmw; low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD-I), S: 47 ppmw) over the nickel-based adsorbents (A-2 and A-5) has been conducted at different conditions by using a flowing system. The adsorption capacity of DF over A-2 corresponding to an outlet sulfur level of 30 ppmw is 2.8 mg-S/g-A. The adsorption capacity of LSD-I over A-5 corresponding to the break-through point at 5.0 ppmw sulfur level is 0.35 mg-S/g-A. The spent A-5 can be regenerated by using H2 gas at a flowing rate of 40-50 ml/min, 500 C, and ambient pressure. Adsorption desulfurization of model diesel fuels over metal-sulfide-based adsorbents (A-6-1 and A-6-2) has been conducted at different temperatures to examine the capacity and selectivity of the adsorbents. A regeneration method for the spent metal-sulfide-based adsorbents has been developed. The spent A-6-1 can be easily regenerated by washing the spent adsorbent with a polar solvent followed by heating the adsorbent bed to remove the remainder solvent. Almost all adsorption capacity of the fresh A-6-1 can be recovered after the regeneration. On the other hand, a MCM-41-supported HDS catalyst was developed for deep desulfurization of the refractory sulfur compounds. The results show that the developed MCM-41-supported catalyst demonstrates consistently higher activity for the HDS of the refractory dibenzothiophenic sulfur compounds than the commercial catalyst. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel is confirmed and improved further.

Xiaoliang Ma; Uday Turaga; Shingo Watanabe; Subramani Velu; Chunshan Song

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" Annual",2012,"6/30/1989" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

436

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2002" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_sum_a_epg0_vrx_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:00:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4","NA1504_SAL_4","NA1504_SAK_4","NA1504_SAZ_4","NA1504_SAR_4","NA1504_SCA_4","NA1504_SCO_4","NA1504_SCT_4","NA1504_SDE_4","NA1504_SDC_4","NA1504_SFL_4","NA1504_SGA_4","NA1504_SHI_4","NA1504_SID_4","NA1504_SIL_4","NA1504_SIN_4","NA1504_SIA_4","NA1504_SKS_4","NA1504_SKY_4","NA1504_SLA_4","NA1504_SME_4","NA1504_SMD_4","NA1504_SMA_4","NA1504_SMI_4","NA1504_SMN_4","NA1504_SMS_4","NA1504_SMO_4","NA1504_SMT_4","NA1504_SNE_4","NA1504_SNV_4","NA1504_SNH_4","NA1504_SNJ_4","NA1504_SNM_4","NA1504_SNY_4","NA1504_SNC_4","NA1504_SND_4","NA1504_SOH_4","NA1504_SOK_4","NA1504_SOR_4","NA1504_SPA_4","NA1504_SRI_4","NA1504_SSC_4","NA1504_SSD_4","NA1504_STN_4","NA1504_STX_4","NA1504_SUT_4","NA1504_SVT_4","NA1504_SVA_4","NA1504_SWA_4","NA1504_SWV_4","NA1504_SWI_4","NA1504_SWY_4"

437

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

438

CH Packaging Program Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT Shipping Package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SAR P charges the WIPP Management and Operation (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize these operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, Hazard Analysis Database Report. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to: (A) Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), and (B) Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements (TSR). (5) Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition. This safety evaluation is not intended to be a request to authorize the activity. Authorization issues are addressed by the unreviewed safety question (USQ) evaluation process. This report constitutes an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

440

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Fragment-based structure-guided drug discovery: strategy, process, and lessons from human protein kinases  

SciTech Connect

The experimental roots of fragment-based drug discovery can be found in the work of Petsko, Ringe, and coworkers, who were the first to report flooding of protein crystals with small organic solutes (e.g., compounds such as benzene with ten or fewer nonhydrogen atoms) to identify bound functional groups that might ultimately be transformed into targeted ligands. The concept of linking fragments together to increase binding affinity was described as early as 1992 by Verlinde et al. Computational screening of fragments, using tools such as DOCK or MCSS, was also described in the early 1990s. Pharmaceutical industry application of fragment screening began at Abbott Laboratories, where Fesik and coworkers pioneered 'SAR by NMR' (structure/activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance). In this spectroscopic approach, bound fragments are detected by NMR screening and subsequently linked together to increase affinity, as envisaged by Verlinde and coworkers. Application of x-ray crystallography to detect and identify fragment hits was also pursued at Abbott. Fragment-based drug discovery has now been under way for more than a decade. Although Fesik and coworkers popularized the notion of linking fragments (as in their highly successful BCL-2 program), tactical emphasis appears to have largely shifted from fragment condensation to fragment engineering (or growing the fragment) to increase binding affinity and selectivity. Various biotechnology companies, including SGX Pharmaceuticals, Astex, and Plexxikon, have recently demonstrated that fragment-based approaches can indeed produce development candidates suitable for Phase I studies of safety and tolerability in patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

Burley, Stephen K.; Hirst, Gavin; Sprengeler, Paul; Reich, Siegfried

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Toward the Total Synthesis of Norzoanthamine: The Development of a Transannular Michael Reaction Cascade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Norzoanthamine is a complex heptacyclic marine alkaloid isolated from colonial zoanthids. It potently inhibits loss of bone weight and strength in a postmenopausal osteoporosis mouse model, but its mode-of-action remains unknown. The scarcity of this natural product from its natural source and the need to access analogs for structure-activity relationship (SAR) study make it necessary to chemically synthesize this compound. However, the complex molecular skeleton, especially the highly functionalized and stereochemically complex ABC core structure of the natural product poses a significant challenge. As part of our efforts to develop a practical synthetic route to norzoanthamine, we systematically explored a transannular Michael reaction cascade in the context of the synthesis of angular 6-6-6 tricyclic ring system, a mimic of the ABC core structure of norzoanthamine. Using 1,7-bis-enones in the form of 14-membered macrocyclic lactone as model substrates, we demonstrated that both E,Z- and E,E-macrocycles underwent facile transannular reactions to give cis-syn-cis and trans-anti-trans ring systems, respectively. However, Z,E- and Z,Z- macrocycles did not cyclize under similar reactions. The similarities and differences between transannular Diels-Alder reactions and this transannular cyclization process were also disclosed. Building upon these preliminary studies, we developed a 12-linear step synthesis of the ABC carbocyclic core of norzoanthamine. It features an organocatalytic asymmetric intramolecular aldolization to set the stereochemistry of the entire molecule, a fragment coupling based on selective alkylation of a bis-enolate, and a transannular Michael reaction cascade for rapid and stereoselective synthesis of the polycyclic core. Subsequent Claisen rearrangement enabled installation of a handle for introduction of the bottom piece to complete the total synthesis. Other efforts toward the total synthesis have also been discussed.

Xue, Haoran

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implem