Sample records for input validation hole

  1. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  2. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2.3.3.216 Addthis Related Articles U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits...

  3. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  4. Input Validation Errors and Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, R.

    = "gpg -r $send_to_list 2>&1" popen($command) ∑ Attack: user fills in the following information-independent policies are preferable Example: SquirrelMail Command Injection Incoming Request (Untrusted input) $command="gpg popen($command) $send_to_list = $_GET[`sendto'] $command = "gpg -r $send_to_list 2>&1" Outgoing Request

  5. U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September...

  6. V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Inject...

  7. U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands, Execute Arbitrary Commands, and Change User Passwords U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input...

  8. The SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data - VALID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) at ORNL contains high quality, independently reviewed models and results that improve confidence in analysis. VALID is developed and maintained according to a procedure of the SCALE quality assurance (QA) plan. This paper reviews the origins of the procedure and its intended purpose, the philosophy of the procedure, some highlights of its implementation, and the future of the procedure and associated VALID library. The original focus of the procedure was the generation of high-quality models that could be archived at ORNL and applied to many studies. The review process associated with model generation minimized the chances of errors in these archived models. Subsequently, the scope of the library and procedure was expanded to provide high quality, reviewed sensitivity data files for deployment through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Sensitivity data files for approximately 400 such models are currently available. The VALID procedure and library continue fulfilling these multiple roles. The VALID procedure is based on the quality assurance principles of ISO 9001 and nuclear safety analysis. Some of these key concepts include: independent generation and review of information, generation and review by qualified individuals, use of appropriate references for design data and documentation, and retrievability of the models, results, and documentation associated with entries in the library. Some highlights of the detailed procedure are discussed to provide background on its implementation and to indicate limitations of data extracted from VALID for use by the broader community. Specifically, external users of data generated within VALID must take responsibility for ensuring that the files are used within the QA framework of their organization and that use is appropriate. The future plans for the VALID library include expansion to include additional experiments from the IHECSBE, to include experiments from areas beyond criticality safety, such as reactor physics and shielding, and to include application models. In the future, external SCALE users may also obtain qualification under the VALID procedure and be involved in expanding the library. The VALID library provides a pathway for the criticality safety community to leverage modeling and analysis expertise at ORNL.

  9. V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 2, 2013 - 1:13am Addthis...

  10. U-147:Red Hat Enterprise MRG Grid Input Validation Flaw

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MRG Management Console (Cumin) does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  11. Method of validating measurement data of a process parameter from a plurality of individual sensor inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating a validated measurement of a process parameter at a point in time by using a plurality of individual sensor inputs from a scan of said sensors at said point in time. The sensor inputs from said scan are stored and a first validation pass is initiated by computing an initial average of all stored sensor inputs. Each sensor input is deviation checked by comparing each input including a preset tolerance against the initial average input. If the first deviation check is unsatisfactory, the sensor which produced the unsatisfactory input is flagged as suspect. It is then determined whether at least two of the inputs have not been flagged as suspect and are therefore considered good inputs. If two or more inputs are good, a second validation pass is initiated by computing a second average of all the good sensor inputs, and deviation checking the good inputs by comparing each good input including a present tolerance against the second average. If the second deviation check is satisfactory, the second average is displayed as the validated measurement and the suspect sensor as flagged as bad. A validation fault occurs if at least two inputs are not considered good, or if the second deviation check is not satisfactory. In the latter situation the inputs from each of all the sensors are compared against the last validated measurement and the value from the sensor input that deviates the least from the last valid measurement is displayed.

  12. V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    update addresses the vulnerabilities correcting the way that Microsoft SharePoint Server validates URLs and user input. IMPACT: A remote user can cause denial of service...

  13. MiTV: Multiple-Implementation Testing of User-Input Validators for Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    MiTV: Multiple-Implementation Testing of User-Input Validators for Web Applications Kunal Taneja1 Nuo Li1 Madhuri R. Marri1 Tao Xie1 Nikolai Tillmann2 1 Department of Computer Science, North Carolina,txie}@ncsu.edu, 2nikolait@microsoft.com ABSTRACT User-input validators play an essential role in guarding a web

  14. T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    vulnerability to allow an attacker to inject a client-side script in the response of a Web request run in the context of the victim's Internet Explorer. The script could spoof...

  15. T-693: Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation Hole Permits

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThisVulnerabilitiesVulnerability | DepartmentCross-Site

  16. U-139: IBM Tivoli Directory Server Input Validation Flaw | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    can conduct cross-site scripting attacks PLATFORM: Version(s): 6.2, 6.3 ABSTRACT: The Web Admin Tool does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before...

  17. T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in BlackBerry Web Desktop Manager Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Express versions...

  18. U-195: PHPlist Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and SQL Injection Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 'public_html/lists/admin' pages do not properly validate user-supplied input in the 'sortby' parameter [CVE-2012-2740]. A remote authenticated administrative user can supply a specially crafted parameter value to execute SQL commands on the underlying database.

  19. U-050: Adobe Flex SDK Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flex applications created using the Flex SDK may not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  20. Energy input from quasars regulates the growth and activity of black holes and their host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiziana Di Matteo; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early Universe, while galaxies were still forming, black holes as massive as a billion solar masses powered quasars. Supermassive black holes are found at the centers of most galaxies today, where their masses are related to the velocity dispersions of stars in their host galaxies and hence to the mass of the central bulge of the galaxy. This suggests a link between the growth of the black holes and the host galaxies, which has indeed been assumed for a number of years. But the origin of the observed relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion, and its connection with the evolution of galaxies have remained unclear. Here we report simulations that simultaneously follow star formation and the growth of black holes during galaxy-galaxy collisions. We find that in addition to generating a burst of star formation, a merger leads to strong inflows that feed gas to the supermassive black hole and thereby power the quasar. The energy released by the quasar expels enough gas to quench both star formation and further black hole growth. This determines the lifetime of the quasar phase (approaching 100 million years) and explains the relationship between the black hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion.

  1. T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  2. U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  3. T-722: IBM WebSphere Commerce Edition Input Validation Holes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the IBM WebSphere software, access data recently submitted by the target user via web form to the site, or take actions on the site acting as the target user. reference...

  4. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivileges |VulnerabilitiesCodeCodeService on

  5. T-722: IBM WebSphere Commerce Edition Input Validation Holes Permit

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThisVulnerabilitiesVulnerability |Users Obtainupdate

  6. T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success Stories Systems Analysis Success Stories

  7. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department of EnergyEnergy 94: IBMand LocalDepartment ofServiceAttacks

  8. T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic

  9. T-670: Skype Input Validation Flaw in 'mobile phone' Profile Entry Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The software does not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input in the The "mobile phone" profile entry before displaying the input.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF AN EDDY CURRENT PROBE DEDICATED TO THE MULTI-FREQUENCY IMAGING OF BORE HOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    1 EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF AN EDDY CURRENT PROBE DEDICATED TO THE MULTI-FREQUENCY IMAGING OF BORE ______________________________________________________________________________________ Article info : Submitted on February 2012 Published on October 2012 Key words : Eddy currents, non dedicated to the eddy current imaging of sub-millimetric surface breaking defects appearing in bore holes

  11. Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidating Computer-DesignedValidation in

  12. Validating

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4VacancyVacancy-InducedValValidating

  13. Coronal Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  14. TART input manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimlinger, J.R.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TART code is a Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code that is only on the CRAY computer. All the input cards for the TART code are listed, and definitions for all input parameters are given. The execution and limitations of the code are described, and input for two sample problems are given. (WHK)

  15. Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

  16. SRS Interface Input

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface Input 1. MOA's: The contractor has no MOA's in effect at the Tritium Operations (SRTO) level. 2. AIP's: The contractor has no AIP's in effect at the SRTO level. 3....

  17. Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. K. Townsend

    1997-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lecture notes for a 'Part III' course 'Black Holes' given in DAMTP, Cambridge. The course covers some of the developments in Black Hole physics of the 1960s and 1970s.

  18. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  19. Gen Inputs Settlement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF2015Gen-Inputs-Settlement Sign

  20. Spatial Statistical Procedures to Validate Input Data in Energy Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G.; Stewart, J.; Barr, C.; Brady Sabeff, L.; George, R.; Heimiller, D.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy modeling and analysis often relies on data collected for other purposes such as census counts, atmospheric and air quality observations, economic trends, and other primarily non-energy related uses. Systematic collection of empirical data solely for regional, national, and global energy modeling has not been established as in the abovementioned fields. Empirical and modeled data relevant to energy modeling is reported and available at various spatial and temporal scales that might or might not be those needed and used by the energy modeling community. The incorrect representation of spatial and temporal components of these data sets can result in energy models producing misleading conclusions, especially in cases of newly evolving technologies with spatial and temporal operating characteristics different from the dominant fossil and nuclear technologies that powered the energy economy over the last two hundred years. Increased private and government research and development and public interest in alternative technologies that have a benign effect on the climate and the environment have spurred interest in wind, solar, hydrogen, and other alternative energy sources and energy carriers. Many of these technologies require much finer spatial and temporal detail to determine optimal engineering designs, resource availability, and market potential. This paper presents exploratory and modeling techniques in spatial statistics that can improve the usefulness of empirical and modeled data sets that do not initially meet the spatial and/or temporal requirements of energy models. In particular, we focus on (1) aggregation and disaggregation of spatial data, (2) predicting missing data, and (3) merging spatial data sets. In addition, we introduce relevant statistical software models commonly used in the field for various sizes and types of data sets.

  1. U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    user's cookies (including authentication cookies), if any, associated with the site running the VPN management interface, access data recently submitted by the target user via...

  2. T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to be executed by the target user's browser. The code will originate from the site running the Citrix Access Gateway software and will run in the security context of that site....

  3. T-693: Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager Input Validation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    user's cookies (including authentication cookies), if any, associated with the site running the Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager software, access data recently submitted by...

  4. U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9.21, 9.30 ABSTRACT: Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers...

  5. V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tomcat FORM Authenticator Lets Remote Users Conduct Session Fixation Attacks U-084: Cisco Digital Media Manager Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-233:...

  6. V-192: Symantec Security Information Manager Input Validation Flaws Permit

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNSDepartmentFebruaryPhase|PotomacDepartmentRemoteVulnerabilityApple

  7. V-192: Symantec Security Information Manager Input Validation Flaws Permit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59Capability for2:ofDepartment|Attacks |1:

  8. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each stream, record or block name must be unique in its category (i.e. all streams must have different names, but a stream can have the same name as a record). Each category is an arbitrary length list which is handled by a 'manager' and there is one manager for each category.

  9. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of achievement in V&V activities, how closely related the V&V benchmarks are to the actual application of interest, and the quantification of uncertainties related to the application of interest.

  10. Model Validation Status Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and engineered barriers, plus the TSPA model itself Description of the model areas is provided in Section 3, and the documents reviewed are described in Section 4. The responsible manager for the Model Validation Status Review was the Chief Science Officer (CSO) for Bechtel-SAIC Co. (BSC). The team lead was assigned by the CSO. A total of 32 technical specialists were engaged to evaluate model validation status in the 21 model areas. The technical specialists were generally independent of the work reviewed, meeting technical qualifications as discussed in Section 5.

  11. Input a journal Viewing Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Journals Contents: Input a journal Viewing Journals Deleting a journal Entering jnl into different period Problems Input a journal 1 Login to Bluqube 2 Select 3 Enter relevant Doc type To select the number of journals you will processing & the total credit value 6 Click on 7 Enter brief description 8

  12. Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch different solar systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data. The deviation between meas * Tel. +49 (0)5151-999503, Fax: +49 (0)5151-999500, Email: paerisch@isfh.de Abstract Input/Output

  13. RHIC | Black Holes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in...

  14. SANSMIC Validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Paula D.; Rudeen, David Keith; Lord, David

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SANSMIC is solution mining software that was developed and utilized by SNL in its role as geotechnical advisor to the US DOE SPR for planning purposes. Three SANSMIC leach modes - withdrawal, direct, and reverse leach - have been revalidated with multiple test cases for each mode. The withdrawal mode was validated using high quality data from recent leach activity while the direct and reverse modes utilized data from historical cavern completion reports. Withdrawal results compared very well with observed data, including the location and size of shelves due to string breaks with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 10% and relative radius differences from 1.5 - 3%. Profile comparisons for the direct mode were very good with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 12% and relative radius differences from 5 - 7%. First, second, and third reverse configurations were simulated in order to validate SANSMIC over a range of relative hanging string and OBI locations. The first-reverse was simulated reasonably well with relative leached volume differences ranging from 1 - 9% and relative radius differences from 5 - 12%. The second-reverse mode showed the largest discrepancies in leach profile. Leached volume differences ranged from 8 - 12% and relative radius differences from 1 - 10%. In the third-reverse, relative leached volume differences ranged from 10 - 13% and relative radius differences were ~4 %. Comparisons to historical reports were quite good, indicating that SANSMIC is essentially the same as documented and validated in the early 1980's.

  15. Recommendation 177: Facilitating Early Public Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE should initiate consultation meetings with stake holders immediately to allow early public input into the planning for IFDP

  16. Countering Poisonous Inputs with Memetic Neuroevolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Togelius, Julian

    Countering Poisonous Inputs with Memetic Neuroevolution Julian Togelius1 , Tom Schaul1 , J-dimensional and/or ill-chosen state description. Evidently, some controller inputs are "poisonous also ex- plore which types of inputs are poisonous for two different reinforcement learning problems. 1

  17. Clauser-Horne Bell test with imperfect random inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Yuan; Qi Zhao; Xiongfeng Ma

    2015-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Bell test is one of the most important tools in quantum information science. On the one hand, it enables fundamental test for the physics laws of nature, and on the other hand, it can be also applied in varieties of device independent tasks such as quantum key distribution and random number generation. In practice, loopholes existing in experimental demonstrations of Bell tests may affect the validity of the conclusions. In this work, we focus on the randomness (freewill) loophole and investigate the randomness requirement in a well-known Bell test, the Clauser-Horne test, under various conditions. With partially random inputs, we explicitly bound the Bell value for all local hidden variable models by optimizing the classical strategy. Our result thus puts input randomness requirement on the Clauser-Horne test under varieties of practical scenarios. The employed analysis technique can be generalized to other Bell's inequalities.

  18. Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal the confidence in solar thermal energy. The so called Input/Output-Procedure is controlling the solar heat systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data and a lot of failures in 11 solar thermal

  19. Dynamics of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of current theory of black-hole dynamics, concentrating on the framework in terms of trapping horizons. Summaries are given of the history, the classical theory of black holes, the defining ideas of dynamical black holes, the basic laws, conservation laws for energy and angular momentum, other physical quantities and the limit of local equilibrium. Some new material concerns how processes such as black-hole evaporation and coalescence might be described by a single trapping horizon which manifests temporally as separate horizons.

  20. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart...

  1. Code input alternatives John C. Wright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John C.

    Code input alternatives John C. Wright John Wright Oct 2009 ≠ CSWIM Workshop@ORNL Extensible markup, #type, #value, #units, #help idebug, logical, 1, "", "Turn;Summary Use a data-centric model for input creation (code namelists, IPS config file, etc) Database

  2. Nonrotating black hole in a post-Newtonian tidal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanne Taylor; Eric Poisson

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the motion and tidal dynamics of a nonrotating black hole placed within a post-Newtonian external spacetime. The tidal perturbation created by the external environment is treated as a small perturbation. At a large distance from the black hole, the gravitational field of the external distribution of matter is assumed to be sufficiently weak to be adequately described by the (first) post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity. There, the black hole is treated as a monopole contribution to the total gravitational field. There exists an overlap in the domains of validity of each description, and the black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics are matched in the overlap. The matching procedure produces the equations of motion for the black hole and the gravito-electric and gravito-magnetic tidal fields acting on the black hole. We first calculate the equations of motion and tidal fields by making no assumptions regarding the nature of the post-Newtonian environment; this could contain a continuous distribution of matter or any number of condensed bodies. We next specialize our discussion to a situation in which the black hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system. As an application of our results, we examine the geometry of the deformed event horizon and calculate the tidal heating of the black hole, the rate at which it acquires mass as a result of its tidal interaction with the companion body.

  3. Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  4. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  5. Generation of RTL verification input stimulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvarathinam, Anand Manivannan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an approach for generating input stimulus for verification of register-transfer level (RTL) design of VLSI circuits. RTL design is often subjected to a significant verification effort due to errors introduced during manual...

  6. On Noncommutative Black Holes Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faizal, Mir; Ulhoa, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will analyze noncommutative deformation of the Schwarzschild black holes and Kerr black holes. We will perform our analysis by relating the commutative and the noncommutative metrics using an Moyal product. We will also analyze the thermodynamics of these noncommutative black hole solutions. We will explicitly derive expression for the corrected entropy and temperature of these black hole solutions.

  7. Reconstructing the massive black hole cosmic history through gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Sesana; Jonathan R. Gair; Emanuele Berti; Marta Volonteri

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The massive black holes we observe in galaxies today are the natural end-product of a complex evolutionary path, in which black holes seeded in proto-galaxies at high redshift grow through cosmic history via a sequence of mergers and accretion episodes. Electromagnetic observations probe a small subset of the population of massive black holes (namely, those that are active or those that are very close to us), but planned space-based gravitational-wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can measure the parameters of ``electromagnetically invisible'' massive black holes out to high redshift. In this paper we introduce a Bayesian framework to analyze the information that can be gathered from a set of such measurements. Our goal is to connect a set of massive black hole binary merger observations to the underlying model of massive black hole formation. In other words, given a set of observed massive black hole coalescences, we assess what information can be extracted about the underlying massive black hole population model. For concreteness we consider ten specific models of massive black hole formation, chosen to probe four important (and largely unconstrained) aspects of the input physics used in structure formation simulations: seed formation, metallicity ``feedback'', accretion efficiency and accretion geometry. For the first time we allow for the possibility of ``model mixing'', by drawing the observed population from some combination of the ``pure'' models that have been simulated. A Bayesian analysis allows us to recover a posterior probability distribution for the ``mixing parameters'' that characterize the fractions of each model represented in the observed distribution. Our work shows that LISA has enormous potential to probe the underlying physics of structure formation.

  8. Holes in Spectral Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between...

  9. Do Black Holes Exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of information loss in black hole formation and the associated violations of basic laws of physics, such as conservation of energy, causality and unitarity, are avoided in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory, if the NGT charge of a black hole and its mass satisfy an inequality that does not violate any known experimental data and allows the existence of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  10. Helical superconducting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct novel static, asymptotically $AdS_5$ black hole solutions with Bianchi VII$_0$ symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, non-isotropic dual ground states with emergent scaling symmetry.

  11. Black hole evolution: I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, but also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 10^12 Msun halo at z=2, which is the progenitor of an archetypical group of galaxies at z=0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z>3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled...

  12. Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShaleInput Product: Total Input Natural

  13. "Kerrr" black hole: the Lord of the String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smailagic, Anais

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kerrr in the title is not a typo. The third "r" stands for "regular", in the sense of pathology-free, rotating black hole. We exhibit a long search-for, exact, Kerr-like, solution of the Einstein equations with novel features: i) no curvature ring singularity; ii) no "anti-gravity" universe with causality violating timelike closed world-lines; iii) no "super-luminal" matter disk. The ring singularity is replaced by a classical, circular, rotating string with Planck tension representing the inner engine driving the rotation of all the surrounding matter. The resulting geometry is regular and smoothly interpolates among inner Minkowski space, borderline deSitter and outer Kerr universe. The key ingredient to cure all unphysical features of the ordinary Kerr black hole is the choice of a "noncommutative geometry inspired" matter source as the input for the Einstein equations, in analogy with spherically symmetric black holes described in earlier works.

