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Sample records for insar psinsar sar

  1. PSInSAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR Jump to:

  2. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics...

  3. PSInSAR (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS Enviro Power Pvt LtdPSInSAR

  4. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  5. Surface deformation analysis over a hydrocarbon reservoir using InSAR with ALOS-PALSAR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?ahin, Sedar Cihan

    2013-01-01

    InSAR has been developed to estimate the temporal change on the surface of Earth by combining multiple SAR images acquired over the same area at different times. In the last two decades, in addition to conventional InSAR, ...

  6. Some thoughts on the use of InSAR data to constrain models of surface deformation: Noise structure and data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    Some thoughts on the use of InSAR data to constrain models of surface deformation: Noise structure models of surface deformation: Noise structure and data downsampling, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 6, Q of data points. Here we estimate the actual covariance structure of noise in InSAR data. We compare

  7. Open-source software for geodetic imaging: ROI_PAC for InSAR and pixel tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matt

    1 Open-source software for geodetic imaging: ROI_PAC for InSAR and pixel tracking Authors: Matthew. Acknowledgements Section I. Introduction Section II. Getting started: Data & software Raw data format Available software for InSAR and pixel tracking Appendix 0: Some basic LINUX commands Appendix 1: Getting

  8. Interseismic deformation and creep along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey): InSAR observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    Interseismic deformation and creep along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey using interferometric synthetic aperture along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey): InSAR observations and implications

  9. Interseismic deformation and creep along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey): InSAR observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    Interseismic deformation and creep along the central section of the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey using interferometric synthetic aperture radar data from the Advanced Land Anatolian Fault (Turkey): InSAR observations and implications for rate-and-state friction properties, J

  10. Mechanical modeling and InSAR measurements of Mount Sedom uplift, Dead Sea basin: Implications for effective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Mechanical modeling and InSAR measurements of Mount Sedom uplift, Dead Sea basin: Implications of predicted profiles: topography, uplift rate, and shear strain. The present topography of Mount Sedom stage and at the Plio-Pleistocene pre-emergent stage of the Sedom diapir, respectively. The uplift

  11. PoroTomo Subtask 3.4 Analysis of existing InSAR data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kurt Feigl

    2014-12-26

    Attributes of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired by TerraSAR-X and TandemX satellite missions and archived at WINSAR facility.

  12. PoroTomo Subtask 3.4 Analysis of existing InSAR data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kurt Feigl

    Attributes of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired by TerraSAR-X and TandemX satellite missions and archived at WINSAR facility.

  13. Allan variance computed in space domain: Application to InSAR data to characterize noise and geophysical signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalié, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The Allan variance was introduced fifty years ago for analyzing the stability of frequency standards. Beside its metrological interest, it is also an estimator of the large trends of the power spectral density (PSD) of frequency deviation. For instance, the Allan variance is able to discriminate different types of noise characterized by different power laws in the PSD. But, it was also used in other fields: accelerometry, geophysics, geodesy, astrophysics and even finances! However, it seems that up to now, it has been exclusively applied for time series analysis. We propose here to use the Allan variance onto spatial data. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is used in geophysics to image ground displacements in space (over the SAR image spatial coverage) and in time thank to the regular SAR image acquisitions by dedicated satellites. The main limitation of the technique is the atmospheric disturbances that affect the radar signal while traveling from the sensor to the ground and back. In this p...

  14. Stochastic Inversion of InSAR Data to Assess the Probability of Pressure Penetration into the Lower Caprock at In Salah

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramirez, Abelardo; Foxall, William

    2014-05-28

    Stochastic inversions of InSAR data were carried out to assess the probability that pressure perturbations resulting from CO2 injection into well KB-502 at In Salah penetrated into the lower caprock seal above the reservoir. Inversions of synthetic data were employed to evaluate the factors that affect the vertical resolution of overpressure distributions, and to assess the impact of various sources of uncertainty in prior constraints on inverse solutions. These include alternative pressure-driven deformation modes within reservoir and caprock, the geometry of a sub-vertical fracture zone in the caprock identified in previous studies, and imperfect estimates of the rock mechanical properties.more »Inversions of field data indicate that there is a high probability that a pressure perturbation during the first phase of injection extended upwards along the fracture zone ~ 150 m above the reservoir, and less than 50% probability that it reached the Hot Shale unit at 1500 m depth. Within the uncertainty bounds considered, it was concluded that it is very unlikely that the pressure perturbation approached within 150 m of the top of the lower caprock at the Hercynian Unconformity. The results are consistent with previous deterministic inversion and forward modeling studies.« less

  15. Stochastic Inversion of InSAR Data to Assess the Probability of Pressure Penetration into the Lower Caprock at In Salah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, Abelardo; Foxall, William

    2014-05-28

    Stochastic inversions of InSAR data were carried out to assess the probability that pressure perturbations resulting from CO2 injection into well KB-502 at In Salah penetrated into the lower caprock seal above the reservoir. Inversions of synthetic data were employed to evaluate the factors that affect the vertical resolution of overpressure distributions, and to assess the impact of various sources of uncertainty in prior constraints on inverse solutions. These include alternative pressure-driven deformation modes within reservoir and caprock, the geometry of a sub-vertical fracture zone in the caprock identified in previous studies, and imperfect estimates of the rock mechanical properties. Inversions of field data indicate that there is a high probability that a pressure perturbation during the first phase of injection extended upwards along the fracture zone ~ 150 m above the reservoir, and less than 50% probability that it reached the Hot Shale unit at 1500 m depth. Within the uncertainty bounds considered, it was concluded that it is very unlikely that the pressure perturbation approached within 150 m of the top of the lower caprock at the Hercynian Unconformity. The results are consistent with previous deterministic inversion and forward modeling studies.

  16. A framework for comparing geomechanical models of InSAR-measured surface deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Laplante, Neil Edward James

    2011-01-01

    High-quality Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) surface deformation data for field sites around the world has become widely available over the past decade. Geomechanical models based on InSAR data occur ...

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies95Symerton, Illinois:EV JumpOpen Energy

  18. InSAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS Enviro Power Pvt

  20. InSAR (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) | Open Energy(Monaster

  1. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Causeway, Miami, FL 33149-1098, United States b Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5­10 cm, 2006; Dai et al., 2002; Kimura & Yamaguchi, 2000), mining and large-scale geotechnical projects (e

  2. Measurements and predictions of subsidence induced by soil consolidation using persistent scatterer InSAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Click Here for Full Article Measurements and predictions of subsidence induced by soil technique is presented for measuring and predicting ground subsidence associated with soil consolidation used to measure land subsidence in Mokpo city, Korea which had been primarily built on land reclaimed

  3. InSAR At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) | Open

  4. InSAR At Brady Hot Springs Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) | OpenInformation

  5. InSAR At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. InSAR At Coso Geothermal Area (2000) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) |Coso Geothermal Area

  7. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) |Coso Geothermal

  8. InSAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) |Coso

  9. InSAR At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004) |CosoInformation

  10. InSAR At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Eneva, Et Al., 2013) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004)

  11. InSAR At Redfield Campus Area (Oppliger, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res. Bd. May, 2004)Information

  12. InSAR At Salton Sea Area (Eneva And Adams, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. InSAR At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX F Wetlandsof EnergyGap Analysis |

  15. Advanced InSAR Techniques for Geothermal Exploration and Production | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLCAdema Technologies IncFuel Cell SystemsEnergy

  16. PSInSAR as a new tool to monitor preeruptive volcano ground deformation: Validation using GPS measurements on Piton de la

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    : Validation using GPS measurements on Piton de la Fournaise A. Peltier,1 M. Bianchi,2 E. Kaminski,3 J over large areas. Citation: Peltier, A., M. Bianchi, E. Kaminski, J.C. Komorowski, A. Rucci, and T of the Piton de La Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island), with a mean of two eruptions per year [Peltier et al

  17. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  18. SAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR Jump to:

  19. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  20. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  1. Measuring large topographic change with InSAR: Lava thicknesses, extrusion rate and subsidence rate at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, John

    at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala S.K. Ebmeier a,n , J. Biggs b , T.A. Mather a , J.R. Elliott a , G. Wadge c , F. We apply this to Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, and measure increases in lava thickness of up to 140

  2. The 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake, Southern California: Vector Near-Field Displacements from ERS InSAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 The 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake, Southern California: Vector Near-Field Displacements from ERS In-slip and dip-slip in along the surface of the 1999 Hector Mine rupture (Figure 1). Many publications use In; Zebker et al., 1994; Peltzer et al., 1994; Fujiwara et al., 1997; Michel et al., 1999b; Price, 1999

  3. Land subsidence in central Mexico detected by ALOS InSAR time-series Estelle Chaussard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Wdowinski a , Enrique Cabral-Cano b , Falk Amelung a a School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University-Aponte, López-Doncel, & Barboza-Gudiño, 2012; Osmanoglu, Dixon, Wdowinski, Cabral-Cano, & Jiang, 2011; Pacheco burdens for local government administrations (e.g. Cabral-Cano et al., 2008; Ortiz-Zamora & Ortega

  4. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  5. Railway Subsidence Monitoring by High Resolution INSAR Time Series Analysis in Tianjin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perissin, Daniele

    Railway Subsidence Monitoring by High Resolution INSAR Time Series Analysis in Tianjin Qingli Luo1 and the development of urban are seriously affected by the subsidence of them. Permanent Scatterers (PS) technology was developed as a powerful tool for subsidence monitoring. High resolution of 1m data can be provided by Terra

  6. Ris National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind ressource mapping: possibilities is to quantify the regional offshore wind climate for wind energy application based on satellite SAR ·Study of 85SAR(m/s) Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps

  7. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  8. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielek, Timothy P. (Albuquerque, NM); Thompson, Douglas G. (Albuqerque, NM); Walker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  9. Category:InSAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,Ground Gravity Survey Jump to:HelpInSAR

  10. Category:PSInSAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,GroundNear InfraredOpenEI Jump to:PSInSAR

  11. Category:SAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR Jump to:

  12. Target Discrimination in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) using Artificial Neural Networks 1 TargetDiscriminationinSyntheticApertureRadar(SAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Target Discrimination in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) using Artificial Neural Networks 1 Target principe@cnel.ufl.edu Abstract: This paper addresses target discrimination in synthetic aperture radar (SAR classification but here the goal is discrimination. We will show that the two applications require different cost

  13. Observations and modeling of shallow fault creep along the San Andreas Fault System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Meng

    2011-01-01

    the expected base model for InSAR data, the 3D velocitynoisy) with base model profiles, the InSAR data profiles area, d, g) Base model constrained by the GPS data. (b, e, h)

  14. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  15. Process for combining multiple passes of interferometric SAR data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickel, Douglas L. (Albuquerque, NM); Yocky, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hensley, Jr., William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-11-21

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is a promising technology for a wide variety of military and civilian elevation modeling requirements. IFSAR extends traditional two dimensional SAR processing to three dimensions by utilizing the phase difference between two SAR images taken from different elevation positions to determine an angle of arrival for each pixel in the scene. This angle, together with the two-dimensional location information in the traditional SAR image, can be transformed into geographic coordinates if the position and motion parameters of the antennas are known accurately.

  16. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component...

  17. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  18. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM), Martin; Grant D. (Marlborough, MA), Holzrichter; Michael W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  19. Mitigating illumination gradients in a SAR image based on the image data and antenna beam pattern

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2013-04-30

    Illumination gradients in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of a target can be mitigated by determining a correction for pixel values associated with the SAR image. This correction is determined based on information indicative of a beam pattern used by a SAR antenna apparatus to illuminate the target, and also based on the pixel values associated with the SAR image. The correction is applied to the pixel values associated with the SAR image to produce corrected pixel values that define a corrected SAR image.

  20. Proceedings OceanSAR 2006 Third Workshop on Coastal and Marine Applications of SAR, St. John's, NL, Canada, October 2006 Algorithm development for operational satellite SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -section to establish a library of signatures (look-up table) for different ice types. Using this library of signatures, a library of backscatter signatures for different ice types is needed for use with calibrated SAR imagery. 2 types using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) C-band scatterometer, together with surface-based ice

  1. New target detector based on geometrical perturbation filters for polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (POL-SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an active microwave remote sensing system able to acquire high resolution images of the scattering behaviour of an observed scene. The contribution of SAR polarimetry (POLSAR) in detection ...

  2. Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Helmut A.

    Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data Reinhold cartographic feature extraction by the airborne AeS--1 instrument is presented. We extract regions corresponding to cartographic features for the classes built--up area, forest, water and open area. Water

  3. Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysisRisø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind

  4. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ?3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole?body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average independent of the imaging subject, albeit with fluctuations. Conclusions: Our 3T RF dosimeter and transducers accurately measure RF exposure in body-equivalent loads and provide scanner-independent assessments of whole-body RF power deposition for establishing safety compliance useful for MRI sequence and device testing.

  5. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  6. SAR Endolysin Regulation in dsDNA Phage Lysis of Gram-Negative Hosts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuty, Gabriel

    2012-02-14

    . The first SAR endolysin to be characterized was P1 Lyz, of phage P1. Its activation requires a disulfide bond isomerization involving its catalytic Cys initiated by a free cysteine thiol from the newly-liberated SAR domain. A second mode of disulfide bond...

  7. SAR Processing of Radar Echo Sounder Data C. Leuschen , S. Gogineni, D. Tammana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    processing. We developed a SAR processing algorithm based on the f-k migration technique and used developed a SAR processing algorithm based on the f-k migration technique for extracting ice thickness data. This results in a depth resolution of about 5 m in ice. The compressed signal is coherently detected

  8. SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAR-BASED WIND CLIMATOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES Merete Bruun Christiansen(1) , Charlotte Bay Hasager(1) , Donald Thompson(2) , Lars Boye Hansen(3) (1) Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory, Technical, Denmark ABSTRACT Wind fields extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are used to analyze

  9. Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 21 - Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Meteorology Program, VEA-118 Abstract Satellite remote sensing of ocean wind fields from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations

  10. Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing RÉGIA T. S. ARAÚJO, FÁTIMA an algorithm to detect oil spills in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images that can be used to support sensing of environmental disasters. Spillage of oil in coastal waters can be a catastrophic event

  11. Resistive Bridge Fault Modeling,Simulationand Test Generation Vijay R. Sar-Dessai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Duncan M. "Hank"

    Resistive Bridge Fault Modeling,Simulationand Test Generation Vijay R. Sar-Dessai Intel Corporation.sar-dessai@intel.com Abstract In this work' we develop models of resistive bridging faults and study thefault coverage on ISCAS85 circuits of different test sets using resistive and zero-ohm bridges at different supply voltages

  12. Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 |Department ofMay 2013EnergyIQA memo10-6-082SAR.doc

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Infrared-VideoSAR Comparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScienceElectromagneticsNewsVideoSAR Sandia has

  14. 784 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 5, NO. 3, JUNE 2012 Multi-Link InSAR Time Series: Enhancement of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, the Keck In- stitute for Space Studies (California Institute.puyssegur@cea.fr). R. Michel was with the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Gif; date of current version June 28, 2012. This work was supported in part by the Commissariat à l'Energie

  15. SAR Assessment and Analysis of Cumulative Body Exposure to Multi Transmitters from a Mobile Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    against possible negative health effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Basic restriction evaluated ones from each transmitter separately. Index Terms -- SAR, Multiple exposure, Radiofrequency I Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) [1] and the Institute of Electronics and Electrical

  16. Processing of multiple-receiver spaceborne arrays for wide-area SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, James Marion; Rajakrishna, D.; Lin, S. C.; Goodman, N. A.

    2002-04-01

    in multiple modes. The disadvantage is that the spatial samples provided by such a constellation will be sparse and irregularly spaced; consequently, traditional matched filtering produces unsatisfactory results. We investigate SAR performance and processing...

  17. Multi-baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar applications and error analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, Song Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, we deal primarily with the multi-baseline SAR configuration utilizing three satellites. Two applications of InSAR, multi-baseline height retrieval and multi-baseline compensation of CCD's slope biasing ...

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry with 3 satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Wallace D. (Wallace Dazheng)

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigates interferometric SAR (InSAR) post-processing height retrieval techniques. We explore the possible improvements by adding a third satellite to the two already in orbit, and examine some potential uses ...

  19. CX-012119: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 05/13/2014 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. Is Computational Materials Science Richard LeSar, Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Is Computational Materials Science Overrated? Richard LeSar, Materials Science and Technology of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, Universityof California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, and Materials Computational materials science is one of the fastest growing disciplines in materials science. With an ever

  1. Pose Estimation for SAR Automatic Target Recognition Qun Zhao, Dongxin Xu, Jose C. Principe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Pose Estimation for SAR Automatic Target Recognition Qun Zhao, Dongxin Xu, Jose C. Principe of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 E-mail: { } @cnel.ufl.edu ABSTRACT This paper explores statistically pose are conducted by using the new MSTAR/ IU Database. Different pose estimator topologies and training criteria

  2. Assessing Radarsat-2 Polarimetric SAR for Mapping Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Radarsat-2 Polarimetric SAR for Mapping Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT Emergency #12;Conventional Shoreline Mapping Method: Helicopter videography Audio commentaries 100 km per persistence of oil Wetlands are low energy environments #12;1) Optimal acquisition parameters (incidence angle

  3. Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen, Risoe National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, DTU, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde-real-time calculated to wind maps using CMOD functions using the ANSWRS software from the Johns Hopkins University

  4. LIFE HISTORY STUDIES OF THE SANDWORM, NEREIS VIRENS SARS, IN THE SHEEPSCOT ESTUARY, MAINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE HISTORY STUDIES OF THE SANDWORM, NEREIS VIRENS SARS, IN THE SHEEPSCOT ESTUARY, MAINE EDWIN P of the sandworm, Nereis virens, in Maine despite their commercial importance over more than 40 years. Life history studies were performed in a flat along the Sheepscot River at Wiscasset, Maine, which was closed

  5. Case Study 1 Detection of Oil Slicks using MODIS and SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    ecosystems. Every year, huge quantities of oil and petroleum products enter the sea, land, and groundwaterCase Study 1 Detection of Oil Slicks using MODIS and SAR Imagery Chuanmin Hu1 , Xiaofeng Li2 , William G. Pichel3 1.1 Background Oil pollution can cause extensive damage to marine and terrestrial

  6. Isatin Compounds as Noncovalent SARS Coronavirus 3C-like Protease Inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhua, Lai

    , such as human rhinovirus (HRV) 3C protease. Therefore, HRV 3C protease inhibitors may also be potential HRV inhibitors were effective SARS CoV 3C-like protease inhibitors.13 They focused mainly on the isatin C-4, C-5, C-7, and N substituents, aiming at the two sites (P1, P2) that were important for HRV

  7. Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes, wastewater plumes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes pollution hazards for the heavily populated Southern California Bight (SCB). Due to their small size observational tool for assessment and monitoring of coastal marine pollution hazards in the SCB and other

  8. Measurement of Seismic Displacements. A comparison of SAR and GPS techniques, with particular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    looking antennas are used to produce a beam of radar pulses which illuminate the land surface is proportional only to the real aperture of the system (thus independent of altitude), which means the resolution be nonsensical since it would be unable to transmit any power. In practice the real aperture chosen for a SAR

  9. Draft genome sequence of strain HIMB100, a cultured representative of the SAR116 clade of marine Alphaproteobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Strain HIMB100 is a planktonic marine bacterium in the class Alphaproteobacteria. This strain is of interest because it is one of the first known isolates from a globally ubiquitous clade of marine bacteria known as SAR116 ...