  14. Energy of Kerr-Newman Black-Holes and Gravitomagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Samuel Berman

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New formulae are obtained for the energy of K.N. b.h.'s that point out a gravitomagnetic energy effect. The results are valid for slowly or rapidly rotating black-holes. The expression of the energy density of Kerr-Newman back-holes in the slow rotation case, is obtained afterwards, and shown to be essentially positive. Subsequently,we show how to attain a "repulsive" gravitation (antigravitation) state identified with negative energy distribution contents in a limited region of space, without violating the Positive Energy Theorem.

  15. Green Computing input for better outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Journal Profile: Udi Dahan Green Maturity Model for Virtualization Profiling Energy Usage for Efficient suggests that tracking energy consumption at every level will become the factor of success for greenGreen Computing input for better outcomes Learn the discipline, pursue the art, and contribute

  16. SWAT 2012 Input/Output Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, J.G.; Kiniry, J.R.; Srinivasan, R.; Williams, J.R.; Haney, E.B.; Neitsch, S.L.

    2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a comprehensive model that requires a diversity of information in order to run. Novice users may feel overwhelmed by the variety and number of inputs when they first begin to use the model. This document...

  17. Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 of 20 Problem A+ Consanguine Calculations Input File: blood.in Every person's blood has 2 markers in a particular ABO blood type for that person. Combination ABO Blood Type AA A AB AB AO A BB B BO B OO O Likewise, every person has two alleles for the blood Rh factor, represented by the characters + and -. Someone who

  18. Asynchronous vs Synchronous Input-Queued Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of high-performance switches. 1 INTRODUCTION A vast technical literature exists on input-queued (IQ to performance losses in comparison with synchronous cell switching, these losses are limited, and may be smaller than the losses due to the above-mentioned segmenta- tion/reassembly overheads. In real scenarios

  19. Asynchronous vs Synchronous Input-Queued Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the design of high-performance switches. I. INTRODUCTION A vast technical literature exists on input. Unfortunately the technical literature has largely neglected this situation, and concentrated the attention throughput, or to simpler scheduling. Even when the asynchronous operation leads to performance losses

  20. Black hole accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  1. USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry to Advance Biofuels for Military and Commercial Transportation USDA, Departments of Energy and Navy Seek Input from Industry...

  2. U-229: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager i (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  3. V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was reported in Splunk Web PLATFORM: Version(s) prior to 5.0.3 ABSTRACT: A reflected cross-site scripting vulnerability was identified in Splunk Web REFERENCE LINKS:...

  4. U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors.

  5. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to be executed by the target user's browser. The code will originate from the site running the IBM Lotus iNotes software and will run in the security context of that site....

  6. U-015: CiscoWorks Common Services Home Page Input Validation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commands. PLATFORM: CiscoWorks Common Services-based products prior to version 4.1 running on Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may...

  7. V-112: Microsoft SharePoint Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivileges | Department ofDepartment

  8. V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivileges | DepartmentDepartmentAttacks |

  9. V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivileges |Vulnerabilities |MicrosoftApple

  10. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks | Department of Energy 9: IBM

  11. T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in BlackBerry Web

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThisVulnerabilities | DepartmentDepartment

  12. T-701: Citrix Access Gateway Enterprise Edition Input Validation Flaw in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThisVulnerabilitiesVulnerability |

  13. U-001:Symantec IM Manager Input Validation Flaws | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscarora Phase IIDOE O 484.1 6-30-20146 (07/03)U

  14. U-015: CiscoWorks Common Services Home Page Input Validation Flaw Lets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscarora Phase IIDOE O 484.1

  15. U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscarora PhaseArbitrary CodeScripting Attacks |

  16. U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscaroraDepartment ofDepartmentScripting Attacks |

  17. U-255: Apache Wicket Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscaroraDepartment ofDepartmentScriptingAttacks |

  18. V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated Users

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNSDepartmentFebruaryPhase|Potomac RiverWithDepartment ofGain Elevated

  19. V-153: Symantec Brightmail Gateway Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNSDepartmentFebruaryPhase|Potomac RiverWithDepartment ofGainScripting

  20. V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNSDepartmentFebruaryPhase|PotomacDepartment of EnergySpoofAttacks |

  1. Thermodynamical instability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to Hawking radiation of black hole with a given spacetime structure, we consider a competitive transition due to a heat transfer from a hotter inner horizon to a colder outer horizon of Kerr black hole, that results in a stable thermodynamical state of extremal black hole. In this process, by supposing an emission of gravitational quanta, we calculate the mass of extremal black hole in the final state of transition.

  2. Towards noncommutative quantum black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Obregon, O.; Sabido, M.; Ramirez, C. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. We use a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate the Hawking's temperature and entropy for the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole.

  3. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  4. Quantum black hole inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Altaie

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we follow a new approach for particle creation by a localized strong gravitational field. The approach is based on a definition of the physical vacuum drawn from Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Using the fact that the gravitational field red-shifts the frequency modes of the vacuum, a condition on the minimum stregth of the gravitational field required to achieve real particle creation is derived. Application of this requirement on a Schwartzchid black hole resulted in deducing an upper limit on the region, outside the event horizon, where real particles can be created. Using this regional upper limit, and considering particle creation by black holes as a consequence of the Casimir effect, with the assumption that the created quanta are to be added to the initial energy, we deduce a natural power law for the development of the event horizon, and consequently a logarithmic law for the area spectrum of an inflating black hole. Application of the results on a cosmological model shows that if we start with a Planck-dimensional black hole, then through the process of particle creation we end up with a universe having the presently estimated critical density. Such a universe will be in a state of eternal inflation.

  5. Black Holes at Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes are copiously produced in particle collisions at energies well above the Planck scale. I briefly review some recent work on the phenomenology of this process, with emphasis on theoretical uncertainties and possible strategies for measuring the number of extra dimensions.

  6. Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012 Jeff Freidberg MIT 1 #12;The Emperor of Fusion has · Comparison (1 GW overnight cost) · Coal $ 3B · Gas $ 1B · Nuclear $ 4B · Wind $ 2B · Solar-T $ 3B · ITER $25B option · Tough MHD, heating, current drive, transport · I doubt it will achieve its mission · Still

  7. Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zurich Soft-input soft-output (SISO) detection in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems constitutes Laboratory ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: boelcskei@nari.ee.ethz.ch Abstract--Soft-input soft

  8. Technology Validation Sig Gronich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and validate integrated hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in a systems context under real operating in quantity that is powered by a wind turbine. ∑ By 2008, validate hydrogen vehicles with greater than 250. . Distributed Generation TransportationBiomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil With

  9. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masaaki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi 448-8542 (Japan); Takahashi, Rohta, E-mail: takahasi@phyas.aichi-edu.ac.j [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  10. Shape of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, MarŪa E Gabach

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that celestial bodies tend to be spherical due to gravity and that rotation produces deviations from this sphericity. We discuss what is known and expected about the shape of black holes' horizons from their formation to their final, stationary state. We present some recent results showing that black hole rotation indeed manifests in the widening of their central regions, limits their global shapes and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotation speed. The results depend only on the horizon area and angular momentum. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the spacetime and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. We also discuss the the relation of this result with the Hoop conjecture.

  11. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  12. Black holes in massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the black hole solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact black hole solutions, analogous to those of General Relativity. In addition to these solutions, hairy black holes -- solutions with no correspondent in General Relativity -- have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of the Birkhoff's theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these black holes richer and more complex than those of General Relativity. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild black hole exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical black holes are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability o...

  13. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  14. Validating Energy Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.; Thomas, D.

    Energy measurements play a very important role in a detailed energy analysis. The role is more important in industrial processes where wide variations of process conditions exist. Valid energy measurements make the decision making process easier...

  15. Accelerated Testing Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in the HD6 MEA. Failure analysis of these MEAs has beenpotential hold test. The failure analysis from these stacksbe validated with the failure analysis from both the AST and

  16. Observational Evidence for Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronomers have discovered two populations of black holes: (i) stellar-mass black holes with masses in the range 5 to 30 solar masses, millions of which are present in each galaxy in the universe, and (ii) supermassive black holes with masses in the range 10^6 to 10^{10} solar masses, one each in the nucleus of every galaxy. There is strong circumstantial evidence that all these objects are true black holes with event horizons. The measured masses of supermassive black hole are strongly correlated with properties of their host galaxies, suggesting that these black holes, although extremely small in size, have a strong influence on the formation and evolution of entire galaxies. Spin parameters have recently been measured for a handful of black holes. Based on the data, there is an indication that the kinetic power of at least one class of relativistic jet ejected from accreting black holes may be correlated with black hole spin. If verified, it would suggest that these jets are powered by a generalized Penrose process mediated by magnetic fields.

  17. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Xiaoming

    The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using available observations, focusing on the role of the synoptically ...

  18. Automatically identifying critical input regions and code in applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbin, Michael James

    Applications that process complex inputs often react in different ways to changes in different regions of the input. Small changes to forgiving regions induce correspondingly small changes in the behavior and output. Small ...

  19. The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control A Dissertation Presented Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control Approved by: Dr. William Singhose, Advisor School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 PID Feedback Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.5 Comparison

  20. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  1. Input Routing Determining the next hop with ip_route_input()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    _route_input(struct sk_buff *skb, u32 daddr, u32 saddr, u8 tos, struct net_device *dev) 1624 { 1625 struct rtable * rth; 1626 unsigned hash; 1627 int iif = dev->ifindex; 1628 1629 tos &= IPTOS_RT_MASK; The rt_hash_code(daddr, saddr ^ (iif tos); The hash function is implemented by the inline function rt

  2. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Strategic inputs into patent pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Strategic inputs into patent pools Justus Baron Henry Delcamp Working;2 Strategic inputs into patent pools1 Justus BARON2 Henry DELCAMP3 Abstract: This article explores what factors determine the decision of a patent pool to accept new inputs. We propose a dynamic analysis

  3. The Ozone Hole Some perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    The Ozone Hole ∑ Some perspective ∑ The British Antarctic Survey ∑ The "Ozone Hole" ∑ International of the predicted ozone losses! This was quite a controversy. Ultimately, ozone losses started appearing in the late 1980s (see Figure below), but by then, there was already a credibility issue for ozone scientists. #12

  4. Optical black holes and solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn Westmoreland

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

  5. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  6. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  7. Alternate Explosions: Collapse and Accretion Events with Red Holes instead of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A red hole is "just like a black hole" except it lacks an event horizon and a singularity. As a result, a red hole emits much more energy than a black hole during a collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae.

  8. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  9. PV array simulator development and validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA); Deuel, Don (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple MPPT DC inputs. The flexibility of the PV simulator enables the validation of the inverter's capability to handle vastly different array configurations.

  10. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Berkowitz; Michael I. Buchoff; Enrico Rinaldi

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One intriguing BSM particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong CP problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the universe. This particle is a pNGB of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry breaking scale, $f_a$, whose value is roughly greater than $10^{9}$ GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, $m_a$, is roughly less than $10^4\\ \\mu \\text{eV}$). The density of axions in the universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early-universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the QCD free energy with respect to the CP-violating phase, $\\theta$. However, this quantity is generically non-perturbative and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small $\\theta$ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the universe. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-$\\theta$ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound $m_a \\geq (14.6\\pm0.1) \\ \\mu \\text{eV}$ when PQ-breaking occurs after inflation.

  11. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  12. Black Hole Interior Mass Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue by explicit computations that, although the area product, horizon radii product, entropy product and \\emph {irreducible mass product} of the event horizon and Cauchy horizon are universal, the \\emph{surface gravity product}, \\emph{surface temperature product} and \\emph{Komar energy product} of the said horizons do not seem to be universal for Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole space-time. We show the black hole mass formula on the \\emph{Cauchy horizon} following the seminal work by Smarr\\cite{smarr} for the outer horizon. We also prescribed the \\emph{four} laws of black hole mechanics for the \\emph{inner horizon}. New definition of the extremal limit of a black hole is discussed.

  13. Preliminary prediction of inflow into the D-holes at the Stripa Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Karasaki, K.; Davey, A.; Peterson, J.; Landsfeld, M.; Kemeny, J.; Martel, S.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is contracted by the US Department of Energy to provide an auxiliary modeling effort for the Stripa Project. Within this effort, we are making calculations of inflow to the Simulated Drift Experiment (SDE), i.e. inflow to six parallel, closely spaced D-holes, using a preliminary set of data collected in five other holes, the N- and W-holes during Stages 1 and 2 of the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) project. Our approach has been to focus on the fracture zones rather than the general set of ubiquitous fractures. Approximately 90% of all the water flowing in the rock is flowing in fracture zones which are neither uniformly conductive nor are they infinitely extensive. Our approach has been to adopt the fracture zone locations as they have been identified with geophysics. We use geologic sense and the original geophysical data to add one zone where significant water inflow has been observed that can not be explained with the other geophysical zones. This report covers LBL's preliminary prediction of flow into the D-holes. Care should be taken in interpreting the results given in this report. As explained below, the approach that LBL has designed for developing a fracture hydrology model requires cross-hole hydrologic data. Cross-hole tests are planned for Stage 3 but were unavailable in Stage 1. As such, we have inferred from available data what a cross-hole test might show and used this synthetic data to make a preliminary calculation of the inflow into the D-holes. Then using all the Stage 3 data we will calculate flow into the Validation Drift itself. The report mainly demonstrates the use of our methodology and the simulated results should be considered preliminary.

  14. arterial input functions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: model. Due to safety and...

  15. arterial input function: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: model. Due to safety and...

  16. Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MT) Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and...

  17. Impacts of atmospheric nutrient inputs on marine biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Mahowald, Natalie; Luo, Chao; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass burning, and biofuels) dominate P inputs [Olmez etburning, fossil fuels, biofuels, volcanoes, sea salts whichburning, fossil fuels, biofuels) G01006 of total P are

  18. ,"New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","227...

  19. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  20. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  1. Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBRís SB Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putman, Valerie Lee

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

  2. Spectral properties of acoustic black hole radiation: Broadening the horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finazzi, Stefano; Parentani, Renaud [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, Trieste 34151 (Italy) and INFN sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, Trieste 34127 (Italy); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Batiment 210, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity of the black hole spectrum when introducing short distance dispersion is studied in the context of atomic Bose condensates. By considering flows characterized by several length scales, we show that, while the spectrum remains remarkably Planckian, the temperature is no longer fixed by the surface gravity. Rather it is determined by the average of the flow gradient across the horizon over an interval fixed by the healing length and the surface gravity, as if the horizon were broadened. This remains valid as long as the flow does not induce nonadiabatic effects that produce oscillations or some parametric amplification of the flux.

  3. Interactive Computing 1 Input/Output and Complex Arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Interactive Computing 1 Input/Output and Complex Arithmetic interactive Python scripts complex Software (MCS 507 L-3) Interactive Computing 30 August 2013 1 / 33 #12;Interactive Computing 1 Input/Output and Complex Arithmetic interactive Python scripts complex arithmetic 2 Python Coding Style and pylint coding

  4. Towards Efficient Private Distributed Computation on Unbounded Input Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /11), Cabarnit Cyber Security MAGNET Consortium, MAFAT and Deutsche Telekom Labs at BGU. #12;2 Shlomi Dolev1Towards Efficient Private Distributed Computation on Unbounded Input Streams Shlomi Dolev1 , Juan- curely and distributively perform a computation on common inputs, in such a way that even if the entire

  5. Global sensitivity analysis of computer models with functional inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -based sensitivity analysis techniques, based on the so-called Sobol's indices, when some input variables computer codes which need a preliminary metamodeling step before performing the sensitivity analysis. We). The "mean model" allows to estimate the sensi- tivity indices of each scalar input variables, while

  6. Considering Workload Input Variations in Error Coverage Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Johan

    different parts of the workload code to be executed different number of times. By using the results from in the workload input when estimating error detection coverage using fault injection are investigated. Results sequence based on results from fault injection experiments with another input sequence is presented

  7. Coordination of Multiple Non-Holonomic Agents with Input Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loizou, Savvas G.

    -aircraft systems modeled as hybrid systems. With the advent of powerful formal verification tools, there has been with aircraft-like kinematic constraints. A model of a system of input-constrained non- holonomic agents by Belta et al. in [10]. In this paper, a discrete model of a system with input- constrained non

  8. Model Verification and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.Model Verification and Validation Engineering

  9. Validation needs of seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods applied to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effort to validate seismic PRA methods is in progress. The work concentrates on the validation of plant response and fragility estimates through the use of test data and information from actual earthquake experience. Validation needs have been identified in the areas of soil-structure interaction, structural response and capacity, and equipment fragility. Of particular concern is the adequacy of linear methodology to predict nonlinear behavior. While many questions can be resolved through the judicious use of dynamic test data, other aspects can only be validated by means of input and response measurements during actual earthquakes. A number of past, ongoing, and planned testing programs which can provide useful validation data have been identified, and validation approaches for specific problems are being formulated.

  10. Generalized Smarr relation for Kerr-AdS black holes from improved surface integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnich, Glenn; Compere, Geoffrey [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using suitably improved surface integrals, we give a unified geometric derivation of the generalized Smarr relation for higher dimensional Kerr black holes which is valid both in flat and in anti-de Sitter backgrounds. The improvement of the surface integrals, which allows one to use them simultaneously at infinity and on the horizon, consists in integrating them along a path in solution space. Path independence of the improved charges is explicitly proved. It is also shown that the charges for higher dimensional Kerr-AdS black holes can be correctly computed from the standard Hamiltonian or Lagrangian surface integrals.

  11. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghi, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  12. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; Kh. Jafarzade

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  13. Energy on black hole spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

  14. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA); Paris, Robert D. (San Ramon, CA); Feldman, Mark (Pleasanton, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  15. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  16. Introduction to Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes are an elementary and pedagogical introduction to the black hole evaporation, based on a lecture given by the author at the Ninth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics and are intended for PhD students. First, quantum field theory in curved spacetime is studied and tools needed for the remaining of the course are introduced. Then, quantum field theory in Rindler spacetime in 1+1 dimensions and in the spacetime of a spherically collapsing star are considered, leading to Unruh and Hawking effects, respectively. Finally, some consequences such as thermodynamics of black holes and information loss paradox are discussed.

  17. The scattering matrix approach for the quantum black hole, an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    If one assumes the validity of conventional quantum field theory in the vicinity of the horizon of a black hole, one does not find a quantum mechanical description of the entire black hole that even remotely resembles that of conventional forms of matter; in contrast with matter made out of ordinary particles one finds that, even if embedded in a finite volume, a black hole would be predicted to have a strictly continuous spectrum. Dissatisfied with such a result, which indeed hinges on assumptions concerning the horizon that may well be wrong, various investigators have now tried to formulate alternative approaches to the problem of ``quantizing" the black hole. We here review the approach based on the assumption of quantum mechanical purity and unitarity as a starting point, as has been advocated by the present author for some time, concentrating on the physics of the states that should live on a black hole horizon. The approach is shown to be powerful in not only producing promising models for the quantum black hole, but also new insights concerning the dynamics of physical degrees of freedom in ordinary flat space-time.

  18. The Efficiency of Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Production in the Collision of Two Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Aranha; H. P. de Oliveira; I. Dami„o Soares; E. V. Tonini

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the efficiency of gravitational bremsstrahlung production in the process of head-on collision of two boosted Schwarzschild black holes. We constructed initial data for the characteristic initial value problem in Robinson-Trautman spacetimes, that represent two instantaneously stationary Schwarzschild black holes in motion towards each other with the same velocity. The Robinson-Trautman equation was integrated for these initial data using a numerical code based on the Galerkin method. The final resulting configuration is a boosted black hole with Bondi mass greater than the sum of the individual mass of each initial black hole. Two relevant aspects of the process are presented. The first relates the efficiency $\\Delta$ of the energy extraction by gravitational wave emission to the mass of the final black hole. This relation is fitted by a distribution function of non-extensive thermostatistics with entropic parameter $q \\simeq 1/2$; the result extends and validates analysis based on the linearized theory of gravitational wave emission. The second is a typical bremsstrahlung angular pattern in the early period of emission at the wave zone, a consequence of the deceleration of the black holes as they coalesce; this pattern evolves to a quadrupole form for later times.

  19. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  20. ONTHEGO TEXT ENTRY: EVALUATING AND IMPROVING MOBILE TEXT INPUT ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starner, Thad E.

    ON≠THE≠GO TEXT ENTRY: EVALUATING AND IMPROVING MOBILE TEXT INPUT ON MINI≠QWERTY KEYBOARDS A Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Thesis Statement-QWERTY KEYBOARDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 4.1 Blind Typing in Real

  1. Face Interface : a methodology for experimental learning of input modalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Jon William

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates that creating a system with a visual representation of the face which mirrors the user's facial gestures appears to solve problems in teaching a user to use the new input affordances of face-based ...

  2. Adaptive Distributed Parameter and Input Estimation in Plasma Tokamak Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Keywords: Thermonuclear fusion, distributed parameter systems, input state and parameter estimation, adaptive infinite-dimensional estimation, Galerkin method 1. INTRODUCTION In a controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor, the plasma thermal diffusivity and heating energy play an important role

  3. Operation of buck regulator with ultra-low input voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Cory Angelo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the LTC3621 and LTC3624, the designed buck regulator proposed in this thesis aims to lower the allowed input voltage and increase efficiency compared to the original part without making significant changes to ...

  4. Graphene induced bifurcation of energy levels at low input power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Shisheng; Liu, Xu; Chen, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study analytically the energy states in the waveguide system of graphene coated dielectric nanowire based on the explicit form of nonlinear surface conductivity of graphene. The energy levels of different plasmonic modes can be tuned by the input power at the order of a few tenths of mW. The self-focusing behavior and self-defocusing behavior are exhibited in the lower and upper bifurcation branches, respectively, which are separated by a saturation of input power. Moreover, due to the nonlinearity of graphene, the dispersion relations for different input powers evolve to an energy band which is in sharp contrast with the discrete energy level in the limit of zero power input.

  5. Comparison of wind stress algorithms, datasets and oceanic power input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Shaoyu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the ocean is in a statistically steady state, energy balance is a strong constraint, suggesting that the energy input into the world ocean is dissipated simultaneously at the same rate. Energy conservation is one of the ...

  6. ac input power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    architecture was ... Salazar, Nathaniel Jay Tobias 2012-01-01 8 On the power of real Turing machines over binary inputs Mathematics Websites Summary: On the power of real Turing...

  7. additional power input: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pairs of channels. Motohisa Fukuda; Ion Nechita 2012-12-07 4 On the power of real Turing machines over binary inputs Mathematics Websites Summary: On the power of real Turing...

  8. anthropogenic lead inputs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    et al. Pb Brest, Universit de 6 GEOS-CHEM ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS Table 1. Inventories general features. Use of optional inventories is set in the input.geos file....

  9. Process and Intermediate Calculations User AccessInputs Outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process and Intermediate Calculations User AccessInputs Outputs Fire Behavior & Probability STARFire System Flow Valuation Processing Temporal Schedules Smoke ∑ Zones ∑ Zone impact ∑ Emissions Fire and compare Valuation (Structured Elicit Process) 1) Value Layers: ∑ Point (housing, cultural trees, etc

  10. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  11. Signatures of black holes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

  12. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  13. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  14. Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

  15. Analyzing the impacts of sales tax on agricultural inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamar, Christina Helweg

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYZING THE IMPACTS OF SALES TAX ON AGRICULTURAL INPUTS CHRISTINA HELWEG ~ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AgtM University in partial fulSllment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major... Subject: Agncultural Economics ABSTRACT Analyzing the Impacts of Sales Tax on Agricultural Inputs. (August 1992) Christina Helweg Lamar, B. S. , Texas AthM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ronald Knutson With the increased demand...

  16. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  17. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 ∑ Einstein, A. "®Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. ∑ Einstein, A. "®Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  18. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of ďcoded aperturesĒ. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  19. Black Hole Radiation and Volume Statistical Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The simplest possible equation for Hawking radiation, and other black hole radiated power is derived in terms of black hole density. Black hole density also leads to the simplest possible model of a gas of elementary constituents confined inside a gravitational bottle of Schwarzchild radius at tremendous pressure, which yields identically the same functional dependence as the traditional black hole entropy. Variations of Sbh can be obtained which depend on the occupancy of phase space cells. A relation is derived between the constituent momenta and the black hole radius which is similar to the Compton wavelength relation.

  20. Software Verification and Validation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olund, Thomas S.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Verification and Validation procedure provides the action steps for the Tank Waste Information Network System (TWINS) testing process. The primary objective of the testing process is to provide assurance that the software functions as intended, and meets the requirements specified by the client. Verification and validation establish the primary basis for TWINS software product acceptance.

  1. DUSTMS-D: DISPOSAL UNIT SOURCE TERM - MULTIPLE SPECIES - DISTRIBUTED FAILURE DATA INPUT GUIDE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessment of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility begins with an estimation of the rate at which radionuclides migrate out of the facility (i.e., the source term). The focus of this work is to develop a methodology for calculating the source term. In general, the source term is influenced by the radionuclide inventory, the wasteforms and containers used to dispose of the inventory, and the physical processes that lead to release from the facility (fluid flow, container degradation, wasteform leaching, and radionuclide transport). Many of these physical processes are influenced by the design of the disposal facility (e.g., how the engineered barriers control infiltration of water). The complexity of the problem and the absence of appropriate data prevent development of an entirely mechanistic representation of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Typically, a number of assumptions, based on knowledge of the disposal system, are used to simplify the problem. This has been done and the resulting models have been incorporated into the computer code DUST-MS (Disposal Unit Source Term-Multiple Species). The DUST-MS computer code is designed to model water flow, container degradation, release of contaminants from the wasteform to the contacting solution and transport through the subsurface media. Water flow through the facility over time is modeled using tabular input. Container degradation models include three types of failure rates: (a) instantaneous (all containers in a control volume fail at once), (b) uniformly distributed failures (containers fail at a linear rate between a specified starting and ending time), and (c) gaussian failure rates (containers fail at a rate determined by a mean failure time, standard deviation and gaussian distribution). Wasteform release models include four release mechanisms: (a) rinse with partitioning (inventory is released instantly upon container failure subject to equilibrium partitioning (sorption) with the waste form), (b) diffusion release.(release from either a cylindrical, spherical, or rectangular wasteform), (c) dissolution release (uniform release over time due to dissolution of the wasteform surface), and (d) solubility limited release. The predicated wasteform releases are corrected for radioactive decay and ingrowth. A unique set of container failure and wasteform release parameters can be specified for each control volume with a container. Contaminant transport is modeled through a finite-difference solution of the advective transport equation with sources (wasteform release and ingrowth) and radioactive decay. Although DUST-MS simulates one-dimensional transport, it can be used to simulate migration down to an aquifer and then transport in the aquifer by running the code twice. A special subroutine allows the flux into the aquifer from the first simulation to be input as the flux at the upstream boundary in the aquifer. This document presents the models used to calculate release from a disposal facility, verification of the model, and instructions on the use of the DUST-MS code. In addition to DUST-MS, a preprocessor, DUSTINMS, which helps the code user create input decks for DUST-MS and a post-processor, GRAFMS, which takes selected output files and plots them on the computer terminal have been written. Use of these codes is also described. In using DUST-MS, as with all computer models, the validity of the predictions relies heavily on the validity of the input parameters. Often, the largest uncertainties arise from uncertainty in the input parameters. Therefore, it is crucial to document and support the use of these parameters. The DUST-MS code, because of its flexibility and ability to compute release rates quickly, is extremely useful for screening to determine the radionuclide released at the highest rate, parameter sensitivity analysis and, with proper choice of the input parameters, provide upper bounds to release rates.

  2. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Astronomical Institute of Kharkov, V. N. Karazin National University, 35 Sumskaya Street, Kharkov, 61022 (Ukraine)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to be less difficult than one could think of it.

  3. Black Hole Evaporation as a Nonequilibrium Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi Saida

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When a black hole evaporates, there arises a net energy flow from the black hole into its outside environment due to the Hawking radiation and the energy accretion onto black hole. Exactly speaking, due to the net energy flow, the black hole evaporation is a nonequilibrium process. To study details of evaporation process, nonequilibrium effects of the net energy flow should be taken into account. In this article we simplify the situation so that the Hawking radiation consists of non-self-interacting massless matter fields and also the energy accretion onto the black hole consists of the same fields. Then we find that the nonequilibrium nature of black hole evaporation is described by a nonequilibrium state of that field, and we formulate nonequilibrium thermodynamics of non-self-interacting massless fields. By applying it to black hole evaporation, followings are shown: (1) Nonequilibrium effects of the energy flow tends to accelerate the black hole evaporation, and, consequently, a specific nonequilibrium phenomenon of semi-classical black hole evaporation is suggested. Furthermore a suggestion about the end state of quantum size black hole evaporation is proposed in the context of information loss paradox. (2) Negative heat capacity of black hole is the physical essence of the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics, and self-entropy production inside the matter around black hole is not necessary to ensure the generalized second law. Furthermore a lower bound for total entropy at the end of black hole evaporation is given. A relation of the lower bound with the so-called covariant entropy bound conjecture is interesting but left as an open issue.

  4. Sensitivity of piping seismic responses to input factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the sensitivity of peak dynamic seismic responses to input parameters. The responses have been modeled and calculated for the Zion Unit 1 plant as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) performed by the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The SSMRP was supported by the US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Two sensitivity topics motivated the study. The first is the sensitivity of piping response to the mean value of piping damping. The second is the sensitivity of all the responses to the earthquake and model input parameters including soil, structure and piping parameters; this information is required for another study, the sensitivity of the plant system response (in terms of risk) to these dynamic input parameters and to other input factors. We evaluate the response sensitivities by performing a linear regression analysis (LRA) of the computer code SMACS. With SMACS we have a detailed model of the Zion plant and of the important dynamic processes in the soil, structures and piping systems. The qualitative results change with the location of the individual response. Different responses are in locations where the many potential influences have different effectiveness. The results give an overview of the complexity of the seismic dyanmic response of a plant. Within the diversity trends are evident in the influences of the input variables on the responses.

  5. Nonlinear quantum input-output analysis using Volterra series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing Zhang; Yu-xi Liu; Re-Bing Wu; Kurt Jacobs; Sahin Kaya Ozdemir; Lan Yang; Tzyh-Jong Tarn; Franco Nori

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum input-output theory plays a very important role for analyzing the dynamics of quantum systems, especially large-scale quantum networks. As an extension of the input-output formalism of Gardiner and Collet, we develop a new approach based on the quantum version of the Volterra series which can be used to analyze nonlinear quantum input-output dynamics. By this approach, we can ignore the internal dynamics of the quantum input-output system and represent the system dynamics by a series of kernel functions. This approach has the great advantage of modelling weak-nonlinear quantum networks. In our approach, the number of parameters, represented by the kernel functions, used to describe the input-output response of a weak-nonlinear quantum network, increases linearly with the scale of the quantum network, not exponentially as usual. Additionally, our approach can be used to formulate the quantum network with both nonlinear and nonconservative components, e.g., quantum amplifiers, which cannot be modelled by the existing methods, such as the Hudson-Parthasarathy model and the quantum transfer function model. We apply our general method to several examples, including Kerr cavities, optomechanical transducers, and a particular coherent feedback system with a nonlinear component and a quantum amplifier in the feedback loop. This approach provides a powerful way to the modelling and control of nonlinear quantum networks.

  6. U-067:WebSVN Input Validation Flaw in getLog() Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can access the target user's cookies (including authentication cookies), if any, associated with the site running the WebSVN software, access data recently submitted by the target user via web form to the site, or take actions on the site acting as the target user.

  7. Particle emission from a black hole on a tense codimension-2 brane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usama A. al-Binni; George Siopsis

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate analytically grey-body factors of Schwarzschild black-holes localized on a 3-brane of finite tension and codimension 2. We obtain explicit expressions for various types of particles emitted in the bulk as well as on the brane in both the low and high frequency regimes. In the latter case, we obtain expressions which are valid for arbitrary number of extra dimensions if the brane tension vanishes.

  8. BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liancheng Wang; Feng He; Xiangyun Fu

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole. It can be found that the BSW process will also arise near black hole horizon when the evaporation of charged black hole is very slow. But now the background black hole does not have to be an extremal black hole, and it will be approximately an extremal black hole unless it is nearly a huge stationary black hole.

  9. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunsden, Barry S. (Chicago, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  10. Incorporating uncertainty in RADTRAN 6.0 input files.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science and Technology)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty may be introduced into RADTRAN analyses by distributing input parameters. The MELCOR Uncertainty Engine (Gauntt and Erickson, 2004) has been adapted for use in RADTRAN to determine the parameter shape and minimum and maximum of the distribution, to sample on the distribution, and to create an appropriate RADTRAN batch file. Coupling input parameters is not possible in this initial application. It is recommended that the analyst be very familiar with RADTRAN and able to edit or create a RADTRAN input file using a text editor before implementing the RADTRAN Uncertainty Analysis Module. Installation of the MELCOR Uncertainty Engine is required for incorporation of uncertainty into RADTRAN. Gauntt and Erickson (2004) provides installation instructions as well as a description and user guide for the uncertainty engine.

  11. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  12. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  13. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Liberman, Vladimir (Needham, MA); Morse, Jeffrey (Martinez, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  14. Quantum Geometry and Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G., J Fernando Barbero

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

  15. Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanagisawa, M. [Department of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hope, J. J. [Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

  16. ETFOD: a point model physics code with arbitrary input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, K.E.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ETFOD is a zero-dimensional code which solves a set of physics equations by minimization. The technique used is different than normally used, in that the input is arbitrary. The user is supplied with a set of variables from which he specifies which variables are input (unchanging). The remaining variables become the output. Presently the code is being used for ETF reactor design studies. The code was written in a manner to allow easy modificaton of equations, variables, and physics calculations. The solution technique is presented along with hints for using the code.

  17. Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"YearProductionShaleInput Product:Input Product: Total

  18. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  19. XML Document XML Document Types and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gregory D.

    XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 April, 2010 #12;XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives Learning Objectives Understand: The need for validation Two ways to specify validity: Document Type Definitions (DTDs) XML Schemas #12;XML

  20. Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary to solve transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as data, formulated in terms: Eddy current problems, time-dependent electromagnetic problems, input current intensities, finite

  1. PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Mashuri L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAROF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLARbuilding to changes in heat input, and to predict room and

  2. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes-- the so called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability timescale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null {\\it rays} is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation {\\it waves} in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  3. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hod, Shahar [Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel) and Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes--the so-called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability time scale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null rays is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation waves in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  4. Canaries in a Coal Mine: Using Globular Clusters to Place Limits on Massive Black Holes in the Galactic Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Arras; Ira Wasserman

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility that massive black holes comprise a significant fraction of the dark matter of our galaxy by studying the dissolution of galactic globular clusters bombarded by them. In our simulations, we evolve the clusters along a sequence of King models determined by changes of state resulting from collisions with the black holes. The results divide naturally into regimes of `small' and `large' black hole mass. `Small' black holes do not destroy clusters in single collisions; their effect is primarily cumulative, leading to a relation between $\\mbh$ and $\\fhalo$, the fraction of the halo in black holes of mass $\\mbh$, which is $\\fhalo\\mbh < $ constant (up to logarithmic corrections). For $\\fhalo=1$, we find $\\mbh \\simless 10^{3} \\msun$ by requiring survival of the same clusters studied by Moore (1993), who neglected cluster evolution, mass loss, and stochasticity of energy inputs in his estimates, but reached a similar conclusion. `Large' black holes may not penetrate a cluster without disrupting it; their effect is mainly catastrophic (close collisions), but also partly cumulative (distant collisions). In the large $\\mbh$ limit, $\\fhalo$ (but not $\\mbh$) can be constrained by computing the probability that a cluster survives a combination of close, destructive encounters and distant, nondestructive encounters. We find that it is unlikely that $\\fhalo \\simgreat 0.3$ by requiring 50 per cent survival probability for Moore's clusters over $10^{10}$ years.

  5. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adami; G. Ver Steeg

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole's absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal "quantum cloning machines" and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as $\\omega/T\\geq10$, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  6. Optimal linear control systems with input derivative constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    . Optimal linear control systems with input derivative constraints J. B. Moore, Ph. D., and Prof. B-loss-function minimisation problem is linear. The "paper applies the results of this optimal control theory to a class of performance desired. For linear, finite-dimensional, completely controllable systems, Kalmanl has shown

  7. Gaussian Process Training with Input Noise Andrew McHutchon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    University Cambridge, CB2 1PZ ajm257@cam.ac.uk Carl Edward Rasmussen Department of Engineering Cambridge University Cambridge, CB2 1PZ cer54@cam.ac.uk Abstract In standard Gaussian Process regression input intuitive sense: for example, an application in Rasmussen and Williams (2006) [1] is that of modelling CO2

  8. Power Control for Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    . K. Rasmussen CUED / F-INFENG / TR 582 August 2007 #12;#12;1 Power Control for Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels Khoa D. Nguyen, Albert Guill¬īen i F`abregas and Lars K. Rasmussen Abstract We consider power systems employing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. K. D. Nguyen and L. K. Rasmussen

  9. Input Design for Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamic Systems -A Particle Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SchŲn, Thomas

    Input Design for Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamic Systems - A Particle Filter Approach R. Bhushan in nonlinear stochastic dynamic systems. The approach relies on minimizing a function of the covariance]). There has also been work done on obtaining finite sam- ple covariance estimates (Weyer et al. [1999], Weyer

  10. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest Colleen2 Ecological Society of America, 2008 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;+ [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] + C and N storage in biomass #12;+ Net primary production

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRATIONINDUCED IMAGE DEFECTS IN INPUT SCANNERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    ) by dynamic errors of gears, timing bets, and motors, and indirectly by structural vibrations induced by gearsCHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRATION­INDUCED IMAGE DEFECTS IN INPUT SCANNERS Robert P. Loce George Wolberg. Keywords: image defects, digital documents, scanned documents, vibrations, motion quality 1. INTRODUCTION

  12. Power Control for Crossbar-based Input-Queued Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , if f is the maximum digital signal frequency, the power consumption of a CMOS device is proportional number of data simultaneously flowing across the switching fabric. Thermal power dissipation is becoming1 Power Control for Crossbar-based Input-Queued Switches Andrea Bianco, Paolo Giaccone, Guido

  13. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO WHEELS ENERGY INPUTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO WHEELS ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Preparation for the AB 1007 (Pavley) Alternative Transportation Fuels Plan Proceeding Prepared For: California Energy, Project Manager Ray Tuvell, Manager EMERGING FUELS & TECHNOLOGY OFFICE Rosella Shapiro, Deputy Director

  14. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For Manager McKinley Addy, Project Manager Ray Tuvell, Manager EMERGING FUELS & TECHNOLOGY OFFICE Rosella Shapiro, Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION B.B Blevins Executive Director DISCLAIMER

  15. Remarks on Renormalization of Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Sung Ku Kim; Kwang-Sup Soh; Jae Hyung Yee

    1996-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We elaborate the renormalization process of entropy of a nonextremal and an extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole by using the Pauli-Villars regularization method, in which the regulator fields obey either the Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac distribution depending on their spin-statistics. The black hole entropy involves only two renormalization constants. We also discuss the entropy and temperature of the extremal black hole.