  10. SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS OF THE SARS-COV NSP15 ENDORIBONUCLEASE, MECHANISM OF ACTION AND INSIGHT INTO CORONAVIRUS INFECTION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz Alcantara, Joanna M.

    2010-07-14

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus encodes several unusual RNA processing enzymes, including Nsp15, an endoribonuclease that preferentially cleaves 3? of uridylates through a Ribonuclease A-like mechanism. ...

  11. LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

    2013-01-01

    Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

  12. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  13. To cite this document: Mure-Dubois, James and Vincent, Franois and Bonacci, David Sonar and radar SAR processing for parking lot detection. (2011) In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    SAR processing for parking lot detection. (2011) In: International Radar Symposium (IRS) 2011, 07-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr #12;Sonar and Radar SAR Processing for Parking Lot Detection James Mure-Dubois , Franc¸ois Vincent non-trivial test scenes. The chosen application is parking lot detection. Laboratory results obtained

  14. RADARSAT ScanSAR Wind Retrieval Under Hurricane Conditions Congling Nie and David G. Long Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RADARSAT ScanSAR Wind Retrieval Under Hurricane Conditions Congling Nie and David G. Long-422-4884 Email:nie@mers.byu.edu ABSTRACT RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR SWA images of Hurricane Katrina are used to retrieve/s, suggesting that the high resolution wind retrieval algorithm can work under hurricane conditions. Except

  15. A comparison of the SAR and Vaneslow equations on three Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guth, David Leonard

    1984-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED. VITA. 10 12 36 40 40 48 64 65 68 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Regression Lines I Regression Lines II. Chemical Properties of the Soils in This Study CEC of Soils Used in This Study. Physical Properties of the Soils... in This Study X-ray Diffraction Data for Olmos and Willacy Soils. CEC of the Edroy Soil. Sodium Adsorbed (meq) in EN = 1. 0 Solution. Page 33 34 36 36 37 38 41 45 Figure 10 12 13 14 15 16 LIST OF FIGURES SAR vs ESR for each of the three...

  16. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  17. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-09-15

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  18. Earth Planets Space, 60, 453461, 2008 InSAR-based mapping of surface subsidence in Mokpo City, Korea, using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Earth Planets Space, 60, 453­461, 2008 InSAR-based mapping of surface subsidence in Mokpo City land in Korea. This reclaimed land is currently experiencing significant ground subsidence due to soil consolidation. We have estimated the subsidence rate of Mokpo City (8 × 8 km) using the synthetic aperture radar

  19. MEJORAMIENTO DE ONDAS INTERNAS EN IMGENES SAR USANDO, EN FORMA COMBINADA, LAS TRANSFORMADAS RADON Y WAVELETS (1-D)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Walls, Rafael

    MEJORAMIENTO DE ONDAS INTERNAS EN IMÁGENES SAR USANDO, EN FORMA COMBINADA, LAS TRANSFORMADAS RADON este trabajo estamos proponiendo el uso combinado de las transformadas RADON y WAVELETS (1-D) para contengan islas o parte de la costa. Palabras clave--Imagen de radar, Ondas internas, Transformada Radon

  20. Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 ­ 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong Composition of MSW at the beginning of the 21st century in China #12;Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 ­ 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong SAR PS-18- 2 Composition of MSW Composition

  1. Decadal scale variations in ice flow along Whillans Ice Stream and its tributaries, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Jezek, Kenneth C.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2005-01-05

    We investigate velocity changes occurring along Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) by comparing velocities derived from repeat aerial photographs acquired in 1985–89 (average date of 1987) to interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) ...

  2. Decadal-scale variations in ice flow along Whillans Ice Stream and its tributaries, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Jezek, K.A.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate velocity changes occurring along Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) by comparing velocities derived from repeat aerial photographs acquired in 1985–89 (average date of 1987) to interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) ...

  3. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR Crevasse Detection Radar : draft final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2010-08-01

    This document is the final report for the 2009 Antarctica Crevasse Detection Radar (CDR) Project. This portion of the project is referred to internally as Phase 2. This is a follow on to the work done in Phase 1 reported on in [1]. Phase 2 involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system used in Phase 1 to work with an LC-130 aircraft that operated in Antarctica in October through November of 2009. Experiments from the 2006 flights were repeated, as well as a couple new flight tests to examine the effect of colder snow and ice on the radar signatures of 'deep field' sites. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica during the fall of 2009.

  4. A Resolution-Reconfigurable 5-to-10-Bit 0.4-to-1 V Power Scalable SAR ADC for Sensor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Marcus

    A power-scalable SAR ADC for sensor applications is presented. The ADC features a reconfigurable 5-to-10-bit DAC whose power scales exponentially with resolution. At low resolutions where noise and linearity requirements ...

  5. Digital Intermediate Frequency Receiver Module For Use In Airborne Sar Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tise, Bertice L. (Albuquerque, NM); Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2005-03-08

    A digital IF receiver (DRX) module directly compatible with advanced radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The DRX can combine a 1 G-Sample/sec 8-bit ADC with high-speed digital signal processor, such as high gate-count FPGA technology or ASICs to realize a wideband IF receiver. DSP operations implemented in the DRX can include quadrature demodulation and multi-rate, variable-bandwidth IF filtering. Pulse-to-pulse (Doppler domain) filtering can also be implemented in the form of a presummer (accumulator) and an azimuth prefilter. An out of band noise source can be employed to provide a dither signal to the ADC, and later be removed by digital signal processing. Both the range and Doppler domain filtering operations can be implemented using a unique pane architecture which allows on-the-fly selection of the filter decimation factor, and hence, the filter bandwidth. The DRX module can include a standard VME-64 interface for control, status, and programming. An interface can provide phase history data to the real-time image formation processors. A third front-panel data port (FPDP) interface can send wide bandwidth, raw phase histories to a real-time phase history recorder for ground processing.

  6. Report on SARS backfit evaluation, Catalytic, Inc. Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, A.F. Jr.

    1980-07-02

    A site visit was made in company with the DOE-OPTA-EA Safety and Health Official for the purpose of providing that official with technical assistance in evaluating the validity of an earlier DOE-OPTA recommendation exempting this facility from the Safety and Analysis and Review backfit requirements of DOE Order 5481.1. A further purpose of the visit was to assess and evaluate the occupational safety and health program at this facility, as compared with the criteria and guidelines contained in ASFE Order 5481.1. Adequate documentation regarding compliance with codes, standards, and regulations were observed at this facility. There is in existence an ongoing continuous safety analysis effort for both modifications or additions to this facility. Adequate environmental safeguards and plans and procedures were observed. The SARS backfit exemption is appropriate. The occupational safety and health program is in many ways a model for the scope of work and nature of hazards involved, and is consistent with ASFE guidelines and statutory requirements.

  7. SUBWAY TUNNELS IDENTIFICATION THROUGH COSMO-SKYMED PSINSARANALYSIS IN SHANGHAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perissin, Daniele

    at an extremely lower cost per area than conventional surveying methods. InSAR is becoming more and more popular localized subsidence with remarkable accuracy. Index Terms--PSInSAR, Urban Monitoring, High Resolution, the subsidence in urban area could also be caused by many other anthropogenic factors, such as construction

  8. A synergetic use of satellite imagery from SAR and optical sensors to improve coastal flood mapping in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    A synergetic use of satellite imagery from SAR and optical sensors to improve coastal flood mapping for inundation mapping and have a great potential for evaluating wetting/drying algorithms of inland and coastal and near infrared domains. Images acquired in these wavelengths (i.e. visible and near infrared

  9. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  10. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

    2011-03-03

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  11. published in JGR, 105, 21,781-21,794, 2000 Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    published in JGR, 105, 21,781-21,794, 2000 Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data collected in the Coso geothermal area, eastern California with the production area of the Coso geothermal plant. The maximum subsidence rate in the peak of the anomaly is 3

  12. Constraints on the mechanism of long-term, steady subsidence at Medicine Lake volcano, northern California,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research 107, 2372, doi:10.1029/ 2001JB000893.]). InSAR data that approximate vertical displacements are similar to the leveling results; however, vertical deformation data alone are not sufficient 480 965 5081. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 150 (2006) 55­78 www

  13. 982 November 2013 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    characterization using satellite-based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which measures ground generally preceded by long-term slow motion. Opening the Way to Systematic Global- Scale Ground DeformationCharac Geolog a Globa Spaceb 982 November 2013 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING #12

  14. Geophys. J. Int. (2009) 176, 657669 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2008.03990.x GJIGeodesy,potentialfieldandappliedgeophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    ,potentialfieldandappliedgeophysics The 2007 Pisco, Peru, earthquake (M8.0): seismology and geodesy Juliet Biggs,1 David P. Robinson2. Received 2008 September 24; in original form 2008 June 13 S U M M A R Y We investigate the 2007 Pisco, Peru low spatial resolving power. Conversely, image-based geodetic techniques such as InSAR provide

  15. Location and mechanism of the Little Skull Mountain earthquake as constrained by satellite radar interferometry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    designed to measure the strain rate across the region around Yucca Mountain. The LSM earthquake complicates parameters; 7260 Seismology: Theory and modeling; KEYWORDS: InSAR, joint inversion, seismic, Yucca Mountain 1. Introduction [2] Yucca Mountain, a proposed long-term (103 ­105 years) disposal site for high-level radioactive

  16. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 377378 (2013) 239247 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    : landslides hydrology precipitation InSAR lidar pore-water pressure diffusion Precipitation drives seasonal velocity changes in slow-moving landslides by increasing pore-water pressure and reducing the effective normal stress along basal shear zones. This pressure change is often modeled as a pore-water pressure

  17. SAR992FINAL.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -Rob Roberts About Us Rob RobertsSelectSAE328 UnlimitedReport

  18. IG SAR 5-09.qxd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with the overall conclusions and recommendations in the report. (DOEIG-0805) National Nuclear Security Administration's Innovative Technologies We conducted this audit to...

  19. Access Control for SAR Systems Stephen Quirolgico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    welfare by providing technical leadership for the Nation's measurement and standards infrastructure. ITL the development of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards and guidelines for the cost Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8940 July 2011 U

  20. IG SAR 5-09.qxd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (OAS-L-09-03) Issues Relating to the Production of Components for the W76 Weapon System at Sandia National Laboratory- New Mexico The inspection was initiated to review the...

  1. Review of SAR for Packaging Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the hypothetical accident condition tests (e.g., from thermal combustion, decomposition, release of fillfission product gases of spent fuel rods) have been accounted for in the...

  2. SAR ISAR 01.01.12 ,, "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Symposium, Dresden 2013 ( ), Journal of Applied Magnetizm, Greece 2013, Advanced Shipping and Ocean, A.D., Kabakchiev, C., Gashinova, M., Kostadinov, T. "Ultra wide band bistatic forward scattering.A., Kostadinov, T.P. "Short Time Pulse Bistatic Forward Scattering Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

  3. DIELECTRONIC RECOMBINATION IN S+Ar COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanis, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    and by the Director, Office of Fusion Energy Research,Office of Fusion Energy, Applied Plasma Physics Division ofby the Director, Office of Fusion Energy Research, Office of

  4. SqueeSAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill PreventionJump

  5. IG SAR 10-09.qxd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-A Government

  6. IG SAR 10-12.qxd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-A Governmentintentionally left

  7. IG SAR 5-09.qxd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-A Governmentintentionally

  8. Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing SwimmingMicrosoft Word1 2 - 2 0 1 5 D ePeer Review of the

  9. IG SAR 5-09.qxd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdateofMarch 21, 2012 ICEIWGSeptemberDepartment

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: SAR Program Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque AlbuquerqueCybernetics: PerceptionMaterialsProject:

  11. DOE IG SAR 10-08.qxd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominate an employee forThisMillion toUseDepartmentTable

  12. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

  13. A highly digital, reconfigurable and voltage scalable SAR ADC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Micropower sensor networks have a broad range of applications which include military surveillance, environmental monitoring, chemical detection and more recently, medical monitoring systems. Each node of the sensor network ...

  14. SAR Imagery Segmentation by Statistical Region Growing and Hierarchical Merging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi

    2010-01-01

    stepwise opti- mization (HSWO) algorithm for the processGoldberg [16], known as HSWO, remains an e?ective approachsegmen- tation [17; 15]. HSWO exploits the idea of hierarchy

  15. Segmentation of SAR Images Based on Markov Random Field Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    , and Balu Santhanam Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, MSC01 1100, 1 University of New Mexico are corrupted with an inherent signal-dependent phenomenon named speckle noise. The speckle noise is grainy

  16. The Three Sisters in the Ge-sar Epic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hummel, Siegbert

    1974-07-23

    is identified with the three sisters. 9. A.H. Fracke, Der Fruhlings- und Wintermythus der Kesar sage (Memoires de la Societe Finno-Ougrienne, XV, Helsingfurs), reprint Osnabruck 1968 (review S. Hummel in; ZMR, 1971, ~): Der Wintermythus, p.46. '10...

  17. Microsoft Word - PeerReview_SAR.doc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Publications Microsoft Word - PeerReviewCCSP.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Assessment of the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower...

  18. Synthetic aperture integration (SAI) algorithm for SAR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-07-09

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  19. Microsoft Word - N01747_Bldg 100 SAR.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony5-TACJune through911 Through May

  20. Microsoft Word - 2014 LANS Plan 501 SAR.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal information isNotice -Program

  1. Microsoft Word - 2014 LANS Plan 502 SAR.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal information isNotice -ProgramRetirees This

  2. Design, Synthesis and SAR of Novel Glucokinase Activators (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solid interactionCrystal SpectrometerSciTechFacility for

  3. April2002SAR Revised Final 6-3-02.pub

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporation |Inc.:ServicesSvcsApprovalTribes

  4. Review of SAR for Packaging Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A WholesaleRetrofit Existing BuildingsImpactBeyond Design

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Imagery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque AlbuquerqueCybernetics:Defense Systems &Vision,Synthetic

  6. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  7. Combining Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO2 in Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swart, Peter K.; Dixon, Tim

    2014-09-30

    A series of surface geophysical and geochemical techniques are tested in order to demonstrate and validate low cost approaches for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) of the integrity of deep reservoirs for CO2 storage. These techniques are (i) surface deformation by GPS; ii) surface deformation by InSAR; iii) passive source seismology via broad band seismometers; and iv) soil gas monitoring with a cavity ring down spectrometer for measurement of CO2 concentration and carbon isotope ratio. The techniques were tested at an active EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) site in Texas. Each approach has demonstrated utility. Assuming Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) activities become operational in the future, these techniques can be used to augment more expensive down-hole techniques.

  8. Decker Student Health Services Center PO Box 6000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    China China, Hong Kong SAR China, Macao SAR Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, Democratic Republic of Costa

  9. AFRICA ASIA SOUTH AMERICA Algeria Afghanistan Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Peru Comoros China, Hong Kong SAR Suriname Congo, Dem. Rep. (Kinshasa) China, Macau SAR Uruguay Congo

  10. EIA Workshop, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 19-22, 2000 1 USE OF INSAR IN SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL OF A LARGE FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    of surveillance and control, which acquires and processes waterflood data, and helps field personnel make optimal, injection data SQL Database Control & optimization Data integration & inversion Off-line On-line Field AND CONTROL OF A LARGE FIELD PROJECT T. W. PATZEK 1 AND D. B. SILIN 2 ABSTRACT In this paper, we introduce

  11. Novel BayesianNovel Bayesian MultiscaleMultiscale MethodsMethods Speckle Removal in SAR ImagesSpeckle Removal in SAR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    Terrain structural information to geologists for mineral explorationexploration Sea state and ice hazard maps to navigatorsSea state and ice hazard maps to navigators Environmental monitoring:Environmental monitoring: ·· Oil spill boundaries on waterOil spill boundaries on water ·· Changes in delicate ecosystems

  12. RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much interest during the last decade. The adventure started in 1991 when the first offshore wind farm. New development plans near Horns Rev and Nysted are ongoing. Offshore wind farms are in development the highest spatial detail (~500 m by 500 m grid cells) and are observed within the offshore `wind-farming

  13. Wind energy and SAR wind mapping Charlotte Hasager(2) and merete christiansen(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    offshore wind farms are operating and more are in construction. Thus the study is focussed on an area is ongoing, and the series of wind maps are used for investigation of offshore wind resources. In wind energy the siting of a wind farm is dependent upon reliable information about the wind climate within the area

  14. Identification of N-linked carbohydrates from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) spike glycoprotein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    symptoms of high fever (N38 °C), dry cough, shortness of breath (dyspnea) and/or more severe breathing

  15. Mediated urban civic space : info deck of the Hong Kong SAR Government Info-tainment Headquarters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louie, Tak-Wing, 1973-

    2001-01-01

    After being a British colony for more than hundred years, Hong Kong's final handover back to China took place 1st July 1997. There are tremendous demands on the new government to reflect her status during this critical ...

  16. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion (freshwater) ice types using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory C-band scatterometer, together with surface data set, composed of over 20 variations of different ice types measured at incident angles from 0

  17. Investigation of coastal dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet using sequential Radarsat SAR images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Sheng-Jung

    2009-05-15

    Increasing human activities have brought about a global warming trend, and cause global sea level rise. Investigations of variations in coastal margins of Antarctica and in the glacial dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet provide useful diagnostic...

  18. Genomics provides powerful tools in the global effort to combat Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    ; a distressing cough brings up blood stained sputum. In the morning the dead bodies were stacked about the morgue by a nonproductive cough and shortness of breath. Eventually, some died because of progressive respiratory failure

  19. Is a curved flight path in SAR better than a straight one?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Stefanov

    2012-12-10

    model of this is to project the curve on the plane, call it ?; then the data are integrals ..... projections to the base falls on ? (points right below the plane's path, i.e.,.

  20. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  1. IG SAR RPT to Congress Content 12-22-03.PUB

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-A Governmentintentionally am

  2. Semiannual Report to congress IG SAR 5-09 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretary Moniz's OpenEnergySeizingDepartment of Energy

  3. A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | OpenEnergyEvaluation |Island, AzoresEnergy

  4. IG 2002 SAR Rpt to Congress-Print Version.pub

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21, 2012 ICEIWG Meeting Agenda:November 17,

  5. IG SAR to Congress 11-2002 final version.PUB

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21, 2012 ICEIWG Meeting Agenda:November 17,6 April 1

  6. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  7. Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  8. Delineation of delta ecozones using interferometric SAR phase coherence Mackenzie River Delta, N.W.T., Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    when overall image coherence is decreased by increasing temporal and spatial baselines. Evaluation significant categories. Sensors such as the Land- sat Thematic Mapper (TM) have been used to attain such classifications based upon visible and near-infrared reflec- tance (Jensen et al., 1986; Mertes, Dunne

  9. Characterization of EER4 and SAR1 in Relation to Their Role in Ethylene Signaling and Dampening Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robles, Linda

    2010-01-01

    al. , 1998) using the lithium acetate method (Rose et. al. ,transformation buffer (0.4 M lithium acetate, 0.1 M DTT, 35%

  10. Structural studies of the SARS virus Nsp15 endonuclease and the human innate immunity receptor TLR3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jingchuan

    2006-08-16

    Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Andreas Holzenburg Committee Members, Ryland Young... 2006) Jingchuan Sun, B.S., Peking University; M.S., Peking University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andreas Holzenburg Three-dimensional (3D) structural determination of biological macromolecules is not only critical to understanding...