  16. Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordt, David Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of different non-Newtonian fluids 56 INTRODUCTION A drilling fluid is used for removing cuttings from the hole, controlling subsurface pressures, preventing caving-in of the formations, suspension of cuttings, weighting materials, and many other uses... of the hole. The drilling problems related to hole cleaning can occur at low as well as high annular velocities. Cuttings can travel no faster than the fluid in which they are transported; however, they can travel more slowly. Their fall (slip) rate...

  17. Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia MŁller; Tehseen Rug

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

  18. Black hole initial data without elliptic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IstvŠn RŠcz; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore whether a new method to solve the constraints of Einstein's equations, which does not involve elliptic equations, can be applied to provide initial data for black holes. We show that this method can be successfully applied to a nonlinear perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole by establishing the well-posedness of the resulting constraint problem. We discuss its possible generalization to the boosted, spinning multiple black hole problem.

  19. Absorption cross section of RN black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

  20. Black holes with massive graviton hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    No-hair theorems exclude the existence of nontrivial scalar and massive vector hair outside four-dimensional, static, asymptotically flat black-hole spacetimes. We show, by explicitly building nonlinear solutions, that black holes can support massive graviton hair in theories of massive gravity. These hairy solutions are, most likely, the generic end state of the recently discovered monopole instability of Schwarzschild black holes in massive graviton theories.

  1. DOE Seeks Public Input on an Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seeks Public Input on an Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application Process for Transmission Authorizations DOE Seeks Public Input on an Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application...

  2. Thermoelectric DC conductivities from black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic expression for the DC electrical conductivity in terms of black hole horizon data was recently obtained for a class of holographic black holes exhibiting momentum dissipation. We generalise this result to obtain analogous expressions for the DC thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. We illustrate our results using some holographic Q-lattice black holes as well as for some black holes with linear massless axions, in both $D=4$ and $D=5$ bulk spacetime dimensions, which include both spatially isotropic and anisotropic examples. We show that some recently constructed ground states of holographic Q-lattices, which can be either electrically insulating or metallic, are all thermal insulators.

  3. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  4. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  5. Lower Dimensional Black Holes: Inside and Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I survey the physics of black holes in two and three spacetime dimensions, with special attention given to an understanding of their exterior and interior properties.

  6. Approximate initial data for binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct approximate analytical solutions to the constraint equations of general relativity for binary black holes of arbitrary mass ratio in quasicircular orbit. We adopt the puncture method to solve the constraint equations in the transverse-traceless decomposition and consider perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes caused by boosts and the presence of a binary companion. A superposition of these two perturbations then yields approximate, but fully analytic binary black hole initial data that are accurate to first order in the inverse of the binary separation and the square of the black holes' momenta.

  7. A new spin on black hole hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that scalar hair can be added to rotating, vacuum black holes of general relativity. These hairy black holes (HBHs) clarify a lingering question concerning gravitational solitons: if a black hole can be added at the centre of a boson star, as it typically can for other solitons. We argue that it can, but only if it is spinning. The existence of such HBHs is related to the Kerr superradiant instability triggered by a massive scalar field. This connection leads to the following conjecture: a (hairless) black hole which is afflicted by the superradiant instability of a given field must allow hairy generalizations with that field.

  8. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of...

  9. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  10. Rotating embedded black holes: Entropy and Hawking's radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng Ibohal

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we derive a class of rotating embedded black holes. Then we study Hawking's radiation effects on these embedded black holes. The surface gravity, entropy and angular velocity are given for each of these black holes.

  11. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong Chan [FRDP, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  12. Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

  13. Gravitating discs around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas; J. -M. Hure; O. Semerak

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid discs and tori around black holes are discussed within different approaches and with the emphasis on the role of disc gravity. First reviewed are the prospects of investigating the gravitational field of a black hole--disc system by analytical solutions of stationary, axially symmetric Einstein's equations. Then, more detailed considerations are focused to middle and outer parts of extended disc-like configurations where relativistic effects are small and the Newtonian description is adequate. Within general relativity, only a static case has been analysed in detail. Results are often very inspiring, however, simplifying assumptions must be imposed: ad hoc profiles of the disc density are commonly assumed and the effects of frame-dragging and completely lacking. Astrophysical discs (e.g. accretion discs in active galactic nuclei) typically extend far beyond the relativistic domain and are fairly diluted. However, self-gravity is still essential for their structure and evolution, as well as for their radiation emission and the impact on the environment around. For example, a nuclear star cluster in a galactic centre may bear various imprints of mutual star--disc interactions, which can be recognised in observational properties, such as the relation between the central mass and stellar velocity dispersion.

  14. Topological Black Holes in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kowalski-Glikman; D. Nowak-Szczepaniak

    2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the black hole solutions with horizons of non-trivial topology and investigate their properties in the framework of an approach to quantum gravity being an extension of Bohm's formulation of quantum mechanics. The solutions we found tend asymptotically (for large $r$) to topological black holes. We also analyze the thermodynamics of these space-times.

  15. Primordial black holes and asteroid danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shatskiy

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability for a primordial black hole to invade the Kuiper belt was calculated. We showed that primordial black holes of certain masses can significantly change asteroids' orbits. These events may result in disasters, local for our solar system and global for the Earth (like the Tunguska meteorite). We also estimated how often such events occur.

  16. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  17. Black holes cannot support conformal scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Zannias

    1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the only static asymptotically flat non-extrema black hole solution of the Einstein-conformally invariant scalar field equations having the scalar field bounded on the horizon, is the Schwarzschild one. Thus black holes cannot be endowed with conformal scalar hair of finite length.

  18. Strings, black holes, and quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find multiple relations between extremal black holes in string theory and 2- and 3-qubit systems in quantum information theory. We show that the entropy of the axion-dilaton extremal black hole is related to the concurrence of a 2-qubit state, whereas the entropy of the STU black holes, Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) as well as non-BPS, is related to the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state. We relate the 3-qubit states with the string theory states with some number of D-branes. We identify a set of large black holes with the maximally entangled Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) class of states and small black holes with separable, bipartite, and W states. We sort out the relation between 3-qubit states, twistors, octonions, and black holes. We give a simple expression for the entropy and the area of stretched horizon of small black holes in terms of a norm and 2-tangles of a 3-qubit system. Finally, we show that the most general expression for the black hole and black ring entropy in N=8 supergravity/M theory, which is given by the famous quartic Cartan E{sub 7(7)} invariant, can be reduced to Cayley's hyperdeterminant describing the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state.

  19. Quantum Entropy of Charged Rotating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a method for obtaining the one-loop quantum corrections to the tree-level entropy for a charged Kerr black hole. Divergences which appear can be removed by renormalization of couplings in the tree-level gravitational action in a manner similar to that for a static black hole.

  20. Regression Given input data (features), predict value of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    ^ = (XX> ) 1 Xy etc. #12;! ∑ Many relations are not linear ∑ The complete graph Non-linear regression #12;! ∑ Need to fit non-linear functions ∑ example: polynomials Non-linear regression y = 6 10000 x5 82 10000 x) the dimension of the inputs ∑ After applying z(x), we fit a plane in 3D-space Non-linear regression y = 0 + 1x

  1. Regression Given input data (features), predict value of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    ∑ The complete graph Non-linear regression #12;∑ Need to fit non-linear functions ∑ example: polynomials Non-linear of the inputs ∑ After applying z(x), we fit a plane in 3D-space Non-linear regression y = 0 + 1x + 2x2 z(x) = 1 x x2 #12;x y x2 regression from x to y, non-linear lifting from x to z=[x x2] regression from [x x2

  2. Thorough analysis of input physics in CESAM and CLES codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josefina Montalban; Yveline Lebreton; Andrea Miglio; Richard Scuflaire; Pierre Morel; Arlette Noels

    2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution is not about the quality of the agreement between stellar models computed by CESAM and CLES codes, but more interesting, on what ESTA-Task~1 run has taught us about these codes and about the input physics they use. We also quantify the effects of different implementations of the same physics on the seismic properties of the stellar models, that in fact is the main aim of ESTA experiments.

  3. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

  4. Bubbles as tracers of heat input to cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Binney; F. Alouani Bibi; H. Omma

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the distribution of injected energy in three-dimensional, adaptive-grid simulations of the heating of cooling flows. We show that less than 10 percent of the injected energy goes into bubbles. Consequently, the energy input from the nucleus is underestimated by a factor of order 6 when it is taken to be given by PVgamma/(gamma-1), where P and V are the pressure and volume of the bubble, and gamma the ratio of principal specific heats.

  5. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

  6. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

  7. IN-DRIFT MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES MODEL VALIDATION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Jolley

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN M09909SPAMINGl.003 using its replacement DTN M00106SPAIDMO 1.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 200 1) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  8. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  9. A probabilistic graphical model based stochastic input model construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jiang [Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 101 Frank H.T. Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3801 (United States); Zabaras, Nicholas, E-mail: nzabaras@gmail.com [Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 101 Frank H.T. Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3801 (United States); Center for Applied Mathematics, 657 Frank H.T. Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-3801 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model reduction techniques have been widely used in modeling of high-dimensional stochastic input in uncertainty quantification tasks. However, the probabilistic modeling of random variables projected into reduced-order spaces presents a number of computational challenges. Due to the curse of dimensionality, the underlying dependence relationships between these random variables are difficult to capture. In this work, a probabilistic graphical model based approach is employed to learn the dependence by running a number of conditional independence tests using observation data. Thus a probabilistic model of the joint PDF is obtained and the PDF is factorized into a set of conditional distributions based on the dependence structure of the variables. The estimation of the joint PDF from data is then transformed to estimating conditional distributions under reduced dimensions. To improve the computational efficiency, a polynomial chaos expansion is further applied to represent the random field in terms of a set of standard random variables. This technique is combined with both linear and nonlinear model reduction methods. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic graphical model based stochastic input models. - Highlights: ē Data-driven stochastic input models without the assumption of independence of the reduced random variables. ē The problem is transformed to a Bayesian network structure learning problem. ē Examples are given in flows in random media.

  10. Black hole and holographic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the connection between black hole and holographic dark energy. We examine the issue of the equation of state (EOS) for holographic energy density as a candidate for the dark energy carefully. This is closely related to the EOS for black hole, because the holographic dark energy comes from the black hole energy density. In order to derive the EOS of a black hole, we may use its dual (quantum) systems. Finally, a regular black hole without the singularity is introduced to describe an accelerating universe inside the cosmological horizon. Inspired by this, we show that the holographic energy density with the cosmological horizon as the IR cutoff leads to the dark energy-dominated universe with $\\omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}=-1$.

  11. Quantum Black Hole Model and Hawking's Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Berezin

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole model with a self-gravitating charged spherical symmetric dust thin shell as a source is considered. The Schroedinger-type equation for such a model is derived. This equation appeared to be a finite differences equation. A theory of such an equation is developed and general solution is found and investigated in details. The discrete spectrum of the bound state energy levels is obtained. All the eigenvalues appeared to be infinitely degenerate. The ground state wave functions are evaluated explicitly. The quantum black hole states are selected and investigated. It is shown that the obtained black hole mass spectrum is compatible with the existence of Hawking's radiation in the limit of low temperatures both for large and nearly extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. The above mentioned infinite degeneracy of the mass (energy) eigenvalues may appeared helpful in resolving the well known information paradox in the black hole physics.

  12. Black Hole Thermodynamics Based on Unitary Evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yu-Lei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we try to construct black hole thermodynamics based on the fact that, the formation and evaporation of a black hole can be described by quantum unitary evolutions. First, we show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S_{BH}$ cannot be a Boltzmann or thermal entropy. To confirm this statement, we show that the original black hole's "first law" cannot be treated as the first law of thermodynamics formally, due to some missing metric perturbations caused by matter. Then, by including those (quantum) metric perturbations, we show that the black hole formation and evaporation can be described in a unitary manner effectively, through a quantum channel between the exterior and interior of the event horizon. In this way, the paradoxes of information loss and firewall can be resolved effectively. Finally, we show that black hole thermodynamics can be constructed in an ordinary way, by constructing statistical mechanics.

  13. Fourier Analysis of the BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian M. Tolfree

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we extend our previous work regarding the role of the Fourier transformation in bulk to boundary mappings to include the BTZ black hole. We follow standard procedures for modifying Fourier Transformations to accommodate quotient spaces and arrive at a bulk to boundary mapping in a black hole background. We show that this mapping is consistent with known results and lends a new insight into the AdS/CFT duality. We find that the micro-states corresponding to the entropy of a bulk scalar field are the Fourier coefficients on the boundary, which transform under the principal series representation of $SL(2,R)$. Building upon this we present a toy model to analyze the implications of this for the origin of black hole entropy. We find that the black hole micro-states live on the boundary and correspond to the possible emission modes of the black hole

  14. An electromagnetic black hole made of metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, a black hole is a region of space with huge gravitational field in the means of general relativity, which absorbs everything hitting it including the light. In general relativity, the presence of matter-energy densities results in the motion of matter propagating in a curved spacetime1, which is similar to the electromagnetic-wave propagation in a curved space and in an inhomogeneous metamaterial2. Hence one can simulate the black hole using electromagnetic fields and metamaterials. In a recent theoretical work, an optical black hole has been proposed based on metamaterials, in which the numerical simulations showed a highly efficient light absorption3. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of electromagnetic black hole in the microwave frequencies. The proposed black hole is composed of non-resonant and resonant metamaterial structures, which can absorb electromagnetic waves efficiently coming from all directions due to the local control of electromagnetic fields. Hence the elect...

  15. Fermionic greybody factors in dilaton black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahed Abedi; Hessamaddin Arfaei

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the question of emission of fermions in the process of dilaton black hole evolution and its characters for different dilaton coupling constants $\\alpha$ is studied. The main quantity of interest, the greybody factors are calculated both numerically and in analytical approximation. The dependence of rates of evaporation and behaviour on the dilaton coupling constant is analyzed. Having calculated the greybody factors we are able to address the question of the final fate of the dilaton black hole. For that we also need to make dynamical treatment of the solution by considering the backreaction which will show a crucial effect on the final result. We find a transition line in $(Q/M, \\alpha)$ plane that separates the two regimes for the fate of the black hole, decay regime and extremal regime. In the decay regime the black hole completely evaporates, while in the extremal regime the black hole approaches the extremal limit by radiation and becomes stable.

  16. Black holes in Asymptotically Safe Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saueressig, Frank; D'Odorico, Giulio; Vidotto, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are among the most fascinating objects populating our universe. Their characteristic features, encompassing spacetime singularities, event horizons, and black hole thermodynamics, provide a rich testing ground for quantum gravity ideas. In this note we observe that the renormalization group improved Schwarzschild black holes constructed by Bonanno and Reuter within Weinberg's asymptotic safety program constitute a prototypical example of a Hayward geometry used to model non-singular black holes within quantum gravity phenomenology. Moreover, they share many features of a Planck star: their effective geometry naturally incorporates the one-loop corrections found in the effective field theory framework, their Kretschmann scalar is bounded, and the black hole singularity is replaced by a regular de Sitter patch. The role of the cosmological constant in the renormalization group improvement process is briefly discussed.

  17. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  18. Empirical Validation of Energy-Neutral Operation on Wearable Devices by MISO Beamforming of IEEE 802.11ac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Empirical Validation of Energy-Neutral Operation on Wearable Devices by MISO Beamforming of IEEE.11ac's multiple input, single output (MISO) structure to focus the transmit power to im- prove environments, and they can act as a reliable source by emit- ting RF power in a controlled manner. Although RF

  19. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters: MAACS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprung, J.L.; Jow, H-N (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)) [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Rollstin, J.A. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)) [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Helton, J.C. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA)) [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA)

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of offsite accident consequences is the customary final step in a probabilistic assessment of the risks of severe nuclear reactor accidents. Recently, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reassessed the risks of severe accidents at five US power reactors (NUREG-1150). Offsite accident consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms were estimated using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). Before these calculations were performed, most MACCS input parameters were reviewed, and for each parameter reviewed, a best-estimate value was recommended. This report presents the results of these reviews. Specifically, recommended values and the basis for their selection are presented for MACCS atmospheric and biospheric transport, emergency response, food pathway, and economic input parameters. Dose conversion factors and health effect parameters are not reviewed in this report. 134 refs., 15 figs., 110 tabs.

  20. Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

  1. Empirical validation of the thermal model of a passive solar cell test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mara, T A; Boyer, H; Mamode, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with an empirical validation of a building thermal model. We put the emphasis on sensitivity analysis and on research of inputs/residual correlation to improve our model. In this article, we apply a sensitivity analysis technique in the frequency domain to point out the more important parameters of the model. Then, we compare measured and predicted data of indoor dry-air temperature. When the model is not accurate enough, recourse to time-frequency analysis is of great help to identify the inputs responsible for the major part of error. In our approach, two samples of experimental data are required. The first one is used to calibrate our model the second one to really validate the optimized model

  2. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  3. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  4. Gravitational waves versus black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevor W. Marshall

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that, in order for the gravitational field to be propagated as a wave, it is necessary for it to satisfy a further set of field equations, in addition to those of Einstein and Hilbert, and these equations mean there is a preferred coordinate frame, called the Global Inertial Frame, giving rise to a unique metric . The implication is that a true gravitational field is not compatible with Einstein's Principle of Equivalence, which is in contradiction with his other fundamental concept of locality. The additional field equations ensure that gravitational collapse does not go below the Schwarzschild radius, thereby excluding the possibility of singular solutions (black holes) of the Einstein-Hilbert equations. Such solutions would also violate Einstein's locality principle.

  5. Holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krotov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya, 25, Moscow, 117259 (Russian Federation); Rebbi, C. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rubakov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Foeringer Ring 6, 80805, Munichn (Germany)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recently proposed model of 'ghost condensation', spatially homogeneous states may mix, via tunneling, with inhomogeneous states which are somewhat similar to bubbles in the theory of false vacuum decay, the corresponding bubble nucleation rate being exponentially sensitive to the ultraviolet completion of the model. The conservation of energy and charge requires that the energy density is negative and the field is strongly unstable in a part of the nucleated bubble. Unlike in the theory of false vacuum decay, this region does not expand during subsequent real-time evolution. In the outer part, positive energy outgoing waves develop, which eventually form shocks. Behind the outgoing waves and away from the bubble center, the background settles down to its original value. The outcome of the entire process is thus a microscopic region of negative energy and strong field - 'hole in the ghost condensate' - plus a collection of outgoing waves (particles of the ghost condensate field) carrying away finite energy.

  6. Criticality Safety Validation of SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.0 Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998;2007, Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Material Outside Reactors, and ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations, require validation of a computer code and the associated data through benchmark evaluations based on physical experiments. The performance of the code and data are validated by comparing the calculated and the benchmark results. A SCALE procedure has been established to generate a Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID). This procedure provides a framework for preparing, peer reviewing, and controlling models and data sets derived from benchmark definitions so that the models and data can be used with confidence. The procedure ensures that the models and data were correctly generated using appropriate references with documented checks and reviews. Configuration management is implemented to prevent inadvertent modification of the models and data or inclusion of models that have not been subjected to the rigorous review process. VALID entries for criticality safety are based on critical experiments documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). The findings of a criticality safety validation of SCALE 6.1 utilizing the benchmark models vetted in the VALID library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are summarized here.

  7. String-theoretic breakdown of effective field theory near black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Dodelson; Eva Silverstein

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the validity of the equivalence principle near horizons in string theory, analyzing the breakdown of effective field theory caused by longitudinal string spreading effects. An experiment is set up where a detector is thrown into a black hole a long time after an early infalling string. Light cone gauge calculations, taken at face value, indicate a detectable level of root-mean-square longitudinal spreading of the initial string as measured by the late infaller. This results from the large relative boost between the string and detector in the near horizon region, which develops automatically despite their modest initial energies outside the black hole and the weak curvature in the geometry. We subject this scenario to basic consistency checks, using these to obtain a relatively conservative criterion for its detectability. In a companion paper, we exhibit longitudinal nonlocality in well-defined gauge-invariant S-matrix calculations, obtaining results consistent with the predicted spreading albeit not in a direct analogue of the black hole process. We discuss applications of this effect to the firewall paradox, and estimate the time and distance scales it predicts for new physics near black hole and cosmological horizons.

  8. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the physical attributes of airborne particulate matter, such as the airborne concentrations of particles and their sizes. The conditions of receptor exposure (duration of exposure in various microenvironments), breathing rates, and dosimetry of inhaled particulates are discussed in more detail in ''Characteristics of the Receptor for the Biosphere Model'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]).

  9. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  10. Analyzing the impacts of sales tax on agricultural inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamar, Christina Helweg

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the needed revenue. Of the options analyzed, the imposition of a sales tax on previously exempted agricultural inputs was introduced. The purposes of this study were to estimate the impact of the loss of the saks tax exemption relative to a state income... budget shortfall in the 1992-93 biennium for the first time in its history. This situation caused legislators to consider possil&le options to raise the needed revenue. Of the options analyzed, the imposition of a sales tax on previously exempted...

  11. Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21 andNov-14Input

  12. Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company LevelInput Supplemental

  13. Delaware Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanySFoot) Year JanYearInput

  14. Florida Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanInput

  15. Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarInput

  16. Iowa Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year JanFoot) YearYearInput

  17. New Hampshire Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot) DecadeYear JanInput

  18. New York Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot)Input Supplemental

  19. North Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May1.878Input Supplemental

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprYearof OthersYearInput

  1. Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity ForYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulInput

  2. Wisconsin Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090 7,16354,828Feet) DecadeDecadeInput

  3. Arkansas Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% ofInput Supplemental Fuels

  4. Table 3. U.S. Inputs to biodiesel production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residentialtight oilU.S. Inputs to

  5. Massachusetts Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year Jan Feb MarInput

  6. Minnesota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2Imports (NoYearInput

  7. South Carolina Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3DecadeInput

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0TotalH BV CYearInput Supplemental

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0Input Supplemental Fuels (Million

  10. Maryland Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication10.9919,923CubicFeet)Input

  11. Thermodynamics of Dyonic Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Zingg

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes with asymptotic anisotropic scaling are conjectured to be gravity duals of condensed matter system close to quantum critical points with non-trivial dynamical exponent z at finite temperature. A holographic renormalization procedure is presented that allows thermodynamic potentials to be defined for objects with both electric and magnetic charge in such a way that standard thermodynamic relations hold. Black holes in asymptotic Lifshitz spacetimes can exhibit paramagnetic behavior at low temperature limit for certain values of the critical exponent z, whereas the behavior of AdS black holes is always diamagnetic.

  12. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  13. Black hole hair in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Cao; Yi-Xin Chen; Jian-Long Li

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the property of matter in equilibrium with a static, spherically symmetric black hole in D-dimensional spacetime. It requires this kind of matter has an equation of state (\\omega\\equiv p_r/\\rho=-1/(1+2kn), k,n\\in \\mathbb{N}), which seems to be independent of D. However, when we associate this with specific models, some interesting limits on space could be found: (i)(D=2+2kn) while the black hole is surrounded by cosmic strings; (ii)the black hole can be surrounded by linear dilaton field only in 4-dimensional spacetime. In both cases, D=4 is special.

  14. Radion clouds around evaporating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kaluza-Klein model, with a matter source associated with Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole, is used to obtain a simple form for the radion effective potential. The environmental effect generally causes a matter-induced shift of the radion vacuum, resulting in the formation of a radion cloud around the hole. There is an albedo due to the radion cloud, with an energy dependent reflection coefficient that depends upon the size of the extra dimensions and the temperature of the hole.

  15. Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractóModel validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation.

  16. AnalyzeHOLE: An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith J. Halford

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically displaying pertinent results.

  17. Thermodynamics of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: thermal stability of Nariai black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization, and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

  18. Input-output multiplier distributions from probabilistic production paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konecny, R.T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard Leontief input-output model, a single dominant technology is assumed in the production of a particular commodity. However, in the real world, quite similar commodities are produced by firms with vastly different technologies. In addressing this limitation, the Probabilistic Production Path model (PPP) is used to investigate both the method of production and identity of the producer. An important feature of the PPP model is the consideration of the effects that heterogeneous technologies and dissimilar trade patterns have on the properties of the distribution of input-output multipliers. The derivation of the distribution of output multipliers is generalized for discrete probabilities based on market shares. Due to the complexity of the generalized solution, a simulation model is used to approximate the multiplier distribution. Results of the model show that the distributional properties of the multipliers are unpredictable, with the majority of the distributions being multimodal. Typically, the mean of the multipliers lies in a trough between two modes. Multimodal multiplier distributions were found to have a tighter symmetric interval than the corresponding standard normal confidence interval. Therefore, the use of the normal confidence interval appears to be sufficient, though overstated, for the construction of confidence intervals in the PPP model.

  19. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, V. F. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Anders, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Burrill, Andrew [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Knobloch, Jens [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Kugeler, Oliver [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Neumann, Axel [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany; Wang, Haipeng [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEKĖcERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  20. String-theoretic breakdown of effective field theory near black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodelson, Matthew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the validity of the equivalence principle near horizons in string theory, analyzing the breakdown of effective field theory caused by longitudinal string spreading effects. An experiment is set up where a detector is thrown into a black hole a long time after an early infalling string. Light cone gauge calculations, taken at face value, indicate a detectable level of root-mean-square longitudinal spreading of the initial string as measured by the late infaller. This results from the large relative boost between the string and detector in the near horizon region, which develops automatically despite their modest initial energies outside the black hole and the weak curvature in the geometry. We subject this scenario to basic consistency checks, using these to obtain a relatively conservative criterion for its detectability. In a companion paper, we exhibit longitudinal nonlocality in well-defined gauge-invariant S-matrix calculations, obtaining results consistent with the predicted spreading albe...

  1. Tucker Wireline Open Hole Wireline Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker Wireline unit ran a suite of open hole logs right behind the RMOTC logging contractor for comparison purposes. The tools included Dual Laterolog, Phased Induction, BHC Sonic, and Density-Porosity.

  2. Towards Black Hole Entropy in Shape Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Herczeg; Vasudev Shyam

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape dynamics is classical theory of gravity which agrees with general relativity in many important cases, but possesses different gauge symmetries and constraints. Rather than spacetime diffeomorphism invariance, shape dynamics takes spatial diffeomorphism invariance and spatial Weyl invariance as the fundamental gauge symmetries associated with the gravitational field. Since the area of the event horizon of a black hole transforms under a generic spatial Weyl transformation, there has been some doubt that one can speak sensibly about the thermodynamics of black holes in shape dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to show that by treating the event horizon of a black hole as an interior boundary, one can recover familiar notions of black hole thermodynamics in shape dynamics and define a gauge invariant entropy that agrees with general relativity.

  3. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeland, Sarah Jane

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the ďno-hairĒ theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong ...

  4. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Total round-trip power loss, coupling efficiency and themicron. Total round-trip power loss and coupling efficiencythe total fractional power loss per round trip, the hole

  5. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  6. Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

  7. Anosov maps with rectangular holes. Nonergodic cases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingenier'ia. Universidad de la Rep'ublica C.C. 30, Montevideo, Uruguay E­mail: roma@fing.edu.uy; Fax: (598 Partially supported by CONICYT (Uruguay). 1 #12; Running head: Anosov maps with rectangular holes Address

  8. Horizon Operator Approach to Black Hole Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    1994-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The $S$-matrix Ansatz for the construction of a quantum theory of black holes is further exploited. We first note that treating the metric tensor $g_{\\m\

  9. Topological Black Holes -- Outside Looking In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the general mathematical construction and physical picture of topological black holes, which are black holes whose event horizons are surfaces of non-trivial topology. The construction is carried out in an arbitrary number of dimensions, and includes all known special cases which have appeared before in the literature. I describe the basic features of massive charged topological black holes in $(3+1)$ dimensions, from both an exterior and interior point of view. To investigate their interiors, it is necessary to understand the radiative falloff behaviour of a given massless field at late times in the background of a topological black hole. I describe the results of a numerical investigation of such behaviour for a conformally coupled scalar field. Significant differences emerge between spherical and higher genus topologies.

  10. Spacetime constraints on accreting black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garofalo, David [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California 91109 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spin dependence of accretion onto rotating Kerr black holes using analytic techniques. In its linear regime, angular momentum transport in MHD turbulent accretion flow involves the generation of radial magnetic field connecting plasma in a differentially rotating flow. We take a first principles approach, highlighting the constraint that limits the generation and amplification of radial magnetic fields, stemming from the transfer of energy from mechanical to magnetic form. Because the energy transferred in magnetic form is ultimately constrained by gravitational potential energy or Killing energy, the spin dependence of the latter allows us to derive spin-dependent constraints on the success of the accreting plasma to expel its angular momentum. We find an inverse relationship between this ability and black hole spin. If this radial magnetic field generation forms the basis for angular momentum transfer in accretion flows, accretion rates involving Kerr black holes are expected to be lower as the black hole spin increases in the prograde sense.

  11. Scattering map for two black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro P. S. de Moura; Patricio S. Letelier

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of light in the gravitational field of two Schwarzschild black holes, making the approximation that they are far apart, so that the motion of light rays in the neighborhood of one black hole can be considered to be the result of the action of each black hole separately. Using this approximation, the dynamics is reduced to a 2-dimensional map, which we study both numerically and analytically. The map is found to be chaotic, with a fractal basin boundary separating the possible outcomes of the orbits (escape or falling into one of the black holes). In the limit of large separation distances, the basin boundary becomes a self-similar Cantor set, and we find that the box-counting dimension decays slowly with the separation distance, following a logarithmic decay law.

  12. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, William E. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  13. Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

  14. Spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikun Ding; Changqing Liu; Qian Guo

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators and, find that particle falling from infinity with zero velocity cannot collide with unbound energy when the noncommutative Kerr black hole is exactly extremal. Our results also show that the bigger of the spinning black hole's mass is, the higher of center of mass energy that the particles obtain. For small and medium noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole, the collision energy depends on the black holes' mass.

  15. Comment on "Black holes constrain varying constants"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper [DDL] claims that the increase of the proton electric charge e leads to a (forbidden) decrease of black hole entropy, therefore, possible evidence for variation of $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ [alpha] must be interpreted as a decrease of the speed of light. We argue that purely theoretical consideration of black holes possibly cannot give any model-independent limitations on variation of fundamental constants.

  16. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinec, Emil J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  17. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  18. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward; R. Di Criscienzo; M. Nadalini; L. Vanzo; S. Zerbini

    2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  19. Notes on Black Hole Fluctuations and Backreaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu; Alpan Raval; Sukanya Sinha

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In these notes we prepare the ground for a systematic investigation into the issues of black hole fluctuations and backreaction by discussing the formulation of the problem, commenting on possible advantages and shortcomings of existing works, and introducing our own approach via a stochastic semiclassical theory of gravity based on the Einstein-Langevin equation and the fluctuation-dissipation relation for a self-consistent description of metric fluctuations and dissipative dynamics of the black hole with backreaction of its Hawking radiance.

  20. Primary plant performance evaluation and plant signals validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anikanov, S. S. [Westinghouse LLC, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Stolyetniy, I. V.; Semenovski, Y. P. [Westron, 1, Academic Proskura str., Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses results of the implementation of NPP signal validation and data reconciliation algorithms applied to VVER-1000 reactor as part of the Core Monitoring System (CMS) project at South Ukrainian NPP. The proposed method is compared with the G2TM tool (Gensym) application of neural network algorithms to the same plant data. The proposed algorithms yield practically identical results for situations with a significant amount of erroneous data, even though it runs in on-line mode as oppose to the off-line mode of the G2TM tool. The method described in this paper includes preliminary signal processing, data fusion, and data reconciliation algorithms. All major primary and secondary sides measurements, used for plant thermal power evaluation based on different methods, were undergone the proposed processing algorithm. Some plant life data is presented to illustrate quality of input signals used to obtain calculation results. (authors)

  1. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  2. MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment Ajit Dingankar, Deepak A. Mathaikutty- tionality, recent generations of microprocessors face difficult validation challenges. The systematic to production RTL, which is likely to remain the dominant design methodology of complex microprocessors

  3. Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. J. Smith

    2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation and ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in resuspended particulate matter in the atmosphere. The analysis was performed in accordance with the technical work plan for the biosphere modeling and expert support (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis revises the previous one titled ''Evaluate Soil/Radionuclide Removal by Erosion and Leaching'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [152517]). In REV 00 of this report, the data generated were fixed (i.e., taking no account of uncertainty and variability) values. This revision incorporates uncertainty and variability into the values for the bulk density, elemental partition coefficients, average annual loss of soil from erosion, resuspension enhancement factor, and field capacity water content.

  4. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled ďValidated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in ScintillatorsĒ (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. k-Validity vs Validity in Q: A formula of Q that is k-valid for all k, but not valid Branden Fitelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    k-Validity vs Validity in Q: A formula of Q that is k-valid for all k, but not valid Branden Fitelson 03/13/07 Consider the following three formulas of Q [where, as always, p q (p q), and p p]: p x A false on any k-element interpretation. And, since A is a closed formula, it must either be true or false

  6. Phase Noise in MIMO Systems: Bayesian Cramer-Rao Bounds and Soft-Input Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasir, Ali A; Mehrpouyan, Hani; Schober, Robert; Hua, Yingbo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a 4 4 MIMO system, the proposed soft-input EKF-EKSin MIMO Systems: Bayesian CramťrĖRao Bounds and Soft-Inputof a MIMO system employing the proposed soft-input EKF-EKS

  7. Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains beamforming for a multiple input single output (MISO) ad hoc network to increase the density of successful

  8. Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian, Berkeley, CA, United States. In the process of calibrating distributed hydrological models, accounting in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated uncertainty. The calibration ignoring input

  9. Methods for Rapid Estimation of Motor Input Power in HVAC Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christman, Kevin D.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preliminary building energy assessments, it is often desired to estimate a motor's input power. Motor power estimates in this context should be rapid, safe, and noninvasive. Existing methods for motor input power estimation, such as direct...

  10. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines June 22,...

  11. The design of efficient input circuits for class C amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fristoe, Harold T.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the design of efficient input circuits for c u s s c amplifiers t heddsigngeof cpi utramh lX jr?cla? t??io?s? nd go dg??s nf? ?ofgsfg ??e usn? o? ??s?gie?n? ?f?efssief? hs?nig ?sfg theds igno lu? h?c??? fc ?jj?????l ????l ??r???lc jar ??cc...????????cXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX ?? ?X ?a??m?c?a?cXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX ?? t??sf?e? ? ? c???ni? o? g?s hsde?f ?io?s??is ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?? m?cl aj j???r?c je??is ?n?s ?X l?s ?ofdgnfg ??iisfg ?ofdgi??geof ?oi hsgsi?efef? ??ndd ? a...

  12. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure was defined as AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses''. This analysis revises the previous version with the same name (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161239]), which was itself a revision of one titled ''Evaluate Soil/Radionuclide Removal by Erosion and Leaching'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [DIRS 152517]). In Revision 00 of this report, the data generated were fixed values (i.e., taking no account of uncertainty and variability). Revision 01 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161239]) incorporated uncertainty and variability into the values for the bulk density, elemental partition coefficients, average annual loss of soil from erosion, resuspension enhancement factor, and field capacity water content. The current revision of this document improves the transparency and traceability of the products without changing the details of the analysis. This analysis report supports the treatment of six of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the Yucca Mountain reference biosphere (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). The use of the more recent FEP list in DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760] represents a deviation from the detail provided in the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]), which referenced a previous version of the FEP list. The parameters developed in this report support treatment of these six FEPs addressed in the biosphere model that are listed in Table 1-1. Inclusion and treatment of FEPs in the biosphere model is described in the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460], Section 6.2).

  13. Choosing a Kernel for Cross-Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savchuk, Olga

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    methods of bandwidth selection termed: Indirect cross-validation and Robust one-sided cross- validation. The kernels used in the Indirect cross-validation method yield an improvement in the relative bandwidth rate to n^1=4, which is substantially better...

  14. Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    -on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

  15. Soft-Input Soft-Output King Decoder for Coded MIMO Wireless Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-Input Soft-Output King Decoder for Coded MIMO Wireless Communications Giuseppe PAPA, Domenico,{domenico.ciuonzo,gianmarco.romano,pierluigi.salvorossi}@unina2.it Abstract--This paper presents a Soft-Input Soft-Output (SISO) version of the King Decoder (KD for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) communication systems. More specifically, four versions of the KD

  16. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI Atmospheric, Oceanic January 2012, in final form 3 May 2012) ABSTRACT The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using

  17. Making Gestural Input from Arm-Worn Inertial Sensors More Practical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    .g., in a wristwatch) can sense arm gestures, enabling natural input in untethered scenarios. Two core components input with a wide variety of applications is arm movement detected by inertial sensors embedded transformation of the input space. For example, two users of different heights per- forming the same gesture

  18. The Revival of White Holes as Small Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon Retter; Shlomo Heller

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are extremely dense and compact objects from which light cannot escape. There is an overall consensus that black holes exist and many astronomical objects are identified with black holes. White holes were understood as the exact time reversal of black holes, therefore they should continuously throw away material. It is accepted, however, that a persistent ejection of mass leads to gravitational pressure, the formation of a black hole and thus to the "death of while holes". So far, no astronomical source has been successfully tagged a white hole. The only known white hole is the Big Bang which was instantaneous rather than continuous or long-lasting. We thus suggest that the emergence of a white hole, which we name a 'Small Bang', is spontaneous - all the matter is ejected at a single pulse. Unlike black holes, white holes cannot be continuously observed rather their effect can only be detected around the event itself. Gamma ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the universe. Long gamma-ray bursts were connected with supernova eruptions. There is a new group of gamma-ray bursts, which are relatively close to Earth, but surprisingly lack any supernova emission. We propose identifying these bursts with white holes. White holes seem like the best explanation of gamma-ray bursts that appear in voids. We also predict the detection of rare gigantic gamma-ray bursts with energies much higher than typically observed.