  11. Spatial Augmented Reality Support for Design of Complex Physical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bruce

    , and animations) and the physical space (physical prototypes and 3D printing). Spatial Augmented Reality (SAR

  12. Using Spatial Augment Reality for Appliance Design Stewart Von Itzstein, Bruce H.Thomas, Ross T. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bruce

    , and animations) and the physical space (physical prototypes and 3D printing). Spatial Augmented Reality (SAR

  13. Master's thesis: "Wind speed measurements in an offshore wind farm by remote sensing: Comparison of radar satellite TerraSAR-X and ground-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master's thesis: "Wind speed measurements in an offshore wind farm by remote sensing: Comparison of the Offshore wind farm alpha ventus with 12 wind turbines, substation and met mast Fino1. Southerly winds cause (wake) caused by wind farms and especially for the interaction of large offshore wind farms, which can

  14. Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit Safety Analysis Report (LWRHU-SAR). Volume I. A. Introduction and executive summary. B. Reference Design Document (RDD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.W.

    1985-10-01

    The orbiter and probe portions of the NASA Galileo spacecraft contain components which require auxiliary heat during the mission. To meet these needs, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Special Nuclear Projects (OSNP) has sponsored the design, fabrication, and testing of a one-watt encapsulated plutonium dioxide-fueled thermal heater named the Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU). This report addresses the radiological risks which might be encountered by people both at the launch area and worldwide should postulate mission failures or malfunctions occur, which would result in the release of the LWRHUs to the environment. Included are data from the design, mission descriptions, postulated accidents with their consequences, test data, and the derived source terms and personnel exposures for the various events.

  15. Mapping Belize´s Coastal Mangrove Forests: experiments with conjunctive use of SPOT, L- and X-band SAR and SRTM data. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin Herrera, Mario A.

    2010-08-11

    Four experimental classifications of coastal mangroves in Belize were developed using Definiens software using various combinations of SPOT multispectral data and ALOS L-band PALSAR data combined with digital surface models ...

  16. Evaluation of electric and magnetic fields distribution and SAR induced in 3D models of water containers by radiofrequency radiation using FDTD and FEM simulation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelsamie, Maher A A; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two software packages using different numerical techniques FEKO 6.3 with Finite-Element Method (FEM) and XFDTD 7 with Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) were used to assess exposure of 3D models of square, rectangular, and pyramidal shaped water containers to electromagnetic waves at 300, 900, and 2400 MHz frequencies. Using the FEM simulation technique, the peak electric field of 25, 4.5, and 2 V/m at 300 MHz and 15.75, 1.5, and 1.75 V/m at 900 MHz were observed in pyramidal, rectangular, and square shaped 3D container models, respectively. The FDTD simulation method confirmed a peak electric field of 12.782, 10.907, and 10.625 V/m at 2400 MHz in the pyramidal, square, and rectangular shaped 3D models, respectively. The study demonstrated an exceptionally high level of electric field in the water in the two identical pyramid shaped 3D models analyzed using the two different simulation techniques. Both FEM and FDTD simulation techniques indicated variations in the distribution of elect...

  17. SARS Coronavirus nsp1 Protein Induces Template-Dependent Endonucleolytic Cleavage of mRNAs: Viral mRNAs Are Resistant to nsp1-Induced RNA Cleavage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    CVB) and human rhinovirus (HRV), while picornavirus type IICVB (Ren-CVB-FF), and HRV 2 (Ren-HRV2-FF) or a flavivirus,

  18. Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 -10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 -2200. MAPSAR: A NEW L-BAND SPACEBORNE SAR MISSION FOR ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 - 10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 - 2200. 2193 MAPSAR: A NEW the 9 7 38 4 #12;Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 - 10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 - 2200. 2194

  19. APPLICATION FOR A SAR MINOR College of Engineering students interested in earning a minor from Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences must complete this form and submit it to the Office

  20. Esercizio 3.1 Il proprietario di 500 ettari di prateria vuole sapere se sar in grado di produrre, allevandocapi di

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casagrandi, Renato

    dell'energia solare persa perché non utilizzata dalle erbe e dell'energia consumata nella respirazione.5 · 106 kcal m­2 di energia e che l'efficienza di produzione primaria lorda ­ grandezza che tiene conto di carne viva. Esercizio 3.2 Odum (1957) studiò la circolazione dell'energia nell

  1. Potential Genetic Contributions to a Pneumopathogenic MHV-1 Virus: Analysis by Targeted Recombination and Whole Genome Sequencing in the MHV-1 Model of SARS-COV Lung Disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGruder, Brenna Mariechen

    2014-04-24

    Biosaftey Level DBT Delayed brain tumor, cell line, mouse FCWF Felis catus whole fetus, cell line, cat L2 Lung, cell line, rat vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT...

  2. Finalizada a campanha de aquisio de dados de radar com o SAR-R99B (SIPAM-SIVAM) na simulao do satlite MAPSAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costeiras, urbanismo, defesa/inteligência. Os requisitos dos usuários foram estabelecidos em função dos

  3. A Long-Term, High-Resolution Wetland Dataset over the Amazon Basin, Downscaled from a Multiwavelength Retrieval Using SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Long-Term, High-Resolution Wetland Dataset over the Amazon Basin, Downscaled from Matiere en Astrophysique, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France FABRICE PAPA Laboratoire d'Etude en Rayonnement et de la Matiere en Astrophysique, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, France (Manuscript received 29

  4. Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Wireless Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardlaw, Jason

    2012-02-14

    application in the proposed sensor system are undertaken and a low-power successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) is presented. The SAR ADC was fabricated and laboratory characterizations show the proposed low-voltage topology...

  5. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  6. NATURE|VOL423|15MAY2003|www.nature.com/nature 207 pencer Abraham, the US energy secretary, seems to have a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to cope with genomics. B arely had the last nucleotide in the genetic code of the SARS coronavirus been

  7. Em constante desafio Como a fora de vontade, a experimentao e a internacionalizao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    descrição de Julião Sar- mento, verá o seu trabalho exposto numa galeria de Madrid, no fim de maio. O contac

  8. Imaging Structure With Fluid Fluxes At The Bradys Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that when integrated with other geophysical observations and reservoir production data, In- SAR analysis will be able to guide new exploration and aid field management....

  9. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  10. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leite, Gladeston C.

    2013-01-01

    resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK. Inevaluation of oil spills and wind farms. Keywords: SAR; Winddata to characterize wind farms and their potential energy

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wendy ; Kim, Yunjin ; Freeman, Anthony ; Jordan, Rolando This paper describes the next generation synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that enables future low cost space-borne radar...

  12. Governance and the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya, Alfred John

    2010-01-01

    Wang. BBC News. 2003a. ?Vietnam Contains SARS Outbreak. ?Thac Mo Hydroelectric Station in Vietnam. ? Hydrotechnical25. Cohen, Margot. 2002. ?Vietnam: Murder and Mystery. ? The

  13. Radar transponder apparatus and signal processing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Axline, Jr., Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Sloan, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    An active, phase-coded, time-grating transponder and a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) and signal processor means, in combination, allow the recognition and location of the transponder (tag) in the SAR image and allow communication of information messages from the transponder to the SAR. The SAR is an illuminating radar having special processing modifications in an image-formation processor to receive an echo from a remote transponder, after the transponder receives and retransmits the SAR illuminations, and to enhance the transponder's echo relative to surrounding ground clutter by recognizing special transponder modulations from phase-shifted from the transponder retransmissions. The remote radio-frequency tag also transmits information to the SAR through a single antenna that also serves to receive the SAR illuminations. Unique tag-modulation and SAR signal processing techniques, in combination, allow the detection and precise geographical location of the tag through the reduction of interfering signals from ground clutter, and allow communication of environmental and status information from said tag to be communicated to said SAR.

  14. Radar transponder apparatus and signal processing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Axline, R.M. Jr.; Sloan, G.R.; Spalding, R.E.

    1996-01-23

    An active, phase-coded, time-grating transponder and a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) and signal processor means, in combination, allow the recognition and location of the transponder (tag) in the SAR image and allow communication of information messages from the transponder to the SAR. The SAR is an illuminating radar having special processing modifications in an image-formation processor to receive an echo from a remote transponder, after the transponder receives and retransmits the SAR illuminations, and to enhance the transponder`s echo relative to surrounding ground clutter by recognizing special transponder modulations from phase-shifted from the transponder retransmissions. The remote radio-frequency tag also transmits information to the SAR through a single antenna that also serves to receive the SAR illuminations. Unique tag-modulation and SAR signal processing techniques, in combination, allow the detection and precise geographical location of the tag through the reduction of interfering signals from ground clutter, and allow communication of environmental and status information from said tag to be communicated to said SAR. 4 figs.

  15. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-03: Limitation of 10 CFR Part...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Part 830. The contractor argued that only equipment referenced in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) or Technical Specifications should come...

  16. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    IRSL dating. Quaternary Geochronology 2, 216- Wintle, A. ,SAR procedure. Quaternary Geochronology 1, 101-108. Dawson,and behavior. Quaternary Geochronology 5, 91-95. Fletcher,

  17. Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

  18. Report of the Independent Scientific Advisory Board Regarding a Research Proposal for Inclusion in the 1997 Smolt Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimates of the effects of the hydroelectric system on the health of salmon populations are essential the hydroelectric system. Yet while it has been technically feasible to gather highly detailed information to guide of wild chinook are significantly different from the interim SAR hydroelectric goal. (3) Compare SARs

  19. Multivortex micromixing: novel techniques using Dean flows for passive microfluidic mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarsan, Arjun Penubolu

    2007-04-25

    herringbone mixer SAR Split-and-recombine P-SAR Planar split-and-recombine ASM Asymmetric serpentine mixer PCB Printed circuit board DI Deionized SEBS Polystyrene?(polyethylene/polybutylene)?polystyrene SIS Polystyrene................................... 87 Concept ......................................................................................... 90 Flow visualization in a two-split microchannel........................ 92 Planar split-and-recombine mixer...

  20. Biochemical and genetic characterization of bacteriophage 21 holin: S21 as a membrane protein and beyond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Taehyun

    2009-05-15

    if a SAR endolysin is used ?............. 20 viii CHAPTER Page I.5.3. Conduct a saturating mutational analysis of the S 21.................................... 53 III.3.3. Macromolecules easily pass through S ? but not S 21 holes.......... 55 III.3.4. Genomic analysis of type II holins with SAR endolysin............ 57 III.4. Discussion...

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2000 2475 Estimation of Snow Water Equivalence Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    of Snow Water Equivalence Using SIR-C/X-SAR, Part II: Inferring Snow Depth and Particle Size Jiancheng Shi and Jeff Dozier Abstract--The relationship between snow water equivalence (SWE) and SAR backscattering of the relationship with an empirical approach is unrealistic. Instead, we estimate snow depth and particle size using

  2. University of California San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gail

    the challenges of global health #12;Large cover image: The corona virus that causes SARS, first identified as infectious--among them, heart disease, cancer, and asthma. This theory can now be more fully explored, thanks that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), this tool--called the microarray--has dramatically

  3. Compressive Radar with Off-Grid and Extended Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fannjiang, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) schemes are proposed for monostatic as well as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging of sparse targets with chirps. In particular, a simple method is developed to improve performance with off-grid targets. Tomographic formulation of spotlight SAR is analyzed by CS methods with several bases and under various bandwidth constraints. Performance guarantees are established via coherence bound and the restricted isometry property. CS analysis provides a fresh and clear perspective on how to optimize temporal and angular samplings for spotlight SAR.

  4. Seasat, ERS-112 and NSCAT Scatterometer Observed Changes on the Large Ice Sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    scattering characteristics and regional melting delineation. SASS-NSCAT differences show 18 year changes but is switched off during SAR-mode operation. Over glacial ice, o"(dB)is approximately a linear function of 8in

  5. TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kland, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    the assessment of envi- ronmental and health effects of oiloil shale technology clearly preclude the use of a simple SAR or Me approach in the calculation and assessmentoil production are sufficient to cause concern. In addition, assessment

  6. NewMedBlog.info NewMedBlog.info -Prescription drug information and pharmaceutical news for professionals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    , SARS with 3.8 Teraflops of Supercomputing Power » Implantable RFID Tag to Wirelessly Monitor GERD-sensing RFID tag and wirelessly transmitting the data to your cellphone for review at your next doctor

  7. Development and use of databases for ligand-protein interaction studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsin, Kun-Yi

    2010-01-01

    This project applies structure-activity relationship (SAR), structure-based and database mining approaches to study ligand-protein interactions. To support these studies, we have developed a relational database system ...

  8. Design and Synthesis of Novel Linear and Cyclic Peptide Ligands for Kappa Opioid Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Weijie

    2008-09-04

    Our research focuses on the development of potent and highly selective peptide ligands for kappa (?) opioid receptors and examination of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for activity at these receptors. Both ? ...

  9. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leite, Gladeston C.

    2013-01-01

    W. ; Feser, F. Relationship between SAR-derived wind vectorsand wind at 10- m height represented by a meososcale model.Yijun, H. Comparison of two wind algorithms of ENVISAT ASAR

  10. MAPSAR Simulation in Brazil: Current StatusMAPSAR Simulation in Brazil: Current Status Dr. Waldir Renato Paradella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPSAR MAPSAR Simulation in Brazil: Current StatusMAPSAR Simulation in Brazil: Current Status Dr #12;MAPSAR MAPSAR Simulation in Brazil (SARMAPSAR Simulation in Brazil (SAR--R99 Campaign)R99 Campaign

  11. Radar Testbed Characterization for Evaluation of Modulated Scatterer Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casper, Matt

    2010-05-27

    of fields including, mass data collection, SAR calibration, and military communication. A radar testbed was developed and charactersized to enable experimental evaluation of communication via modulated scatterer concepts. The radar operates with a 1.84-GHz...

  12. Prioritization methodology using hazard analysis results at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasser, M.K.; Hall, M.; Stack, D.; Brooks, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    Risk management activities, such as prioritizing risk-reducing projects, often are commissioned for facilities as special tasks supported by special task forces and conducted independently of other on-going risk assessment and risk management activities. Many DOE facilities have completed hazard analyses (HAs) as part of their efforts to upgrade their SARs to meet the new DOE standard that was issued in 1994. Although a complete SAR would contain more resource allocation information than the HA, the HA usually is completed before the SAR. This paper describes how SAR results, and particularly HA results, can be used directly to support managers` risk-based prioritization of project funding. This can reduce the time to conduct prioritization modeling, increase the quality of the results, and, perhaps most importantly, integrate the results into the on-going risk management activities of the site.

  13. Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Duane

    1996-01-01

    Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

  14. UnB/Universidade de Braslia Relatrio de Gesto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    , Contabilidade e Ciência da Informação e Documentação FACE Prof. César Augusto Tibúrcio Silva Faculdade de

  15. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the SAR. 2.2 Description of Alternatives. Alternative B - No Action The BLM NEPA Handbook (H-1790-1) states that for Environmental Assessments (EAs) on externally initiated...

  16. This article was downloaded by: [Bibliothekssystem Universitt Hamburg] On: 07 May 2015, At: 04:04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form/August 1999. We also used a pair of Advanced SAR (ASAR) images from May 2005 showing imprints of singular oil

  17. This article was downloaded by: [University of Hamburg] On: 03 November 2011, At: 09:07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form of Advanced SAR (ASAR) images from May 2005 showing imprints of singular oil spills in the Southern Baltic

  18. Universit degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" AREA OFFERTA FORMATIVA E DIRITTO ALLO STUDIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    PRESTAZIONE OCCASIONALE DA SVOLGERE PRESSO IL SERVIZIO POP'S, UNIVERSITA' "LA SAPIENZA" Visto l'art. 5 del, e si svolgerà presso il Servizio POP'S della Sapienza. PUBBLICAZIONE: Il presente avviso sarà

  19. SANDIA REPORT SAND930731 s UC706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    SANDIA REPORT SAND93­0731 s UC­706 Unlimited Release Printed March 1993 Spaceborne SAR Study: LDRD, VA 22161 NTIS price codes Printed copy A06 Microfiche copy AO1 #12;SAND93-0731 Unlimited Release

  20. Participatory epidemiology : harnessing the HealthMap platform for community-based disease outbreak monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freifeld, Clark

    2010-01-01

    Due to increasing global trade and travel along with a range of environmental factors, emerging infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), drug-resistant tuberculosis, and 2009 HiNi continue to ...

  1. Chemoselective Functionalization of Carboxylic Acid and Phenol Containing Natural Products and the Development and Use of a Nucleophile Catalyzed Michael Aldol Lactonization Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarlin, Rae

    2013-05-02

    The development of methods for site-selective derivatization of natural products to enable simultaneous arming and structure activity relationship (SAR) studies has shown great potential for the synthesis of pharmaceutical ...

  2. Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begoli, Edmon; Boehmann, Brant; DeNap, Frank A

    2012-04-01

    In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI SAR system was an outstanding success and contributed greatly to the security and resiliency of their states. At least one state commented that SERRI's implementation of the MSSI SAR actually 'jump started' and accelerated deployment and acceptance of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI). While all states were enthusiastic about their systems, South Carolina and Tennessee appeared to be the heaviest users of their respective systems. With NSI taking the load of sharing SARs with other states, Tennessee has redeployed the MSSI SAR system within Tennessee to allow SAR sharing between state and local organizations including Tennessee's three Homeland Security Regions, eleven Homeland Security Districts, and more than 500 police and sheriff offices, as well as with other states. In one success story from South Carolina, the Economy SAR System was used to compile similar SARs from throughout the state which were then forwarded to field liaison officers, emergency management personnel, and law enforcement officers for action.

  3. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to themore »theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.« less

  4. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to the theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.

  5. The role of ring current nose events in producing stable auroral red arc intensifications during the main phase: Observations during the September 19--24, 1984, equinox transition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyra, J.U. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Chandler, M.O. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States)); Peterson, W.K.; Klumpar, D.M. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)); Slater, D.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Buonsanto, M.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Westford (United States)); Carlson, H.C. (Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    This article reports on a study of the characteristics of stable auroral red (SAR) arcs. These arcs are characterized by 6300-[angstrom] emission which normally appears near F region heights. In particular the authors study observations made in September, 1984. These studies showed that oxygen ion collisions in the ring current were responsible for the recovery phase enhancement of the SAR. Satellite observations showed and enhanced 15 to 25 keV proton component in the ring current during the main phase of the SAR which is responsible for the enhancement during this phase of the event. This enhanced high energy proton flux appears to have come from ion injection into the inner magnetosphere in response to an abrupt change in the electric field across the magnetotail.

  6. Releases of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere after a potential fire in a cylinder storage yard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Williams, W.R.; Anderson, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), a toxic material, is stored in just over 6200 cylinders at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The safety analysis report (SAR) for cylinder yard storage operations at the plant required the development of accident scenarios for the potential release of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere. In accordance with DOE standards and guidance, the general approach taken in this SAR was to examine the functions and contents of the cylinder storage yards to determine whether safety-significant hazards were present for workers in the immediate vicinity, workers on-site, the general public off-site, or the environment. and to evaluate the significance of any hazards that were found. A detailed accident analysis was performed to determine a set of limiting accidents that have potential for off-site consequences. One of the limiting accidents identified in the SAR was the rupture of a cylinder engulfed in a fire.