  19. Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Wong

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a site-response model and its implementation for developing earthquake ground motion input for preclosure seismic design and postclosure assessment of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The model implements a random-vibration theory (RVT), one-dimensional (1D) equivalent-linear approach to calculate site response effects on ground motions. The model provides results in terms of spectral acceleration including peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and dynamically-induced strains as a function of depth. In addition to documenting and validating this model for use in the Yucca Mountain Project, this report also describes the development of model inputs, implementation of the model, its results, and the development of earthquake time history inputs based on the model results. The purpose of the site-response ground motion model is to incorporate the effects on earthquake ground motions of (1) the approximately 300 m of rock above the emplacement levels beneath Yucca Mountain and (2) soil and rock beneath the site of the Surface Facilities Area. A previously performed probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) (CRWMS M&O 1998a [DIRS 103731]) estimated ground motions at a reference rock outcrop for the Yucca Mountain site (Point A), but those results do not include these site response effects. Thus, the additional step of applying the site-response ground motion model is required to develop ground motion inputs that are used for preclosure and postclosure purposes.

  20. Combined Effects of Gravity, Bending Moment, Bearing Clearance, and Input Torque on Wind Turbine Planetary Gear Load Sharing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; LaCava, W.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This computational work investigates planetary gear load sharing of three-mount suspension wind turbine gearboxes. A three dimensional multibody dynamic model is established, including gravity, bending moments, fluctuating mesh stiffness, nonlinear tooth contact, and bearing clearance. A flexible main shaft, planetary carrier, housing, and gear shafts are modeled using reduced degrees-of-freedom through modal compensation. This drivetrain model is validated against the experimental data of Gearbox Reliability Collaborative for gearbox internal loads. Planet load sharing is a combined effect of gravity, bending moment, bearing clearance, and input torque. Influences of each of these parameters and their combined effects on the resulting planet load sharing are investigated. Bending moments and gravity induce fundamental excitations in the rotating carrier frame, which can increase gearbox internal loads and disturb load sharing. Clearance in carrier bearings reduces the bearing load carrying capacity and thus the bending moment from the rotor can be transmitted into gear meshes. With bearing clearance, the bending moment can cause tooth micropitting and can induce planet bearing fatigue, leading to reduced gearbox life. Planet bearings are susceptible to skidding at low input torque.

  1. Holographic superconductor in the exact hairy black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Chanyong Park

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged black hole of hyperbolic horizon with scalar hair (charged Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli: CMTZ black hole) as a model of analytic hairy black hole for holographic superconductor. For this purpose, we investigate the second order phase transition between CMTZ and hyperbolic Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS (HRNAdS) black holes. However, this transition unlikely occur. As an analytic treatment for holographic superconductor, we develop superconductor in the bulk and superfluidity on the boundary using the CMTZ black hole below the critical temperature. The presence of charge destroys the condensates around the zero temperature, which is in accord with the thermodynamic analysis of the CMTZ black hole.

  2. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). Parameter values developed in this report, and the related FEPs, are listed in Table 1-1. The relationship between the parameters and FEPs was based on a comparison of the parameter definition and the FEP descriptions as presented in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). The parameter values developed in this report support the biosphere model and are reflected in the TSPA through the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). Biosphere modeling focuses on radionuclides screened for the TSPA-LA (BSC 2002 [160059]). The same list of radionuclides is used in this analysis (Section 6.1.4). The analysis considers two human exposure scenarios (groundwater and volcanic ash) and climate change (Section 6.1.5). This analysis combines and revises two previous reports, ''Transfer Coefficient Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [152435]) and ''Environmental Transport Parameter Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [152434]), because the new ERMYN biosphere model requires a redefined set of input parameters. The scope of this analysis includes providing a technical basis for the selection of radionuclide- and element-specific biosphere parameters (except for Kd) that are important for calculating BDCFs based on the available radionuclide inventory abstraction data. The environmental transport parameter values were developed specifically for use in the biosphere model and may not be appropriate for other applications.

  3. The Environmental Impact of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham Loeb

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermassive black holes observed at the centers of almost all present-day galaxies, had a profound impact on their environment. I highlight the principle of self-regulation, by which supermassive black holes grow until they release sufficient energy to unbind the gas that feeds them from their host galaxy. This principle explains several observed facts, including the correlation between the mass of a central black hole and the depth of the gravitational potential well of its host galaxy, and the abundance and clustering properties of bright quasars in the redshift interval of z~2-6. At lower redshifts, quasars might have limited the maximum mass of galaxies through the suppression of cooling flows in X-ray clusters. The seeds of supermassive black holes were likely planted in dwarf galaxies at redshifts z>10, through the collapse of massive or supermassive stars. The minimum seed mass can be identified observationally through the detection of gravitational waves from black hole binaries by Advanced LIGO or LISA. Aside from shaping their host galaxies, quasar outflows filled the intergalactic medium with magnetic fields and heavy elements. Beyond the reach of these outflows, the brightest quasars at z>6 have ionized exceedingly large volumes of gas (tens of comoving Mpc) prior to global reionization, and must have suppressed the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in these volumes before the same occurred through the rest of the universe.

  4. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  5. Investigating Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerated expansion of the universe is ascribed to the existence of dark energy. Black holes accretion of dark energy induces a mass change proportional to the energy density and pressure of the background dark energy fluid. The time scale during which the mass of black holes changes considerably is too long relative to the age of the universe, thus beyond detection possibilities. We propose to take advantage of the modified black hole masses for exploring the equation of state $w[z]$ of dark energy, by investigating the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries on a dark energy background. Deriving the signatures of dark energy accretion on the evolution of binaries, we find that dark energy imprints on the emitted gravitational radiation and on the changes in the orbital radius of the binary can be within detection limits for certain supermassive black hole binaries. In this talk I describe how binaries can provide a useful tool in obtaining complementary information on the nature of dark energy, based on the work done with A.Kelleher.

  6. Black Holes with Flavors of Quantum Hair?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that black holes can posses a long-range quantum hair of super-massive tensor fields, which can be detected by Aharonov-Bohm tabletop interference experiments, in which a quantum-hairy black hole, or a remnant particle, passes through the loop of a magnetic solenoid. The long distance effect does not decouple for an arbitrarily high mass of the hair-providing field. Because Kaluza-Klein and String theories contain infinite number of massive tensor fields, we study black holes with quantum Kaluza-Klein hair. We show that in five dimensions such a black hole can be interpreted as a string of `combed' generalized magnetic monopoles, with their fluxes confined along it. For the compactification on a translation-invariant circle, this substructure uncovers hidden flux conservation and quantization of the monopole charges, which constrain the quantum hair of the resulting four-dimensional black hole. For the spin-2 quantum hair this result is somewhat unexpected, since the constituent `magnetic' charges have no `electric' counterparts. Nevertheless, the information about their quantization is encoded in singularity.

  7. Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. √?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬Ę Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

  8. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  9. Black Hole Chromosphere at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, black holes will be copiously produced at the LHC. In this work we study the main properties of the light descendants of these black holes. We show that the emitted partons are closely spaced outside the horizon, and hence they do not fragment into hadrons in vacuum but more likely into a kind of quark-gluon plasma. Consequently, the thermal emission occurs far from the horizon, at a temperature characteristic of the QCD scale. We analyze the energy spectrum of the particles emerging from the "chromosphere", and find that the hard hadronic jets are almost entirely suppressed. They are replaced by an isotropic distribution of soft photons and hadrons, with hundreds of particles in the GeV range. This provides a new distinctive signature for black hole events at LHC.

  10. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  11. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  12. Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Bentley

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

  13. Turbodrilling in the hot-hole environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, geothermal and other types of hot-hole drilling have presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, particularly those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. Typical temperatures of 350 to 700/sup 0/F (177 to 371/sup 0/C) damage the elastomers and create other operating problems, reducing the life of the motors and their ability to drill efficiently. Recent innovations in turbodrill design have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and have allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling time in hot-hole conditions. The unique feature of this turbodrill is the lack of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials. Its capabilities are matched closely to the requirements of drilling in elevated-temperature environments. The bearing assembly can withstand conditions encountered in typical geothermal formations and provides the performance necessary to stay in the hole. The result is increased rate of penetration (ROP) and more economical drilling.

  14. Structure of the Spherical Black Hole Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonanno; S. Droz; W. Israel; S. M. Morsink

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal structure of a charged spherical black hole is still a topic of debate. In a nonrotating but aspherical gravitational collapse to form a spherical charged black hole, the backscattered gravitational wave tails enter the black hole and are blueshifted at the Cauchy horizon. This has a catastrophic effect if combined with an outflux crossing the Cauchy horizon: a singularity develops at the Cauchy horizon and the effective mass inflates. Recently a numerical study of a massless scalar field in the \\RN background suggested that a spacelike singularity may form before the Cauchy horizon forms. We will show that there exists an approximate analytic solution of the scalar field equations which allows the mass inflation singularity at the Cauchy horizon to exist. In particular, we see no evidence that the Cauchy horizon is preceded by a spacelike singularity.

  15. Gravitational energy of rotating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Maluf; E. F. Martins; A. Kneip

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity the energy density of asymptotically flat gravitational fields can be naturaly defined as a scalar density restricted to a three-dimensional spacelike hypersurface $\\Sigma$. Integration over the whole $\\Sigma$ yields the standard ADM energy. After establishing the reference space with zero gravitational energy we obtain the expression of the localized energy for a Kerr black hole. The expression of the energy inside a surface of constant radius can be explicitly calculated in the limit of small $a$, the specific angular momentum. Such expression turns out to be exactly the same as the one obtained by means of the method preposed recently by Brown and York. We also calculate the energy contained within the outer horizon of the black hole for {\\it any} value of $a$. The result is practically indistinguishable from $E=2M_{ir}$, where $M_{ir}$ is the irreducible mass of the black hole.

  16. Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractóModel validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation. A few methods to define model quality indices have been proposed to quantify model error for model validation criteria development.

  17. Protocol assessment of a field reliability experiment at the NDI Validation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashbaugh, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spencer, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial task pursued by the Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) at the request of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was to plan and to implement a specific field experiment. The purpose was to assess the reliability of detecting a crack originating within fastener holes in thin aluminum structure using high-frequency eddy current inspection methods. To accomplish this the authors developed a consistent and systematic methodology to assess reliability of nondestructive inspections through field experiments (Spencer et al., 1993). In this article they briefly discuss major elements necessary for field experimentation. The authors also relate how they tested these elements for the Eddy Current Inspection Reliability Experiment (ECIRE) through a dress rehearsal in the Validation Center.

  18. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Winstanley; Phil M. Young

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal (`lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  19. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winstanley, Elizabeth; Young, Phil M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstroem-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal ('lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  20. Tachyon Perturbation on Two Dimensional Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniket Basu

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the black hole geometry in the presence of tachyonic perturbations, and solve for the form of allowed tachyonic hair in the presence of back reaction, and for the form of the metric under the assumption that only the metric is perturbed but not the dilaton. We evaluate the Kretschmann scalar and argue that the horizon becomes singular in the presence of tachyons, implying that the black hole has turned into a naked singularity. A form of the allowed tachyon potential emerges as a requirement of self-consistency of our solution.

  1. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  2. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Lorentz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose A. R. Cembranos; Jorge Gigante Valcarcel

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Different black hole solutions of the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills equations are well known from long time. They have attracted much attention from mathematicians and physicists from their discovery. In this work, we analyze black holes associated with the gauge Lorentz group. In particular, we study solutions which identify the gauge connection with the spin connection. This ansatz allows to find exact solutions to the complete system of equations. By using this procedure, we show the equivalence between the Yang-Mills-Lorentz model in curved space-time and a particular set of extended gravitational theories.

  3. Chaotic Information Processing by Extremal Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review an explicit regularization of the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence, that preserves all isometries of bulk and boundary degrees of freedom. This scheme is useful to characterize the space of the unitary evolution operators that describe the dynamics of the microstates of extremal black holes in four spacetime dimensions. Using techniques from algebraic number theory to evaluate the transition amplitudes, we remark that the regularization scheme expresses the fast quantum computation capability of black holes as well as its chaotic nature.

  4. Dynamics of galaxy cores and supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on the dynamical evolution of galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes is reviewed. Topics include galaxy structural properties; collisionless and collisional equilibria; loss-cone dynamics; and dynamics of binary and multiple supermassive black holes.

  5. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronĖhole...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronĖhole pairs in CsI. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronĖhole pairs in CsI. Abstract: A Monte Carlo...

  6. Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole, following which nitrogen was...

  7. Topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Ronggen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Liming [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ohta, Nobuyoshi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find topological (charged) black holes whose horizon has an arbitrary constant scalar curvature 2k in Horava-Lifshitz theory. Without loss of generality, one may take k=1, 0, and -1. The black hole solution is asymptotically anti-de Sitter with a nonstandard asymptotic behavior. Using the Hamiltonian approach, we define a finite mass associated with the solution. We discuss the thermodynamics of the topological black holes and find that the black hole entropy has a logarithmic term in addition to an area term. We find a duality in Hawking temperature between topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory and Einstein's general relativity: the temperature behaviors of black holes with k=1, 0, and -1 in Horava-Lifshitz theory are, respectively, dual to those of topological black holes with k=-1, 0, and 1 in Einstein's general relativity. The topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory are thermodynamically stable.

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300...

  9. A Note on Black Hole Temperature and Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose intuitive derivations of the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole.

  10. Entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanwi Ghosh; Soumitra SenGupta

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using brick wall method the entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole is determined for both asymptotically flat and non-flat cases. The entropy turns out to be proportional to the horizon area of the black hole confirming the Beckenstien, Hawking area-entropy formula for black holes. The leading order logarithmic corrections to the entropy are also derived for such black holes.

  11. Can the fluctuations of a black hole be treated thermodynamically?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Ropotenko

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the temperature of a typical Schwarzschild black hole is very low, some doubts are raised about whether the fluctuations of the black hole can be treated thermodynamically. It is shown that this is not the case: the thermodynamic fluctuations of a black hole are considerably larger than the corresponding quantum fluctuations. Moreover the ratio of the mean square thermodynamic fluctuation to the corresponding quantum fluctuation can be interpreted as a number of the effective constituents of a black hole.

  12. Black holes in Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Yekta, Davood Mahdavian [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we find different types of black holes for the Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity. Our solutions include (un)charged warped (anti-)de Sitter black holes for four and six derivative expanded action. We also look at the black holes in unexpanded Born-Infeld action. In each case we calculate the entropy, angular momentum and mass of the black holes. We also find the central charges for the conformal field theory duals.

  13. Entropy and Area of Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments related to the entropy of black holes strongly constrain the spectrum of the area operator for a Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity. In particular, this spectrum is fixed completely by the assumption that the black hole entropy is maximum. Within the approach discussed, one arrives in loop quantum gravity at a quantization rule with integer quantum numbers $n$ for the entropy and area of a black hole.

  14. PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

  15. Validation of two tropical marine bivalves as bioindicators of mining1 contamination in the New Caledonia lagoon: Field transplantation experiments2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    nickel exploitation. Among other, local mining activities result in large53 anthropogenic inputs1 Validation of two tropical marine bivalves as bioindicators of mining1 contamination in the New, DCBS,25 Departamento de HidrobiologŪa, C.P. 09340, Iztapalapa, Mexico D.F., Mexico26 27 hal-00566717

  16. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase Core Storage R&D Storage Infrastructure Strategic Program Support NATCARBAtlas Program Plan Project Portfolio...

  17. Calibration and Validation of Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    +45 98 14 25 55 Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering No. 2 Calibration and Validation of Measurement ......................................................................................................................................11 9. SIPHON TURBINE ......................................................................................................................................12 10. DUMMY TURBINES

  18. HEV, PHEV, BEV Test Standard Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BEV Test Standard Validation 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 10, 2011 Michael Duoba Argonne National Laboratory Sponsored by Lee Slezak...

  19. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Validation of Multicomponent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation of Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry at Four Geothermal Power Plants Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

  20. Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is...

  1. FIMS Data Validation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FIMS Data Validation The Facility Information Management System (FIMS) is the Department's official repository of real property data. The Department relies on the FIMS data for...

  2. Fuel Cell Backup Power Technology Validation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about fuel cell backup power technology validation activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  3. FACILITIES INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FIMS) DATA VALIDATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    not scored xii) Year Acquired - Validated not scored xiii) Disposition Date (Archived data) xiv) Disposition Method (Archived data) xv) Net Proceeds (Archived data) b) The...

  4. Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation and Validation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion...

  5. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  6. Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    1 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN Department of Humanities and Social@duke.poly.edu word count: 5498 #12;2 word count: 5498 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument ABSTRACT. Einstein. In particular, I suggest that a gauge-invariant interpretation of Einstein algebras that avoids the hole

  7. MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westervelt, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R M Westervelt, J C Culbertson

  8. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive $\\geq30\\Msun$, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos in the mass range $10^{6}-10^{10}\\Ms$. Such early black holes, at redshifts z$\\gtsim10$, could be the seed black holes for the many supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If they exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime signal for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation of black holes in the center of high redshift dark matter halos and explore implications of initial natal kick velocities conjectured by some formation models. The central concentration of early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they are born even with moderate kicks of tens of km/s. The modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the lower mass black holes as compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N--body simulations we quantify the role of natal kicks of black holes formed from massive metal free stars on their merger rates with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies. Our results also apply to black holes ejected by the gravitational slingshot mechanism.

  9. On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions John Byron Manchak*y Here, we clarify the relationship among three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole. In what follows, we consider three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole

  10. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  11. Limits on New Physics from Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford Cheung; Stefan Leichenauer

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes emit high energy particles which induce a finite density potential for any scalar field $\\phi$ coupling to the emitted quanta. Due to energetic considerations, $\\phi$ evolves locally to minimize the effective masses of the outgoing states. In theories where $\\phi$ resides at a metastable minimum, this effect can drive $\\phi$ over its potential barrier and classically catalyze the decay of the vacuum. Because this is not a tunneling process, the decay rate is not exponentially suppressed and a single black hole in our past light cone may be sufficient to activate the decay. Moreover, decaying black holes radiate at ever higher temperatures, so they eventually probe the full spectrum of particles coupling to $\\phi$. We present a detailed analysis of vacuum decay catalyzed by a single particle, as well as by a black hole. The former is possible provided large couplings or a weak potential barrier. In contrast, the latter occurs much more easily and places new stringent limits on theories with hierarchical spectra. Finally, we comment on how these constraints apply to the standard model and its extensions, e.g. metastable supersymmetry breaking.

  12. Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

  13. Black hole formation in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  14. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge-Rui Chen; Shiwei Zhou; Yong-Chang Huang

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a BTZ black hole. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  15. Brief review on higher spin black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  16. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  17. The Overlap of Numerical Relativity, Perturbation Theory and Post-Newtonian Theory in the Binary Black Hole Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Le Tiec

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspiralling and coalescing binary black holes are promising sources of gravitational radiation. The orbital motion and gravitational-wave emission of such system can be modelled using a variety of approximation schemes and numerical methods in general relativity: the post-Newtonian formalism, black hole perturbation theory, numerical relativity simulations, and the effective one-body model. We review recent work at the multiple interfaces of these analytical and numerical techniques, emphasizing the use of coordinate-invariant relationships to perform meaningful comparisons. Such comparisons provide independent checks of the validity of the various calculations, they inform the development of a universal, semi-analytical model of the binary dynamics and gravitational-wave emission, and they help to delineate the respective domains of validity of each approximation method. For instance, several recent comparisons suggest that perturbation theory may find applications in a broader range of physical problems than previously thought, including the radiative inspiral of intermediate mass-ratio and comparable-mass black hole binaries.