  7. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  8. Development of SOI pixel detector in Cracow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szymon Bugiel; Roma Dasgupta; Sebastian Glab; Marek Idzik; Jakub Moron; Piotr Julian Kapusta; Wojciech Kucewicz; Michal Turala

    2015-07-03

    This paper presents the design of a new monolithic Silicon-On-Insulator pixel sensor in $200~nm$ SOI CMOS technology. The main application of the proposed pixel detector is the spectroscopy, but it can also be used for the minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracking in particle physics experiments. For this reason few different versions of pixel cells are developed: a source-follower based pixel for tracking, a low noise pixel with preamplifier for spectroscopy, and a self-triggering pixel for time and amplitude measurements. In addition the design of a Successive Approximation Register Analog-to-Digital Converter (SAR ADC) is also presented. A 10-bit SAR ADC is developed for spectroscopic measurements and a lower resolution 6-bit SAR ADC is integrated in the pixel matrix as a column ADC, for tracking applications.

  9. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  10. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  11. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ZONES 6 5 7 8 9 15 4 3 1 2 13 10 11 12 1. Buoy J 2. ATBA 3. WSJF 4. ESJF 5. Rosario 6. Guemes 7.0% 14.0% 16.0% 18.0% Buoy J : 0.0% | x 0.91 SJIslands : 0.0% | x 0.96 ATBA : 0.0% | x 0.96 Sar.0% 3.5% 4.0% 4.5% Buoy J : +0.0% SJIslands : +0.0% ATBA : +0.0% Sar/Skagit : +0.0% Tac. South : 0

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    ;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY ZONES 6 5 7 8 9 15 4 3 1 2 13 10 11 12 1. Buoy J 2. ATBA 3. WSJF 4. ESJF 5. Rosario% 25% 30% Buoy J : +0.0% | x 1.00 ATBA : +0.0% | x 1.02 Sar/Skagit : 0.0% | x 0.99 SJIslands : +0% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% Buoy J : +0.0% | x 1.09 ATBA : +0.0% | x 1.33 Sar/Skagit : +0.0% | x 3.42 SJIslands

  13. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  14. NMR approaches in structure-based lead discovery: Recent developments and new frontiers for targeting multi-protein complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, David M.; Ciulli, Alessio

    2014-08-28

    . Using 2D HSQC one can collect the spectra in the absence and in the presence of small-molecule compounds or other target proteins. This simple approach allows obtaining chemical shift perturbation (CSP) (Williamson, 2013) data. A comparison of 2D 1H... . The chemical shift perturbation assay has been used extensively to identify binding sites of small molecules. This approach gained even more popularity when SAR by NMR was introduced in 1996. (Shuker et al., 1996) SAR by NMR (Fig. 2) first uses CSP data...

  15. Communicative & Integrative Biology 3:2, 130-138; March/April 2010; 2010 Landes Bioscience ReseARCh pApeR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    .landesbioscience.com/journals/cib/article/10584 Introduction Plants are constantly challenged by a plethora of disease caus- ing microorganisms.1,2 To counter the onslaught of infections by microorganisms, plants have evolved a combination of con- stitutive and corresponding pathogen encoded avirulence (Avr) genes. The induction of SAR leads to enhanced resistance

  16. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  17. Chemicals for tomorrow J. Ranke, B. Jastorff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Friederike - Fachbereich 2 Biologie

    analysis ·Transdisciplinary evaluation of risks ·Undergraduate courses: ,,SAR of organic compounds" ,,The to support evaluations on a weak factual basis, but with high relevance? SOME THOUGHTS ON RISK INDICATORS risks to the biosphere. BUSINESS CUSTOMER LEGAL ENVIRONMENT PUBLIC BIOSPHERE Sustainable Relationship

  18. Nitrogen deep accepters in ZnO nanowires induced by ammonia plasma Rui Huang, Shuigang Xu, Wenhao Guo, Lin Wang, Jie Song et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Shengwang

    and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR 2 Department of Physics and Electronic EngineeringNitrogen deep accepters in ZnO nanowires induced by ammonia plasma Rui Huang, Shuigang Xu, Wenhao subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Nitrogen deep

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 52, NO. 6, JUNE 2014 3063 Reduction of Vibration-Induced Artifacts in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    of Vibration-Induced Artifacts in Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery Qi Wang, Student Member, IEEE, Matthew Pepin, Armin W. Doerry, and Majeed M. Hayat, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Target vibrations introduce (SAR) signals. This causes ar- tifacts, or ghost targets, which appear near vibrating targets in re

  20. Humboldt University Berlin Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................. 4 2. Thermal climate in cities: the urban heat island of issue. Heat waves, urban climate and human health HU Berlin Public Report SAR-PR-2006-06 April 2006 Press (submitted) #12;Heat waves, urban climate and human health Wilfried Endlicher1 , Gerd Jendritzky2

  1. Analysis of a Novel 2-DOF Flexure Hinge-based Parallel Micromanipulator in a Polar Coordinate System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    also reveals that the mechanism has ideal linearity in terms of the kinematic and static properties Av. Padre Tom´as Pereira S.J., Taipa, Macao SAR, China School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin by piezoelectric actuator (PZT) is presented in this paper. According to the designed mechanism structure, a pseudo

  2. Im2Learn Manual The motivation for developing Im2Learn (Image to Learn) comes from academic, government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    cover classification, map analysis, geo-spatial information systems (GIS), synthetic aperture radar (SAR, automobile industry, database retrieval, surveillance, and digital library. Band Selection Unsupervised de-noising and de-blurring in microarray data. Classification: Two and N-class classification

  3. Remote sensing analysis of natural oil and gas seeps on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Beukelaer, Sophie Magdalena

    2004-11-15

    acoustic shadows on the side-scan sonar records. The oily bubbles generated clear signatures extending from the seafloor to the near surface on the acoustic profile records. RADARSAT SAR images verified the presence of surface oil slicks over the hydrate...

  4. Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf of Mexico Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf their demand characteristics. Results in- dicate that opportunities for entry exist, especiallyfor products was packed in soy oil. The major sources for imported sar- dines are Norway, Peru, Portugal, Japan

  5. Por: Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade Investigadora Auxiliar y Directora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    SAR puede ser usado para medir pequeñas tasas de esfuerzo acumulado entre terremotos. En esta imagen cada herramienta para la predicción de terremotos. A mano derecha se ve el desplazamiento a lo largo de la Falla Lava Lake determinado del analisis de datos del satélite ERS-1. Poco después ocurrió el terremoto de

  6. Carla Guerrini 1 Equazioni differenziali ordinarie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrini, Carla

    popolazione di batteri posta in un ambiente limitato nel quale non possono convivere pi´u di B batteri crescita dei batteri sia pari a una costante C. In questo caso il cambia- mento della popolazione di batteri nel tempo sar´a proporzionale al numero di batteri preesistenti, modulato dal fatto che pi´u di B

  7. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the TRUPACT-II SAR. At the request of DOE and WTS, NRC has agreed to incorporate shielded containers TRU Solutions (WTS) is assembling the DOT Type A test report and analytical documentation for the shielded container. DOE-CBFO policy requires 3 rd party review of WTS' test report for the shielded

  8. NASA/CR-2001-211271 ICASE Interim Report No. 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2001-211271 ICASE Interim Report No. 39 Real Automation in the Field C6sar Mu_oz ICASE, Hampton, Virginia Micaela Mayero INRIA, Le Chesnay Cedex, France December 2001 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics

  9. NASA/CR-2000-209851 ICASE Report No. 2000-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2000-209851 ICASE Report No. 2000-4 Towards a Customizable PVS Gerald Liittgen and C_sar Mu_oz ICASE, Hampton, Virginia Ricky Butler, Ben Di Vito, and Paul Miner NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia January2000 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been

  10. The Use of Biologically Related Model (Eclipse) for the Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR, China for IMRT optimization. The use of biological related models has been proposed and can be a new trend. This work was to assess the performance of the biologically based IMRT optimization model installed

  11. PAPER www.rsc.org/dalton | Dalton Transactions Perfect polar stacking of parallel beloamphiphile layers. Synthesis, structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    times larger than that of urea. Optimization of the beloamphiphile and systematic SAR studies the performance of this new class of functional organic materials. The materials are organic semiconductors and show promise as blue emitters, as nonlinear optical materials and as OLED materials. Introduction Polar

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2000 2465 Estimation of Snow Water Equivalence Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    of Snow Water Equivalence Using SIR-C/X-SAR, Part I: Inferring Snow Density and Subsurface Properties Jiancheng Shi and Jeff Dozier Abstract--Algorithms for estimating dry snow density and the dielectric polarization at L-band frequency (1.25 GHz). Comparison with field measure- ments of snow density during

  13. Cortes-Barco AM, Goodwin PH, Hsiang T. in press. A comparison of induced resistance activated by benzothiadiazole, (2R,3R)-butanediol and an isoparaffin mixture against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    /ethylene (JA/ET)-dependent basal resistance. SAR can be induced in plants by activators produced by bacteria1 Cortes-Barco AM, Goodwin PH, Hsiang T. in press. A comparison of induced resistance activated Pathology. A comparison of induced resistance activated by benzothiadiazole, (2R,3R

  14. Molecular responses of Jurkat T-cells to 1763 MHz radiofrequency TAI-QIN HUANG1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    Molecular responses of Jurkat T-cells to 1763 MHz radiofrequency radiation TAI-QIN HUANG1 , MIN SU emitted radiofrequency (RF) radiation are the subject of intense study, yet the hypothesis that RF was not detected upon 1763 MHz RF radiation under 10 W/kg SAR for 24 h to Jurkat T cells. Keywords: Radiofrequency

  15. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 26 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1977-01-01

    'HISES WWJCLIFFE TlllANCH - John Hind, 14 ELngham Rd., l1adcliffe-on-'l'rent, Notts, NG12 2FY. '!'ho club for those with a zany sense of humour. S'!'AR TREK HfPOHl\\'iATION G!lOUP - Ross Carter, 29 Castle Hoad, Southsea, Portsmouth. O~rrCOR.i!1 - ~'racy Cooke, 67...

  16. UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Refined Freeman-Durden for Harvest Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    detection in rice paddy fields. However, harvest detection for other crops without a smooth underlying water#12;UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Refined Freeman-Durden for Harvest Detection using PolSAR data by Sina is one of the main challenges of the current century. Harvest detection, as an input for decision making

  17. 1950 B i M d l 1960 General Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rannacher, Rolf

    AFA 2001 TAR 2000 Earth System Models (ESMs) 2014 ARS Climate Research Meteo- rology Climate Change Atmosphere Ocean Models (AOGCMs) 1979 Charney Report 1990 FAR 1995 SAR 2007 AFA 2001 TAR 2000 Earth System Models (ESMs) 2014 ARS Climate Research Meteo- rology Climate Change Science and Policy 1 Cl Re Meteo

  18. 1736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: REGULAR PAPERS, VOL. 58, NO. 8, AUGUST 2011 Analysis of Power Consumption and Linearity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serdijn, Wouter A.

    binary-weighted structures, the linearity requirements impose much larger unit capacitance during the conversion phase. During the conversion phase, the SAR and control logic perform a binary analog input signal . In other words, during the first clock cycle in the conversion phase the comparator

  19. Second Order draft Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group III Do Not Cite or Quote 1 Summary for Policy Makers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increased by more than 50%, with CO2, being the largest source, having grown by about 60% (high confidence biomass Note: 100 year GWPs from IPCC 1996 (SAR) were used to convert emissions to CO2-eq. (cf. UNFCCC reporting guidelines).1 Pg CO2-eq = 1Gt CO2-eq Figure SPM.1: Global greenhouse gas emissions trends 1970

  20. Workshop on Intelligent Techniques for Spatio-Temporal Data Analysis in Environmental Applications, Chania, Greece, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Technology Center Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science The University of Kansas Lawrence it fuses the SAR-extracted features with digital grid climatology data and sea ice concentration data. The growth and decay of sea ice in the polar regions indicate changes in global weather patterns; and because

  1. Ris National Laboratory Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Postprint Wind Energy Department Year 2006 Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2006_96.pdf Wind resource assessment from C-band SAR Merete Bruun Christiansen a, Wolfgang Koch b, Jochen Horstmann b, Charlotte Bay Hasager a, Morten Nielsen a a Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 45, NO. 8, AUGUST 1998 1067 Finite-Difference Time-Domain Analysis of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagness, Susan C.

    risks of human exposure to electromagnetic fields is to set up controlled experiments wherein living-response experiments using the TEM cell should account for the possibility of strong localized SAR peaking Terms-- Absorbing media, biological cells, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation, biological

  3. Bacteriophage P1: a new paradigm for control of phage lysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Min

    2005-11-01

    is demonstrated to be both necessary and sufficient not only for export to the membrane but also for release into the periplasm of this endolysin. We propose that this unusual N-terminal domain functions as a "signal arrest- release" (SAR) sequence, which first...

  4. International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing, pages 907911, Nagoya, Japan, 14-18 October 2013.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In particular, syntactic information is being inte- grated either on the source or target or both side-18 October 2013. Influence of Part-of-Speech and Phrasal Category Universal Tag-set in Tree of Computer and Information Science, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China {olifran, derekfw, lidiasc

  5. Improved Radon Based Imaging using the Shearlet Transform Glenn R. Easleya, Flavia Colonnab, Demetrio Labatec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labate, Demetrio

    Improved Radon Based Imaging using the Shearlet Transform Glenn R. Easleya, Flavia Colonnab, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), can be described mathematically as col- lecting data in a Radon transform domain. The process of inverting the Radon transform to form an image can be unstable when the data

  6. ARTICLE IN PRESS 2 A method to produce evolving functional connectivity maps during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morettin, Pedro A.

    , Cerqueira Ce´sar, Sa~o Paulo, SP, CEP: 05403-001, 9 Sa~o Paulo, S.P., Brazil 10 c Brain Image Analysis Unit of Sa~o Paulo, Rua do Mata~o, 1010, Cidade Universita´ria, CEP 05508-090, Sa~o Paulo, S.P., Brazil 8 b

  7. Calcite dissolution and Ca/Na ion-exchange reactions in columns with different flow rates through high ESR soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarre, Audrey

    1999-01-01

    min?¹ under conditions of saturated flow. Column eluate was monitored for pH, carbonate alkalinity, and Na, Ca and Cl concentrations to evaluate the elution of SAR 10 solution, dissolution of CaCO? and exchange of Na by Ca on the cation...

  8. Fusion Engineering and Design 38 (1997) 159188 ARIES-RS magnet systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    section has been optimized, using innovative solutions to minimize the cross section and the cost. The sec the toroidal and poloidal field system for minimized size and cost, optimized structure and increased access-I due to the lower magnetic field. On the other hand, the problems in PUL- SAR with respect

  9. Thermal Image Analysis for Detecting Facemask Leakage Jonathan Dowdall*, Ioannis Pavlidis*, and James Levine#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syndrome (SARS), an area of overt concern has been the transmission of infection through respiratory leakage in masks based on the principles of heat transfer and thermodynamics. The advantage with elevated levels of transmission risk such as hospital clinics, border check points, and airports. Keywords

  10. Proceedings of the International Conference on Information and Automation, December 15-17, 2006, Colombo, Sri Lanka. 1 Sahana: Overview of a Disaster Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    , Colombo, Sri Lanka. 1 Sahana: Overview of a Disaster Management System Mifan Careem, Chamindra De Silva. it then describes the anatomy of the Sahana system. We follow up with a case study of Sahana deployment and lessons learned. I. INTRODUCTION Recent disasters such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, the 2004 Asian tsunami, the 2005

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Synergistic use of very high-frequency radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    carbon sequestration (Hyde et al. 2007; Lucas et al. 2000; Skole and Tucker 1993). The traditional field · Introduction Accurate estimation of aboveground bio- mass is essential to better understand the carbon cycleSAR . Scanning lidar. Profiling lidar. Aboveground biomass . Best subsets regression . Carbon 1 Introduction

  12. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19

    , providing a convenient animal model that can be investigated without the restrictions necessary to work with the SARS-coronavirus. A reverse genetic cDNA assembly system was developed for the betacoronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHVA59), in 2002...

  13. CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. MolecularEcology 1996,5,73-80 Compatibility of systemic acquired resistance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handelsman, Jo

    to pesticides for controlof plant diseases. SAR and Bacillus cereus UW85, a micro- bial biocontrol agent biocontrol for suppression of plant disease in a laboratory assay J. CHEN, L. M. JACOBSON, J. HANDELSMAN Abstract Systemic acquired resistance (SARI and microbial biocontrol each hold promise as alter- natives

  16. Open Access Data in Polar and Cryospheric Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, Allen; Rees, W. Gareth; Fox, Adrian J.; Fleming, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    , access, sharing and use. Keywords: polar; Arctic; Antarctic; cryosphere; glaciers; permafrost; snow; sea ice; data; open access; multispectral; SAR; passive microwave; airphot; scatterometry; DEMs; software OPEN ACCESS Remote Sens. 2014, 6 6184 1... equivalent, ocean circulation, tree line migration, permafrost lake dynamics, circumpolar environmental impact assessment or penguin populations, recent research has clearly demonstrated the increasing importance of Earth observation. Nevertheless, many...

  17. http://smap.jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    http://smap.jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology SMAP SAR* On-Orbit Misalignment Calibration Dynamics & Control, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA *Synthetic Aperture Radar #12;Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory California

  18. ExperimentalEvolutionofPathogens Vaughn S. Cooper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    multiple factors that could affect the pop- ulation biology of pathogens and ultimately favor certain Encyclopedia of Infectious Diseases: Modern Methodologies, by M.Tibayrenc Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons of a coronavirus capable of causing SARS (Chapter 9, this volume)? Modern biology typically probes these questions

  19. 242-A evaporator safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAMPBELL, T.A.

    1999-05-17

    This report provides a revised safety analysis for the upgraded 242-A Evaporator (the Evaporator). This safety analysis report (SAR) supports the operation of the Evaporator following life extension upgrades and other facility and operations upgrades (e.g., Project B-534) that were undertaken to enhance the capabilities of the Evaporator. The Evaporator has been classified as a moderate-hazard facility (Johnson 1990). The information contained in this SAR is based on information provided by 242-A Evaporator Operations, Westinghouse Hanford Company, site maintenance and operations contractor from June 1987 to October 1996, and the existing operating contractor, Waste Management Hanford (WMH) policies. Where appropriate, a discussion address the US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders applicable to a topic is provided. Operation of the facility will be compared to the operating contractor procedures using appropriate audits and appraisals. The following subsections provide introductory and background information, including a general description of the Evaporator facility and process, a description of the scope of this SAR revision,a nd a description of the basic changes made to the original SAR.