  18. Data error detection and device controller failure detection in an input/output system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzman, J.A.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bixler, R.M.; Davidow, W.H.; Despotakis, J.A.; Graziano, P.J.; Green, M.D.; Greig, D.A.; Hayashi, S.J.; Mackie, D.R.

    1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an input/output system for a multiprocessor system of the kind in which separate processor modules are interconnected for parallel processing, each of the processor modules having a central processing unit and a memory, at least some of the processor modules having an input/output channel, the input/output system comprising, at least one device controller for controlling the transfer of data between multiple different ones of the processor modules and a peripheral device.

  19. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratoryís Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  20. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  1. SRTC input to DOE-HQ R and D database for FY99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, L.R. Jr.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a database of the Savannah River Site input to the DOE Research and Development database. The report contains approximately 50 project abstracts.

  2. PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Mashuri L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Systems for Heating and Cooling. May, 1978. (Washington:Hemisphere heating, Publishing Corp. , 1978),INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.

  3. Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The study entitled, ďApproaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input,Ē focuses on the issue of showing compliance with given...

  4. [Composite analysis E-area vaults and saltstone disposal facilities]. PORFLOW and FACT input files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This diskette contains the PORFLOW and FACT input files described in Appendix B of the accompanying report `Composite Analysis E-Area Vaults and Saltstone Disposal Facilities`.

  5. Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847 Task 9 Deliverable ≠ Baseline Model Validation By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural

  6. Validation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Alan

    of APIs in the directory and shows that REST1 [3] is in the majority and is growing faster than any other validation. 1ProgrammableWeb API styles are self-reported by the API owners, and APIs reported as RESTful mayValidation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation Peter J. Danielsen and Alan Jeffrey Bell Labs

  7. Improved methods for simulating nearly extremal binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Scheel; Matthew Giesler; Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Kevin Kuper; Michael Boyle; Bela Szilagyi; Lawrence E. Kidder

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical black holes could be nearly extremal (that is, rotating nearly as fast as possible); therefore, nearly extremal black holes could be among the binaries that current and future gravitational-wave observatories will detect. Predicting the gravitational waves emitted by merging black holes requires numerical-relativity simulations, but these simulations are especially challenging when one or both holes have mass $m$ and spin $S$ exceeding the Bowen-York limit of $S/m^2=0.93$. We present improved methods that enable us to simulate merging, nearly extremal black holes more robustly and more efficiently. We use these methods to simulate an unequal-mass, precessing binary black hole coalescence, where the larger black hole has $S/m^2=0.99$. We also use these methods to simulate a non-precessing binary black hole coalescence, where both black holes have $S/m^2=0.994$, nearly reaching the Novikov-Thorne upper bound for holes spun up by thin accretion disks. We demonstrate numerical convergence and estimate the numerical errors of the waveforms; we compare numerical waveforms from our simulations with post-Newtonian and effective-one-body waveforms; we compare the evolution of the black-hole masses and spins with analytic predictions; and we explore the effect of increasing spin magnitude on the orbital dynamics (the so-called "orbital hangup" effect).

  8. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  9. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  10. Predictability in Quantum Gravity and Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible resolution of the information loss paradox for black holes is proposed in which a phase transition occurs when the temperature of an evaporating black hole equals a critical value, $T_c$, and Lorentz invariance and diffeomorphism invariance are spontaneously broken. This allows a generalization of Schr\\"odinger's equation for the quantum mechanical density matrix, such that a pure state can evolve into a mixed state, because in the symmetry broken phase the conservation of energy-momentum is spontaneously violated. TCP invariance is also spontaneously broken together with time reversal invariance, allowing the existence of white holes, which are black holes moving backwards in time. Domain walls would form which separate the black holes and white holes (anti-black holes) in the broken symmetry regime, and the system could evolve into equilibrium producing a balance of information loss and gain.

  11. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  12. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive >30 Msun, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos. We expect primordial stars to form in halos in the mass range 10^6-10^10 Msun. Some of these early black holes, formed at redshifts z>10, could be the seed black hole for a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If the black hole descendants of the primordial stars exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime candidate for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation and evolution of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM universe. We seed high-redshift dark matter halos with early black holes, and explore the merger history of the host halos and the implications of black hole's kick velocities arising from their coalescence. The central concentration of low mass early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they experience even moderate kicks of tens of km/s. Even such modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the low mass black holes that were ejected, compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates with central supermassive black holes in the largest halos may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N-body simulations, we quantify the role of kicks on the merger rates of black holes formed from massive metal free stars with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies.

  13. MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?nuts√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

  14. Estimating uncertainty of inference for validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a validation process based upon the concept that validation is an inference-making activity. This has always been true, but the association has not been as important before as it is now. Previously, theory had been confirmed by more data, and predictions were possible based on data. The process today is to infer from theory to code and from code to prediction, making the role of prediction somewhat automatic, and a machine function. Validation is defined as determining the degree to which a model and code is an accurate representation of experimental test data. Imbedded in validation is the intention to use the computer code to predict. To predict is to accept the conclusion that an observable final state will manifest; therefore, prediction is an inference whose goodness relies on the validity of the code. Quantifying the uncertainty of a prediction amounts to quantifying the uncertainty of validation, and this involves the characterization of uncertainties inherent in theory/models/codes and the corresponding data. An introduction to inference making and its associated uncertainty is provided as a foundation for the validation problem. A mathematical construction for estimating the uncertainty in the validation inference is then presented, including a possibility distribution constructed to represent the inference uncertainty for validation under uncertainty. The estimation of inference uncertainty for validation is illustrated using data and calculations from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The ICF measurements of neutron yield and ion temperature were obtained for direct-drive inertial fusion capsules at the Omega laser facility. The glass capsules, containing the fusion gas, were systematically selected with the intent of establishing a reproducible baseline of high-yield 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} neutron output. The deuterium-tritium ratio in these experiments was varied to study its influence upon yield. This paper on validation inference is the first in a series of inference uncertainty estimations. While the methods demonstrated are primarily statistical, these do not preclude the use of nonprobabilistic methods for uncertainty characterization. The methods presented permit accurate determinations for validation and eventual prediction. It is a goal that these methods establish a standard against which best practice may evolve for determining degree of validation.

  15. Dynamics of stellar black holes in young star clusters with different metallicities - II. Black hole-black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunetto Marco Ziosi; Michela Mapelli; Marica Branchesi; Giuseppe Tormen

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the formation and dynamical evolution of black hole-black hole (BH-BH) binaries in young star clusters (YSCs), by means of N-body simulations. The simulations include metallicity-dependent recipes for stellar evolution and stellar winds, and have been run for three different metallicities (Z = 0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun). Following recent theoretical models of wind mass-loss and core-collapse supernovae, we assume that the mass of the stellar remnants depends on the metallicity of the progenitor stars. We find that BH-BH binaries form efficiently because of dynamical exchanges: in our simulations, we find about 10 times more BH-BH binaries than double neutron star binaries. The simulated BH-BH binaries form earlier in metal-poor YSCs, which host more massive black holes (BHs) than in metal-rich YSCs. The simulated BH-BH binaries have very large chirp masses (up to 80 Msun), because the BH mass is assumed to depend on metallicity, and because BHs can grow in mass due to the merger with stars. The simulated BH-BH binaries span a wide range of orbital periods (10^-3-10^7 yr), and only a small fraction of them (0.3 per cent) is expected to merge within a Hubble time. We discuss the estimated merger rate from our simulations and the implications for Advanced VIRGO and LIGO.

  16. FLEX AND PINCH: A CASE STUDY OF WHOLE HAND INPUT DESIGN FOR VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    FLEX AND PINCH: A CASE STUDY OF WHOLE HAND INPUT DESIGN FOR VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION JOSEPH J. LAVIOLA JR. and ROBERT C. ZELEZNIK Brown University Site of the NSF Science and Technology Center. In this paper, we describe our Pinch Glove like input device which is used as a tool to augment bend

  17. Noninvasive high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noninvasive high-resolution detection of the arterial and venous input function through a PET Wrist using planar coincidence images. I. INTRODUCTION Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography (PET) often determine the input function. These techniques include external monitors and PET scanners that measure

  18. Improved Imaged-derived Input Function for Study of Human Brain FDG-PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Improved Imaged-derived Input Function for Study of Human Brain FDG-PET Hongbin Guo, Rosemary tomography (PET) studies. Two time windows can be recognized in the time activity curve measured from the compartmental model for FDG PET [5]. Index Terms Quantification of FDG PET, Automated Image-derived input

  19. Evaluating an Alternative Model for the Input Function in FDG-PET Studies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Evaluating an Alternative Model for the Input Function in FDG-PET Studies 1 Hongbin Guo 2 Rosemary-D-glucose flu- oro (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) brain studies with bolus injection is presented-derived expressions. The new model provides an effective means to recover the input function in FDG-PET studies

  20. Experimental Results on Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) Time Reversal for UWB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Experimental Results on Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) Time Reversal for UWB Systems with multiple-input single- output (MISO) antennas over ultra-wideband (UWB) channels. In particular, temporal and spatial focusing as well as array gain are studied based on a (4 ◊ 1) MISO scheme in an office environment

  1. Design of penalty functions for optimal control of linear dynamical systems under state and input constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of penalty functions for optimal control of linear dynamical systems under state and input of solving a constrained optimal control for a general single-input single output linear time varying system dimensional (functional optimization) case. The main novelty is that both the bounds on the control variable

  2. Asymptotic Controllability and Input-to-State Stabilization: The Effect of Actuator Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    a new feedback design that makes globally asymptotically controllable systems input-to-state stable of input-to-state stable (ISS) systems forms the basis for much modern nonlinear feedback design-to-state stabi- lizability of nonlinear finite-dimensional continuous-time control systems. We focus on some

  3. Kalman filtering with unknown inputs via optimal state estimation of singular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    1 Kalman filtering with unknown inputs via optimal state estimation of singular systems M. DAROUACH de Lorraine, 54400 COSNES ET ROMAIN, FRANCE A new method for designing a Kalman filter for linear the Kalman filter, it is generally assumed that all system parameters, noise covariances, and inputs

  4. INPUT VARIABLE SELECTION USING INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND HIGHER ORDER STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialatte, FranÁois

    that the method is capable of giving reliable performance with dependent inputs to non- linear models. 1-test. Given a linear regression model (1) where is an parameter vector and is an input regression vector. Assume we have a generating system given by (2) where and is some static non- linear function, possibly

  5. A coupled isotope tracer method to characterize input water to lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    of input waters after accounting for the effects of secondary evaporative isotopic enrichment. As shownA coupled isotope tracer method to characterize input water to lakes Yi Yi a,*, Bronwyn E. Brock in revised form 7 November 2007; accepted 9 November 2007 KEYWORDS Water isotope tracers; Isotope hydrology

  6. Magnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory -- Intermediate between MFE and IFE ∑ Presently only fundedMagnetized Target Fusion: Input to the 35-yr Fusion Long-Range Electric Plan G. A. Wurden Fusion Energy Program Office Los Alamos National Laboratory Jan. 14, 2003 #12;Magnetized Target Fusion: Input

  7. A Current-based Method for Short Circuit Power Calculation under Noisy Input Waveforms*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Current-based Method for Short Circuit Power Calculation under Noisy Input Waveforms* Hanif circuit energy dissipation of logic cells. The short circuit current is highly dependent on the input waveforms are then used to calculate the short circuit current, and hence, short circuit energy dissipation

  8. 2008 Residential Building Efficiency Standards 1 Efficiency Ratings and Performance Modeling Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inputs for the Daiken AC (Americas), Inc. Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump System The Building-to-Water Source Heat Pump can provide space heating, space cooling and domestic water heating functions Required Compliance Software Inputs-- The Altherma Air-to-Water Source Heat Pump system is an electric heat

  9. LETTER Communicated by Emilio Salinas Higher-Order Statistics of Input Ensembles and the Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTER Communicated by Emilio Salinas Higher-Order Statistics of Input Ensembles and the Response (Steinmetz et al., 2000; Salinas & Sejnowski, 2001). The effect of correlated synaptic input on the neuronal; Salinas & Sejnowski, 2000; Svirskis & Rinzel, 2000; Feng & Zhang, 2001; Stroeve & Gielen, 2001

  10. Gravitational radiation from dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective energy tensor for gravitational radiation is identified for uniformly expanding flows of the Hawking mass-energy. It appears in an energy conservation law expressing the change in mass due to the energy densities of matter and gravitational radiation, with respect to a Killing-like vector encoding a preferred flow of time outside a black hole. In a spin-coefficient formulation, the components of the effective energy tensor can be understood as the energy densities of ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation. By anchoring the flow to the trapping horizon of a black hole in a given sequence of spatial hypersurfaces, there is a locally unique flow and a measure of gravitational radiation in the strong-field regime.

  11. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. KrŲll

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  12. Geometric description of BTZ black holes thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states of the Ba\\~nados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole in (2+1)-gravity. We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to introduce in the space of equilibrium states a $2-$dimensional thermodynamic metric whose curvature is non-vanishing, indicating the presence of thermodynamic interaction, and free of singularities, indicating the absence of phase transitions. Similar results are obtained for generalizations of the BTZ black hole which include a Chern-Simons term and a dilatonic field. Small logarithmic corrections of the entropy turn out to be represented by small corrections of the thermodynamic curvature, reinforcing the idea that thermodynamic curvature is a measure of thermodynamic interaction.

  13. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  14. Formation and Evolution of Galactic Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The main requirements for fueling an active galactic nucleus and to form massive black holes are reviewed. Low-luminosity AGN can be fueled easily from the local star clusters, near the nucleus, and the various stellar processes are described. Above a certain luminosity (and therefore accretion rate) large-scale gas flows from galactic scales are required. These can be driven by gravity torques of non-axisymmetric perturbations, such as bars, spirals, galaxy interactions. Observational evidence that these mechanisms are in action is found for high enough luminosities. It is very frequent that starbursts are also triggered through the same mechanisms, and the dense nuclear star clusters formed provide fuel for the AGN over a longer time-scale. Secular internal evolution and more violent evolution through interactions and mergers contribute to grow both a massive black hole and a bulge, and this could explain the observed proportionality relation between the mass of these two components.

  15. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  16. Phase Structure of Higher Spin Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chowdhury; Arunabha Saha

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the study of the phase structure of higher spin black holes carried out in arXiv$:1210.0284$ using the "canonical formalism". In particular we study the low as well as high temperature regimes. We show that the Hawking-Page transition takes place in the low temperature regime. The thermodynamically favoured phase changes from conical surplus to black holes and then again to conical surplus as we increase temperature. We then show that in the high temperature regime the diagonal embedding gives the appropriate description. We also give a map between the parameters of the theory near the IR and UV fixed points. This makes the "good" solutions near one end map to the "bad" solutions near the other end and vice versa.

  17. Quantized black holes, their spectrum and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under quite natural general assumptions, the following results are obtained. The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The general structure of the horizon spectrum is found. In the special case of loop quantum gravity, the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is found. The discrete spectrum of thermal radiation of a black hole fits the Wien profile. The natural widths of the lines are much smaller than the distances between them. The total intensity of the thermal radiation is estimated. If the density of quantized primordial black holes is close to the present upper limit on the dark-matter density in our Solar system, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation.

  18. Review of input stages used in front end electronics for particle detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplon, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present noise analysis of the input stages most commonly used in front end electronics for particle detectors. Analysis shows the calculation of the input referenced noise related to the active devices. It identifies the type, parallel or series, of the equivalent noise sources related to the input transistors, which is the important input for the further choice of the signal processing method. Moreover we calculate the input impedance of amplifiers employed in applications where the particle detector is connected to readout electronics by means of transmission line. We present schematics, small signal models,a complete set of equations, and results of the major steps of calculations for all discussed circuits.

  19. Charged Cylindrical Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson Levi Said; Joseph Sultana; Kristian Zarb Adami

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering cylindrical topology we present the static solution for a charged black hole in conformal gravity. We show that unlike the general relativistic case there are two different solutions, both including a factor that when set to zero recovers the familiar static charged black string solution in Einstein's theory. This factor gives rise to a linear term in the potential that also features in the neutral case and may have significant ramifications for particle trajectories.

  20. Comparing quantum black holes and naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Singh

    2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    There are models of gravitational collapse in classical general relativity which admit the formation of naked singularities as well as black holes. These include fluid models as well as models with scalar fields as matter. Even if fluid models were to be regarded as unphysical in their matter content, the remaining class of models (based on scalar fields) generically admit the formation of visible regions of finite but arbitrarily high curvature. Hence it is of interest to ask, from the point of view of astrophysics, as to what a stellar collapse leading to a naked singularity (or to a visible region of very high curvature) will look like, to a far away observer. The emission of energy during such a process may be divided into three phases - (i) the classical phase, during which matter and gravity can both be treated according to the laws of classical physics, (ii) the semiclassical phase, when gravity is treated classically but matter behaves as a quantum field, and (iii) the quantum gravitational phase. In this review, we first give a summary of the status of naked singularities in classical relativity, and then report some recent results comparing the semiclassical phase of black holes with the semiclassical phase of spherical collapse leading to a naked singularity. In particular, we ask how the quantum particle creation during the collapse leading to a naked singularity compares with the Hawking radiation from a star collapsing to form a black hole. It turns out that there is a fundamental difference between the two cases. A spherical naked star emits only about one Planck energy during its semiclassical phase, and the further evolution can only be determined by the laws of quantum gravity. This contrasts with the semiclassical evaporation of a black hole.

  1. Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent string theory motivated paper, Nicolini, Smailagic and Spallucci (NSS) presented an interesting model for a noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like black hole solution in 4-dimensions. The essential effect of having noncommutative co-ordinates in this approach is to smear out matter distributions on a scale associated with the turn-on of noncommutativity which was taken to be near the 4-d Planck mass. In particular, NSS assumed that this smearing was essentially Gaussian. This energy scale is sufficiently large that in 4-d such effects may remain invisible indefinitely. Extra dimensional models which attempt to address the gauge hierarchy problem, however, allow for the possibility that the effective fundamental scale may not be far from {approx} 1 TeV, an energy regime that will soon be probed by experiments at both the LHC and ILC. In this paper we generalize the NSS model to the case where flat, toroidally compactified extra dimensions are accessible at the TeV-scale and examine the resulting modifications in black hole properties due to the existence of noncommutativity. We show that while many of the noncommutativity-induced black hole features found in 4-d by NSS persist, in some cases there can be significant modifications due the presence of extra dimensions. We also demonstrate that the essential features of this approach are not particularly sensitive to the Gaussian nature of the smearing assumed by NSS.

  2. Kerr black holes with scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M,J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^2>1, quadrupole moment larger than J^2/M and larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (...

  3. The Extended Power Law as Intrinsic Signature For a Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Titarchuk; Thomas Zannias

    1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the exact general relativistic exact integro-differential equation of radiative transfer describing the interaction of low energy photons with a Maxwellian distribution of hot electrons in gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole. We prove that due to Comptonization an initial arbitrary spectrum of low energy photons unavoidably results in spectra characterized by an extended power-law feature. We examine the spectral index by using both analytical and numerical methods for a variety of physical parameters as such the plasma temperature and the mass accretion rate. The presence of the event horizon as well as the behaviour of the null geodesics in its vicinity largely determine the dependence of the spectral index on the flow parameters. We come to the conclusion that the bulk motion of a converging flow is more efficient in upscattering photons than thermal Comptonization provided that the electron temperature in the flow is of order of a few keV or less. In this case, the spectrum observed at infinity consists of a soft component produced by those input photons that escape after a few scatterings without any significant energy change and of hard component (described by a power law) produced by the photons that underwent significant upscattering. The luminosity of the power-law component is relatively small compared to that of the soft component. For accretion into black hole the spectral energy index of the power-law is always higher than one for plasma temperature of order of a few keV. This result suggests that the bulk motion Comptonization might be responsible for the power-law spectra seen in the black-hole X-ray sources.

  4. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  5. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of Assumptions and Draft Workshop Agenda for the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop, February 3-4, 2014, Golden, Colorado, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  6. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines Print In the struggle to keep up with microbes whose rapid mutations outpace our ability to produce vaccines, the human race has...

  7. A VALIDATION INDEX FOR ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    A VALIDATION INDEX FOR ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS Stephen Roberts, Lionel Tarassenko, James Pardey and estimation properties of artificial neural networks. Like many `traditional' statistical techniques & David Siegwart Neural Network Research Group Department of Engineering Science University of Oxford, UK

  8. Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  9. Tools for event generator tuning and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Buckley

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of MCnet tools for validating the performance of event generator simulations against data, and for tuning their phenomenological free parameters. For validation, the Rivet toolkit is now a mature and complete system, with a large library of prominent benchmark analyses. For tuning, the Professor system has recently completed its first tunes of Pythia 6, with substantial improvements on the existing default tune and potential to greatly aid the setup of new generators for LHC studies.

  10. Black-Hole Solutions to Einstein's Equations in the Presence of Matter and Modifications of Gravitation in Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Goutťraux

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we wish to examine the black-hole solutions of modified gravity theories inspired by String Theory or Cosmology. Namely, these modifications will take the guise of additional gauge and scalar fields for the so-called Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories with an exponential Liouville potential; and of extra spatial dimensions for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theories. The black-hole solutions of EMD theories as well as their integrability are reviewed. One of the main results is that a master equation is obtained in the case of planar horizon topology, which allows to completely integrate the problem for s special relationship between the couplings. We also classify existing solutions. We move on to the study of Gauss-Bonnet black holes, focusing on the six-dimensional case. It is found that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling exposes the Weyl tensor of the horizon to the dynamics, severely restricting the Einstein spaces admissible and effectively lifting some of the degeneracy on the horizon topology. We then turn to the study of the thermodynamic properties of black holes, in General Relativity as well as in EMD theories. For the latter, phase transitions may be found in the canonical ensemble, which resemble the phase transitions for Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes. Generically, we find that the thermodynamic properties (stability, order of phase transitions) depend crucially on the values of the EMD coupling constants. Finally, we interpret our planar EMD solutions holographically as Infra-Red geometries through the AdS/CFT correspondence, taking into account various validity constraints. We also compute AC and DC conductivities as applications to Condensed Matter Systems, and find some properties characteristic of strange metal behaviour.

  11. Scattering of Sound Waves by a Canonical Acoustic Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira; LuŪs C. B. Crispino

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of a monochromatic planar perturbation impinging upon a canonical acoustic hole. We show that acoustic hole scattering shares key features with black hole scattering. The interference of wavefronts passing in opposite senses around the hole creates regular oscillations in the scattered intensity. We examine this effect by applying a partial wave method to compute the differential scattering cross section for a range of incident wavelengths. We demonstrate the existence of a scattering peak in the backward direction, known as the glory. We show that the glory created by the canonical acoustic hole is approximately 170 times less intense than the glory created by the Schwarzschild black hole, for equivalent horizon-to-wavelength ratios. We hope that direct experimental observations of such effects may be possible in the near future.

  12. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehl, UT); Johnson, Monte L. (Orem, UT); Bartholomew, David B. (Springville, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  13. Connecting horizon pixels and interior voxels of a black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piero Nicolini; Douglas Singleton

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss to what extent one can infer details of the interior structure of a black hole based on its horizon. Recalling that black hole thermal properties are connected to the non-classical nature of gravity, we circumvent the restrictions of the no hair theorem by postulating that the black hole interior is singularity free due to violations of the usual energy conditions. Further these conditions allow one to establish a one-to-one, holographic projection between Planckian areal "bits" on the horizon and "voxels", representing the gravitational degrees of freedom in the black hole interior. We illustrate the repercussions of this idea by discussing an example of the black hole interior consisting of a de Sitter core postulated to arise from the local graviton quantum vacuum energy. It is shown that the black hole entropy can emerge as the statistical entropy of a gas of voxels.

  14. Black holes in extra dimensions can decay on the bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the extra dimensional theories, with TeV scale Plank constant, black holes may be produced in the Large Hadron Collider experiments. We have argued that in the d-dimensional black hole, the intrinsically 4-dimensional brane fields do not see the same geometry at the horizon, as in a 4-dimensional space-time. Kaluza-Klein modes invades the brane and surroundings and the brane fields can be considered as a thermal system at the temperature of the black hole. From energy and entropy consideration, we show that whether or not a six-dimensional black hole will decay by emitting Kaluza-Klein modes or the standard model particles, will depend on the length scale of the extra dimensions as well as on the mass of the black hole. For higher dimensional black holes, Kaluza-Klein modes will dominate the decay.

  15. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  16. MCNP-4B Validation for the DFS System at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the current work to date on the validation of the WSRC certified MCNP-4B, and is the last stage of the WSRC Validation Plan that was drafted to guide the validation effort.

  17. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingwu (Chelmsford, MA); Li, Wenguang (Andover, MA); Jiang, Hua (Methuen, MA)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  18. KKW Analysis for the Dyadosphere of a Charged Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Radinschi

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keski-Vakkuri, Kraus and Wilczek (KKW) analysis is used to compute the temperature and entropy in the dyadosphere of a charged black hole solution. For our purpose we choose the dyadosphere region of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole solution. Our results show that the expressions of the temperature and entropy in the dyadosphere of this charged black hole are not the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, respectively.

  19. A Quantum Material Model of Static Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -T. Sung

    1997-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum-mechanical prescription of static Einstein field equation is proposed in order to construct the matter-metric eigen-states in the interior of a static Schwarzschild black hole where the signature of space-time is chosen as (--++). The spectrum of the quantum states is identified to be the integral multiples of the surface gravity. A statistical explanation of black hole entropy is given and a quantisation rule for the masses of Schwarzschild black holes is proposed.

  20. A mathematical simulation of horizontal drain-hole performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Thomas Ru-Kang

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow Rate Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 22 Comparison of The Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 24 Relative Positions of Conventional Well and Horizontal Drain-Hole in Simulation Runs. . . . . 27 Comparison... of The Economic Oil Recovery Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . . . . . 28 Comparison of The Cumulative Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . 29 Effect of Horizontal Drain...

  1. Classical and Quantum Properties of Liouville Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole spacetimes can arise when a Liouville field is coupled to two- dimensional gravity. Exact solutions are obtained both classically and when quantum corrections due to back reaction effects are included. The black hole temperature depends upon the mass and the thermodynamic limit breaks down before evaporation of the black hole is complete, indicating that higher-loop effects must be included for a full description of the process.

  2. Brownian Motion of Black Holes in Dense Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Peter Berczik; Frederik Laun

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Brownian motion of a massive particle ("black hole") at the center of a galaxy using N-body simulations. Our galaxy models have power-law central density cusps like those observed at the centers of elliptical galaxies. The simulations show that the black hole achieves a steady-state kinetic energy that is substantially different than would be predicted based on the properties of the galaxy model in the absence of the black hole. The reason appears to be that the black hole responds to stars whose velocities have themselves been raised by the presence of the black hole. Over a wide range of density slopes and black hole masses, the black hole's mean kinetic energy is equal to what would be predicted under the assumption that it is in energy equipartition with stars lying within a distance ~r_h/2 from it, where r_h is the black hole's influence radius. The dependence of the Brownian velocity on black hole mass is approximately ~ 1/M^{1/(3-gamma)} with gamma the power-law index of the stellar density profile, rho~1/r^gamma. This is less steep than the 1/M dependence predicted in a model where the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocities is ignored. The influence of a stellar mass spectrum on the black hole's Brownian motion is also evaluated and found to be consistent with predictions from Chandrasekhar's theory. We use these results to derive a probability function for the mass of the Milky Way black hole based on a measurement of its proper motion velocity. Interesting constraints on M will require a velocity resolution exceeding 0.5 km/s.

  3. All-optical routing of single photons with multiple input and output ports by interferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Bin Yan; Bao Liu; Ling Zhou; Heng Fan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a waveguide-cavity coupled system to achieve the routing of photons by the phases of other photons. Our router has four input ports and four output ports. The transport of the coherent-state photons injected through any input port can be controlled by the phases of the coherent-state photons injected through other input ports. This control can be achieved when the mean numbers of the routed and control photons are small enough and require no additional control fields. Therefore, the all-optical routing of photons can be achieved at the single-photon level.

  4. Input to the PRAST computer code used in the SRS probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearnaghan, D.P.

    1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The PRAST (Production Reactor Algorithm for Source Terms) computer code was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Science Application International Corporation for the quantification of source terms for the SRS Savannah River Site (SRS) Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment. PRAST requires as input a set of release fractions, decontamination factors, transfer fractions and source term characteristics that accurately reflect the conditions that are evaluated by PRAST. This document links the analyses which form the basis for the PRAST input parameters. In addition, it gives the distribution of the input parameters that are uncertain and considered to be important to the evaluation of the source terms to the environment.

  5. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zacharakis, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,...

  7. Small Hairy Black Holes in Global AdS Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Basu; Jyotirmoy Bhattacharya; Sayantani Bhattacharyya; R. Loganayagam; Shiraz Minwalla; V. Umesh

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study small charged black holes in global AdS spacetime in the presence of a charged massless minimally coupled scalar field. In a certain parameter range these black holes suffer from well known superradiant instabilities. We demonstrate that the end point of the resultant tachyon condensation process is a hairy black hole which we construct analytically in a perturbative expansion in the black hole radius. At leading order our solution is a small undeformed RNAdS black hole immersed into a charged scalar condensate that fills the AdS `box'. These hairy black hole solutions appear in a two parameter family labelled by their mass and charge. Their mass is bounded from below by a function of their charge; at the lower bound a hairy black hole reduces to a regular horizon free soliton which can also be thought of as a nonlinear Bose condensate. We compute the microcanonical phase diagram of our system at small mass, and demonstrate that it exhibits a second order `phase transition' between the RNAdS black hole and the hairy black hole phases.

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  9. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

  10. Hydrodynamic model for electron-hole plasma in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Svintsov; V. Vyurkov; S. Yurchenko; T. Otsuji; V. Ryzhii

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a hydrodynamic model describing steady-state and dynamic electron and hole transport properties of graphene structures which accounts for the features of the electron and hole spectra. It is intended for electron-hole plasma in graphene characterized by high rate of intercarrier scattering compared to external scattering (on phonons and impurities), i.e., for intrinsic or optically pumped (bipolar plasma), and gated graphene (virtually monopolar plasma). We demonstrate that the effect of strong interaction of electrons and holes on their transport can be treated as a viscous friction between the electron and hole components. We apply the developed model for the calculations of the graphene dc conductivity, in particular, the effect of mutual drag of electrons and holes is described. The spectra and damping of collective excitations in graphene in the bipolar and monopolar limits are found. It is shown that at high gate voltages and, hence, at high electron and low hole densities (or vice-versa), the excitations are associated with the self-consistent electric field and the hydrodynamic pressure (plasma waves). In intrinsic and optically pumped graphene, the waves constitute quasineutral perturbations of the electron and hole densities (electron-hole sound waves) with the velocity being dependent only on the fundamental graphene constants.

  11. Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Radinschi

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and M{\\o}ller.

  12. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  13. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  14. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  16. Spectroscopy of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deyou Chen; Haitang Yang

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy spectrum of a spherically symmetric black hole was derived via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule in Majhi and Vagenas's work. Extending this work to charged and rotating black holes, we quantize the horizon area and the entropy of an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) black hole via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule and the adiabatic invariance. The result shows the area spectrum and the entropy spectrum are respectively equally spaced and independent on the parameters of the black hole.

  17. Particle Acceleration Around 5-dimensional Kerr Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Naresh Dadhich; Bobomurat Ahmedov; Husan Eshkuvatov

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    On the lines of the 4-dimensional Kerr black hole we consider the particle acceleration near a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole which has the two rotation parameters. It turns out that the center of mass energy of the two equal mass colliding particles as expected diverges for the extremal black hole and there is a symmetry in the results for $\\theta = 0, \\pi/2$. Because of the two rotation parameters, $r=0$ can be a horizon without being a curvature singularity. It is shown that the acceleration of particles to high energies near the 5-D extreme rotating black hole avoids fine-tuning of the angular momentum of particles.

  18. Moduli vacuum bubbles produced by evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J. R. [Physics Department, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary, Indiana 46408 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4D effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5D cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicate a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D 74, 024004 (2006)]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower-energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high-temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I. G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 32, 1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low-energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter.

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  20. accreting black holes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae. James S. Graber...

  1. Complete single-horizon quantum corrected black hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltola, Ari; Kunstatter, Gabor [Department of Physics and Winnipeg Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a semiclassical polymerization of the interior of Schwarzschild black holes gives rise to a tantalizing candidate for a nonsingular, single-horizon black hole spacetime. The exterior has nonzero quantum stress energy but closely approximates the classical spacetime for macroscopic black holes. The interior exhibits a bounce at a microscopic scale and then expands indefinitely to a Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. Polymerization therefore removes the singularity and produces a scenario reminiscent of past proposals for universe creation via quantum effects inside a black hole.

  2. Exploring higher dimensional black holes at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Chris M; Palmer, M J; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P

    cross section for production of black holes not too much heavier than the fundamental Planck scale corresponds to a production rate of a few Hertz at the LHC design luminosity. In the following sections, the process of the black hole production and decay... scattering in quantum gravity, hep-th/9906038. [7] R. Emparan, G. T. Horowitz, and R. C. Myers, Exact description of black holes on branes, JHEP 01 (2000) 007, [hep-th/9911043]. [8] S. B. Giddings and S. Thomas, High energy colliders as black hole factories...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1991 - 1991 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) Exploration...

  7. Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration...

  8. Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates...

  9. Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon...

  11. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  12. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for...

  13. Empirical validation using data from the SERI class-A validation house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A residential test building at the SERI Interim Field Site was monitored at the Class-A level during the spring of 1982. The building was also modeled on three building energy analysis simulations - DOE2.1A, Blast 3.0 and SERIRES - using measured weather data from the test period and the location. The measured energy performance data, and that predicted by the simulations, were compared. More correct input files for the codes were developed using measured values of input parameters, and the results were also compared with the measured performance data. The comparisons show that input errors can contribute to predicted auxiliary energy requirements which are on the order of 60% or more higher than the measured loads, and that improvements in input variables could reduce these errors significantly.

  14. Entropy: From Black Holes to Ordinary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Badiali

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Several results of black holes thermodynamics can be considered as firmly founded and formulated in a very general manner. From this starting point we analyse in which way these results may give us the opportunity to gain a better understanding in the thermodynamics of ordinary systems for which a pre-relativistic description is sufficient. First, we investigated the possibility to introduce an alternative definition of the entropy basically related to a local definition of the order in a spacetime model rather than a counting of microstates. We show that such an alternative approach exists and leads to the traditional results provided an equilibrium condition is assumed. This condition introduces a relation between a time interval and the reverse of the temperature. We show that such a relation extensively used in the black hole theory, mainly as a mathematical trick, has a very general and physical meaning here; in particular its derivation is not related to the existence of a canonical density matrix. Our dynamical approach of thermodynamic equilibrium allows us to establish a relation between action and entropy and we show that an identical relation exists in the case of black holes. The derivation of such a relation seems impossible in the Gibbs ensemble approach of statistical thermodynamics. From these results we suggest that the definition of entropy in terms of order in spacetime should be more general that the Boltzmann one based on a counting of microstates. Finally we point out that these results are obtained by reversing the traditional route going from the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation to statistical thermodynamics.

  15. Density matrix of black hole radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasma Alberte; Ram Brustein; Andrei Khmelnitsky; A. J. M. Medved

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Hawking's model of black hole evaporation is not unitary and leads to a mixed density matrix for the emitted radiation, while the Page model describes a unitary evaporation process in which the density matrix evolves from an almost thermal state to a pure state. We compare a recently proposed model of semiclassical black hole evaporation to the two established models. In particular, we study the density matrix of the outgoing radiation and determine how the magnitude of the off-diagonal corrections differs for the three frameworks. For Hawking's model, we find power-law corrections to the two-point functions that induce exponentially suppressed corrections to the off-diagonal elements of the full density matrix. This verifies that the Hawking result is correct to all orders in perturbation theory and also allows one to express the full density matrix in terms of the single-particle density matrix. We then consider the semiclassical theory for which the corrections, being non-perturbative from an effective field-theory perspective, are much less suppressed and grow monotonically in time. In this case, the R\\'enyi entropy for the outgoing radiation is shown to grow linearly at early times; but this growth slows down and the entropy eventually starts to decrease at the Page time. In addition to comparing models, we emphasize the distinction between the state of the radiation emitted from a black hole, which is highly quantum, and that of the radiation emitted from a typical classical black body at the same temperature.

  16. ACCRETION-JET CONNECTION IN BLACK HOLES THE ORIGIN OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    of a sudden drop of the hard X-rays..." ∑"The particles (corona/inner disk) are blown away..." ∑"Jets have Direct collapse depends on: ∑Metal content ∑Mass of the core ∑Angular momentum Can this model be tested observationally ? #12;HOW ARE FORM BLACK HOLE BINARIES ? CORE COLLAPSE MODELS: (Fryer & Kalogera ; Woosley & Heger

  17. Tunneling into black hole, escape from black hole, reflection from horizon and pair creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Within classical general relativity, a particle cannot reach the horizon of a black hole during a finite time, in the reference frame of an external observer; a particle inside cannot escape from a black hole; and the horizon does not produce any reflection. We argue that these processes may possibly be allowed in the quantum world. It is known that quantum mechanics allows pair creation at the horizon (one particle inside, another particle outside) and Hawking radiation. One can extend this idea to propose other processes. Tunneling of an external particle inside black hole may be produced by the creation of a pair at the horizon, followed by the annihilation of one created particle with the initial particle outside, with the other created particle appearing inside. Escape of a particle from a black hole may result from the creation of a pair, followed by the annihilation of one created particle with the particle inside, with the other created particle appearing outside. The escape may allow the transfer of information to the outside.Finally, the reflection of an external particle from the horizon may be modelled by a combination of the two processes presented above. The relationship between these "pair creation-annihilation'' mechanisms and the "horizon tunneling" calculations [1-5] is discussed.

  18. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workersí and Worker Representativesí Input in Work Planning and Control.

  19. Use of Building Automation System Trend Data for Inputs Generation in Bottom-Up Simulation Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibin, N. F.; Zmeureanu, R. G.; Love, J. A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for analysis and use in simulation is very large. This paper explores automating the process of generating inputs from Building Automation System (BAS) trend data for use in building simulation software. A proof-of-concept prototype called the Automatic...

  20. Assigning intonation elements and prosodic phrasing for English speech synthesis from high level linguistic input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W; Taylor, Paul A

    This paper describes a method for generating intonation events and prosodic phrasing from a high level linguistic description. Specifically, the input consists of information normally available from linguistic processing: ...