  20. A Visual Analytics Process for Maritime Resource Allocation and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Ross

    A Visual Analytics Process for Maritime Resource Allocation and Risk Assessment Abish Malik Ross provide mar- itime risk assessment tools that allow analysts to explore Coast Guard coverage for SAR by analysts at the Coast Guard Atlantic Area. Keywords: Visual analytics, risk assessment, Coast Guard 1

  1. MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design by Coupling to evaluate ligand binding with an obvious utility in structure-based drug discovery and design.7-10 The "SAR to bind a target protein while obtaining structure-related information as part of a struc- ture-based drug

  2. Could Ash Cloud or Deep-Sea Current Overwhelm the Internet? Rocky K. C. Chang, Edmond W. W. Chan, Weichao Li, Waiting W. T. Fok, and Xiapu Luo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Rocky Kow-Chuen

    Could Ash Cloud or Deep-Sea Current Overwhelm the Internet? Rocky K. C. Chang, Edmond W. W. Chan Hunghom, Hong Kong, SAR China Abstract In this paper, we are initially set out to evaluate how the ash the ash-cloud news. The paths under our monitoring were overloaded by taking on additional traffic

  3. Habitat use and population density of the houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata in Fuerteventura (Canary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    (Canary Islands) Luis M. Carrascal1 *, David Palomino2 , Javier Seoane3 and Ce´sar L. Alonso4 1 Department), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 45071 Toledo, Spain Abstract The houbara bustard in the Canary Islands- eventura (the largest island occupied by the species in the Canary archipelago, 1730 km2 ) and analyses its

  4. Contradiction in conservation of island ecosystems: plants, introduced herbivores and avian scavengers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donázar, José A.

    scavengers in the Canary Islands LAURA GANGOSO1, *, JOSE´ A. DONA´ ZAR1 , STEPHAN SCHOLZ2 , CE´ SAR J rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were introduced in the Canary Islands around 500 B.C. Barbary ground. It is urgently necessary to harmonize farming and conservation objectives in the Canary Islands. The impact

  5. Habitat use and population density of the houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata in Fuerteventura (Canary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Javier

    (Canary Islands) Luis M. Carrascal1 *, David Palomino2 , Javier Seoane3 and Ce´sar L. Alonso4 1 Department de Castilla-La Mancha, 45071 Toledo, Spain Abstract The houbara bustard in the Canary Islands- eventura (the largest island occupied by the species in the Canary archipelago, 1730 km2 ) and analyses its

  6. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  7. J. E. Ortiz, O. Puche, I. Rbano and L. F. Mazadiego (eds.) History of Research in Mineral Resources. Cuadernos del Museo Geominero, 13. Instituto Geolgico y Minero de Espaa, Madrid. ISBN 978-84-7840-856-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boni, Maria

    -84-7840-856-6 © Instituto Geológico y Minero de España 2011 Discovery anD mining history of the "calamine" in sW sar Calamine mining districts were: Buggerru-Planu Sartu, San Benedetto-Baueddu, San Giovanni-Seddas Moddizzis-Campo Pisano and Monteponi-Agruxiau. The main difference between the deposits was their iron content

  8. AFFILIATIONS: X. Li--GST, NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland; Zhang--Hurricane Research Division, AOML, NOAA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    at kilometer spa- tial resolution. However, the intense air­sea inter- action near the ocean surface cannot;radar that emits radar pulses that can penetrate through clouds. SAR then receives the radar back the ocean surface return--a process quite similar to the QuikSCAT scatterometer wind retrieval. As a result

  9. IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, Vol. 54, No. 6, December 2012 69 A Study of RF Dosimetry from Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    -frequency (RF) exposure caused by cell phones, where the position of the phone relative to the body is somewhat multiple antennas and radiate at different frequencies, ranging from 850 MHz to 2.4 GHz. Unlike radio radiating element and when one ignored the actual duty cycle of these meters did the SAR values exceed

  10. Specific Absorption Rate Studies of the Parallel Transmission of Inner-Volume Selective Excitations at 7 Tesla A. C. ZELINSKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    at 7 Tesla A. C. ZELINSKI 1 , L. M. ANGELONE 2 , V. K. GOYAL 1 , G. BONMASSAR 2 , E. ADALSTEINSSON 1 excitations via regional cancellation. Here, we study average and local SAR in a head model at 7 Tesla for 2D

  11. Lagrangian analysis of a tidal plume Initial Expansion of the Columbia River Tidal Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, David

    numerical model (with five mixing formulations) are tested. Model results are compared to SAR images and vessel radar data to verify that the predicted fron- tal properties are realistic. The models show, and it is important to include the horizontal gradient in F as well as surface slope in the pressure gradient driving

  12. e-mail: ymli@umac.mo Qingsong Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yangmin

    , Macao SAR, China Kinematic Analysis and Design of a New 3-DOF Translational Parallel Manipulator A new. The inverse kinematics, forward kinematics, and velocity analysis are performed and the singular and isotropic.1115/1.2198254 Keywords: parallel manipulators, mechanism design, kinematics, singularity, isotropy, workspace, dexterity

  13. CX-001827: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a 3-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR and Kinematic Structural AnalysisCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 04/27/2010Location(s): Washoe County, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  14. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 66876699, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/6687/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    occultation instruments is the implementation of open- loop signal tracking in the IGOR (TerraSAR-X) receiver- cessfully injected into a sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit at an altitude of about 514 km and about 97, 2010). In addition, the spacecraft is equipped with a laser communication instrument and the Tracking

  15. Three-dimensional deformation caused by the Bam, Iran, earthquake and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    Three-dimensional deformation caused by the Bam, Iran, earthquake and the origin of shallow slip on seismogenic faults. We derive the full vector displacement field due to the Bam, Iran, earthquake of moment on deformation associated with the Mw ¼ 6.5 Bam earthquake in Iran determined using the SAR data from the ERS

  16. International Journal of Engineering and Technical Research (IJETR) ISSN: 2321-0869, Volume-2, Issue-4, April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    and the approximate time of the plane to reach the ground. Additionally, Geographic Information System (GIS) helps considering the Gujarat state, India and suggest ways and means for SAR operations. Index Terms: Air drag, search and rescue operations, Geographic Information Systems, plane crash, Gujarat, India. I

  17. MacauMap: Tourism-Oriented Mobile GIS Application Robert P. Biuk-Aghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

    MacauMap: Tourism-Oriented Mobile GIS Application Robert P. Biuk-Aghai Faculty of Science GIS application. The selected target platform was PalmOS, meaning that personal digital assistants and Technology University of Macau P.O. Box 3001 Macau S.A.R., China Phone: (+853) 3974365 Fax: (+853) 838314

  18. MacauMap: Next Generation Mobile Traveling Assistant Robert P. Biuk-Aghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

    of the MacauMap handheld digital tourist guide application. MacauMap is a tourism-oriented map application existing GIS applications or programming libraries. Thus many design and implementation challenges were met and Information Science Faculty of Science and Technology University of Macau P.O. Box 3001 Macau S.A.R., China

  19. Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, 16 Mesoporous carbon with uniquely combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, and her Ph.D. in mechan- ical engineering from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST and mass transport characteristics for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells Received 25th September 2012

  20. Design of Coordination Polymer Gels as Stable Catalytic Systems Bengang Xing, Ming-Fai Choi, and Bing Xu*[a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Bengang

    Kong University of Science & Technology Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (SAR) (China) Fax: (852)2358-1594 EDesign of Coordination Polymer Gels as Stable Catalytic Systems Bengang Xing, Ming-Fai Choi irreversibly in dimethylsulfoxide via the creation of cross-linked, three- dimensional coordination polymer net

  1. Electrochimica Acta 51 (2006) 55245531 Effect of anode backing layer on the cell performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2006-01-01

    University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China Received 10 January 2006 direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), based on a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM), has received much the effect of hydrophobic polymer (i.e., FEP) content in the cathode DL on the cell performance of a H2-fed

  2. RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS CB, Provo, Utah 84602 ABSTRACT RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR SWA images of Hurricane Katrina are used-band polarization ratio models have been proposed, none have been well verified in hurricane conditions. Although C

  3. The ionic charge of Copper-64 complexes conjugated to an engineered antibody effects biodistribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dearling, Jason L. J.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Paterson, Brett M.; Akurathi, Vamisidhar; Betanzos-Lara, Soledad; Treves, S. Ted; Voss, Stephan D.; White, Jonathan M.; Huston, James S.; Donnelly, Paul S.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The development of biomolecules as imaging probes requires radiolabeling methods that do not significantly influence their biodistribution. Sarcophagine (Sar) chelators form extremely stable complexes with copper, and are therefore a promising option for labeling proteins with ??Cu. However, initial studies using the first-generation sarcophagine bifunctional chelator SarAr to label the engineered antibody fragment ch14.18-?CH2 (MW 120 kDa) with ??Cu showed high tracer retention in the kidneys,(>38% injected dose per gram (ID/g) 48 h post-injection), presumably because the high local positive charge on the CuII-SarAr moiety resulted in increased binding of the labeled protein to the negatively charged basal cells ofmore »the glomerulus. To test this hypothesis, ch14.18-?CH2 was conjugated with a series of Sar derivatives of decreasing positive charge and three commonly used macrocyclic polyaza polycarboxylate (PAC) BFCs. The immunoconjugates were labeled with ??Cu and injected into mice, and PET/CT images were obtained at 24 and 48 h post injection (p.i.). At 48 h p.i., ex vivo biodistribution was carried out. In addition, to demonstrate the potential of metastasis detection using ??Cu-labeled ch14.18-?CH2, a preclinical imaging study of intrahepatic neuroblastoma tumors was performed carried out. Reducing the positive charge on the Sar chelators decreased kidney uptake of Cu-labeled ch14.18-?CH2 by more than 6-fold, from >45 ID/g to H2 in neuroblastoma hepatic metastases was detected using PET.« less

  4. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  5. Waveform Synthesizer For Imaging And Ranging Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Dudley, Peter A. (Albuquerque, NM); Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Tise, Bertice L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-12-28

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for Local Oscillator (LO) feed-through. An operational procedure filters LO feed-through effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver, unwanted energies, such as LO feed-through energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of LO feed-through can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  6. Waveform Synthesizer For Imaging And Ranging Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DUDLEY, PETER A.; [et al

    2004-11-30

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance. An operational procedure filters imbalance effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of quadrature imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  7. Rocky Flats Plant Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolosi, S.L.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of the Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report (RAR) is to provide an authorization basis for operation as required by DOE 5480.16. The existing Live-Fire Range does not have a safety analysis-related authorization basis. EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. has worked with DOE and its representatives to develop a format and content description for development of an RAR for the Live-Fire Range. Development of the RAR is closely aligned with development of the design for a baffle system to control risks from errant projectiles. DOE 5480.16 requires either an RAR or a safety analysis report (SAR) for live-fire ranges. An RAR rather than a SAR was selected in order to gain flexibility to more closely address the safety analysis and conduct of operation needs for a live-fire range in a cost-effective manner.

  8. Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

  9. Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

  10. Iterative Self-Dual Reconstruction on Radar Image Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Charles; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela; Bezerra, Francisco; Marques, Regis; Mascarenhas, Nelson

    2010-05-21

    Imaging systems as ultrasound, sonar, laser and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are subjected to speckle noise during image acquisition. Before analyzing these images, it is often necessary to remove the speckle noise using filters. We combine properties of two mathematical morphology filters with speckle statistics to propose a signal-dependent noise filter to multiplicative noise. We describe a multiscale scheme that preserves sharp edges while it smooths homogeneous areas, by combining local statistics with two mathematical morphology filters: the alternating sequential and the self-dual reconstruction algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to varying window sizes when applied to simulated and real SAR images in comparison with standard filters.

  11. UPDATING THE NRC STANDARD REVIEW PLAN - CHAPTER 8 - ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN,K.

    2007-06-24

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (Reference 2), provides guidance to the regulatory staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on performing their safety reviews of applications to construct or operate nuclear power plants, and applications to approve standard designs and sites for nuclear power plants. Chapter 8 of the SRP provides guidance related to the review of station electrical distribution systems described by the applicant in its Design Control Document (DCD) or Safety Analysis Report (SAR). As part of the 2006-2007 SAR update, all sections in this Chapter (8.1, 8.2, 8.3.1, 8.3.2, Appendix 8A, and Appendix 8B) were revised to incorporate new analyses, design approaches, and the lessons learned from the review of the AP 1000 design certification and to assure consistency with the draft Regulatory Guide DG-1145, ''Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants (LWR Edition)''.

  12. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dabala, Dana [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Neamtu, Camelia, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Vasile, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  13. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  14. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  15. Compact antenna arrays with wide bandwidth and low sidelobe levels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2014-09-09

    Highly efficient, low cost, easily manufactured SAR antenna arrays with lightweight low profiles, large instantaneous bandwidths and low SLL are disclosed. The array topology provides all necessary circuitry within the available antenna aperture space and between the layers of material that comprise the aperture. Bandwidths of 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz, with 30 dB SLLs azimuthally and elevationally, and radiation efficiencies above 40% may be achieved. Operation over much larger bandwidths is possible as well.

  16. Supporting Information StructureBased Optimization of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Conformational analysis data S8 Time series of van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies S9 SAR 0.6 BMPR1A 51 BMPR1B 0.9 BMX 55 BRK 12 DDR1 1.4 DDR2 21 EGFR 8.6 EPHA6 40 EPHB4 1.2 EPHB6 32 ERBB2 Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the methyl of compound 66 and the side chains

  17. Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

  18. Overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R.J.; Stoddart, W.C.; Burnett, W.A.; Beavers, J.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the Department of Energy (DOE). The overview describes the original design, the seismic evaluations performed for the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) issued in 1985, and current evaluations and designs to address revised DOE requirements. Future plans to ensure changes in requirements and knowledge are addressed.

  19. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  20. Natural resource appropriation in cooperative artisanal fishing between fishermen and dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Laguna, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

    (Tursiops truncatus) in Laguna, Brazil De´bora Peterson a,*, Natalia Hanazaki a , Paulo Ce´sar Simo/ECZ, Floriano´polis, SC 88010-970, Brazil b Laborato´rio de Mami´feros Aqua´ticos, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, CCB/ECZ, Floriano´polis, SC 88010-970, Brazil a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available

  1. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  2. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian M.; Xue, Kai; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; McGrath, Steve; Storkey, Jonathan; et al

    2015-04-07

    Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receivingmore »nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P z values also varied significantly with different functional genes involved in carbon (C), N, P, and sulfur (S) cycling and with various phylogenetic groups (archaea, bacteria, and fungi). Similarly, the plant SARs increased significantly (P « less

  3. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D. J.; Baek, J. S.; Hanson, A. L.; Cheng, L-Y; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  4. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  5. PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration batch, which included 5%, 50%, and 95% dose likelihood, and the sensitivity of each assumption to the calculated doses. As one would intuitively expect, the doses from the probabilistic assessment for most scenarios were found to be much less than the deterministic assessment. The lower dose of the probabilistic assessment can be attributed to a ''smearing'' of values from the high and low end of the PDF spectrum of the various input parameters. The analysis also found a potential weakness in the deterministic analysis used in the SAR, a detail on drum loading was not taken into consideration. Waste emplacement operations thus far have handled drums from each shipment as a single unit, i.e. drums from each shipment are kept together. Shipments typically come from a single waste stream, and therefore the curie loading of each drum can be considered nearly identical to that of its neighbor. Calculations show that if there are large numbers of drums used in the accident scenario assessment, e.g. 28 drums in the waste hoist failure scenario (CH5), then the probabilistic dose assessment calculations will diverge from the deterministically determined doses. As it is currently calculated, the deterministic dose assessment assumes one drum loaded to the maximum allowable (80 PE-Ci), and the remaining are 10% of the maximum. The effective average of drum curie content is therefore less in the deterministic assessment than the probabilistic assessment for a large number of drums. EEG recommends that the WIPP SAR calculations be revisited and updated to include a probabilistic safety assessment.

  6. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  7. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  8. Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2013-09-25

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

  9. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadat, M E [University of Cincinnati; Patel, Ronak [University of Cincinnati; Sookoor, Jason [University of Cincinnati; Bud'ko, Sergey L [Ames Laboratory; Ewing, Rodney C [Stanford University; Zhang, Jiaming [Stanford University; Xu, Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Wang, Yilong [Tongji University School of Medicine; Pauletti, Giovanni M [University of Cincinnati; Mast, David B [University of Cincinnati; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  10. Systemic, local, and imaging biomarkers of brain injury: more needed, and better use of those already established?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Czosnyka, Marek; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Newcombe, Virginia F. J.; Helmy, Adel; Shannon, Richard J.; Budohoski, Karol P.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, Thomas Adrian; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2015-02-18

    , cerebral metabolic rate of glucose; CMRO2, cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen; CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure; GABA, gamma-aminobutyric acid; ICP, intracranial pressure; i.v., intravenous; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy; NAA, N-acetylaspartate; PbtO2... to surface coils, because of the radio-frequency power absorption by the brain as a consequence of decoupling 1H from the 13C to achieve an interpretable 13C spectrum. The specific absorption rate (SAR) limit to minimize heating of tissue is especially...

  11. Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keser, Saniye; Duzgun, Sebnem; Aksoy, Aysegul

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to plan waste management activities at local scale including waste minimization, collection, treatment, and disposal. At global scale, the MSW generation rates in Turkey are significantly related to unemployment rate and asphalt-paved roads ratio. Yet, significances of these variables may diminish at local scale for some provinces. At local scale, different factors may be important in affecting MSW generation rates.

  12. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    9 15 4 3 1 2 13 10 11 12 1. Buoy J 2. ATBA 3. WSJF 4. ESJF 5. Rosario 6. Guemes 7. Saddlebag 8.0% 3.3% 4.5% 11.1% 7.4% 8.2% 13.3% 14.0% 14.7% 27.0% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Buoy J : +0.0% | x 1.0% 0.5% 1.8% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% Buoy J : +0.0% ATBA : +0.0% Sar/Skagit : +0.0% SJIslands : +0

  13. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    9 15 4 3 1 2 13 10 11 12 1. Buoy J 2. ATBA 3. WSJF 4. ESJF 5. Rosario 6. Guemes 7. Saddlebag 8.2% 3.3% 3.5% 5.2% 7.1% 8.8% 13.0% 14.1% 16.2% 25.2% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Buoy J : 0.0% | x 1.1% 2.1% 0.0% 0% 1% 1% 2% 2% 3% Buoy J : +0.0% ATBA : +0.0% Sar/Skagit : +0.0% SJIslands : +0.0% Tac

  14. VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    - PCF Draft #12;DEFINITION OF 15 WATERWAY ZONES 6 5 7 8 9 15 4 3 1 2 13 10 11 12 1. Buoy J 2. ATBA 3 : 0.0% | x 0.89 Buoy J : +0.5% | x 1.63 Saddlebag : +1.5% | x 1.62 Georgia Str. : +0.8% | x 1.27 ESJF.0% 6.5% 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% 7.0% ATBA : +0.0% Sar/Skagit : +0.0% SJIslands : +0.0% Buoy

  15. Neutronics model of the bulk shielding reactor (BSR): validation by comparison of calculations with the experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Miller, L.F.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1981-05-01

    A neutronics model for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bulk Shielding Reactor (ORNL-SAR) was developed and verified by experimental measurements. A cross-section library was generated from the 218 group Master Library using the AMPX Block Code system. A series of one-, two-, and three-dimensional neutronics calculations were performed utilizing both transport and diffusion theory. Spectral comparison was made with /sup 58/Ni(n,p) reaction. The results of the comparison between the calculational model and other experimental measurements showed agreement within 10% and therefore the model was determined to be adequate for calculating the neutron fluence for future irradiation experiments in the ORNL-BSR.

  16. The Department of Human Genetics Presents 2015 Marjorie I. and Bernard A. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad, Yoav

    Bed Cyp Bed Syr Spa BaS Sau Dru Cre Ukr Eth Pal Sar Ire Alg CroFre ItS Fre FIN Orc Abk Hun Geo Ukr Ady Mac Chu Hun Tur BaS Cre Cre Est Cre Fre Cre Lib Pal PolSwe Rus Cro Dru Mrd Orc Fre Cro Irn Fre Sao MorN FIN Kur Orc Sau Sao Cyp Leb Gre Chu Pel LSF Fin Yem Den Gre Kab OsNBlk LSF Cro Den Orc RusChu Ady Cre

  17. Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehm, J.R.; Deobald, T.L.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-05-23

    This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings.

  18. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  19. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  20. Belleville-Breese folio, Illinois 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udden, Johan August, 1859-1932.; Shaw, E. W. (Eugene Wesley), 1881-1935.

    1915-01-01

    libre de manera segura E-144S 11/08 Jenna Anding Lider de Programa de Extensi?n y Profesora Asociada de Nutrici?n y Ciencia Alimentaria, El Sistema Texas A&M A sar alimentos a la parrilla al aire libre es una manera divertida de cocinar para la... asar a la parrilla para asegurar un ?rea de trabajo limpio y preparaci?n de segura de los alimentos. Antes de empezar Escoja carne, carne de ave o mariscos que sean frescos y de alta calidad. Una vez que la compre, ll?vesela a casa y refrig...

  1. Field tests of a small instrumented pile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01

    vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

  2. Correlation of gravity anomalies and geology in the San Antonio region, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Patrick Thomas

    1968-01-01

    ?al, Kendall? Bl;!nco, encl Gil- lc. spic cour?tie . It is bouncled b? latitudes 29 00 ' encl 30o 07 ' 30" ir], and long. ' tiides 98c' 22 ' 30" V and 98o '5 ' iri. C] ties w] thin i l?c. ai-ea are Sar. Ant, nio, Bocrrnc r Blat?co, anrlr dohnson Ci Ly... zone of the Ouachita belt. The axis of this maximum is located at about 29o 00 ' N latitude in the area shown on the gravity map (Pl. I). South of thc axis the gravity anomaly values decrease gently toward the Gulf. coast, according to regional...

  3. Microsoft Word - Permit Change 10-23-08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates on Gas5 15NEWSQuickMayth reSAR.doc

  4. SATEC Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR Jump to:SATEC

  5. SC Johnson Waxdale Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR Jump

  6. SCC Americas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR JumpSCC

  7. SCI Engineered Materials Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR JumpSCCSCI

  8. SCIENTIA Group, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|GasRugbyRuthton WindSAR

  9. Category:SRT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR Jump to:SRT

  10. Category:SWERA Map Files | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR Jump

  11. Category:SWIR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR JumpSWIR Jump

  12. Category:Sanyal Temperature Classification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR JumpSWIR

  13. Category:Self Potential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR JumpSWIRSelf

  14. Category:Silica Geothermometers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density JumpSAR

  15. PUCT DG Interconnection Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR Jump

  16. PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR JumpPUD No

  17. PVNext Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR JumpPUD

  18. PVT Austria Gmbh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR JumpPUDPVT

  19. PVWatts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: Energy ResourcesLLCPPLPSInSAR

  20. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of He isotopesConcept TestingBradysInSAR and

  1. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of He isotopesConcept TestingBradysInSAR

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Integrated Military Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScienceElectromagneticsNewsVideoSAR Sandia

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Jeff Brinker elected a Fellow of National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScienceElectromagneticsNewsVideoSAR SandiaAcademy

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: LabNews Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScienceElectromagneticsNewsVideoSAR

  5. Occupational radiation dose assessment for a non site specific spent fuel storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Eble, R.G. Jr. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) the Department of Energy has completed a phase I CISF Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the phase I CISF if a site is designated. An occupational radiation does assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the phase I CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store SNF in dual-purpose cask/canister systems (DPC`s). Currently there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant ISFSI and transport cask handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend ALARA techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: Dose estimates from vendor SAR`s; ISFSI experience with similar systems; Traditional methods of operations; Expected CISF cask receipt rates; and feasible ALARA techniques. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

  7. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore »true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  8. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian M.; Xue, Kai; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; McGrath, Steve; Storkey, Jonathan; et al

    2015-04-07

    Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receivingmore »nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P « less

  9. Waveform synthesis for imaging and ranging applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Dudley, Peter A.; Dubert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2004-12-07

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance and Local Oscillator (LO) feed-through. An operational procedure filters imbalance and LO feed-through effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as LO feed-through and/or imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of LO feed-through and imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  10. HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model enhancements for plume rise and dispersion around buildings, lift-off of buoyant plumes, and robustness of numerical solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, S.R.; Chang, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model was developed for use in preparing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) by estimating the consequences of possible accidental releases of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) located in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. Although the latter report carries a 1996 date, the work that is described was completed in late 1994. When that report was written, the primary release scenarios of interest were thought to be gas pipeline and liquid tank ruptures over open terrain away from the influence of buildings. However, upon further analysis of possible release scenarios, the developers of the SARs decided it was necessary to also consider accidental releases within buildings. Consequently, during the fall and winter of 1995-96, modules were added to HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} to account for flow and dispersion around buildings. The original HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model also contained a preliminary method for accounting for the possible lift-off of ground-based buoyant plumes. An improved model and a new set of wind tunnel data for buoyant plumes trapped in building recirculation cavities have become available that appear to be useful for revising the lift-off algorithm and modifying it for use in recirculation cavities. This improved lift-off model has been incorporated in the updated modules for dispersion around buildings.

  11. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Daddy, E-mail: d.setyawan@bapeten.go.id [Center for Assessment of Regulatory System and Technology for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia); Rohman, Budi [Licensing Directorate for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  12. Measurements of ionospheric effects on wideband signals at VHF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1998-08-17

    Radars operating at very high frequency (VHF) have enhanced foliage and ground penetration compared to radars operated at higher frequencies. For example, VHF systems operated from airplanes have been used as synthetic aperture radars (SAR); a satellite-borne VHF SAR would have considerable utility. In order to operate with high resolution it would have to use both a large relative bandwidth and a large aperture. A satellite-borne radar would likely have to operate at altitudes above the maximum density of the ionosphere; the presence of the ionosphere in the propagation path of the radar will cause a deterioration of the performance because of dispersion over the bandwidth. The author presents measurements of the effects of the ionosphere on radar signals propagated from a source on the surface of the Earth and received by instruments on the FORTE satellite at altitudes of 800 km. The author employs signals with a 90 MHz bandwidth centered at 240 MHz with a continuous digital recording period of 0.6 s.

  13. On the detection of crevasses in glacial ice with synthetic-aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.

    2010-02-01

    The intent of this study is to provide an analysis of the scattering from a crevasse in Antarctic ice, utilizing a physics-based model for the scattering process. Of primary interest is a crevasse covered with a snow bridge, which makes the crevasse undetectable in visible-light images. It is demonstrated that a crevasse covered with a snow bridge can be visible in synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images. The model of the crevasse and snow bridge incorporates a complex dielectric permittivity model for dry snow and ice that takes into account the density profile of the glacier. The surface structure is based on a fractal model that can produce sastrugi-like features found on the surface of Antarctic glaciers. Simulated phase histories, computed with the Shooting and Bouncing Ray (SBR) method, are processed into SAR images. The viability of the SBR method for predicting scattering from a crevasse covered with a snow bridge is demonstrated. Some suggestions for improving the model are given.

  14. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

  15. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

  16. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy Pfr conformer reverses this activity upon initial light exposure, inducing the switch to photomorphogenic development. This reversal involves light-triggered translocation of the photoactivated phy molecule into the nucleus where it interacts with PIF-family members, inducing rapid phosphorylation and degradation of the PIFs via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This degradation in turn elicits rapid alterations in gene expression that drive the deetiolation transition. This project has made considerable progress in defining phy-PIF signaling activity in controlling the SAR. The biological functions of the multiple PIF-family members in controlling the SAR, including dissection of the relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this process, as well as to diurnal growth-control oscillations, have been investigated using higher-order pif-mutant combinations. Using microarray analysis of a quadruple pif mutant we have defined the shade-induced, PIF-regulated transcriptional network genome-wide. This has revealed that a dynamic antagonism between the phys and PIFs generates selective reciprocal responses during deetiolation and the SAR in a rapidly light-responsive transcriptional network. Using integrated RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis of higher order pif-mutant combinations, we have defined the direct gene-targets of PIF transcriptional regulation, and have obtained evidence that this regulation involves differential direct targeting of rapidly light-responsive genes by the individual PIF-family members. This project has provided significant advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the phy-PIF photosensory signaling pathway regulates an important bioenergy-related plant response to the light environment. The identification of molecular targets in the primary transcriptional-regulatory circuitry of this pathway has the potential to enable genetic or reverse-genetic manipulation of the partitioning of carbon between reproductive and vegetative (cellulose-accumulating) tissue, toward enhanced bioenergy yield.

  17. Mr & Mrs Vernon Wright Scholarship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    %e nriter niehee te onseeee l4e ayyeaeiatiea ta Sr~ C E, '%Cakier, l3eaa ef the Selac@ of VooationaX %ealCkg, nnser ehaee Liroetken thin thaeie hae baca yseyaxeL? far nie cdk anL haiggaX euggaehienem ta tha fialioehag naeihann of tha..., and eheulk bo xegaixed Co 4e aQ. ihe oyoxatione in +hie@ he hae not aXxoadg aoyd. sod ekLX3 ke a mQe, ee Sar ae yoeaLM?, the elsa5eNAa ~ he xeyaized to 4e aXX oX' the neck themlaLvee~ boeenee veoatdosaL egeiceLtavaX o4noatioa ~ tsisee to 4ew4oy beth mn...

  18. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility vacuum and purge system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Vacuum and Purge System (VPS) . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the VPS equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  19. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  20. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R.

    2009-04-10

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  1. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01

    Viajel Bnrrett, William Shatner, Jamefl Doohan, George Takei, Susan Sacl(ett, Grace Lee Whitney 1 Ann :;::!cCaffrey, Anne Pngo. *?X??;f?********?***?>t?x-* DUES U.K~ ;l~1.50 per yO~lr. Europe ?2 J!rint.ecl r9,+'0, ?3.50 8i:rmail let.?~Br r2t.~1. U.,S.1\\.. ?6... that the fil'" we shot so far is defini tely SIJ.Y~R TREK. We I VG had that 831',18 comr.l0nt from 0veryone v/h~)f s looked at it, that the}' rc happily surprised to SOG it is indeGd t~10 sar

  2. North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.M. Ruonavaara

    1995-01-18

    The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

  3. A study of the condensation of primary, secondary, and tertiary butyl alcohols with benzene in the presence of anhydrous ferric chloride 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Ralph Jordan

    1939-01-01

    with aresatio hg4rosoxboas aeso those shish ooataiao4 the QK greay aituate4 aloes be a 4oohlo boa4 (4) yatosse oa4 yileti, Xloyfer, 8K ~ 5I 5btV (1899) (V) 8ohlaa ao4 Kleyfor, Sar, , ~58 5150 (1899) ~ (8} Khstisoht ao4 PoLaositeh, ~, ~ 5104 (1909} (9...) Huetoa oa4 yx4o4ssouai ~ 5995 (1954) ~ Bootes, sosis, oa4 0roh~at, ibb4, ~ 1555 (195t) g Raelea oa4 Lssis, ~. ~ ~55 SSty (1951) g Rsstca os4 Boat, ~, ~ 1505 (1955}} ~ oa4 stsisuoe, ~b. , ~ 481' (1955} g Bustoa 0eamteat ea4 sasOaL11+ ibbL, ~58 4484...

  4. Estimations of local thermal impact on living organisms irradiated by non-thermal microwaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatalov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Pennes' differential equation for bioheat transfer and the heat transfer equation are solved for the temperature distribution in a living tissue with spherical inclusions, irradiated by microwave power. It is shown that relative temperature excess in a small inclusion in the tissue in some cases is inversely proportional to its radius and does not depend on the applied power. In pulsing RF fields the effect is amplified proportionally to the ratio of the pulse period to the pulse duration. The local temperature rise significantly outpaces the averaged one and therefore the Watt to Weight SAR limits may be insufficient to estimate the safety of RF radiation and the conventional division of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on the thermal and non-thermal needs to be revised.

  5. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Using architectures for semantic interoperability to create journal clubs for emergency response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Linn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Mark L B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In certain types of 'slow burn' emergencies, careful accumulation and evaluation of information can offer a crucial advantage. The SARS outbreak in the first decade of the 21st century was such an event, and ad hoc journal clubs played a critical role in assisting scientific and technical responders in identifying and developing various strategies for halting what could have become a dangerous pandemic. This research-in-progress paper describes a process for leveraging emerging semantic web and digital library architectures and standards to (1) create a focused collection of bibliographic metadata, (2) extract semantic information, (3) convert it to the Resource Description Framework /Extensible Markup Language (RDF/XML), and (4) integrate it so that scientific and technical responders can share and explore critical information in the collections.

  7. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  8. Methodology assessment and recommendations for the Mars science laboratory launch safety analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Powers, Dana Auburn; Atcitty, Christopher B.; Robinson, David B; Hewson, John C.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Dodson, Brian W.; Potter, Donald L.; Kelly, John E.; MacLean, Heather J.; Bergeron, Kenneth Donald; Bessette, Gregory Carl; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2006-09-01

    The Department of Energy has assigned to Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility of producing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the plutonium-dioxide fueled Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) proposed to be used in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) is anticipating a launch in fall of 2009, and the SAR will play a critical role in the launch approval process. As in past safety evaluations of MMRTG missions, a wide range of potential accident conditions differing widely in probability and seventy must be considered, and the resulting risk to the public will be presented in the form of probability distribution functions of health effects in terms of latent cancer fatalities. The basic descriptions of accident cases will be provided by NASA in the MSL SAR Databook for the mission, and on the basis of these descriptions, Sandia will apply a variety of sophisticated computational simulation tools to evaluate the potential release of plutonium dioxide, its transport to human populations, and the consequent health effects. The first step in carrying out this project is to evaluate the existing computational analysis tools (computer codes) for suitability to the analysis and, when appropriate, to identify areas where modifications or improvements are warranted. The overall calculation of health risks can be divided into three levels of analysis. Level A involves detailed simulations of the interactions of the MMRTG or its components with the broad range of insults (e.g., shrapnel, blast waves, fires) posed by the various accident environments. There are a number of candidate codes for this level; they are typically high resolution computational simulation tools that capture details of each type of interaction and that can predict damage and plutonium dioxide release for a range of choices of controlling parameters. Level B utilizes these detailed results to study many thousands of possible event sequences and to build up a statistical representation of the releases for each accident case. A code to carry out this process will have to be developed or adapted from previous MMRTG missions. Finally, Level C translates the release (or ''source term'') information from Level B into public risk by applying models for atmospheric transport and the health consequences of exposure to the released plutonium dioxide. A number of candidate codes for this level of analysis are available. This report surveys the range of available codes and tools for each of these levels and makes recommendations for which choices are best for the MSL mission. It also identities areas where improvements to the codes are needed. In some cases a second tier of codes may be identified to provide supporting or clarifying insight about particular issues. The main focus of the methodology assessment is to identify a suite of computational tools that can produce a high quality SAR that can be successfully reviewed by external bodies (such as the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel) on the schedule established by NASA and DOE.

  9. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  10. Safety review advisor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boshers, J.A.; Alguindigue, I.E.; Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Burnett, C.G. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The University of Tennessee's Nuclear Engineering Department, in cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), is evaluating the feasibility of utilizing an expert system to aid in 10CFR50.59 evaluations. This paper discusses the history of 10CFR50.59 reviews, and details the development approach used in the construction of a prototype Safety Review Advisor (SRA). The goals for this expert system prototype are to (1) aid the engineer in the evaluation process by directing his attention to the appropriate critical issues, (2) increase the efficiency, consistency, and thoroughness of the evaluation process, and (3) provide a foundation of appropriate Safety Analysis Report (SAR) references for the reviewer. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Geology of the Pontotoc area, Mason, Llano, and San Saba counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gontko, Robert Nicholas

    1962-01-01

    SROXiOSX SS' TRR PORTOTOO ARRAp RASOR, XLARO, ARR RAR SARA OOSRTXRS, TRXAS Ry' RGSRST RXOROLAS OOlFgKO SehsAtie4 Co Qae QeahaaSo School at She isa'fealeoo'al osd Neehoakeel OolleSo of Tesao fa yosiiai fultillaoae et Sho eeS~aSo toe She Oegaee... of RASTRR IN' SCXRSOR lQSS Sages SohgoeSI Seelem OR@OOF OP %R POSI0%90 kl8kg xaae, xaum, am sar azaa cornea@, mxaa k Thoaie ROSRRT SZOROXkl QOITKO Ayyteted aa W etj1e and een4ea4 ~s FRONTISPIECE The Llano basin. View to the south from road cut...

  12. Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.; Shinn, J.; Hesse, D; Kaninich, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mubayi, V.

    1997-08-01

    The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

  13. Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farrell, R.F. [Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This qualitative hazard evaluation systematically assessed potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Postulated accidents included the spontaneous ignition of a waste drum, puncture of a waste drum by a forklift, dropping of a waste drum from a forklift, and simultaneous dropping of seven drums during a crane failure. The descriptions and estimated frequencies of occurrence for these accidents were developed by the Hazard and Operability Study for CH TRU Waste Handling System (WCAP 14312). The estimated materials at risk, damage ratios, airborne release fractions and respirable fractions for these accidents were taken from the 1995 Safety Analysis Report (SAR) update and from the DOE handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities (DOE-HDBK-3010-94). A Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the range of worker exposures that could result from each accident. Guidelines for evaluating the adequacy of defense-in-depth for worker protection at WIPP were adopted from a scheme presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in its publication on Protection from Potential Exposure: A Conceptual Framework (ICRP Publication 64). Probabilities of exposures greater than 5, 50, and 300 rem were less than 10{sup -2}, 10{sup -4}, and 10{sup -6} per year, respectively. In conformance with the guidance of DOE standard 3009-94, Appendix A (draft), we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposure under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, as well as members of the public and the environment.

  14. Safety Assessment for a Surface Repository in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - Methodology for Assessing Disposal under Intervention Conditions - 13476

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haverkamp, B.; Krone, J.; Shybetskyi, I.

    2013-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (RWDF) Buryakovka was constructed in 1986 as part of the intervention measures after the accident at Chernobyl NPP (ChNPP). Today, RWDF Buryakovka is still being operated but its maximum capacity is nearly reached. Plans for enlargement of the facility exist since more than 10 years but have not been implemented yet. In the framework of an European Commission Project DBE Technology GmbH prepared a safety analysis report of the facility in its current state (SAR) and a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) based on the planned enlargement. Due to its history RWDF Buryakovka does not fully comply with today's best international practices and the latest Ukrainian regulations in this area. The most critical aspects are its inventory of long-lived radionuclides, and the non-existent multi-barrier waste confinement system. A significant part of the project was dedicated, therefore, to the development of a methodology for the safety assessment taking into consideration the facility's special situation and to reach an agreement with all stakeholders involved in the later review and approval procedure of the safety analysis reports. Main aspect of the agreed methodology was to analyze the safety, not strictly based on regulatory requirements but on the assessment of the actual situation of the facility including its location within the Exclusion Zone. For both safety analysis reports, SAR and PSAR, the assessment of the long-term safety led to results that were either within regulatory limits or within the limits allowing for a specific situational evaluation by the regulator. (authors)

  15. Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2009-02-13

    The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

  16. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more »into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  17. Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

  18. Criticality Safety Analysis Of As-loaded Spent Nuclear Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Scaglione, John M

    2015-01-01

    The final safety analysis report (FSAR) or the safety analysis report (SAR) for a particular spent nuclear fuel (SNF) cask system documents models and calculations used to demonstrate that a system meets the regulatory requirements under all normal, off-normal, and accident conditions of spent fuel storage, and normal and accident conditions of transportation. FSAR/SAR calculations and approved content specifications are intended to be bounding in nature to certify cask systems for a variety of fuel characteristics with simplified SNF loading requirements. Therefore, in general, loaded cask systems possess excess and uncredited criticality margins (i.e., the difference between the licensing basis and the as-loaded calculations). This uncredited margin could be quantified by employing more detailed cask-specific evaluations that credit the actual as-loaded cask inventory, and taking into account full (actinide and fission product) burnup credit. This uncredited criticality margin could be potentially used to offset (1) uncertainties in the safety basis that needs to account for the effects of system aging during extended dry storage prior to transportation, and (2) increases in SNF system reactivity over a repository performance period (e.g., 10,000 years or more) as the system undergoes degradation and internal geometry changes. This paper summarizes an assessment of cask-specific, as-loaded criticality margins for SNF stored at eight reactor sites (215 loaded casks were analyzed) under fully flooded conditions to assess the margins available during transportation after extended storage. It is observed that the calculated keff margin varies from 0.05 to almost 0.3 keff for the eight selected reactor sites, demonstrating that significant uncredited safety margins are present. In addition, this paper evaluates the sufficiency of this excess margin in applications involving direct disposal of currently loaded SNF casks.

  19. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-10-01

    No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R&D) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes, such as standards maintenance, performance measures, assessments, corrective actions, lessons-learned, and training. In conjunction with the Directives Program, the use of the voluntary environmental management system, ISO 14001, was evaluated. This includes the only international environmental management standard to which an entity can be certified. NETL is using the specifications and guidance from this standard to identify an effective environmental management system for the NETL sites. An outside consultant performed an environmental management system assessment (also referred to as an initial environmental review), as referenced in ISO 14004. The objective of the assessment was to determine the degree to which NETL's existing integrated safety management system (ISMS), safety analysis review system (SARS), and environmental management programs conformed with the ISO14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) standard and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Code of Environmental Management Principles. A performance measurement system continued to be maintained during 2001 to assist in evaluating how effectively activities at NETL meet mission-critical goals and how well missions and strategies are connected in the DOE strategic plan. This system also provides data to assist in gauging performance against the DOE critical success factors, that is, performance against technical objectives. Various environmental milestones can be tracked to completion, thus giving NETL measures by which to gauge the sites' goals of remaining in regulatory compliance and achieving best-in-class environmental performance.

  20. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  1. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

  2. A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

    2013-01-01

    Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

  3. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Dudley, Peter A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-21

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  4. A Comprehensive Collection of Systems Biology Data Characterizing the Host Response to Viral Infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese RW; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale L.; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  5. Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Tatsuya; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is foreseen to be upgraded during the shut-down period of 2018-2019 to deliver about 3 times the instantaneous design luminosity. Since the ATLAS trigger system, at that time, will not support such an increase of the trigger rate an improvement of the trigger system is required. The ATLAS LAr Calorimeter readout will therefore be modified and digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity will be provided to the trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 Super Cells which achieves a 5-10 better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The Super Cell readout is composed of custom developed 12-bit combined SAR ADCs in 130 nm CMOS technology which will be installed on-detector in a radiation environment and digitizes the detector pulses at 40 MHz. The data will be transmitted to the back end using a custom serializer and optical converter applying 5.44 Gb/s optical links. These components are install...

  6. Reactivity Screening of Anatase TiO2 Nanotube Arrays and Anatase Thin Films: A Surface Chemistry Point of View

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, S.; Hokkanen, B.; Nurkic, T.; Goering, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, Uwe; Ghicov, A.; Schmuki, P.; Yu, Zhongqing; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2008-09-19

    As a reactivity screening we collected thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) data of iso-butane, O2, CO2, and CO adsorbed on ordered TiO2 nanotube (TiNTs) arrays. As a reference system iso-butane adsorption on an anatase TiO2 thin film has been considered as well. The as-grown TiNTs are vertically aligned and amorphous. Polycrystalline (poly.) anatase or poly. anatase/rutile mixed nanotubes are formed by annealing confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anatase thin film was grown on SrTiO3(001) and characterized by XRD and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surprisingly, oxygen distinctly interacts with the TiNTs whereas this process is not observed on fully oxidized single crystal rutile TiO2(110). Desorption temperatures of 110-150 K and 100-120 K were observed for CO2 and CO, respectively, on the TiNTs. Variations in the binding energies of the alkanes on TiNTs and anatase thin films also were present, i.e., a structure-activity relationship (SAR) is evident.

  7. RESIK observations of He-like Ar X-ray line emission in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sylwester; B. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-06-09

    The Ar XVII X-ray line group principally due to transitions 1s2 - 1s2l (l=s, p) near 4 Anstroms was observed in numerous flares by the RESIK bent crystal spectrometer aboard CORONAS-F between 2001 and 2003. The three line features include the Ar XVII w (resonance line), a blend of x and y (intercombination lines), and z (forbidden line), all of which are blended with Ar XVI dielectronic satellites. The ratio G, equal to [I(x+y) + I(z)]/I(w), varies with electron temperature Te mostly because of unresolved dielectronic satellites. With temperatures estimated from GOES X-ray emission, the observed G ratios agree fairly well with those calculated from CHIANTI and other data. With a two-component emission measure, better agreement is achieved. Some S XV and S XVI lines blend with the Ar lines, the effect of which occurs at temperatures greater than 8MK, allowing the S/Ar abundance ratio to be determined. This is found to agree with coronal values. A nonthermal contribution is indicated for some spectra in the repeating-pulse flare of 2003 February 6.

  8. Environmental proteomics of microbial plankton in a highly productive coastal upwelling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowell, Sarah [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Smith, Daniel [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Barofsky, Douglas [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Giovannoni, Stephen [Oregon State University, Corvallis

    2011-01-01

    Metaproteomics is one of a suite of new approaches providing insights into the activities of microorganisms in natural environments. Proteins, the final products of gene expression, indicate cellular priorities, taking into account both transcriptional and posttranscriptional control mechanisms that control adaptive responses. Here, we report the proteomic composition of the o 1.2 lm fraction of a microbial community from Oregon coast summer surface waters, detected with two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Spectra corresponding to proteins involved in protein folding and biosynthesis, transport, and viral capsid structure were the most frequently detected. A total of 36% of all the detected proteins were best matches to the SAR11 clade, and other abundant coastal microbial clades were also well represented, including the Roseobacter clade (17%), oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria group (6%), OM43 clade (1%). Viral origins were attributed to 2.5% of proteins. In contrast to oligotrophic waters, phosphate transporters were not highly detected in this nutrient-rich system. However, transporters for amino acids, taurine, polyamines and glutamine synthetase were among the most highly detected proteins, supporting predictions that carbon and nitrogen are more limiting than phosphate in this environment. Intriguingly, one of the highly detected proteins was methanol dehydrogenase originating from the OM43 clade, providing further support for recent reports that the metabolism of one-carbon compounds by these streamlined methylotrophs might be an important feature of coastal ocean biogeochemistry.

  9. Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design.

  10. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhijian, Chen [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China) [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Xiaoxue, Li [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Wei, Zheng [Zhejiang International Travel Healthcare Center, 230 Zhonghezhong Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China)] [Zhejiang International Travel Healthcare Center, 230 Zhonghezhong Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China); Jiliang, He, E-mail: he_jiliang@hotmail.com [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)] [Institute of Environmental Health, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ? Protein microarray shows the differential expression of 27 proteins induced by RFR. ? RPA32 related to DNA repair is down-regulated in Western blot. ? p73 related to cell genome stability and apoptosis is up-regulated in Western blot. -- Abstract: In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P < 0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis.

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

  12. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archivedmore »at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.« less

  13. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  14. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  15. Westinghouse Hanford Company safety analysis reports and technical safety requirements upgrade program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    During Fiscal Year 1992, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) separately transmitted the following US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for compliance: DOE 5480.21, ``Unreviewed Safety Questions,`` DOE 5480.22, ``Technical Safety Requirements,`` and DOE 5480.23, ``Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.`` WHC has proceeded with its impact assessment and implementation process for the Orders. The Orders are closely-related and contain some requirements that are either identical, similar, or logically-related. Consequently, WHC has developed a strategy calling for an integrated implementation of the three Orders. The strategy is comprised of three primary objectives, namely: Obtain DOE approval of a single list of DOE-owned and WHC-managed Nuclear Facilities, Establish and/or upgrade the ``Safety Basis`` for each Nuclear Facility, and Establish a functional Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process to govern the management and preservation of the Safety Basis for each Nuclear Facility. WHC has developed policy-revision and facility-specific implementation plans to accomplish near-term tasks associated with the above strategic objectives. This plan, which as originally submitted in August 1993 and approved, provided an interpretation of the new DOE Nuclear Facility definition and an initial list of WHC-managed Nuclear Facilities. For each current existing Nuclear Facility, existing Safety Basis documents are identified and the plan/status is provided for the ISB. Plans for upgrading SARs and developing TSRs will be provided after issuance of the corresponding Rules.

  16. Method and apparatus for reducing range ambiguity in synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-10-26

    A modified Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system with reduced sensitivity to range ambiguities, and which uses secondary receiver channels to detect the range ambiguous signals and subtract them from the signal received by the main channel. Both desired and range ambiguous signals are detected by a main receiver and by one or more identical secondary receivers. All receivers are connected to a common antenna with two or more feed systems offset in elevation (e.g., a reflector antenna with multiple feed horns or a phased array with multiple phase shift networks. The secondary receiver output(s) is (are) then subtracted from the main receiver output in such a way as to cancel the ambiguous signals while only slightly attenuating the desired signal and slightly increasing the noise in the main channel, and thus does not significantly affect the desired signal. This subtraction may be done in real time, or the outputs of the receivers may be recorded separately and combined during signal processing.

  17. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  18. Review Guidance for the TWRS FSAR amendment for Waste Retrieval and waste feed delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFITH, R.W.

    1999-10-01

    This review guidance (Guide) was developed for Office of River Protection (ORP) reviewers to use in reviewing the amendment to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) covering waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. Waste retrieval and waste feed delivery are necessary to supply nuclear waste from TWRS storage tanks to the TWRS Privatization (TWRS-P) Contractor's vitrification facility and to receive intermediate waste from the vitrification facility back into the TWRS tank farms for interim storage. An amendment to the approved TWRS FSAR (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Rev. 0) is necessary to change the authorization basis to accommodate waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. The ORP'S safety responsibility in reviewing the FSAR amendment is to determine that reasonable assurance exists that waste retrieval and waste feed delivery operations can be accomplished with adequate safety for the workers, the public, and the environment. To carry out this responsibility, the ORP will evaluate the Contractor's amendment to the TWRS FSAR for waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to determine whether the submittal provides adequate safety and complies with applicable regulatory requirements.

  19. Hanford waste tank bump accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MALINOVIC, B.

    2003-03-21

    This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis (HNF-SD-Wh4-SAR-067 2001). The purpose of the new evaluation is to consider new information and to support new recommendations for final safety controls. This evaluation considers historical data, industrial failure modes, plausible accident scenarios, and system responses. A tank bump is a postulated event in which gases, consisting mostly of water vapor, are suddenly emitted from the waste and cause tank headspace pressurization. A tank bump is distinguished from a gas release event in two respects: First, the physical mechanism for release involves vaporization of locally superheated liquid, and second, gases emitted to the head space are not flammable. For this reason, a tank bump is often called a steam bump. In this report, even though non-condensible gases may be considered in bump models, flammability and combustion of emitted gases are not. The analysis scope is safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The analysis considers physical mechanisms for tank bump to formulate criteria for bump potential, application of the criteria to the tanks, and accident analysis of bump scenarios. The result of consequence analysis is the mass of waste released from tanks for specific scenarios where bumps are credible; conversion to health consequences is performed elsewhere using standard Hanford methods (Cowley et al. 2000). The analysis forms a baseline for future extension to consider waste retrieval.

  20. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside ±45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  1. Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-03-08

    Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

  2. Advanced product realization through model-based design and virtual prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreas, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    Several government agencies and industrial sectors have recognized the need for, and payoff of, investing in the methodologies and associated technologies for improving the product realization process. Within the defense community as well as commercial industry, there are three major needs. First, they must reduce the cost of military products, of related manufacturing processes, and of the enterprises that have to be maintained. Second, they must reduce the time required to realize products while still applying the latest technologies. Finally, they must improve the predictability of process attributes, product performance, cost, schedule and quality. They must continue to advance technology, quickly incorporate their innovations in new products and in processes to produce them, and they need to capitalize on the raw computational power and communications bandwidth that continues to become available at decreasing cost. Sandia National Laboratories initiative is pursuing several interrelated, key concepts and technologies in order to enable such product realization process improvements: model-based design; intelligent manufacturing processes; rapid virtual and physical prototyping; and agile people/enterprises. While progress in each of these areas is necessary, this paper only addresses a portion of the overall initiative. First a vision of a desired future capability in model-based design and virtual prototyping is presented. This is followed by a discussion of two specific activities parametric design analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) and virtual prototyping of miniaturized high-density electronics -- that exemplify the vision as well as provide a status report on relevant work in progress.

  3. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Uday Turaga; Shingo Watanabe; Subramani Velu; Chunshan Song

    2004-05-01

    The overall objective of this project is to explore a new desulfurization system concept, which consists of efficient separation of the refractory sulfur compounds from diesel fuel by selective adsorption, and effective hydrodesulfurization of the concentrated fraction of the refractory sulfur compounds in diesel fuels. Our approaches focused on (1) selecting and developing new adsorbents for selective adsorption of sulfur or sulfur compounds in commercial diesel fuel; (2) conducting the adsorption desulfurization of model fuels and real diesel fuels by the selective-adsorption-for-removing-sulfur (PSUSARS) process over various developed adsorbents, and examining the adsorptive desulfurization performance of various adsorbents; (3) developing and evaluating the regeneration methods for various spent adsorbent; (4) developing new catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of the refractory sulfur existing in the commercial diesel fuel; (5) on the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, further confirming and improving the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel Three types of adsorbents, the metal-chloride-based adsorbents, the activated nickel-based adsorbents and the metal-sulfide-based adsorbents, have been developed for selective adsorption desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons. All of three types of the adsorbents exhibit the significant selectivity for sulfur compounds, including alkyl dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in diesel fuel. Adsorption desulfurization of real diesel fuels (regular diesel fuel (DF), S: 325 ppmw; low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD-I), S: 47 ppmw) over the nickel-based adsorbents (A-2 and A-5) has been conducted at different conditions by using a flowing system. The adsorption capacity of DF over A-2 corresponding to an outlet sulfur level of 30 ppmw is 2.8 mg-S/g-A. The adsorption capacity of LSD-I over A-5 corresponding to the break-through point at 5.0 ppmw sulfur level is 0.35 mg-S/g-A. The spent A-5 can be regenerated by using H2 gas at a flowing rate of 40-50 ml/min, 500 C, and ambient pressure. Adsorption desulfurization of model diesel fuels over metal-sulfide-based adsorbents (A-6-1 and A-6-2) has been conducted at different temperatures to examine the capacity and selectivity of the adsorbents. A regeneration method for the spent metal-sulfide-based adsorbents has been developed. The spent A-6-1 can be easily regenerated by washing the spent adsorbent with a polar solvent followed by heating the adsorbent bed to remove the remainder solvent. Almost all adsorption capacity of the fresh A-6-1 can be recovered after the regeneration. On the other hand, a MCM-41-supported HDS catalyst was developed for deep desulfurization of the refractory sulfur compounds. The results show that the developed MCM-41-supported catalyst demonstrates consistently higher activity for the HDS of the refractory dibenzothiophenic sulfur compounds than the commercial catalyst. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel is confirmed and improved further.

  4. Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal

    2009-02-18

    This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

  5. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  6. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Bryan L. (Tijeras, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  8. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT Shipping Package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SAR P charges the WIPP Management and Operation (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize these operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

  9. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Michael Sprague; Lu Sun; Chunshan Song

    2002-10-01

    In order to reduce the sulfur level in liquid hydrocarbon fuels for environmental protection and fuel cell applications, deep desulfurization of a model diesel fuel and a real diesel fuel was conducted by our SARS (selective adsorption for removing sulfur) process using the adsorbent A-2. Effect of temperature on the desulfurization process was examined. Adsorption desulfurization at ambient temperature, 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over A-2 is efficient to remove dibenzothiophene (DBT) in the model diesel fuel, but difficult to remove 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT) and 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT). Adsorption desulfurization at 150 C over A-2 can efficiently remove DBT, 4-MDBT and 4,6-DMDBT in the model diesel fuel. The sulfur content in the model diesel fuel can be reduced to less than 1 ppmw at 150 C without using hydrogen gas. The adsorption capacity corresponding to the break-through point is 6.9 milligram of sulfur per gram of A-2 (mg-S/g-A-2), and the saturate capacity is 13.7 mg-S/g-A-2. Adsorption desulfurization of a commercial diesel fuel with a total sulfur level of 47 ppmw was also performed at ambient temperature and 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over the adsorbent A-2. The results show that only part of the sulfur compounds existing in the low sulfur diesel can be removed by adsorption over A-2 at such operating conditions, because (1) the all sulfur compounds in the low sulfur diesel are the refractory sulfur compounds that have one or two alkyl groups at the 4- and/or 6-positions of DBT, which inhibit the approach of the sulfur atom to the adsorption site; (2) some compounds coexisting in the commercial low sulfur diesel probably inhibit the interaction between the sulfur compounds and the adsorbent. Further work in determining the optimum operating conditions and screening better adsorbent is desired.

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

  11. Fragment-based structure-guided drug discovery: strategy, process, and lessons from human protein kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burley, Stephen K.; Hirst, Gavin; Sprengeler, Paul; Reich, Siegfried

    2012-04-24

    The experimental roots of fragment-based drug discovery can be found in the work of Petsko, Ringe, and coworkers, who were the first to report flooding of protein crystals with small organic solutes (e.g., compounds such as benzene with ten or fewer nonhydrogen atoms) to identify bound functional groups that might ultimately be transformed into targeted ligands. The concept of linking fragments together to increase binding affinity was described as early as 1992 by Verlinde et al. Computational screening of fragments, using tools such as DOCK or MCSS, was also described in the early 1990s. Pharmaceutical industry application of fragment screening began at Abbott Laboratories, where Fesik and coworkers pioneered 'SAR by NMR' (structure/activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance). In this spectroscopic approach, bound fragments are detected by NMR screening and subsequently linked together to increase affinity, as envisaged by Verlinde and coworkers. Application of x-ray crystallography to detect and identify fragment hits was also pursued at Abbott. Fragment-based drug discovery has now been under way for more than a decade. Although Fesik and coworkers popularized the notion of linking fragments (as in their highly successful BCL-2 program), tactical emphasis appears to have largely shifted from fragment condensation to fragment engineering (or growing the fragment) to increase binding affinity and selectivity. Various biotechnology companies, including SGX Pharmaceuticals, Astex, and Plexxikon, have recently demonstrated that fragment-based approaches can indeed produce development candidates suitable for Phase I studies of safety and tolerability in patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  13. Cumulative soil chemistry changes from land application of saline-sodic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganjegunte, G.K.; King, L.A.; Vance, G.F. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

    2008-09-15

    Management of large volumes (60,000 ha-m) of co-production water associated with coal bed natural gas (CBNG) water extraction is a potential concern in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana due to elevated water salinity and sodicity levels. Land application of saline-sodic CBNG water is a common water management method being practiced in the PRB, which can result in deterioration in soil quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects from 1 to 4 yr of land application with CBNG water on soil chemical properties at six study sites (fine to loamy, mixed to smectitic, mesic, Ustic Ardisols and Entisols) in the Wyoming PRB region. Changes in chemistry of soils collected from six depths irrigated with CBNG water were compared with representative non-irrigated soils. Applications of CBNG water significantly increased soil EC, SAR, and ESP values (up to 21, 74, and 24 times, respectively) compared with non-irrigated soils. Differences in soil chemical properties between an irrigated and non-irrigated coarse-textured soil were less than that of fine-textured soils, emphasizing texture as an important factor for salinity buildup. Pretreatment of CBNG water using a sulfur burner and application of gypsum and elemental S soil amendments reduced soil pH but did not prevent the build-up of salts and sodium. Study results suggest that current CBNG water management strategies are not as effective as projected. Additional research is needed to develop management strategies appropriate for mitigating adverse effects of CBNG water irrigation.

  14. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

  15. Digital Instrumentation and Control Failure Events Derivation and Analysis by Frame-Based Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui-Wen Huang; Chunkuan Shih [National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013 (China); Swu Yih [DML International, 18F-1 295, Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Yen-Chang Tzeng; Ming-Huei Chen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wunhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-01

    A frame-based technique, including physical frame, logical frame, and cognitive frame, was adopted to perform digital I and C failure events derivation and analysis for generic ABWR. The physical frame was structured with a modified PCTran-ABWR plant simulation code, which was extended and enhanced on the feedwater system, recirculation system, and steam line system. The logical model is structured with MATLAB, which was incorporated into PCTran-ABWR to improve the pressure control system, feedwater control system, recirculation control system, and automated power regulation control system. As a result, the software failure of these digital control systems can be properly simulated and analyzed. The cognitive frame was simulated by the operator awareness status in the scenarios. Moreover, via an internal characteristics tuning technique, the modified PCTran-ABWR can precisely reflect the characteristics of the power-core flow. Hence, in addition to the transient plots, the analysis results can then be demonstrated on the power-core flow map. A number of postulated I and C system software failure events were derived to achieve the dynamic analyses. The basis for event derivation includes the published classification for software anomalies, the digital I and C design data for ABWR, chapter 15 accident analysis of generic SAR, and the reported NPP I and C software failure events. The case study of this research includes (1) the software CMF analysis for the major digital control systems; and (2) postulated ABWR digital I and C software failure events derivation from the actual happening of non-ABWR digital I and C software failure events, which were reported to LER of USNRC or IRS of IAEA. These events were analyzed by PCTran-ABWR. Conflicts among plant status, computer status, and human cognitive status are successfully identified. The operator might not easily recognize the abnormal condition, because the computer status seems to progress normally. However, a well trained operator can become aware of the abnormal condition with the inconsistent physical parameters; and then can take early corrective actions to avoid the system hazard. This paper also discusses the advantage of Simulation-based method, which can investigate more in-depth dynamic behavior of digital I and C system than other approaches. Some unanticipated interactions can be observed by this method. (authors)

  16. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio, Luis G. . E-mail: luis.valerio@FDA.HHS.gov; Arvidson, Kirk B.; Chanderbhan, Ronald F.; Contrera, Joseph F.

    2007-07-01

    Consistent with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, predictive toxicology software programs employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are currently under evaluation for regulatory risk assessment and scientific decision support for highly sensitive endpoints such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. At the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (ICSAS), the use of computational SAR tools for both qualitative and quantitative risk assessment applications are being developed and evaluated. One tool of current interest is MDL-QSAR predictive discriminant analysis modeling of rodent carcinogenicity, which has been previously evaluated for pharmaceutical applications by the FDA ICSAS. The study described in this paper aims to evaluate the utility of this software to estimate the carcinogenic potential of small, organic, naturally occurring chemicals found in the human diet. In addition, a group of 19 known synthetic dietary constituents that were positive in rodent carcinogenicity studies served as a control group. In the test group of naturally occurring chemicals, 101 were found to be suitable for predictive modeling using this software's discriminant analysis modeling approach. Predictions performed on these compounds were compared to published experimental evidence of each compound's carcinogenic potential. Experimental evidence included relevant toxicological studies such as rodent cancer bioassays, rodent anti-carcinogenicity studies, genotoxic studies, and the presence of chemical structural alerts. Statistical indices of predictive performance were calculated to assess the utility of the predictive modeling method. Results revealed good predictive performance using this software's rodent carcinogenicity module of over 1200 chemicals, comprised primarily of pharmaceutical, industrial and some natural products developed under an FDA-MDL cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA). The predictive performance for this group of dietary natural products and the control group was 97% sensitivity and 80% concordance. Specificity was marginal at 53%. This study finds that the in silico QSAR analysis employing this software's rodent carcinogenicity database is capable of identifying the rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring organic molecules found in the human diet with a high degree of sensitivity. It is the first study to demonstrate successful QSAR predictive modeling of naturally occurring carcinogens found in the human diet using an external validation test. Further test validation of this software and expansion of the training data set for dietary chemicals will help to support the future use of such QSAR methods for screening and prioritizing the risk of dietary chemicals when actual animal data are inadequate, equivocal, or absent.

  17. Evaluating the use of PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of nuclear canister filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Murray E.

    2014-07-18

    This document details the distinction between using PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of filters. This document is developed to justify the use of PAO rather than DOP for evaluating the performance of filters in the SAVY 4000 and Hagan containers. The design criteria (Anderson et al, 2012) for purchasing SAVY 4000 containers and the Safety Analysis Report for the SAVY 4000 Container Series specified that the filter must “capture greater than 99.97% of 0.45 ?m mean diameter dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol at the rated flow with a DOP concentration of 65±15 micrograms per liter.”This corresponds to a leakage percent of 0.03% (3.0x10-2). The density of DOP oil is 985 kg/m3 and the density of PAO oil is 819 kg/m3. ATI Test Inc measured the mass mean diameter of aerosol distributions produced by a single Laskin type III-A nozzle operating at a 20 psig air pressure as 0.563 ?m for DOP oil and 0.549 ?m for PAO oil. (See Appendix A.) For both types of oil in this document, the single fiber method calculated the leakage percent to be 4.4x10-5 for DOP oil and 4.7x10-5 for PAO oil. Although the percent error between these two quantities is 7.7%, these calculated leakage percent values are more than two orders of magnitude less than the criterion specified in the SAVY canister SAR. As a point of reference, the photometer used to measure the SAVY canister filter performance cannot resolve values for the leakage percent below 1.0x10-5. Additionally, over a range of particle sizes from 0.01 ?m to 3.0 ?m, there was less than 4.0x10-5 error between the calculated filter efficiency for the two types of oil at any particular particle size diameter. In conclusion, the difference between using DOP and PAO for testing SAVY canister filters is of inconsequential concern.

  18. Magnetophoretic bead trapping in a high-flowrate biological detection system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Rahimian, Kamayar; Martin, James Ellis; Anderson, G. Ronald; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Lemp, Thomas; Derzon, Mark Steven; James, Conrad D.

    2005-03-01

    This report contains the summary of the 'Magnetophoretic Bead Trapping in a High-Flowrate Biological Detection System' LDRD project 74795. The objective of this project is to develop a novel biodetection system for high-throughput sample analysis. The chief application of this system is in detection of very low concentrations of target molecules from a complex liquid solution containing many different constituents--some of which may interfere with identification of the target molecule. The system is also designed to handle air sampling by using an aerosol system (for instance a WESP - Wet Electro-Static Precipitator, or an impact spray system) to get air sample constituents into the liquid volume. The system described herein automatically takes the raw liquid sample, whether air converted or initially liquid matrix, and mixes in magnetic detector beads that capture the targets of interest and then performs the sample cleanup function, allowing increased sensitivity and eliminating most false positives and false negatives at a downstream detector. The surfaces of the beads can be functionalized in a variety of ways in order to maximize the number of targets to be captured and concentrated. Bacteria and viruses are captured using antibodies to surface proteins on bacterial cell walls or viral particle coats. In combination with a cell lysis or PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), the beads can be used as a DNA or RNA probe to capture nucleic acid patterns of interest. The sample cleanup capability of this system would allow different raw biological samples, such as blood or saliva to be analyzed for the presence of different infectious agents (e.g. smallpox or SARS). For future studies, we envision functionalizing bead surfaces to bind to chemical weapons agents, radio-isotopes, and explosives. The two main objectives of this project were to explore methods for enhancing the mixing of the capture microspheres in the sample, and to develop a novel high-throughput magnetic microsphere trap. We have developed a novel technique using the magnetic capture microspheres as 'stirrer bars' in a fluid sample to enhance target binding to the microsphere surfaces. We have also made progress in developing a polymer-MEMS electromagnet for trapping magnetic spheres in a high-flowrate fluid format.

  19. Crash hit frequency analysis of aircraft overflights of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Device Assembly Facility (DAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, C Y; Sanzo, D L; Sharirli, M

    1998-07-09

    Aircraft crashes are an element of external events required to be analyzed and documented in Facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) and Nuclear Explosive Safety Studies (NESS). Aircraft crashes into DOE facilities are of concern due to effects related to impact and fire that can potentially lead to penetration of the facility, disruption of operations, and the potential of release of radioactive and/or hazardous materials subsequent to the aircraft impact. Recent changes in the control of the airspace were not considered in previous safety studies of aircraft flights over the NTS [Refs. 4,5,6]. The Airspace changes have warranted review of the effects of the issued MOU on the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Authorization Basis Documents [Refs. 4,5], the underlying analysis assumptions, and results relevant to aircraft crash. This report documents the review and analysis of aircraft crash hit frequency on the DAF within NTS. It focuses on the impact of airspace changes based on the MOU. The frequency of an aircraft crashing and hitting the DAF is in the 1 E-7 to E-8 range. While this is considered to be acceptably small, it should not be considered an upper bound. This conclusion should not be interpreted to mean that no further work need be done. The results of the analysis are highly dependent on the assumptions made and the available data. There is considerable uncertainty in the number of overflights which are taking place over the NTS and restricted airspace R-4808N. To reduce this uncertainty, additional follow-on work should be done to activate the monitor in the CP at NTS which is to receive information from the Nellis Range control station, to monitor the level of air activity in R-4808N and to recalculate the aircraft crash hit frequency on the DAF when better overflight estimates are obtained. Finally, to reduce the human error component, the process by which the DOE notifies the USAF of ?no-fly? periods for R-4808N during which SNM is present in the DAF should be formalized either by modifying an existing operational procedure or instituting a new procedure. Additionally, the process for DOE notification by DAF personnel of the presence of SNM should be formalized.

  20. Crash hit frequency analysis of aircraft overflights of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Device Assembly Facility (DAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, C. Y.; Sanzo, D. L.; Sharirli, M.

    1998-12-16

    Aircraft crashes are an element of external events required to be analyzed and documented in Facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) and Nuclear Explosive Safety Studies (NESS). Aircraft crashes into DOE facilities are of concern due to effects related to impact and fire that can potentially lead to penetration of the facility, disruption of operations, and the potential of release of radioactive and/or hazardous materials subsequent to the aircraft impact. Recent changes in the control of the airspace were not considered in previous safety studies of aircraft flights over the NTS [Refs. 4,5,6]. The Airspace changes have warranted review of the effects of the issued MOU on the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Authorization Basis Documents [Refs. 4,5], the underlying analysis assumptions, and results relevant to aircraft crash. This report documents the review and analysis of aircraft crash hit frequency on the DAF within NTS. It focuses on the impact of airspace changes based on the MOU. The frequency of an aircraft crashing and hitting the DAF is in the 1 E-7 to E-8 range. While this is considered to be acceptably small, it should not be considered an upper bound. This conclusion should not be interpreted to mean that no further work need be done. The results of the analysis are highly dependent on the assumptions made and the available data. There is considerable uncertainty in the number of overflights which are taking place over the NTS and restricted airspace R-4808N. To reduce this uncertainty, additional follow-on work should be done to activate the monitor in the CP at NTS which is to receive information from the Nellis Range control station, to monitor the level of air activity in R-4808N and to recalculate the aircraft crash hit frequency on the DAF when better overflight estimates are obtained. Finally, to reduce the human error component, the process by which the DOE notifies the USAF of ?no-fly? periods for R-4808N during which SNM is present in the DAF should be formalized either by modifying an existing operational procedure or instituting a new procedure. Additionally, the process for DOE notification by DAF personnel of the presence of SNM should be formalized.

  1. AIR DISPERSION MODELING AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-08-01

    One concern at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides or hazardous chemicals that can become airborne at the facility and reach the Exclusive Use Area boundary as the result of a release from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) or from the underground during waste emplacement operations. The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), WIPP RCRA Permit, and WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessments include air dispersion calculations to address this issue. Meteorological conditions at the WIPP facility will dictate direction, speed, and dilution of a contaminant plume of respirable material due to chronic releases or during an accident. Due to the paucity of meteorological information at the WIPP site prior to September 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) reports had to rely largely on unqualified climatic data from the site and neighboring Carlsbad, which is situated approximately 40 km (26 miles) to the west of the site. This report examines the validity of the DOE air dispersion calculations using new meteorological data measured and collected at the WIPP site since September 1996. The air dispersion calculations in this report include both chronic and acute releases. Chronic release calculations were conducted with the EPA-approved code, CAP88PC and the calculations showed that in order for a violation of 40 CFR61 (NESHAPS) to occur, approximately 15 mCi/yr of 239Pu would have to be released from the exhaust stack or from the WHB. This is an extremely high value. Hence, it is unlikely that NESHAPS would be violated. A site-specific air dispersion coefficient was evaluated for comparison with that used in acute dose calculations. The calculations presented in Section 3.2 and 3.3 show that one could expect a slightly less dispersive plume (larger air dispersion coefficient) given greater confidence in the meteorological data, i.e. 95% worst case meteorological conditions. Calculations show that dispersion will decrease slightly if a more stable wind class is assumed, where very little vertical mixing occurs. It is recommended that previous reports which used fixed values for calculating the air dispersion coefficient be updated to reflect the new meteorological data, such as the WIPP Safety Analysis Report and the WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment. It is also recommended that uncertainty be incorporated into the calculations so that a more meaningful assessment of risk during accidents can be achieved.

  2. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

  3. Investigation of the Cause of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell K Meyer

    2012-06-01

    Blister–threshold testing of fuel plates is a standard method through which the safety margin for operation of plate-type in research and test reactors is assessed. The blister-threshold temperature is indicative of the ability of fuel to operate at high temperatures for short periods of time (transient conditions) without failure. This method of testing was applied to the newly developed U-Mo monolithic fuel system. Blister annealing studies on the U-Mo monolithic fuel plates began in 2007, with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 experiment, and they have continued as the U-Mo fuel system has evolved through the research and development process. Blister anneal threshold temperatures from early irradiation experiments (RERTR-6 through RERTR-10) ranged from 400 to 500°C. These temperatures were projected to be acceptable for NRC-licensed research reactors and the high-power Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) based on current safety-analysis reports (SARs). Initial blister testing results from the RERTR-12 experiment capsules X1 and X2 showed a decrease in the blister-threshold temperatures. Blister threshold temperatures from this experiment ranged from 300 to 400°C. Selected plates from the AFIP-4 experiment, which was fabricated using a process similar to that used to fabricate the RERTR-12 experiment, also underwent blister testing to determine whether results would be similar. The measured blister-threshold temperatures from the AFIP-4 plates fell within the same blister-threshold temperature range measured in the RERTR-12 plates. Investigation of the cause of this decrease in bister threshold temperature is being conducted under the guidance of Idaho National Laboratory PLN-4155, “Analysis of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments,” and is driven by hypotheses. The main focus of the investigation is in the following areas: 1. Fabrication variables 2. Pre-irradiation characterization 3. Irradiation conditions 4. Post-irradiation examination 5. Additional blister testing 6. Mechanical modeling This report documents the preliminary results of this investigation. Several hypotheses can be dismissed as a result of this investigation. Two primary categories of causes remain. The most prominent theory, supported by the data, is that low blister-threshold temperature is the result of mechanical energy imparted on the samples during the fabrication process (hot and cold rolling) without adequate post processing (annealing). The mechanisms are not clearly understood and require further investigation, but can be divided into two categories: • Residual Stress • Undesirable interaction boundary and/or U-Mo microstructure change A secondary theory that cannot be dismissed with the information that is currently available is that a change in the test conditions has resulted in a statistically significant downward shift of measured blister temperature. This report outlines the results of the forensic investigations conducted to date. The data and conclusions presented in this report are preliminary. Definitive cause and effect relationships will be established by future experimental programs.

  4. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

  5. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of PIT-Tagged Spring/Summer Chinook and Summer Steelhead : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comparative Survival Study Oversight Committee and Fish Passage Center

    2008-12-02

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS; BPA Project 199602000) began in 1996 with the objective of establishing a long term dataset of the survival rate of annual generations of salmon from their outmigration as smolts to their return to freshwater as adults to spawn (smolt-to-adult return rate; SAR). The study was implemented with the express need to address the question whether collecting juvenile fish at dams and transporting them downstream in barges and trucks and releasing them downstream of Bonneville Dam was compensating for the effect of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on survival of Snake Basin spring/summer Chinook salmon migrating through the hydrosystem. The Completion of this annual report for the CSS signifies the 12th outmigration year of hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon marked with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags as part of the CSS and the 9th complete brood year return as adults of those PIT-tagged fish (report covers adult returns from 1997-2006 hatchery Chinook juvenile migrations). In addition, the CSS has provided PIT-tags to on-going tagging operations for wild Chinook since 2002 (report covers adult returns from 1994-2006 wild Chinook juvenile migrations). The CSS tags wild steelhead on the lower Clearwater River and utilized wild and hatchery steelhead from other tagging operations in evaluations of transportation (report covers adult returns from 1997-2005 wild and hatchery steelhead migrations). The primary purpose of this report is to update the time series of smolt-to-adult survival rate data and related parameters with additional years of data since the completion of the CSS 10-yr retrospective analysis report (Schaller et al 2007). The 10-yr report provided a synthesis of the results from this ongoing study, the analytical approaches employed, and the evolving improvements incorporated into the study as reported in CSS annual progress reports. This current report specifically addresses the constructive comments of the most recent regional technical review conducted by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board and Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISAB and ISRP 2007). This report completes the 3-salt returns from migration years 2004 for wild and hatchery Chinook and steelhead (all returns are to Lower Granite Dam). For wild and hatchery Chinook, this report also provides 3-salt returns from migration year 2005 and 2-salt returns from migration year 2006 through a cutoff date of August 13, 2008. For wild and hatchery steelhead, it provides completed 2-salt returns for wild and hatchery steelhead that outmigrated in 2005 (any 3-salt returns of PIT-tagged steelhead are few, but will occur after July 1, 2008). All of the Chinook salmon evaluated in the CSS study exhibit a stream-type life history. All study fish used in this report were uniquely identifiable based on a PIT-tag implanted in the body cavity during (or before) the smolt life stage and retained through their return as adults. These tagged fish can then be detected as juveniles and adults at several locations of the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reductions in the number of individuals detected as the tagged fish grow older provide estimates of survival. This allows comparisons of survival over different life stages between fish with different experiences in the hydrosystem (e.g. transportation vs. in-river migrants and migration through various numbers of dams) as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The CSS is a long term study within the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC FWP) and is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Study design and analyses are conducted through a CSS Oversight Committee with representation from Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The Fish Passage Center (FPC) coordinates the PIT-tagging efforts, data management and preparation

  6. Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Ruckelshaus

    2008-09-30

    The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate