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1

DOE`s Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program accelerating the implementation of innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

A program to help accelerate the adoption and implementation of new and innovative remediation technologies has been initiated by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program Office (EM40). Developed as a Public-Private Partnership program in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Technology Innovation Office (TIO) and coordinated by Sandia National Laboratories, the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program attempts to reduce many of the classic barriers to the use of new technologies by involving government, industry, and regulatory agencies in the assessment, implementation, and validation of innovative technologies. In this program, DOE facilities work cooperatively with EPA, industry, national laboratories, and state and federal regulatory agencies to establish remediation demonstrations using applicable innovative technologies at their sites. Selected innovative technologies are used to remediate small, one to two acre, sites to generate the full-scale and real-world operating, treatment performance, and cost data needed to validate these technologies and gain acceptance by industry and regulatory agencies, thus accelerating their use nationwide. Each ITRD project developed at a DOE site is designed to address a typical soil or groundwater contamination issue facing both DOE and industry. This includes sites with volatile organic compound (VOC), semi-VOC, heavy metal, explosive residue, and complex or multiple constituent contamination. Projects are presently underway at three DOE facilities, while additional projects are under consideration for initiation in FY96 at several additional DOE sites. A brief overview of the ITRD Program, program plans, and the status and progress of existing ITRD projects are reviewed in this paper.

Hightower, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

An innovative stabilization/solidification treatment For contaminated soil remediation: demonstration project results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative stabilization/solidification (S/S) process using high-performance additivated concrete technology was developed for remediating soil contaminated by metals from abandoned industrial sites. In ord...

Petra Scanferla; Giorgio Ferrari; Roberto Pellay…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Innovative photocatalytic media optimized for solar-powered remediation: Application to pyrimethanil treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar photocatalysis, which is part of the family of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), is illustrative of an ecotechnology harnessing solar energy for remediation purposes. \\{AOPs\\} are able to treat what are dubbed persistent organic pollutants, as the core process is non-selective. Photocatalysis induces the mineralization of organic compounds by producing radical species. The aim is to develop photocatalytic media in a granule substrate of pores and fibers, but this comes at the cost of a major loss of substrate efficiency due to its relative inability to absorb enough UV irradiation. The authors have recently demonstrated the potential of innovative new media—aluminum foams defined in a way that optimizes the capture of incident radiation. However, their cost puts them out of reach of large-scale environmental water remediation applications. We propose a novel potential solution based on using recycled aluminum swarf machining waste as substrate media for photocatalytic material. These metal shavings offer a foam-like macroporous structure creating the potential to develop a large interface surface for exchange with incident light. Aluminum swarf developed a far higher mineralization capacity than cellulose fabric. This promising finding shows that foam and swarf are able to deliver good absorption of incident flux.

K. Elatmani; G. Plantard; D. Sacco; I. Aitichou; V. Goetz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund`s National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.

Gour-Tsyh Yeh; Jin-Ping Gwo; Malcolm D. Siegel; Ming-Hsu Li; Yilin Fang; Fan Zhang; Wensui Luo; Steve B. Yabusaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

Yeh, Gour T. [Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (Taiwan); National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Gwo, Jin Ping (Jack) [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Rockville, MD (United States); Siegel, Malcolm D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Ming-Hsu [National Central Univ. (Taiwan); ; Fang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Fan [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Luo, Wensui [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

VI.11 Innovative soil and groundwater remediation: the SITE program experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The superfund innovative technology evaluation (SITE) program of the United States environmental protection agency (EPA) has integrated the private sector, EPA, and other federal and state agencies to successfully address complex hazardous waste problems. The SITE program is a key element in EPA's efforts to increase the availability and use of innovative technologies for the remediation of the nation's hazardous waste sites. The SITE program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative treatment technologies. The program provides environmental decision-makers with relevant data on new, viable remediation technologies that may have performance or cost advantages compared to conventional treatment technologies. The SITE program technology evaluations are used by the remediation community to choose cleanup technology options and that data is credible because of the rigorous quality assurance and careful planning of demonstrations. A number of promising technologies based on sound scientific principles being developed under the SITE program are bioremediation, phytotechnology, electroremediation techniques, and treatment trains.

Annette M. Gatchett; Robert A. Olexsey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Innovative Soil and Groundwater Remediation; Applications and Demonstrations: The Site Program Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program of the ... United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluates innovative hazardous waste remediation technologies. The program works with t...

S. Rock; J. Martin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Full Document...

12

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with Organics and Radionuclides - An Innovative Approach Eases Traditional Hurdles  

SciTech Connect

Traditional approaches to the remediation of contaminated groundwater, such as pump-and-treat, have been used for many years for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with various organics. However the treatment of groundwater contaminated with organics and radionuclides has been considerably more challenging. Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) was recently faced with these challenges while designing a remediation system for the remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater and soil at the RMI Extrusion Plant in Ashtabula, OH. Under contract with RMI Environmental Services (RMIES), SEC teamed with Regenesis, Inc. to design, implement, and execute a bioremediation system to remove TCE and associated organics from groundwater and soil that was also contaminated with uranium and technetium. The SEC-Regenesis system involved the injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC), a natural attenuation accelerant that has been patented, designed, and produced by Regenesis, to stimulate the reductive dechlorination and remediation of chlorinated organics in subsurface environments. The compound was injected using direct-push Geoprobe rods over a specially designed grid system through the zone of contaminated groundwater. The innovative approach eliminated the need to extract contaminated groundwater and bypassed the restrictive limitations listed above. The system has been in operation for roughly six months and has begun to show considerable success at dechlorinating and remediating the TCE plume and in reducing the radionuclides into insoluble precipitants. The paper will provide an overview of the design, installation, and initial operation phase of the project, focusing on how traditional design challenges of remediating radiologically contaminated groundwater were overcome. The following topics will be specifically covered: a description of the mechanics of the HRC technology; an assessment of the applicability of the HRC technology to contaminated groundwater plumes and other potential remediation opportunities; a discussion of how the implementation of the HRC technology eased permitting issues and other challenges of remediating groundwater contaminated with radionuclides and organics; an overview of the remedial design and installation of the design including the inputs required to design the remediation system; a summary of results achieved to date and a forecast of future results; and a discussion of future needs and lessons learned.

Scott, J.; Case, N.; Coltman, K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Groundwater remediation technologies for trichloroethylene and technetium-99.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??M. Eng. The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program (ITRD) made technology recommendations after reviewing thirty in situ remediation technologies… (more)

Uhl, John Nicholas, 1960-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

In Situ Vitrification an Innovative Melting Technology for the Remediation of Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The remediation of contaminated sites is an increasingly serious problem in industrialised countries. There is a growing need for efficient techniques for remedial actions, especially for on-site treatment of ...

Dipl.-Ing. Hans Joachim Hampel; V. F. Fitzpatrick

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review...

20

Innovative Remediation Technology for Contaminated Military Sites: A Canadian Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel and innovative technology has been developed in Canada to clean-up soil contaminated with a wide range of organic pollutants, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, phthala...

Igor J. Marvan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination  

SciTech Connect

Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

The option to abandon: Stimulating innovative groundwater remediation technologies characterized by technological uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies on technology adoption demonstrate that uncertainty leads to a postponement of investments by integrating a wait option in the economic analysis. The aim of this study however is to demonstrate how the investment in new technologies can be stimulated by integrating an option to abandon. Furthermore, this real option analysis not only considers the ex ante decision analysis of the investment in a new technology under uncertainty, but also allows for an ex post evaluation of the investment. Based on a case study regarding the adoption of an innovative groundwater remediation strategy, it is demonstrated that when the option to abandon the innovative technology is taken into account, the decision maker decides to invest in this technology, while at the same time it determines an optimal timing to abandon the technology if its operation proves to be inefficient. To reduce uncertainty about the effectiveness of groundwater remediation technologies, samples are taken. Our analysis shows that when the initial belief in an effective innovative technology is low, it is important that these samples provide correct information in order to justify the adoption of the innovative technology.

T. Compernolle; S. Van Passel; K. Huisman; P. Kort

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Technology transfer of an innovative remediation technology from the laboratory to the field: a case study of in situ aerobic cometabolic bioremediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scaling-up an environmental remediation technology from the laboratory to the field ... in order to demonstrate and evaluate a new remediation technology in the field. Finally, to commercialize an innovative tech...

M. N. Goltz; G. C. Mandalas; G. D. Hopkins…

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The three most frequently used remediation technologies are discussed: (1) NAPL removal, (2) Pump-and-Treat, (3) Soil Vapor Extraction.

Oostrom, Mart; Falta, Ron W.; Mayer, Alex S.; Javandel, I.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

Aggression in young children with concurrent callous–unemotional traits: can the neurosciences inform progress and innovation in treatment approaches?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...parenting. Based on this innovative research, we then discuss...causes, manifestations and remediation cover all aspects of human...biological-behavioural interactions in the remediation of behavioural disorders...parenting. Based on this innovative research, we then discuss...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for transport of pollutants from the ground surface37 to ground water. Contaminants in the vadose zone1 Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2 3 amendments into the vadose zone for in situ11 remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ

Hubbard, Susan

28

A Regional Perspective on Contaminated Site Remediation—Fate of Materials and Pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Regional Perspective on Contaminated Site Remediation—Fate of Materials and Pollutants ... Other innovative treatment technologies such as bioremediation showed a decreasing trend, although they could be very effective treatment alternatives for PHCs (6). ... Anderson, W. C. Innovative Site Remediation Technology. ...

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sodium Persulfate Oxidation for the Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents (USEPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study has been conducted at the University of Connecticut (UCONN) in connection with the USEPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program to evaluate ... for the field implementation of the ch...

M. Amine Dahmani; Kunchang Huang; George E. Hoag

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Treatment and remediation methods for arsenic removal from the ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, ground water is contaminating by arsenic continously, which needs economic treatment and remediation technologies. Physical, chemical and biological treatment methods have been developed, that include different kinds of filters, bucket type units, fill and draw, kalshi etc. The remediation methods discussed are air oxidation, reactive barriers, utilisation of deeper aquifers and sanitary protected dug wells. To the best of our knowledge no technology is available capable to remove arsenic from water at efficient, economic and commercial levels. Therefore, fast, efficient and economic arsenic removal technologies are required. Attempts have been made to suggest the future technologies of arsenic removal.

Imran Ali; Tabrez A. Khan; Iqbal Hussain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

427 427 Rev. 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Review Report: Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, PGDP, Paducah Kentucky 15 August 2007 Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Paducah KY Prepared for: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Engineering and Technology Review Report - C-400 Thermal Remediation PGDP WSRC-STI-2007-00427 rev. 1 Cover Photo: Oblique view overhead photograph of the Department of Energy Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Paducah KY. The TCE source area targeted for thermal treatment is located near the center of the photograph. .

33

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products on indoor air quality. The emissions of two wood remedial treatment products (water in real conditions during a roof renovation work in an old building. A petroleum-based solvent product of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products. Simple models can be applied to emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department`s future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department's future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

First results of operating and monitoring an innovative design of a permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of chromate contaminated groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative setup of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in Willisau, Switzerland to remediate chromate contaminated groundwater. Instead of a conventional continuous barrier, this PRB consists of cylinders installed in rows: a single row for lower expected CrVI-concentrations and an offset double row for higher expected CrVI-concentrations. The cylinders are filled with reactive grey cast-Fe shavings mixed with gravel to prevent extensive precipitation of secondary phases in the pore space. The treatment of the contaminants takes place both within the cylinders and in the dissolved FeII plume generated downstream of the barrier. Monitoring of the contamination situation over a period of 3 a provided evidence of the mobilization, transport and behavior of the contaminants in the aquifer. Groundwater and reactive material were sampled upstream, within and downstream of the barrier by a Multi-Port Sampling System (MPSS) that revealed the geochemical processes as a function of time and space. Comprehensive chemical analyses included sensitive parameters such as CrVI, FeII/FeIII, redox potential, dissolved O2 and pH. Several campaigns using multiple optical tracers revealed a rather complex hydrological regime at different scales, thereby complicating the barrier performance. Results from the large 3D hydrogeochemical dataset show that the double row of cylinders successfully treated the chromate contamination. Remediation by the single row was not effective enough due to insufficient lateral overlap of the cylinders and their FeII-plumes. The low amount of precipitated secondary phases observed in the pore space of the reactive material reduced the risk of clogging the system and suggested a favorable longevity of the barrier. Limiting factors for the long-term operation are inferred to be the availability and accessibility of FeII within the cylinders and the concentration within the generated FeII-plume.

Bettina Flury; Urs Eggenberger; Urs Mäder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support

38

Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance  

SciTech Connect

An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

Tuck, D.M.

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

39

Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001  

SciTech Connect

A problematic waste form encountered during remediation of the Hanford Site 618-10 burial ground consists of bottled aqueous waste potentially contaminated with regulated metals. The liquid waste requires stabilization prior to landfill disposal. Prior remediation activities at other Hanford burial grounds resulted in a standard process for sampling and analyzing liquid waste using manual methods. Due to the highly dispersible characteristics of alpha contamination, and the potential for shock sensitive chemicals, a different method for bottle processing was needed for the 618-10 burial ground. Discussions with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to development of a modified approach. The modified approach involves treatment of liquid waste in bottles, up to one gallon per bottle, in a tray or box within the excavation of the remediation site. Bottles are placed in the box, covered with soil and fixative, crushed, and mixed with a Portland cement grout. The potential hazards of the liquid waste preclude sampling prior to treatment. Post treatment verification sampling is performed to demonstrate compliance with land disposal restrictions and disposal facility acceptance criteria. (authors)

Faulk, Darrin E.; Pearson, Chris M.; Vedder, Barry L.; Martin, David W. [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions.

Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Membrane contactors (NDSX and EPT): an innovative alternative for the treatment of effluents containing metallic pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents an overview of membrane-based solvent extraction technologies using membrane contactors as an innovative alternative for the remediation of effluents containing metallic pollutants. The discussion is focused on the description of Non-Dispersive Solvent Extraction (NDSX) and Emulsion Pertraction Technologies (EPTs). Three case studies are reported to demonstrate the viability of NDSX and EPT for the removal and recovery of metallic pollutants present in aqueous streams: remediation of polluted groundwaters containing hexavalent chromium; recovery of zinc from acid spent pickling solutions; recovery of copper used as homogeneous catalyst in Wet Peroxide Oxidation (WPO) processes.

Eugenio Bringas; M. Fresnedo San Roman; A. Miren Urtiaga; Inmaculada Ortiz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review The groundwater underlying the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally trichloroethylene (TCE), as well as other contaminants. TCE was released as a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to the subsurface soils and groundwater as a result of operations that began in 1952. The Building C-400 area is coincident with the highest TCE concentrations in the groundwater plumes at PGDP. Based on all characterization data

43

Contaminated soil and sediments in a highly developed catchment-estuary system (Sydney estuary, Australia): an innovative stormwater remediation strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current research was to provide a strategy to remediate stormwater from an old, high-developed catchment dominated (94%) by diffuse sources. Contaminated catchment soils, a dense road netw...

Gavin F. Birch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analysis and remedial treatment of a steel pipe-jacking accident in complex underground environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steel pipe-jacking has been widely used in the construction of water supply and sewage pipelines because of its self-sealing qualities, ability to withstand high pressure and lower environmental impact. The trend in steel pipe-jacking is towards larger diameters, longer drive lengths, and better adaptation to more complex underground conditions. Steel pipe-jacking, in which a flexible pipe is used, is different from concrete pipe-jacking where a rigid pipe is used. With increasing diameters and drive lengths, the mechanical characteristics of deep-buried steel pipe-jacking in complex underground conditions have presented new challenges for designers. In this study, the forces involved and the stability of steel pipe-jacking are analyzed by examining an example of steel pipe-jacking in a complex underground environment. The causes of high deflection under elevated water and earth pressure and local buckling incidents are investigated by the finite element method. The results show that, in this particular case, confining pressure combined with jacking force leads to buckling. Two main remedial schemes are proposed: one is to increase the wall thickness of the pipe, and the other is to install stiffening ribs on the pipe where high deflection occurs. The effect of the two remedial schemes is presented and evaluated. In particular, various stiffening ribs are used in different deflection sections with grouting to decrease friction and lower the corresponding axial jacking force. This approach demonstrates that the structural strength of the pipeline has met the requirements after the rectification action is taken. The analysis and remedial treatment for this case study will provide a reference for effective design and construction of similar steel pipe-jacking.

Liang Zhen; Jin-Jian Chen; Pizhong Qiao; Jian-Hua Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Volume 1, Phase 1: Annual report, September 28, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Vortex has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program with the Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and will not leach to the environment--as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC system design. This topical report will present a summary of the activities conducted during Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The report includes the detail technical data generated during the experimental program and the design and cost data for the preliminary Phase 2 plant.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has… (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Innovation Creating the Next Generation of Government * Make Government Stronger - Transparency * Make Government More Efficient - Participation * Stimulate Economic Growth- Collaboration challenges Solutions * Government as a Platform * Provide services directly to the citizen wherever and whenever * Enabled by Technology Impact - Transparency Impact - Participation Impact - collaboration Tools At Our Disposal Open Government Open Government QuickTime(tm) and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 4. Data Communities 5. Reviewing Existing Agency Rules * Three grand challenges * 26 projects * One year to complete QuickTime(tm) and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 1. Launch "We the People"

48

Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1945, Vannevar Bush began the innovation conversation by writing Science: The Endless Frontier. In that report Bush said that "New products and new processes do not appear full-grown [they]…are painstakingly developed by research in the purest realms of science." With those words The Endless Frontier launched a national conversation linking science to the nation's manufacturing industry and thence to our country's economic prosperity and national security.

49

Making wastewater environmentally sustainable: Innovative technology offers new possibilities for wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Story by Katie Heinrich 16 tx H2O Summer 2013 Making wastewater environmentally sustainable Innovative technology o#30;ers new possibilities for wastewater treatment Municipal wastewater treatment plants may soon become more sustainable... in their treatment of wastewater by pursuing new electron beam (e-beam) technology being researched at a Texas A&M AgriLife Research center in College Station. To help these plants in their move to increased sustainability in wastewater treatment, the National...

Heinrich, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Contaminated Water Using a Dense  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discharge of organic compounds require that new, innovative tech- nologies and methods of remediation dioxide, making the DMP reactor a promising tool in the future remediation of water. Chemical and physical is transformed into a more toxic material or a substance that is more difficult to remediate, the treatment

Dandy, David

51

Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment...concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies...and throughout the world. In Appalachia, centuries of coal mining has left thousands of abandoned...

Cara M. Santelli; Donald H. Pfister; Dana Lazarus; Lu Sun; William D. Burgos; Colleen M. Hansel

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

1995 AAAS Annual Meeting and Science Innovation Exposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Environment Contamination Remediation: How Chemical ContamiContamination...Strategies P.M. Innovative Describing and A...Potomac Foundation Innovative Environmental Technologies...13. Environmental Remediation: How Much Can/Should...Problems Involving Innovative Time-series Methods...

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

D.F. Nickelson; D.K. Jorgensen; J.J. Jessmore; R.A. Hyde; R.K. Farnsworth

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE’s Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

Jorgensen, Douglas Kay; Nickelson, David Frank; Nickelson, Reva Anne; Farnsworth, Richard Kent; Jessmore, James Joseph

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

Childress, Amy E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Innovative wastewater treatment using reversing anaerobic upflow system (RAUS)  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic processes are widely popular in the treatment of a variety of industrial wastewaters since the development of such high rate treatment processes like upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic filter, and the fluidized-bed process. In order to devise a low cost/high technology system so that it would provide an economical solution to environmentally sound pollution control, the Reversing Anaerobic Upflow System (RAUS) was developed. The system consists of two anaerobic reactors connected to each other. At the beginning, one reactor is fed upwards with wastewater while the other acts as a settling tank. After a set interval of time, the flow is reversed such that the second reactor is fed with wastewater and the first one acts as the settler. This particular feeding pattern had shown improved settling characteristics and granulation of methanogenic biomass from research carried out at the Hannover University with different wastewaters. The biological reaction vessels to which wastewater is introduced intermittently functions basically as a sludge blanket type reactor although the costly integrated settling devices present in a typical UASB system are avoided. The RAUS combines three principle reactor configurations: (1) conventional with sludge recycling; (2) fill and draw or sequential batch, inflow maintained constant during feeding; (3) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket. A pilot scale RAUS was operated for 400 days using distillery wastewater consisting of molasses slop and bottle washing water mixed in the ratio 1:1. This paper discusses the results of pilot scale experiments.

Basu, S.K. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Environmental Engineering Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Innovative systems for mixed waste retrieval and/or treatment in confined spaces  

SciTech Connect

Fernald established operations in 1951 and produced uranium and other metals for use at other DOE facilities. A part of the sitewide remediation effort is the removal, treatment, and disposal of the K-65 wastes from Silos 1 and 2. These silos contain radium-bearing residues from the processing of pitchblende ore. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis was prepared to evaluate the removal action alternatives using the preliminary characterization data and select a preferred alternative. The selected alternative consisted of covering the K-65 residues and the silo dome. The remediation of the K-65 wastes consists of the retrieval and treatment of the wastes prior to final disposal, which has not yet been determined. Treatment will be performed in a new facility to be built adjacent to the silos. The wastes must be retrieved from silos in an efficient and reliable way and delivered to the treatment facility. The first challenge of covering the wastes with bentonite has been successfully met. The second phase of retrieving the wastes from the silos is not due for a few years. However, conceptual design and configuration of the retrieval system have been developed as part of the Conceptual Design Report. The system is based on the utilization of hydraulic mining techniques, and is based on similar successful applications. This report describes the emplacement of the bentonite grant and the design for the slurry retrieval system.

Fekete, L.J.; Ghusn, A.E. [Parsons Environmental Services, Inc., Fairfield, OH (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect

On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Review on electrical discharge plasma technology for wastewater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As wastewater remediation becomes a global concern, the development of innovative advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment is still a major challenge. With regard to its fast removal rate and environmental compatibility, plasma technology is considered as a promising remediation technology for water remediation. The principles of electrical plasma with liquids for pollutant removal and the reactors of various electrical discharge types are outlined in this review. To improve energy efficiency, combination of plasma technology with catalysts has attracted significant attention. The present review is concerned about present understanding of the mechanisms involved in these combined processes. Further on, detailed discussions are given of the effects of various factors on the performance of pulsed electrical plasma technology in water treatment processes. Finally, special attention is paid to the future challenges of plasma technology utilized for industrial wastewater treatment.

Bo Jiang; Jingtang Zheng; Shi Qiu; Mingbo Wu; Qinhui Zhang; Zifeng Yan; Qingzhong Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waterjet injection of powdered activated carbon for sediment remediation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"In situ sediment remediation through waterjet-activated carbon amendment delivery is an innovative means to mitigate the dangers posed by hydrophobic organic compounds. Ease of use… (more)

Redell, Chris J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

INNOVATIVE OXIDATION PATHWAYS FOR THE TREATMENT OF TRADITIONAL AND EMERGING CONTAMINANTS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three different topics related to the activation of persulfate, and the application of reactive peroxygen system for recalcitrant contaminant remediation, and regeneration of used activated… (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Innovation Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. N. (2002). Social intelligence, innovation, and enhancedPerspectives in Innovation and Social Change, MethodosThe Innovation Innovation Any social system must combine (1)

Read, Dwight W; van der Leeuw, Sander E; Lane, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A novel method for simulating smoldering propagation and its application to STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents the development and proof of concept of a phenomenologically-based numerical model capable of simulating the expansion of a smoldering front in a heterogeneous reactive porous medium. This practical tool has potential for investigating ... Keywords: Multiphase flow, NAPLs, Site remediation, Smoldering propagation, Subsurface heterogeneity

Stephanie L. MacPhee; Jason I. Gerhard; Guillermo Rein

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

66

Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

68

Groundwater remediation by anionic surfactant micelles — An innovative double layer model applied to Na+ and Mg2+ association with dodecylsulfate micelles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The association reactions involving counterions, Na+ and Mg2+, and micelles composed of the anionic surfactant, dodecylsulfate (DS?), were investigated in ultrafiltration experiments. To access the data, an innovative model was developed that considered specific counterion binding within a Stern layer, with binding constant dependent upon the electrical potential as derived by the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and with calculation of the cmc as a function of counterion binding (or association). The experimental and model results both show that magnitude of counterion binding is greater for divalent species, Mg2+, than that for the monovalent species, Na2+. However, high concentration of Na+ compete for surface area diminishing the ability of the DS? to bind either divalent species. At experimental conditions from 0 to 100 mM NaCI addition, the binding ratio (BR) varied only from 0.58 to 0.63. The optimum binding constants, \\{KMg\\} and KNa, were determined to be 0.4 and 1.0 L mol?1, respectively, for the model. The experimental data and model calculated results were generally in good agreement.

Ching Yuan; Chung-Hsuang Hung; Chad T. Jafvert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Peer Reviewed: Hard Times for Innovative Cleanup Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: Hard Times for Innovative Cleanup Technology ... What can be done to remove market barriers to new groundwater and soil remediation technologies? ...

Jacqueline A. MacDonald

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Development of a Guideline on the Sampling/Testing of Innovative/Alternative Disposal Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal Principle Investigators Calvin P. C. Poon #12;Problem will be built in rural areas of Rhode Island. Many of the installations are the newly innovative will be specifically Most I/A ISDS technologies claim better treatment of the sewage which leads to their claim

Rhode Island, University of

72

Remediation of Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Soils by STAR Technology using Vegetable Oil Smoldering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is an innovative soil remediation approach based on smoldering combustion that has been demonstrated to effectively destroy complex hydrocarbon nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) with minimal energy input. This is the first study to explore the smoldering remediation of sand contaminated by a volatile NAPL (Trichloroethylene, TCE) and the first to consider utilizing vegetable oil as supplemental fuel for STAR. Thirty laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationship between key outcomes (TCE destruction, rate of remediation) to initial conditions (vegetable oil type, oil:TCE mass ratio, neat versus emulsified oils). Several vegetable oils and emulsified vegetable oil formulations were shown to support remediation of TCE via self-sustaining smoldering. A minimum concentration of 14,000 mg/kg canola oil was found to treat sand exhibiting up to 80,000 mg/kg TCE. On average, 75% of the TCE mass was removed due to volatilization. This proof-of-concept study suggests that injection and smoldering of vegetable oil may provide a new alternative for driving volatile contaminants to traditional vapour extraction systems without supplying substantial external energy.

Madiha Salman; Jason I. Gerhard; David W. Major; Paolo Pironi; Rory Hadden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of Carbon Tetrachloride Groundwater Transport in Support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Technology Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater modeling was performed in support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program. The ITRD program is facilitated by Sandia National Laboratory for the Department of Energy Office of Science and Technology. This report was prepared to document the results of the modeling effort and facilitate discussion of characterization and remediation options for the carbon tetrachloride plume among the ITRD participants. As a first step toward implementation of innovative technologies for remediation of the carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume underlying the 200-West Area, this modeling was performed to provide an indication of the potential impact of the CT source on the compliance boundary approximately 5000 m distant. The primary results of the modeling bracket the amount of CT source that will most likely result in compliance/non-compliance at the boundary and the relative influence of the various modeling parameters.

Truex, Michael J.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cole, Charles R.; Cameron, Richard J.; Johnson, Michael D.; Skeen, Rodney S.; Johnson, Christian D.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

R&D priorities in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article was presented as a position paper during the Environmental Biotechnology and Microbiology Conference in Bologna, Italy in April 2012. It indicates major and emerging environmental biotechnology research and development (R&D) priorities for EU members in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater. The identified priorities are: anaerobic/aerobic microbial treatment, combination of photochemical and biological treatment, phytoremediation and algae-based remediation, as well as innovative technologies currently investigated, such as enzyme-based treatment, bioelectrochemical treatment and recovery of nutrients and reuse of cleaned water. State of the art, research needs and prospective development in these domains are crucially discussed. As a result, goals of the future development of bioremediation and purification processes are defined and the way to achieve them is proposed.

Korneliusz Miksch; Grzegorz Cema; Philippe F.-X. Corvini; Ewa Felis; Adam Sochacki; Joanna Surmacz-Górska; Jaros?aw Wiszniowski; Sebastian ?abczynski

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Remediation of Methyl Iodide in Aqueous Solution and Soils Amended with Thiourea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of Methyl Iodide in Aqueous Solution and Soils Amended with Thiourea ... Therefore, spraying thiourea on the soil surface to form a “reactive surface barrier” may be an effective and innovative strategy for controlling fumigant emissions to the atmosphere and for improving environmental protection. ... Currently, new and innovative remediation technologies including bioremediation, phytoremediation, and chemical remediation have been proposed for use in cleaning polluted soil and groundwater. ...

Wei Zheng; Sharon K. Papiernik; Mingxin Guo; Scott R. Yates

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of an on-site ex-situ unsaturated-flow remediation process for trace metal contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Innovative means and methods were tested to develop an economical, pragmatic and environmentally sustainable soil remediation process for heavy metal contaminated soils. An unsaturated-flow soil… (more)

Andrade, Marc-David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transfer and commercialisation of contaminated groundwater remediation technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High costs and poor performance of conventional groundwater remediation technologies have brought a call for the deployment of innovative technologies capable of attaining regulatory standards while satisfying time and budget constraints. To develop an innovative technology in the laboratory and ultimately transition it to full-scale commercialisation, presents challenges at various levels. Scientific and engineering problems and regulatory and legal issues exist that must be dealt with when moving a technology from the laboratory to the field. Importantly, cost and performance data must be presented in a manner that convinces stakeholders that the technology can accomplish remediation more economically, safely and efficiently than conventional technologies. The challenges of transferring and commercialising innovative groundwater remediation technologies and strategies that may be used to help overcome these challenges are discussed. Case studies of groundwater remediation technology transfer are presented.

Mark N. Goltz; Kenneth J. Williamson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cancer-Related Anorexia/Cachexia Syndrome and Oxidative Stress: An Innovative Approach beyond Current Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...include a conspicuous increase in the plasma glutamate...Whether the increase in plasma glutamate...and improvement of quality of life (QL...oranges, red wine, or green tea...clinical response, increase of lean body mass...and improvement of quality of life. The treatment...

Giovanni Mantovani; Clelia Madeddu; Antonio Macciò; Giulia Gramignano; Maria Rita Lusso; Elena Massa; Giorgio Astara; and Roberto Serpe

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Remediation Experiences in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses remediation practices for addressing gasoline-impacted soil and ground water at several hundred Neste Marketing Limited (Neste ... in Finland. The first systematic investigation and remediation

Martti R. Suominen; Nancy E. Milkey P.G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Pinellas Agreement Name Remediation Agreement for the Four and One-Half Acre Site in Largo, Pinellas County, Florida State Florida Agreement Type Remediation Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/ Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended/ Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act Scope Summary Remediation of property adjacent to the former Pinellas Plant Parties DOE; Florida Department of Environmental Protection Date 3/12/2001 SCOPE * Remediate the groundwater under a parcel of property adjacent to DOE's former Pinellas Plant to levels consistent with industrial use. * Complete remedial actions at the site in accordance with a Remedial Action Plan prepared by DOE and approved by FDEP. * Submit quarterly reports of interim remedial actions at the Site.

82

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes ... To illustrate this innovative technique, TiO2/Ti/Ta2O5?IrO2 bifunctional electrodes were prepared using a facile thermal decomposition technique and employed in this study. ... The establishment and enforcement of limits for the discharge and/or disposal of toxic and hazardous materials has required the development of new technologies to effectively remediate a variety of gaseous and liquid effluents, solid waste and sludge. ...

Robert Matthew Asmussen; Min Tian; Aicheng Chen

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION  

SciTech Connect

The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.

Barry L. Burks

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sulfate Reduction in Groundwater: Characterization and Applications for Remediation  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate is ubiquitous in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sulfate reduction reactions play a significant role in mediating redox conditions and biogeochemical processes for subsurface systems. They also serve as the basis for innovative in-situ methods for groundwater remediation. An overview of sulfate reduction in subsurface environments is provided, with a specific focus on implications for groundwater remediation. A case study presenting the results of a pilot-scale ethanol injection test illustrates the advantages and difficulties associated with the use of electron-donor amendments for sulfate remediation.

Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Carreon-Diazconti, C.; Johnson, B.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Deploying Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation Deploying Innovation FCI deploys Laboratory technology for enhanced economic impact regionally and nationally. We offer both negotiable and non-negotiable license...

87

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the author’s vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Summary - X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected catalyzed hydrogen peroxide without meeting the

89

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

90

Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Framework for Sustainable Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, after more than 30 years of experience with remediation projects, it is now clear that remedial actions are frequently energy intensive, may produce their own pollutant emissions, and may disturb and cause controversy in neighboring communities. ... Regulators, industry, and communities recognize that sustainability principles must be integrated into remediation activities, and various sustainable remediation guidance documents have been developed. ...

Karin S. Holland

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative is to seek holistic solutions to DOE’s groundwater contamination problems that consider not only...

94

Innovation Practices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This Chapter focuses on examples of digital innovation in practice, providing fact-sheets of 10 of the most interesting ideas in the field of digital innovation worldwide in 2013. The genesis of the selected i...

Vincenzo Morabito

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation - 13211  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance. (authors)

Truex, Mike; Oostrom, Mart; Carroll, K.C.; Bunn, Amoret; Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Limiting factors in ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If one is charged with restoring a contaminated aquifer today, the procedure of pumping contaminated water to the surface for treatment and discharge is most often the state-of-practice technology. The perceived success of pump-and-treat technology can be misleading if the hydrology and contaminant characteristics at the site are not adequately understood. A failure to understand the processes controlling contaminant transport can result in extremely long pumping periods and, consequently, costly and inefficient remediation. Effects of tailing, sorption, and residual immiscible fluids on time required for pump-and-treat remediation of ground water are discussed.

Clinton W. Hall; Jeffrey A. Johnson

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Applications of triazine chemistry: education, remediation, and drug delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and its effect on the environment and society. The modification of chitosan for herbicide remediation has been accomplished using triazine chemistry, as well. Treatment of chitosan iteratively with cyanuric chloride followed by piperazine produces...

Hatfield, Susan Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Integrated phytobial remediation for sustainable management of arsenic in soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Arsenic (As), cited as the most hazardous substance by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR, 2005), is an ubiquitous metalloid which when ingested for prolonged periods cause extensive health effects leading to ultimate untimely death. Plants and microbes can help mitigate soil and groundwater As problem since they have evolved elaborate detoxification machineries against this toxic metalloid as a result of their coexistence with this since the origin of life on earth. Utilization of the phytoremediation and bioremediation potential of the plants and microbes, respectively, is now regarded as two innovative tools that encompass biology, geology, biotechnology and allied sciences with cutting edge applications for sustainable mitigation of As epidemic. Discovery of As hyperaccumulating plants that uptake and concentrate large amounts of this toxic metalloid in their shoots or roots offered new hope to As phytoremediation, solar power based nature's own green remediation. This review focuses on how phytoremediation and bioremediation can be merged together to form an integrated phytobial remediation which could synergistically achieve the goal of large scale removal of As from soil, sediment and groundwater and overcome the drawbacks of the either processes alone. The review also points to the feasibility of the introduction of transgenic plants and microbes that bring new hope for more efficient treatment of As. The review identifies one critical research gap on the importance of remediation of As contaminated groundwater not only for drinking purpose but also for irrigation purpose and stresses that more research should be conducted on the use of constructed wetland, one of the most suitable areas of application of phytobial remediation. Finally the review has narrowed down on different phytoinvestigation and phytodisposal methods, which constitute the most essential and the most difficult part of pilot scale and field scale applications of phytoremediation programs.

Madhumita Roy; Ashok K. Giri; Sourav Dutta; Pritam Mukherjee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Innovation Celebration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation Celebration Innovation Celebration Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Innovation Celebration showcases economic development in Northern New Mexico Ten local businesses honored at the event. May 1, 2013 Chantal Lau of PediBioMetrix, LLC was one of those recogned at the Innovation Celebration Chantal Lau of PediBioMetrix, LLC was one of those recognized at the Innovation Celebration. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Last month 10 New Mexico businesses were recognized during the 12th annual Innovation Celebration in Albuquerque. The companies highlighted are involved in everything from helping with premature infants' feeding difficulties to separating water from natural gas pumped from wells. They

104

Paper D-019, in: E.A. Foote and G.S. Durell (Conference Chairs), Remediation of Contaminated Sediments--2007. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (Savannah, Georgia;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper D-019, in: E.A. Foote and G.S. Durell (Conference Chairs), Remediation of Contaminated Sediments--2007. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Contaminated Sediments layer to bring biogenically-produced gas to shoreline collectors through an innovative support grid

Rockne, Karl J.

105

Innovation and collective entrepreneurship.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper aims to examine different forms of innovation including social innovation, and why innovation and social innovation have become important themes in public policy… (more)

Spear, Roger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognised since the birth of agriculture, the landspreading of industrial...full life cycle assessment (LCA). For example, blending high-nutrient-content...cradle-to-grave) of an LCA can also lead to misleading...remediation option is best. In LCA, impacts are classified as...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

107

Using Hydro-Cutting to Aid in Remediation of a Firing Range Contaminated with Depleted Uranium  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the challenges encountered in decommissioning a firing range that had been used to test fire depleted uranium rounds in the late 1950's and early 1960's. The paper details the operational challenges and innovative solutions involved in remediating and decommissioning a firing range bullet catcher once unexploded ordnance was discovered. It also discusses how the Army dealt with an intertwining web of regulatory and permit issues that arose in treating and disposing of multiple waste streams. The paper will show how the use of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Temporary Authorization allowed the Army to deal with the treatment of a variety of waste streams and how hydro-cutting process was used to demilitarize the potentially unexploded rounds.

Styvaert, Michael S.; Conley, Richard D.; Watters, David J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Implementation of fluidized granulated iron reactors in a chromate remediation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new approach concerning in-situ remediation on source (‘hot-spot’) decontamination of a chromate damage in connection with an innovative pump-and-treat-technique has been developed. Iron granulates show significant higher reduction rates, using fluidized bed conditions, than a literature study with a fixed bed installation of small-sized iron granules. First results from an abandoned tannery site concerning injections of sodium dithionite as a chromate reductant for the vadose zone in combination with a pump-and-treat-method, allying the advantages of granulated zero valent iron (ZVI), are reported. Reduction amounts of chromate have been found up to 88% compared with initial values in the soil after a soil water exchange of 8 pore volumes within 2.5 months. Chromate concentrations in the pumped effluent have been reduced to under the detection limit of 0.005 mg/L by treatment with ZVI in the pilot plant.

P. Müller; K.E. Lorber; R. Mischitz; C. Weiß

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

All Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 Years of Innovations » 70 Years of Innovations » All Innovations /about/_assets/images/icon-about.jpg All Innovations Since 1943, some of the world's smartest and most passionate technical people have accomplished the difficult, the unexpected, and what sometimes seems impossible at Los Alamos *70 YEARS OF INNOVATIONS 1940s 1943 WAR-ENDING INVENTIONS The Laboratory was created with one crucial objective: gather the world's brightest scientific minds to design and build a weapon that would help to end World War II. Fight power with power xx Essential for obtaining data to design war-ending weapons, Los Alamos scientists constructed the first homogeneous liquid-fuel reactor fueled by enriched uranium, code-named Water Boiler, as a neutron source. Two more were built. These reactors led to pioneering research on radiation's effects.

110

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Motors Site in General Motors Site in Adrian, Michigan Department of Energy OiZce of Assistant Manager for Environmental Management Oak Ridge Operations January 2001 69 Printed on recycledhcydable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE GENERAL MOTORS SITE ADRIAN, MICHIGAN JANUARY 200 1 Prepared for United States Army Corps of Engineers Under Contract No. DACW45-98-D-0028 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. TABLES ...............................................................................................................................................

111

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Field demonstration of a full-scale in situ thermal desorption system for the remediation of soil containing PCBS and other hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of a full-sale, innovative and cost-effective remediation system using in situ thermal description (ISTD) was conducted at a state Superfund site in the northeastern United States in early 1996. The Demonstration was performed as part of the regulatory process to obtain a nationwide Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) permit for the remediation of soils containing PCBs at concentrations up to 5,000 ppm. An area of approximately 4800 square feet was remediated during six applications of an in situ Thermal Blanket covering an area of 800 square feet. Each application utilized five 160 square foot, electrically heated, 100-kilowatt modules. The Thermal Blanket heaters were operated at temperatures as high as 925 C. The modules contain 10 in. of vermiculite insulation to reduce upward heat losses to less than 10% of total power. The modules are covered with an impermeable silicone sheet and the in situ process is run at negative pressure to collect contaminants, prevent contaminant migration and eliminate odors. Off-gas emissions are controlled by a vapor extraction system comprised of a cyclonic separator for particulate removal, a flameless thermal oxidizer for destruction of residual contaminants, and a carbon polishing unit. Treatment times ranged from slightly more than 24 hours to treat the upper six inches to approximately four days to treat soil 12 to 18 inches deep. Temperature profiles and remedial efficiency are consistent with results from a computer thermal simulator. Post-treatment soil samples demonstrated the capability to achieve stringent soil cleanup levels of less than 2 ppm for PCBs while concurrently meeting ambient air quality standards with respect to air emissions and worker exposure limits. The Thermal Blanket is less intrusive than other permanent remedies and produces less noise, generates less dust and has a minimum of other impacts on the surrounding community.

Sheldon, R.B.; Iben, I.E.T.; Edelstein, W.A. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Innovation Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation ecosystems today are the lifeblood or the great hope of many major economies, but at the heart of these ecosystems, there are places and spaces. Silicon Valley is not just a place, but a cluster of spaces where ...

Schneider-Sikorsky, Patrick A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Pilot Plant for Soil Remediation with Supercritical CO2 under Quasi-Isobaric Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil remediation using CO2 in a supercritical extraction process is one innovative technique currently available. ... It was based on a first pressurized vessel acting as an extractor (where the soil to be remediated was located), a second pressurized vessel acting as an adsorber (where activated carbon was placed), a pump for solvent supply, and auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, pressure, temperature, and flow meters. ...

M. J. Cocero; E. Alonso; S. Lucas

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

Iron and Arsenic Cycling in Intertidal Surface Sediments during Wetland Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we examined the behavior of Fe and As during aeration of natural groundwater from the intertidal fringe of a wetland being remediated by tidal inundation. ... This project was funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (6-6-01-06/07 ‘A National Demonstration Site for Innovative Acid Sulfate Soil Management’) and the Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management. ... Details are presented of scientific investigations, and a lime-assisted tidal exchange strategy that are being undertaken to remediate a serious ASS problem. ...

Scott G. Johnston; Annabelle F. Keene; Edward D. Burton; Richard T. Bush; Leigh A. Sullivan

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect

THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

BERGMAN TB; STEFANSKI LD; SEELEY PN; ZINSLI LC; CUSACK LJ

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. O’Carroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect

Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baker and Williams Baker and Williams Warehouses Site in New York, New York, 7997 - 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 7 995 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES SITE IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 1991-1993 NOVEMBER 1995 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 __ CONTENTS .- ~_- _- ..- ^_ FIGURES . ...,.,.....,,........,,.,_.....,.,.,.__,....,,,,, v TABLES ,.,__...,,....,..._._..,,,,_._...,.,.,,.,,,..._,,,, vi ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..v~

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121

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' at the C. H. Schnoor Site, Springdale, Pennsylvania, in 1 994 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE C. H. SCHNOOR SITE SPRINGDALE, PENNSYLVANIA, IN 1994 NOVEMBER 1996 prep&ed for United States Department of ~nergy Oak Ridge Operations Off= r Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. '14501 CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi UNITS OF MEASURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

122

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alba Craft Laboratory and Alba Craft Laboratory and Vicinity Properties Site in Oxford, Ohio C Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office January 1997 $$@T Op% 3 @!B . i~d!l Ab Printed on recycled/recyclable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE FORMER ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY AND VICINITY PROPERTIES SITE IN OXFORD, OHIO JANUARY 1997 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC0591 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. v TABLES.. .............................................................................................................................................. vi

123

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Aliquippa Forge Site Aliquippa Forge Site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKE.~ FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ALIQUIPPA FORGE SITE IN ALIQUIPPA, PENNSYLVANIA NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for . UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-9 1 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TABLES vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii UNITSOFMEASURE ix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

124

Advanced Remediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

Krahn, St.; Miller, C.E. [The United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The CAMU Rule: A tool for implementing a protective, cost-effective remedy at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a former uranium processing facility currently under remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act as amended (CERCLA). Contamination at the FEMP consists of low-level radioactivity, hazardous substances, hazardous wastes and/or mixed wastes. Regulations promulgated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as amended (RCRA) are evaluated as applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remediation of the FEMP. Historically, joint CERCLA-RCRA guidance dictated that hazardous waste could not be treated, or moved out of the designated area of contiguous contamination (AOC), without triggering land disposal restrictions (LDRs) or minimum technology requirements (MTRs). To avoid invoking these stringent requirements, in situ capping was chosen as the lower cost remedy at many sites, although on-site disposal and/or treatment of hazardous wastes would have been more protective. The Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) and Temporary Units (TUs) Final Rule [58 FR 8658, Vol. 58, No. 29, hereinafter the {open_quotes}CAMU Rule{close_quotes}], promulgated on February 16, 1993, provides facilities regulated under RCRA corrective action authority with greater flexibility to move, treat, and dispose of wastes on site without triggering LDRs or MTRs, thereby encouraging application of innovative technologies and more protective remedies. The waste acceptance criteria for the on-site disposal facility is based on site-specific considerations including the mobility of the contaminants through the underlying site geology and the protectiveness of the engineered liners. Application of the {open_quotes}CAMU Rule{close_quotes} allows for disposition in the on-site facility based on these technical considerations rather than on regulatory classifications.

Dupuis-Nouille, E.M. [Fernald Environmental Management Project, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Goidell, L.C.; Strimbu, M.J. [Jacobs Engineering Group of Ohio, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Competition Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Competition Innovations Competition Innovations Through the years, innovations, advancements and research projects have resulted from competitions. From Challenge X 2007 Mississippi State University on the road during the on-road fuel economy event Forrest Jehlik, Lead Technical Coordinator, Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison preparing for an on-road vehicle emissions event. Pennsylvania State University racing through the cones of the autocross event. Left: Mississippi State University on the road during the on-road fuel economy event. Center: Forrest Jehlik and the University of Wisconsin-Madison preparing for an on-road fuel economy event. Right: Pennsylvania State University on the road during the on-road fuel economy event.

129

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 1999 Operable Unit (OU) III Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study(RI/FS) and was designated as AreaOU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven REMEDIATION Executive Summary

130

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

131

Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume; and (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,c) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006b), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for this site, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006). As outlined in the next section, the CCC/USDA also believes that air sparging does not represent a viable remedial alternative. The CCC/USDA therefore proposes to collect the technical data required to evaluate the potential viability of a phytoremediation approach for this site and, if appropriate, to support the development of a remedial design.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

A two-stage process using electrokinetic remediation and electrochemical degradation for treating benzo[a]pyrene spiked kaolin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative process that combines soil electrokinetic remediation and liquid electrochemical oxidation for the degradation of organic compounds present in a polluted soil was developed and evaluated by using benzo[a]pyrene spiked kaolin. In order to increase benzo[a]pyrene solubility during electrokinetic treatment, the addition of a co-solvent or surfactant, such as ethanol or Brij 35, as flushing solution was tested. The research carried out demonstrated the influence of the desorption agent employed on benzo[a]pyrene remediation from the kaolin matrix. Thus, if the flushing solution was ethanol at 40%, there was no presence of contaminant in either chamber. On the contrary, when a solution of surfactant Brij 35 was used, benzo[a]pyrene was transported towards the cathode chamber, where it was collected. Moreover, the extent of this recovery depends on the pH profile on the soil. When no pH control was used, around 17% of initial contaminant was detected in the cathode chamber; however, when pH control was applied, the recovery of benzo[a]pyrene could be higher than 76%, when the pH control in the anode chamber was set at 7.0. In order to obtain the total degradation of mobilised benzo[a]pyrene from the contaminated soil, the liquid collected by electrokinetic remediation was oxidised by electrochemical treatment. This oxidation was accomplished via an electrochemical cell with a working volume of 0.4 L, and graphite as electrode material. The benzo[a]pyrene was almost totally degraded in 1 d, reaching a degradation of about 73% in 16 h.

J. Gómez; M.T. Alcántara; M. Pazos; M.A. Sanromán

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Horizontal Directional Drilling: A Green and Sustainable Technology for Site Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Horizontal Directional Drilling: A Green and Sustainable Technology for Site Remediation ... Although a host of innovative technologies exist to treat contaminated soil and groundwater, constructing them in the field continues to rely on age-old, conventional methods: vertical drilling or excavation. ...

Michael D. Lubrecht; LG

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation Frequently Asked Questions What is a remedial investigation? A remedial investigation is a technical assessment that characterizes the soil. A remedial investigation includes the analysis of soil and water samples as well as evaluating existing data

Netoff, Theoden

136

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Identity and Social Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the microfoundation of social innovation and social change.it is a source of innovation and social change as it actspromote innovation in the performance of a social role, the

Bell, Duran

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Innovation Through Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation Through Collaboration: Criterion 3 Student Learning and Effec0ve Teaching IUPUI Town Hall, March 19, 2012 #12;Innovation Through Collaboration: The organiza;Innovation Through Collaboration: 3a. The organiza0on's goals for student learning outcomes

Zhou, Yaoqi

140

Science and Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Science and Innovation Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Remediation of old environmental liabilities in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in all areas of nuclear R and D in the Czech Republic. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at research nuclear reactors and many other topics. The NRI operates two research nuclear reactors, many facilities as a hot cell facility, research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, radionuclide irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. After 50 years of activities in the nuclear field, there are some environmental liabilities that shall be remedied in the NRI. There are three areas of remediation: (1) decommissioning of old obsolete facilities (e.g. decay tanks, RAW treatment technology, special sewage system), (2) treatment of RAW from operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities, and (3) elimination of spent fuel from research nuclear reactors operated by the NRI. The goal is to remedy the environmental liabilities and eliminate the potential negative impact on the environment. Based on this postulate, optimal remedial actions have been selected and recommended for the environmental remediation. Remediation of the environmental liabilities started in 2003 and will be finished in 2012. Some liabilities have already been successfully remedied. The most significant items of environmental liabilities are described in the paper together with information about the history, the current state, the progress, and the future activities in the field of remediation of environmental liabilities in the NRI. (authors)

Podlaha, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Surfactants for ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground water contamination is a most intractable form of pollution. Spilled solvent or fuel liquids are trapped below the water table by colloidal forces. Surfactants may be used to dramatically improve contaminated aquifer remediation rates. Principal remediation mechanisms include micellar solubilization and mobilization of the trapped liquids by lowering of the oil/water interfacial tension. Surfactant selection is a key to the successful design of a remediation effort, and involves consideration of factors including Krafft Point, surfactant adsorption onto the aquifer solids, and the phase behavior of the oil/water/surfactant system. Successful field demonstrations have occurred in recent months and the technology is moving rapidly toward commercialization. Critical research issues remain including acceptable clean-up levels, surfactant/contaminant in situ biodegradation rates, and surfactant decontamination and reuse.

Jeffrey H. Harwell; David A. Sabatini; R.C. Knox

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Innovization: Innovative Design Principles Through Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovization: Innovative Design Principles Through Optimization Kalyanmoy Deb and Aravind) in the context of finding new and innovative design principles by means of optimization techniques. Although optimization algorithms are routinely used to find an optimal solution corresponding to an optimization problem

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

144

Innovative sludge stabilization method  

SciTech Connect

Sludge is generated in many water and wastewater treatment processes, both biological and physical/chemical. Examples include biological sludges from sanitary and industrial wastewater treatment operations and chemical sludges such as those produced when metals are removed from metal plating wastewater. Even some potable water plants produce sludge, such as when alum is used as a flocculating agent to clarify turbid water. Because sludge is produced from such a variety of operations, different techniques have been developed to remove water from sludges and reduce the sludge volume and mass, thus making the sludge more suitable for recovery or disposal. These techniques include mechanical (e.g., filter presses), solar (sludge drying beds), and thermal. The least expensive of these methods, neglecting land costs, involves sludge drying beds and lagoons. The solar method was widely used in sewage treatment plants for many years, but has fallen in disfavor in the US; mechanical and thermal methods have been preferred. Since environmental remediation often requires managing sludges, this article presents a discussion of a variation of sludge lagoons known as evaporative sludge stabilization. Application of this process to the closure of two 2.5 acre (10117 m{sup 2}) hazardous waste surface impoundments will be discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

Riggenbach, J.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

Tunison, Douglas Irvin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Use of Risk Analysis on Remedial Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative risk assessment (RA) is a tool used in determining a remedial alternative’s effectiveness of reducing public health ... to occur at a site. Under the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) ...

Teresa A. Schuller; Denice H. Wardrop…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has inventoried over 30000 major hazardous waste sites in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each of these  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each new and innovative strategies are developed. Much of the problem and initial cost of subsurface remediation concerns site characterization. A three-dimensional picture of the heterogeneous subsurface

Rubin, Yoram

149

Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Residential radon remediation: performance over 17 years  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......covering about 1000 m2. Water drains into the basin...sub-slab ventilation remediation system installed, i...sub-slab ventilation remediation (Bq mSE). Measured...concentration with height above ground level. For example...had a sub-slab radon remediation system installed that......

Naomi H. Harley; Passaporn Chittaporn; Anthony Marsicano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Bargaining over Remedies in Merger Bruce Lyons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the internationally standard 2-phase investigation structure and remedy negotiations of the form practiced by the EC jurisdictions, remedies can be agreed in either phase of investigation. In particular, both the EU and US merger regulations allow remedies to be agreed in either phase of the investigation. Either de jure (as in the EU

Feigon, Brooke

152

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone...

153

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

154

Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Remediation of Phenol by Platinized Titania–Silica Mixed Oxides under Solar-Simulated Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Remediation of Phenol by Platinized Titania–Silica Mixed Oxides under Solar-Simulated Conditions ... In recent years, innovative research for the development of advanced products has realized nanomaterials that demonstrate the unique structural, mechanical, optical, electronic, and catalytic properties under light irradiation. ...

Harrison S. Kibombo; Ranjit T. Koodali

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Innovative Technologies, Innovative Diplomacy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technologies, Innovative Diplomacy Innovative Technologies, Innovative Diplomacy Innovative Technologies, Innovative Diplomacy April 30, 2012 - 3:26pm Addthis 1 of 5 U.S. Energy Department Secretary Steven Chu, along with other leading energy decision-makers from around the world, at the third Clean Energy Ministerial annual meeting in London. Image: Department of Energy and Climate Change. 2 of 5 Prime Minister David Cameron, Secretary of State Edward Davey, U.S. Energy Department Secretary Steven Chu and Minister of State Greg Barker at the third Clean Energy Ministerial event in London. Image: Department of Energy and Climate Change. 3 of 5 Energy Ministers from around the world at the third Clean Energy Ministerial event in London. Image: Department of Energy and Climate Change. 4 of 5 U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Secretary of State

156

Advanced Remedial Methods for Metals and Radionuclides in Vadose Zone Environments  

SciTech Connect

Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport or toxicity of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in arid environments where the vadose zone can be up to hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges that limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of the contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to underlying aquifers prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Shear-thinning fluids (i.e., surfactants) can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting reactive remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 20% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory-/ intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Hubbard, Susan; Miracle, Ann L.; Zhong, Lirong; Foote, Martin; Wu, Yuxin; Jansik, Danielle P.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

158

Intellectual Property for Market Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rents Market Innovation Parameter Gross social benefit Lowour model. Market Innovation Figure 6: Social benefit whererights for market innovations can increase social welfare by

Duffy, John F; Abramawitz, Micheal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Early Customer Involvement in Innovation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Front End of innovation (FEI) or early innovation presents one of the greatest opportunities for improving an entire innovation process in any firm.… (more)

Penn, Sylvain Bienvenu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Architecting and Innovating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovating is essential to sustained industrial growth and profitability. But experience amply demonstrates how difficult innovation is, especially for large companies. The synthesis of valued offerings by aligning customer ...

Campbell, Ronald B. Jr.

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Science, technology and innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's three core pillars of expertise: · science and technology · innovation · sustainability. YouScience, technology and innovation Taught degrees MSc in Innovation and Sustainability of strategies to achieve sustainable growth and well-being in developing countries. However, the impact of new

Sussex, University of

163

The Technology & Innovation Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Technology & Innovation Centre #12;The Technology and Innovation Centre revolutionises the way in Scotland and further afield ­ including power and energy, renewable technologies, photonics and sensors, for industry, the Technology and Innovation Centre has already attracted major partners including Scottish

Mottram, Nigel

164

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

165

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

166

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

167

Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

168

Innovation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Innovation Innovation View a slideshow from the 2013 ARPA-E Summit Technology Showcase, including a Tesla Model S electric sedan. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. View a slideshow from the 2013 ARPA-E Summit Technology Showcase, including a Tesla Model S electric sedan. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. As a science agency, the Energy Department plays an important role in the innovation economy. The Department catalyzes the transformative growth of basic applied scientific research, the discovery and development of new clean energy technologies and prioritizes scientific innovation as a cornerstone of US economic prosperity.

169

SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 national security complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allowing the use of macroencapsulation technologies. SCFADemonstration of Macroencapsulation of Mixed Waste Debrisoff-site for treatment. Macroencapsulation will meet the LDR

Hazen, Terry

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT 2010ANNUAL REPORT Technology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology

171

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Consideration of Reliability in System Design for Ground Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remedial action design system is described that may be used to evaluate candidate remediation systems and select the preferred alternative under conditions of uncertainty. The remedial action design method i...

W. Woldt; I. Bogardi; L. Duckstein

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

176

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

178

Innovative technologies for soil cleanup  

SciTech Connect

These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

180

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

D. E. Shanklin

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Utah Technology Commercialization Office Location: Salt Lake City, UT Project Title Energy Innovation Commercialization Center Proposed Action or Project Description The project proposes to create an Energy Innovation Commercialization Center at the University of Utah. The scope of work for this project is in two phases: tasks necessary to create the Center and actual commercialization and outreach to other institutions. Specific activities for Phase I for the Center startup include 1) negotiating contract, prepare correspondence, establishing website, meetings, scheduling activities, developing metrics, and designing and creating a database. Phase 2 activities for Center

183

Energy Innovations DOE Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Leo Breton, representing Energy Innovations of Washington, DC, a small company engaged in improving the energy efficiency of appliances, automobiles, and HVAC systems, requested a meeting with DOE...

184

The Innovation Arena.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis addresses the opportunities and difficulties that can occur in the creation of an innovation arena concerning sustainable city solutions. A case study… (more)

Jönsson, Lovisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Innovations | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

are thinking outside the box and developing innovative ways to drive demand for energy upgrades, provide attractive financing options, foster a trained energy workforce, and...

186

Innovative Technology Simulates Slips So Employees Don't Have To |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technology Simulates Slips So Employees Don't Have To Innovative Technology Simulates Slips So Employees Don't Have To Innovative Technology Simulates Slips So Employees Don't Have To January 25, 2013 - 10:37am Addthis A Savannah River Remediation employee finds out how hazardous slippery conditions can be as part of a safety demonstration inside the URS Slip Simulator. A harness connected to a support beam allows participants to experience walking on slippery conditions without falling. | Photo by Energy Department A Savannah River Remediation employee finds out how hazardous slippery conditions can be as part of a safety demonstration inside the URS Slip Simulator. A harness connected to a support beam allows participants to experience walking on slippery conditions without falling. | Photo by Energy Department

187

Innovation Concepts in Healthcare  

SciTech Connect

AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens’ Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt.                                                                                

None

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Innovation Concepts in Healthcare  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today?s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the ?industrialization? of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens? Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt.                                                                                

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems Location: Cambridge, MA Project Title TechBridge Energy Innovation Acceleration Program

190

Netherlands pushes for innovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... plan presented to Dutch parliament this week. The strategy, which focuses heavily on boosting private investment in research and innovation, has some Dutch scientists worried that fundamental research will ... government, industry and knowledge institutions and asked them to clinch 'innovation deals' — public–private partnerships in which industry must contribute a minimum of 40% of R&D funding ...

Marian Turner

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) The Regents of the University of California, UC San Diego Location: La Jolla, CA Project Title Regional Energy Innovation and Commercialization Proposed Action or Project Description The University of California San Diego and San Diego State University are partnering to address deficiencies in the process for translation of research discoveries to the private sector in the clean energy space in the greater San Diego region and accelerate the movement of clean energy innovation from the university laboratory into the marketplace. The Phase I objective for launching the Regional Energy Innovation Challenge includes tasks such as: 1) project management and planning (organizing advisory

192

Innovation @ King's Innovation: King's strategic purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assets so the emphasis is to embed commercial, project management and regulatory planning resource their sectors. King's wants to work openly with innovators. We recognise the value of combined resources's expends and diversifies activities within themes directed towards policy-makers, cultural industries

Applebaum, David

193

The novelty of Open Innovation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Proponents of Open Innovation argue in support of its novel additions, critics however question its novelty and argue that the roots of Open Innovation… (more)

Altmann, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

195

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

196

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

SITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...............................................................................................................5 5.2 Ground and Surface Water MonitoringSITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION June 29, 2004 Prepared by: Colorado School of Mines .................................................................................................4 5.0 SITE AIR AND WATER MONITORING

198

Avoiding Destructive Remediation at DOE Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pollutants, Radioactive 0 Water Pollutants, Radioactive...States Government Agencies Water Pollutants, Radioactive...management government agencies ground water policy pollutants pollution...pumping radioactive waste remediation risk assessment soils...

F. W. Whicker; T. G. Hinton; M. M. MacDonell; J. E. Pinder III; L. J. Habegger

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Combined use of a transformed red mud reactive barrier and electrokinetics for remediation of Cr/As contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reactive barrier (RB) of transformed red mud (TRM), a by-product of the refinement of bauxite in alumina production, was placed adjacent to the anode of an electrokinetic (EK) system with the aim of enhancing removal of chromium or arsenic, added singly to a low permeability clayey soil, and favouring entrapment. The innovative study focused on evaluation of the synergic interaction between the EK system and the RB, and of the efficiency when compared to traditional EK remediation (control tests). The results obtained underlined the successful outcome of treatment of the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. In presence of the TRM RB, 19.4% wt. of total Cr content was detected in the anolyte and 20.6% wt. trapped in the anodic RB after 6 d, versus 6.6% wt. in the anolyte and 8.8% wt. in the soil adjacent to the anode following the control run without RB. On increasing duration of treatment up to 12 d, 60.8% wt. of total initial Cr was found in the anolyte and 25.5% wt. trapped in the RB, versus 9.1% wt. and 5.3% wt., respectively, after a control run of the same duration. Finally, on increasing the mass of TRM in the RB, 60.6% wt. of initial Cr content was found to have accumulated in the RB, with Cr being completely absent from the anodic chamber. Conversely, combined treatment was much less effective on As contaminated soil, at least under the operative conditions applied. Low initial As concentration and interference with iron oxides in the soil were likely the reasons underlying low efficiency while attempting As decontamination.

G. Cappai; G. De Gioannis; A. Muntoni; D. Spiga; J.J.P. Zijlstra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sequential application of chelating agents and innovative surfactants for the enhanced electroremediation of real sediments from toxic metals and \\{PAHs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study focused on the sequential application of a chelating agent (citric acid) followed by a surfactant in the simultaneous electroremediation of real contaminated sediments from toxic metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, the efficiency evaluation of two innovative non-ionic surfactants, commercially known as Poloxamer 407 and Nonidet P40, was investigated. The results indicated a removal efficacy of approximately 43% and 48% for the summation of \\{PAHs\\} (SUM PAHs), respectively for the aforementioned surfactants, much better than the one obtained by the use of Tween 80 (nearly 21%). Individual \\{PAHs\\} (e.g. fluorene) were removed in percentages that reached almost 84% and 92% in the respective electrokinetic experiments when these new surfactants were introduced. In addition, the combined-enhanced sequential electrokinetic treatment with citric acid improved dramatically the removal of Zn and As, compared to the unenhanced run, but did not favor the other toxic metals examined. Since no improvement in metal removal percentages occurred when Tween 80 was used, significant contribution to this matter should also be attributed to the solubilization capacity of these innovative, in electrokinetic remediation, non-ionic surfactants.

John N. Hahladakis; Nikolaos Lekkas; Andreas Smponias; Evangelos Gidarakos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

205

NREL Spectrum of Innovation  

SciTech Connect

There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545  

SciTech Connect

Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this process also provides new opportunities to think differently and look at the bigger picture of the overall benefit we are providing with our remediation projects. The opportunities from the move towards GSR are very real. They will help us make remedial actions truly more beneficial to the environment and to society. They will also allow (or force) remediation practitioners to think outside of the usual realm of approaches to find newer and more beneficial technologies. (authors)

Simpkin, Thomas J. [CH2M HILL, Denver, Colorado (United States); Favara, Paul [CH2M HILL, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Enabling Exponential Innovation via Open Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-technical innovations #12;Power law distribution #12;OSSD Projects as innovation engines Social/technical innovations OSSD projects exhibit sustained exponential growth via social and technical innovations ExponentialEnabling Exponential Innovation via Open Source Software Development Walt Scacchi Institute

Scacchi, Walt

208

Gaming & Social Innovation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dette paper prœsenterer en rœkke ny computerspil, som har det fœllesmål at skabe borgerdreven social innovation. Indledningsvist vil paperet skitsere den udvikling, der har fundetsted… (more)

Wichmand, Mette

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Remediation of a uranium-contamination in ground water  

SciTech Connect

The former production site of NUKEM where nuclear fuel-elements were developed and handled from 1958 to 1988 was situated in the centre of an industrial park for various activities of the chemical and metallurgical industry. The size of the industrially used part is about 300.000 m{sup 2}. Regulatory routine controls showed elevated CHC (Chlorinated Hydro-Carbons) values of the ground water at the beginning of the 1990's in an area which represented about 80.000 m{sup 2} down-gradient of locations where CHC compounds were stored and handled. Further investigations until 1998 proved that former activities on the NUKEM site, like the UF{sub 6} conversion process, were of certain relevance. The fact that several measured values were above the threshold values made the remediation of the ground water mandatory. This was addressed in the permission given by the Ministry for Nuclear Installations and Environment of Hesse according to chap. 7 of the German atomic law in October 2000. Ground water samples taken in an area of about 5.000 m{sup 2} showed elevated values of total Uranium activity up to between 50 and 75 Bq/l in 2002. Furthermore in an area of another 20.000 m{sup 2} the samples were above threshold value. In this paper results of the remediation are presented. The actual alpha-activities of the ground waters of the remediation wells show values of 3 to 9 Bq/l which are dominated by 80 to 90 % U-234 activity. The mass-share of total Uranium for this nuclide amounts to 0,05% on average. The authority responsible for conventional water utilisation defined target values for remediation: 20 {mu}g/l for dissolved Uranium and 10 {mu}g/l for CHC. Both values have not yet been reached for an area of about 10.000 m{sup 2}. The remediation process by extracting water from four remediation wells has proved its efficiency by reduction of the starting concentrations by a factor of 3 to 6. Further pumping will be necessary especially in that area of the site where the contaminations were found later during soil remediation activities. Only two wells have been in operation since July 2002 when the remediation technique was installed and an apparatus for direct gamma-spectroscopic measurement of the accumulated activities on the adsorbers was qualified. Two further remediation wells have been in operation since August 2006, when the installed remediation technique was about to be doubled from a throughput of 5 m{sup 3}/h to 10 m{sup 3}/h. About 20.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted since from these two wells and the decrease of their Uranium concentrations behaves similar to that of the two other wells being extracted since the beginning of remediation. Both, total Uranium-concentrations and the weight-share of the nuclides U-234, U-235 and U-238 are measured by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry) besides measurements of Uranium-Alpha-Activities in addition to the measurement of CHC components of which PCE (Per-chlor-Ethene) is dominant in the contaminated area. CHC compounds are measured by GC (Gas Chromatography). Down-gradient naturally attenuated products are detected in various compositions. Overall 183.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted. Using a pump and treat method 11 kg Uranium have been collected on an ion-exchange material based on cellulose, containing almost 100 MBq U-235 activity, and almost 15 kg of CHC, essentially PCE, were collected on GAC (Granules of Activated Carbon). Less than 3% of the extracted Uranium have passed the adsorber-system of the remediation plant and were adsorbed by the sewage sludge of the industrial site's waste water treatment. The monthly monitoring of 19 monitoring wells shows that an efficient artificial barrier was built up by the water extraction. The Uranium contamination of two ground water plumes has drastically been reduced by the used technique dependent on the amounts of extracted water. The concentration of the CHC contamination has changed depending on the location of temporal pumping. Thereby maximum availability of this contaminan

Woerner, Joerg; Margraf, Sonja; Hackel, Walter [RD Hanau GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Central Florida Location: Orlando, FL Project Title MegaWatt Ventures Proposed Action or Project Description The University of Central Florida is dedicated to creating innovative programs that accelerate the

211

INNOVATION HUBS INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY + DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as city planning, social innovation, architecture, engineering, computer science, and social science

212

Basics of pump-and-treat ground-water remediation technology. Special report  

SciTech Connect

The pump-and-treat process, whereby contaminated ground water is pumped to the surface for treatment, is one of the most common ground-water remediation technologies used at hazardous waste sites. However, recent research has identified complex chemical and physical interactions between contaminants and the subsurface media which may impose limitations on the extraction part of the process. The report was developed to summarize the basic considerations necessary to determine when, where, and how pump-and-treat technology can be used effectively to remediate ground-water contamination.

Mercer, J.W.; Skipp, D.C.; Giffin, D.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An example of remediation of mercury impacted soil using high vacuum low temperature thermal desorption  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe a high vacuum, low temperature thermal desorption (LTTD) technology which has been used to remediate soil impacted with elemental mercury and to present the results of pre-treatment and post-treatment soil sampling. The general operating principles of this high vacuum LTTD technology, the IRHV-200, are: (a) depression of the boiling points of the target compounds by lowering the ambient pressure within the treatment chamber using a vacuum pump; (b) use of infrared radiation to generate a thermal gradient in the top several inches of non-liquid material contained within the treatment chamber and use of a carrier gas to transport the desorbed contaminants from the treatment chamber to a pollution control system. The overall effect of these parameters is a batch treatment system capable of desorbing target contaminants from soil under anaerobic conditions and low temperature such that the desorbed contaminants do not degrade and generate thermal or oxidative by-products. Essentially, the desorbed contaminants undergo a reversible phase change from liquid to vapor in the treatment chamber and are condensed back to liquid in the pollution control system. Results of bench top testing are compared to full scale remediations of significant volumes of soil to demonstrate remediation of mercury impacted soil. This technology is also applicable for soils impacted with other higher boiling point organics, such as, PCP, PCBs, PAHs, PNAs, pesticides and herbicides.

Dagdigian, J.V. [McLaren/Hart, Irvine, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

EM-54 Technology Development In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites as well as wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety and the environment, and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations by 2019. EM-50 is charged with developing new technologies that are safer, more effective and less expensive than current methods. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (the subject of this report) is part of EM-541, the Environmental Restoration Research and Development Division of EM-54. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: Significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces; in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP tends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman Spectroscopy—An Innovative and Versatile Tool To Follow the Respirational Activity and Carbonate Biomineralization of Important Cave Bacteria ... (11) Bacterial calcium carbonate formation is applied in contaminated soil and groundwater remediation,(12) the protection and repair of concrete and cement structures,(13) and the conservation of building stone and statuary. ...

Robert Keiner; Torsten Frosch; Stefan Hanf; Anna Rusznyak; Denise M. Akob; Kirsten Küsel; Jürgen Popp

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating… (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15 °C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5 ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE Energy Innovation Portal Connects Innovative Energy Technologies to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Innovation Portal Connects Innovative Energy Energy Innovation Portal Connects Innovative Energy Technologies to the Marketplace DOE Energy Innovation Portal Connects Innovative Energy Technologies to the Marketplace February 2, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Innovation Portal now has more than 300 business-friendly marketing summaries available to help investors and companies identify and license leading-edge energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The Portal is an online tool that links available DOE innovations to the entrepreneurs who can successfully license and commercialize them. By helping to move these innovations from the laboratory to the market, the Portal facilitates an integral step in supporting growing America's clean energy industries and

219

How to accelerate the Fernald remediation  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Reising, J. [USDOE Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Remediation of Contaminated Marine Sediment Using Thin-Layer Capping with Activated Carbon—A Field Experiment in Trondheim Harbor, Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of Contaminated Marine Sediment Using Thin-Layer Capping with Activated Carbon—A Field Experiment in Trondheim Harbor, Norway ... Innovative chemical and biological monitoring methods were deployed to test capping effectiveness. ... (1) Two earlier pilot studies on AC amendment in the field have been established: one at Hunters Point, in San Francisco Bay, CA,(2, 3) and the other at Grasse River, NY.(1) The first field test aimed at remediating polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mud flats in the San Francisco Bay, and the second field study was carried out on a permanently inundated freshwater river bed also contaminated with PCBs. ...

Gerard Cornelissen; Marie Elmquist Kruså; Gijs D. Breedveld; Espen Eek; Amy M.P. Oen; Hans Peter H. Arp; Caroline Raymond; Göran Samuelsson; Jenny E. Hedman; Øystein Stokland; Jonas S. Gunnarsson

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Long Term Innovative Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's Hydrogen and DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop Bryan Pivovar With Input/Feedback from Rod Borup (LANL), Debbie Myers (ANL), DOE and others as noted in presentation Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 Long Term Innovative Technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Innovative/Long Term and RELEVANT Mission of DOE Mission of EERE (Applied Program) Mission of HFCT To enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells in diverse sectors of the economy-with emphasis on applications that will most effectively strengthen the nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment-through research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies, and through diverse activities to overcome

222

DOE Energy Innovation Hubs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » DOE Energy Research » DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Materials Sciences & Engineering (MSE) Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences (CSGB) Accelerator and Detector Research Research Conduct Policies DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Energy Frontier Research Centers National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » Research DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds

223

Obstacles to innovation management in SMEs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis examines innovation, innovation management and the innovation process in SMEs (small and medium enterprises). There are many academic researchers who work on… (more)

WEI, YI

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley * BRIEpath from social capital to innovation has been identified.social capital has for economic development and innovation.

Kenney, Martin; Patton, Donald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center

226

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center

227

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

228

Hydrocarbon pollution control and remediation of groundwater: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil-contaminated sediments. There are two main remediation techniques: soil washing and bio- remediation. With soil washing, contaminated soil is leached with water containing a surfactant to assist in hydrocarbon removal. In situ washing is undertaken...

L. Clark

229

Remedial Costs for MTBE in Soil and Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of MTBE in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediating MTBE/BTEX releases compared to remediating sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluat...

Barbara H. Wilson; John T. Wilson Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan Colorado School of Mines, Colorado 80021 #12;The S.M. Stoller Corporation Flood Plain Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study ..................................................................................................... 1-8 1.6 Previous Investigations

231

Lignol Innovations Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lignol Innovations Inc. Lignol Innovations Inc. Corporate Headquarters: Berwyn, PA Global Headquarters: Canada Proposed Facility Location: Commerce City, Colorado Description: This project will design, construct, and operate a demonstration plant to produce ethanol, lignin and furfural from cellulosic feedstock, including hard and softwood residues. CEO or Equivalent: Ross MacLachlan, President and CEO Participants: Suncor Energy and; Parker Messana & Associates Engineering Production: Excess of 2 million gallons/year of cellulosic ethanol plus biochemical co-products, including High Purity-Lignin ("HP- L(tm)") Technology and Feedstocks: * Proprietary solvent pretreatment process integrated with saccharification, fermentation and product recovery processes

232

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

234

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design Innovation: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Product Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Design Innovation: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Product Innovation by Design A paper presented at the 5th European Academy of Design Conference held in Barcelona, in April 2003. Bilge The term `design innovation,' while not having a universally agreed upon definition, is increasingly used

Mutlu, Bilge

236

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and Model Field Data from a Test of Steam Injection in an Hydraulically Created Fracture, EPA (co-PI) 1994-1998 Field Demonstration of In Situ Thermally Enhanced Extraction...

237

NREL: Innovation Spectrum Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation Spectrum Innovation Spectrum Te xt version The scope of NREL's capabilities emulates the nature of the innovation process itself. Moving new technologies from initial concept to commercial application requires a breadth of expertise across the innovation spectrum, encompassing: Fundamental science Market-relevant research Systems integration Testing and validation Commercialization Deployment The NREL innovation spectrum is highly interactive within the laboratory and across other research institutions and private industry. NREL provides the scientific and analytical leadership to guide the innovation process, contributing knowledge and expertise at each stage. Innovation Success Stories Learn more about the spectrum of clean energy innovation and how NREL is creating a future of sustainable energy systems based on clean,

238

Innovation by Entrants and Incumbents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the basic Schumpeterian endogenous growth model by allowing incumbents to undertake innovations to improve their products, while entrants engage in more “radical” innovations to replace incumbents. Our model ...

Acemoglu, Daron

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Entrepreneurship and Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and managers need to understand the power of innovation and how it translates into new products, processes and competitive economy. Sustaining a competitive advantage requires that individuals, companies, and nations and the ability to combine such insight with the daily practical The programme is a one-year Master's degree

van der Torre, Leon

240

TRADITION INNOVATION CELEBRATION Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the reunion · Complimentary College of Engineering Commemorative History Book · Recognition at C.J. MackenzieTRADITION INNOVATION CELEBRATION Engineering College of CENTENNIAL SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE Your. · Exposure at one of the biggest engineering parties this province has seen · Signage at events during

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar Innovator | Alta Devices  

SciTech Connect

Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Democratized From innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years of basic research and development at the 100-nanometer scale, the importance of nanotechnology as a source of innovations and new capabilities in everything from materials science to medicine is already well-understood. Three trends, however, will define how nanotechnology will unfold, and what impacts

Anderson, Douglas R.

243

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Reducing LED Costs Through Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A Wisconsin-based company is developing an innovative way to reduce manufacturing costs of light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

245

Building America 2013 Top Innovations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides a listing of and links to 2013 Top Innovations coming out of the Building America program.

246

Intellectual Property for Market Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , Quantifying Brand Image: Empirical Evidence ofbrands are identical. ”). Market Innovation advertising and promotion, a spurious image

Duffy, John F; Abramawitz, Micheal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Screening and comparison of remedial alternatives for the South Field and flyash piles at the Fernald site  

SciTech Connect

The South Field, the Inactive Flyash Pile, and the Active Flyash Pile are in close proximity to each other and are part of Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The baseline risk assessment indicated that the exposure pathways which pose the most significant risk are external radiation from radionuclides in surface soils and use of uranium contaminated groundwater. This paper presents screening and comparison of various remedial alternatives considered to mitigate risks from the groundwater pathway. Eight remedial alternatives were developed which consisted of consolidation and capping, excavation and off-site disposal with or without treatment, excavation and on-site disposal with or without treatment and combinations of these. Risk-based source (soil) preliminary remediation levels (PRLs) and waste acceptance criteria (WACs) were developed for consolidation and capping, excavation, and on-site disposal cell. The PRLs and WACs were developed using an integrated modeling tool consisting of an infiltration model, a surface water model, a vadose zone model, and a three-dimensional contaminant migration model in saturated media. The PRLs and WACs were then used to determine need for soil treatment, determine excavation volumes, and screen remedial alternatives. The selected remedial alternative consisted of excavation and on-site disposal with off-site disposal of the fraction exceeding the WAC.

Bumb, A.C. [Fluor Daniel Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Jones, G.N. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Warner, R.D. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The adoption of sustainable remediation behaviour in the US and UK: A cross country comparison and determinant analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The sustainable remediation concept, aimed at maximizing the net environmental, social, and economic benefits in contaminated site remediation, is being increasingly recognized by industry, governments, and academia. However, there is limited understanding of actual sustainable behaviour being adopted and the determinants of such sustainable behaviour. The present study identified 27 sustainable practices in remediation. An online questionnaire survey was used to rank and compare them in the US (n = 112) and the UK (n = 54). The study also rated ten promoting factors, nine barriers, and 17 types of stakeholders' influences. Subsequently, factor analysis and general linear models were used to determine the effects of internal characteristics (i.e. country, organizational characteristics, professional role, personal experience and belief) and external forces (i.e. promoting factors, barriers, and stakeholder influences). It was found that US and UK practitioners adopted many sustainable practices to similar extents. Both US and UK practitioners perceived the most effectively adopted sustainable practices to be reducing the risk to site workers, protecting groundwater and surface water, and reducing the risk to the local community. Comparing the two countries, we found that the US adopted innovative in-situ remediation more effectively; while the UK adopted reuse, recycling, and minimizing material usage more effectively. As for the overall determinants of sustainable remediation, the country of origin was found not to be a significant determinant. Instead, organizational policy was found to be the most important internal characteristic. It had a significant positive effect on reducing distant environmental impact, sustainable resource usage, and reducing remediation cost and time (p < 0.01). Customer competitive pressure was found to be the most extensively significant external force. In comparison, perceived stakeholder influence, especially that of primary stakeholders (site owner, regulator, and primary consultant), did not appear to have as extensive a correlation with the adoption of sustainability as one would expect.

Deyi Hou; Abir Al-Tabbaa; Peter Guthrie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Separations innovative concepts: Project summary  

SciTech Connect

This project summary includes the results of 10 innovations that were funded under the US Department's Innovative Concept Programs. The concepts address innovations that can substantially reduce the energy used in industrial separations. Each paper describes the proposed concept, and discusses the concept's potential energy savings, market applications, technical feasibility, prior work and state of the art, and future development needs.

Lee, V.E. (ed.)

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Animal innovation defined and operationalized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, improvisation, innovation, invention, operational definition, social learning 1. Introduction The studyAnimal innovation defined and operationalized Grant Ramsey Department of Philosophy, University://www.aim.unizh.ch/Members/vanschaik.html Abstract: Innovation is a key component of most definitions of culture and intelligence. Additionally

Indiana University

251

Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board 2009 Annual Report of the #12;2009 Annual Report of the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Innovation Program February 2010 #12;For Information regarding the Technology

Magee, Joseph W.

252

Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board 2009 Annual Report of the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board 2010 Annual Report of the #12;2010 Annual Report of the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology

253

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect

The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

R. P. Wells

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Awards recognize outstanding innovation in Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recognize outstanding innovation Awards recognize outstanding innovation in Technology Transfer The award honors inventors whose patented invention exhibits significant...

255

Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria Information from the Canadian Embassy Canada:...

256

Toronto University Innovation Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Toronto University Innovation Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Toronto University Innovation Foundation Place: Canada Sector: Services Product: General Financial &...

257

Interested Parties - Pittsburgh Green Innovators | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pittsburgh Green Innovators Interested Parties - Pittsburgh Green Innovators Attachment to Registered Lobbyist Disclosure Form: R More Documents & Publications Interested Parties -...

258

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Remediation Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 June 6, 1997 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of noncompliances associated with the dispersal of radioactive material during the remediation of trenches. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company - EA-97-03 Consent Order, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA 98-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation , Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

260

Scientific Innovation Through Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.emsl.pnl.gov www.emsl.pnl.gov National asset for high- impact science As a national scientific user facility, EMSL provides scientific solutions to scientists from universities, industry, and government who seek out our unique capabilities and scientific expertise for their most challenging research objectives. At EMSL, we collaborate with these scientists-our users-to enable discovery and innovative solutions for the nation's energy, environmental, and national security problems. EMSL user projects by funding source in FY11. ACCELERATING INNOVATION ACROSS AMERICA PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION User facilities provide training ground for educating next generation of scientists EMSL supports postdoctoral researchers, as well as graduate, undergraduate, and high school

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Patents Database - Innovations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Innovations DOE Innovations Breakthroughs and Award Winners from the last 2 decades... Capillary Electrophoresis Ames Laboratory This technology allows multiple samples of substances to be analyzed simultaneously, providing both speed and accuracy. Has won multiple R&D 100 awards for inventor Ed Yeung and has been licensed by Spectromedix. U.S. Patent Nos. 5,324,401 and 5,582,705. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD) Argonne National Laboratory Greatly surpasses other diamond film technologies with commercial potential, and can be used in a broad and diverse range of applications from macro to nanodevices, 2006 FLC Award Winner. U.S. Patent Nos. 5,620,512 and others. T7 Gene Expression System Brookhaven National Laboratory This patent family has been licensed to over 700 commercial entities

262

Innovating science communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Education & Outreach project has, over the years, developed a strong reputation for supporting innovation. Animated event displays, musical CDs, 3d movies, 3-storey murals, photo books, data sonifications, multi-media art installations, pub slams, masterclasses, documentaries, pop-up books, LEGO® models, and virtual visits are among the many diverse methods being exploited to communicate to the world the goals and accomplishments of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. This variety of creativity and innovation does not pop out of a vacuum. It requires underlying motivation by the collaboration to communicate with the public; freedom and encouragement to do so in a creative manner; and a support structure for developing, implementing and promoting these activities. The ATLAS Outreach project has built this support structure on a well-defined communication plan, high-quality content, and effective delivery platforms. Most importantly, implementation of the program has been based on the effective engagem...

Goldfarb, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration; Shaw, Kate

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rethinking remediation technologies for desertified landscapes  

SciTech Connect

Shrub-dominated communities have replaced native grasslands throughout much of the arid Southwest during the past 120 years. Most currently available remediation technologies are uneconomical due to large inputs of energy, fertilizers, herbicides and labor, or are ecologically ineffective due to harsh environments and the highly competitive nature of these native shrubs. Our analysis of these historical remediation technologies together with new information on ecosystem processes has led us to pursue an ecologically-based approach in which more limited inputs are targeted to promote natural processes of regeneration. Advantages to this approach include lower costs, reduced reliance on agronomic practices, and maintenance of natural landscape features. Disadvantages include longer time required for desired changes to occur, and a need for increased understanding of arid land processes.

Herrick, J.E.; Havstad, K.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Coffin, D.P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

BEST VISIONS. BEST INNOVATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEST VISIONS. BEST INNOVATIONS. BEST SOLUTIONS: INDUSTRIE 4.0 NRW Cluster Nordrhein INTERNATIONAL KOOPERATIONS- B�RSE KOMMUNIKATION & NETWORKING FOREN 13:30 - 17:00 Uhr Industrie 4.0 CPS in der.NRW, Geschäftsführer, IMST GmbH Moderation: Anna Planken #12;4 |www.iuk-tag-nrw.de FORUM Industrie 4.0 ­ CPS in der

Hellebrand, Sybille

265

Manufacturing Innovation Topics Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program (OSD ManTech) will host a workshop to discuss AMO's recent Request for Information (RFI) on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topic Areas as well as the recent areas of interest announced by OSD ManTech for a new Manufacturing Innovation Institute on October 8-9, 2014 in Fort Worth, TX.

266

2010sr31_box-remediation.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, November 18, 2010 Thursday, November 18, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 292-2484 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov SRS Recovery Act TRU Waste Project Ahead of Schedule with Box Remediation Program Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) started off the last 12 months of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act with an enormous success in its legacy transuranic (TRU) waste program. The H-Canyon

267

Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials  

SciTech Connect

During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Bacterial dehalogenases: biochemistry, genetics, and biotechnological applications.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...may be suitable for the remediation of waste materials contaminated...treatment may be optimal for the remediation of wastes containing highly...Protection Agency, Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation project...and M. B. Burton. 1988. Remediation of multimedia contamination...

S Fetzner; F Lingens

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Remedial design through effective electronic associations  

SciTech Connect

Black and Veatch Special Projects Corp. (BVSPC) used an environmental data management system (EDMS) to consolidate x-ray fluorescence (XRF), global positioning system (GPS), and laboratory analytical data into a unique and flexible electronic database. Cost savings were acknowledged in all phases of the remedial design due to the development and use of the EDMS and its distinct associations with various electronic software packages. The EDMS allowed effective and efficient completion of the remedial design investigation of the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site. The Site is a 125-year old mining community in Jasper County, Missouri. Approximately 6,500 residences are now located within the 60 square-mile Superfund Site where lead and zinc were mined. Smelting and mining activities were conducted in several areas throughout the community. These operations left approximately 9 million tons of mine wastes at the Site upon completion of the mining activities. The purpose of the remedial design investigation was to quantify and identify the residential yards that were adversely affected by these activities.

Deis, J.L.; Wankum, R.D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

618-10 Burial Ground Trench Remediation and 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground Nonintrusive Characterization of Vertical Pipe Units Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

A “lessons learned” is a noteworthy practice or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or an adverse work practice/experience that is captured and shared to avoid reoccurrence. This document provides the lessons learned identified by the 618-10 Burial Ground trench remediation and the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground nonintrusive characterization of the vertical pipe units (VPUs).

Darby, J. W.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Beneficial reuse of treated media from remediation at an industrial site  

SciTech Connect

Remediation at an active PVC resin manufacturing plant in southeastern Pennsylvania has involved closure of lagoons under a RCRA plan and design of a groundwater pump and treat program under CERCLA. Both the CERCLA and RCRA programs involve beneficial reuse of the treated media, which in effect has offset some costs of the remediation. The lagoons were used to settle the PVC residual material from wastewater generated by the facility. Analysis of the residual material showed that the polymer content would allow it to be used as a low-grade PVC resin after drying. The treatment process selected for the RCRA lagoon closure involved indirect steam stripping and filter pressing which produced a filter cake that was both nonhazardous and marketable. Approximately 6,000 tons of product was sent to market from the lagoons. The groundwater, which will be remediated at the site, contains trichlorethylene (TCE), vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), and other volatile organic compounds. An average 400 gpm of groundwater will be extracted and treated by carbon absorbents and an air stripper. The groundwater will be used by the plant in the production process after it is treated by the CERCLA remediation system.

Erdman, D.E. [Smith Environmental Technologies, Plymouth Meeting, PA (United States); Weston, A.F. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Morrissey, B.J. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Detailed Survey on Various Aspects of SQL Injection: Vulnerabilities, Innovative Attacks, and Remedies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In today's world, Web applications play a very important role in individual life as well as in any country's development. Web applications have gone through a very rapid growth in the recent years and their adoption is moving faster than that was expected few years ago. Now-a-days, billions of transactions are done online with the aid of different Web applications. Though these applications are used by hundreds of people, in many cases the security level is weak, which makes them vulnerable to get compromised. In most of the scenarios, a user has to be identified before any communication is established with the backend database. An arbitrary user should not be allowed access to the system without proof of valid credentials. However, a crafted injection gives access to unauthorized users. This is mostly accomplished via SQL Injection input. In spite of the development of different approaches to prevent SQL injection, it still remains an alarming threat to Web applications. In this paper, we present a detailed ...

Kindy, Diallo Abdoulaye

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Demonstration of On-site Innovative Technolegies: Case Studies in Soil and Groundwater Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United States Department of Defense is responsible for restoring a significant number of domestic military sites contaminated by soil and groundwater pollutants. With the end of the Cold War, the Departmen...

Daphne Kamely

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessment of innovative in "situ" techniques for groundwater and soil remediation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Boden- und Grundwasserkontaminationen durch organische und anorganische Schadstoffe sind ein weitverbreitetes Problem in vielen Industrieländern. Chlorierte Kohlenwasserstoffe gehören dabei zu den am häufigsten vorkommenden Schadstoffen.… (more)

Laumann, Susanne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Small Business Innovation Research Grant Helps Propel Innovative Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Innovation Research Grant Helps Propel Innovative Small Business Innovation Research Grant Helps Propel Innovative Wind Energy Small Business Small Business Innovation Research Grant Helps Propel Innovative Wind Energy Small Business March 11, 2011 - 10:32am Addthis Link to image of Wind Tower System's Space Frame Tower™ Link to image of Wind Tower System's Space Frame Tower(tm) Mark Higgins Operations Supervisor, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office Wind Tower Systems, a subsidiary of Wasatch Wind, was founded in 2002 to research, develop and commercialize new ways to make lighter, taller and easier- to-assemble land-based wind turbines. Since then, the Park City, Utah-based small business received early funding from the Department of Energy, which catalyzed investment from the California Energy Commission

277

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations Innovations Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Innovations on AddThis.com... Innovations Image comprised of Better Buildings terms, each term having a clickable area. The green terms are Communitywide Competition, Carrotmobs, Neighborhood Infrared Home Scans, and Energy Data Dashboards. The dark blue terms are Loans that Stay With the Property, Cash for Carbon, and Fast Financing Approval. The medium blue terms are Community Workforce Agreement, Equipment Loans for Businesses, and Rating Contractor Performance. The orange terms are University Partnership, Energy Advisors, and Neighborhood Sweeps. Clicking on each of these terms takes you to the appropriate explanatory area in the interactive graphic below, and all of the terms in this image are also included as links in the graphic below. cash for carbon energy data dashboards neighborhood sweeps rating contractor performance Fast financing approval Carrotmobs neighborhood infrared home scans community workforce agreement Loans that stay with the property Energy advisors equipment loans for businesses University partnership communitywide competition

278

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

282

NREL: Innovation Spectrum - NREL Spectrum of Innovation Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are many...and the challenges are daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including Fundamental...

283

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

284

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

285

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

286

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

287

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 January 2011 Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003] The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Procedure. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 More Documents & Publications CX-009415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011

288

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

289

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Creating an Energy Innovation Ecosystem  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Regions for the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, Locations of Clean Energy Business Incubators and i6 Innovative Proof of Concept Centers

291

Commercialization and Innovation Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

grant works to acceler- ate the transition of innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy concepts from university laboratories to the market. The i6 Green Challenge grant...

292

Retail marketing innovation in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study carried out on innovation within the field of retail marketing. It arises from the limited scientific literature on the subject, given the significant current interest in marketing innovation as a possible solution to confront the new competitive scene in the current economic and social climate. The database utilised was provided by PITEC 2008 (June 2010). The main findings highlight that retail marketing innovation is in an initial phase; turnover, export activities and internal R&D appear to be the characteristics that make retailers more likely to develop marketing innovations.

Natalia Medrano-Sáez; Mª Cristina Olarte-Pascual

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effective marketing of technical innovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent trends in the global business market point to the increasing importance of technology and technical innovations to gain and maintain competitive business strategic advantage. However, the marketing of technical innovations throughout the supply chain is still governed by traditional strategies and practices. Such strategies and practices are ineffective in a highly technologically advanced marketplace. As a result, the marketers of technologically innovative products and concepts are left with many questions and very few practical answers. This research offers a practical, integrated approach to marketing technical innovations. The approach offered is presented within an organisational, people and technology strategic context. A field study is utilised to illustrate the utility of the proposed approach.

Andrew J. Czuchry; Mahmoud M. Yasin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East Dakota County, Minnesota\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2.1.doc A2 Table\\19\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2

Netoff, Theoden

295

Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah...

296

Remediation of environmental contaminants by novel organoclay adsorbents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Naturally occuring layer silicate clay minerals could be value-added by modifying the surface properties in order to enhance their efficacy in the remediation of environmental… (more)

Sarkar, Binoy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Remediation Services & InformationAdmin Support December 12, 2012 - 10:22am Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization...

298

EPA - National Remedy Review Board webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Review Board webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - National Remedy Review Board webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

299

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group...

300

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE has determined that the contamination is not attirbutable to the AEC-sponsored operations. Therefore, DOE does not have legal authority to conduct remedial actions at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

100-D/H Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study /Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Proposed Plan Nina Menard Washington State Department of Ecology 100-DH RIFSPP * Received Draft RIFSPP on December 14, 2012 *...

302

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

303

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site...

304

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY) WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSE'ITS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

305

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

306

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

307

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning...

308

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

309

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making. Led by the...

310

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC CORPORATION BUILDING 7 BLOOMFIELD, NEW JERSEY SW 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of...

311

MANAGEMENT ALERT Remediation of Selected Transuranic Waste Drums...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

MANAGEMENT ALERT Remediation of Selected Transuranic Waste Drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory - Potential Impact on the Shutdown of the Department's Waste Isolation Plant DOE...

312

NREL: Innovation Spectrum - NREL Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text Version) Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text Version) Below is the text version of the NREL Spectrum of Innovation video. "...renewable energy is a national imperative..." "...This breakthrough technology will..." "...we are still looking for an innovative material that will..." "...we need a study to determine..." "...the right people need to work together..." "...competing priorities mean we cannot..." There are many voices calling for a future of abundant, clean energy. The choices are many...and the challenges are daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including Fundamental Science, Market-Relevant Research, Systems Integration, Testing and Validation, Commercialization, and

313

QUARTIER DE L'INNOVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but largely unknown to the public Facing sizeable urban planning challenges Comprising three of Montreal social, cultural, and technological innovation Model of sustainable development Catalyst for the growth the development of an innovative and entrepreneurial culture that balances four pillars: Industrial, Education

Barthelat, Francois

314

Green Office Program: Innovation Credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Office Program: Innovation Credits There are plenty of sustainable practices that aren't on our Green Office Program checklist. In an effort to encourage such practices, and reward offices Green: 5 Think outside the box, but make sure your innovation credits are approved by your Green Office

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

315

Selection of a remedial alternative at a superfund site in an environmentally sensitive context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The site is a former intermediate dye products research and production facility which operated from the late 1950's until 1981. It is located on a small island in the midst of a salt marsh, adjacent to the upper reach of a tidal creek. The remedial investigation identified a variety of synthetic organic chemicals, primarily aromatics and substituted aromatics, in the shallow groundwater and in a restricted area of soils. Treatment technologies selected for analysis during the feasibility study included off-site disposal, incineration, and low-temperature thermal aeration for soils and carbon adsorption for groundwater. As required by the National Contingency Plan, “no action” alternatives were included for both media. These technologies were combined to provide 12 remedial action alternatives, seven of which were selected for detailed analysis. The detailed analysis considered technical feasibility, legal and regulatory requirements, human health and environmental effects, and cost.

Ralph Odom Jr.; William D. Adams

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Social Innovation Fellowship Program Guidelines & Application Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8/25/2011 Social Innovation Fellowship Program Guidelines & Application Materials Introduction The Social Innovation Fellowship program was created in order to support Stanford Graduate School of Business drive social innovation and transformation in various fields including education, health, environment

Ford, James

317

Temporal Evolution of Social Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acceptance of an innovation can occur through mutliple exposures to individuals who have already accepted it. Presented here is a model to trace the evolution of an innovation in a social network with a preference $\\lambda$, amidst topological constraints specified mainly by connectivity, $k$ and population size, $N_k$. With the interplay between properties of innovation and network structure, the model attempts to explain the variations in patterns of innovations across social networks. Time in which the propagation attains highest velocity depends on $\\lambda^{-2}k^{-2}N_{k}^{1/2}$. Dynamics in random networks may lead or lag behind that in scale-free networks depending on the average connectivity. Hierarchical propagation is evident across connectivity classes within scale-free networks, as well as across random networks with distinct topological indices. For highly preferred innovations, the hierarchy observed within scale-free networks tends to be insignificant. The results have implications for administ...

Kulkarni, Varsha S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Innovation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovation Innovation Home Jessi3bl's picture Submitted by Jessi3bl(15) Member 16 December, 2012 - 19:18 GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway clean energy Clean Energy Fuels energy Environment Fuel GE Innovation Partnerships Technology Innovation & Solutions Transportation Trucking Energy Data Initiative (EDI) Description: Liberating Data as Fuel for Innovation Initiative Vision: Transform gigabytes into actionable intelligence, which accelerates job creation. Fuel entrepreneurs with previously untapped data to spur new products and services that help American families and businesses save money on utility bills and at the pump, protect the environment, and ensure a safe and reliable energy future. Links: Check out the EDI on the EDG Big Data Commercialization

319

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

D. Vandel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Natsis, M.E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Natsis, M.E. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Walker, J.S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Photocatalytic remediation of indoor pollution by transparent TiO2 films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Transparent, mechanically robust TiO2 films obtained by an innovative electrochemically assisted procedure are presented as effective photocatalysts for environmental remediation and self-cleaning. The film morphology and optical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV–vis spectroscopy. Mechanical tests (Wolff Wilborn hardness and adhesion tests) proved the high robustness of the layer. The film thickness could be modulated by varying the number of deposited layers (from 1 to 5) without altering the film transparency. A fast light-induced superhydrophilicity is observed even under solar irradiation. The photocatalytic remediation activity of the films was tested under UV and solar irradiation towards two different systems: the gas phase degradation of volatile organic compounds, \\{VOCs\\} (ethanol and acetaldehyde) and the degradation of dry stains of long chain organic molecules (siloxanes) adsorbed at the film surface to simulate the staining by fingerprints/oily liquids. The titania layers showed excellent photocatalytic activity in both tested systems under UV and simulated solar irradiation. The photocatalyst deactivation upon repeated degradation tests was observed to be very limited. The presented stable and transparent TiO2 layers represent promising materials for photocatalytic windows and coatings.

Alice Antonello; Guido Soliveri; Daniela Meroni; Giuseppe Cappelletti; Silvia Ardizzone

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geothermal innovative technologies catalog  

SciTech Connect

The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Access to Courts and Preemption of State Remedies in Collective Action Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application of preemption doctrine to state judicial remedies. This article applies a “collective action” framework for preemption analysis to the issue of remedial preemption. Our analysis suggests that while remedial preemption may be justified in some...

Glicksman, Robert L.; Levy, Richard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

RCRA Information Brief, June 1996: Conditional remedies under RCRA correction action  

SciTech Connect

This document describes conditional remedies under RCRA corrective action. The definition of conditional remedies, criteria that must be met, applications to DOE facilities, applicable clean-up standards, and implementation of conditional remedies are discussed in the document.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Characterization of complex mineral assemblages: Implications for contaminant transport and environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...W P ( 1996 ) Ground Water 34 : 778 – 783...environmental remediation. | Surface...and biological remediation strategies...environmental effects ground water humic acids humic...pollutants pollution remediation risk assessment...

Paul M. Bertsch; John C. Seaman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011_1012_Hansen_100-K_Remediation.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K Area Remediation Summary of Draft Su a y o a t Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan Study and Proposed Plan October 2011 Purpose * The 100-K Remedial...

328

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water;Objectives · To come up with a mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels

330

Integration of biotechnology in remediation and pollution prevention activities  

SciTech Connect

The North American Free Trade Agreement/North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation provides a mechanism for an international collaboration between the US, Canada, and Mexico to jointly develop, modify, or refine technologies that remediate or protect the environment. These countries have a vested interest in this type of collaboration because contaminants do not respect the boundaries of a manufacturing site, region, city, state, or country. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of a diverse group of individuals who address a variety of environmental issues. ESD is involved in basic and applied research on the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants; environmental assessment; environmental engineering; and demonstrations of advanced remediation technologies. The remediation and protection of the environment includes water, air, and soils for organic, inorganic, and radioactive contaminants. In addition to remediating contaminated sites, research also focuses on life-cycle analyses of industrial processes and the production of green technologies. The author focuses this discussion on subsurface remediation and pollution prevention; however, the research activities encompass water, soil and air and many of the technologies are applicable to all environments. The discussion focuses on the integration of biotechnology with remediation activities and subsequently linking these biological processes to other remediation technologies.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Innovation Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program

333

Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Housing Innovation Housing Innovation Awards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Housing Innovation Awards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator

334

Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January...

335

Small Business Innovation Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs enacted under the Small Business Innovation Development Act of...

336

Technology Commercialization and Business Innovation | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

commercialization and business innovation funding programs: SunShot Incubator Program Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIRSTTR)....

337

Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric Vehicles to Students and Public Michigan, Missouri: Innovative Mobile Exhibits Bring Electric Vehicles to Students and...

338

Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner with us, license a technology, or innovate locally here in New Mexico. Genomics Request for Information Dipen Sinha and team win 2014 Richard P. Feynman Innovation...

339

Science & Innovation Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Science & Innovation Reports Science & Innovation Reports August 12, 2014 Audit Report: OAS-M-14-09 Office of Science's Management of Research Misconduct Allegations May 22, 2014...

340

Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Green Energy Innovations | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Works: Mark Little on Green Energy Innovations What Works: Mark Little on Green Energy Innovations Mark Little, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, answers the...

342

Energy Innovation Assistance Program (EIAP) (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy innovation assistance program (PAIE) aims to encourage the development of new technologies or innovative processes focusing on energy efficiency or emerging energy sources by financially...

343

Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Energy Systems Innovations to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

344

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

345

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

346

Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Waste Management Conference 2010) Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Waste Management Conference 2010) More Documents & Publications Recent Developments in DOE FUSRAP

347

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Review of Savannah River Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), Office of Safety and Quality Assurance (OSQA), Technical Support Division (TSD) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), Phase II Verification of Savannah River Remediation (SRR). The purpose of the DOE-SR Phase II ISMS Verification was to verify that the SRR ISMS Description that was submitted to and approved by the DOE-SR Manager is being effectively implemented at the Savannah

348

DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Remediation Services at Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory September 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to CDM, A Joint Venture, of Fairfax, Virginia, to provide environmental remediation services for the Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Canoga Park, California. The cost-plus incentive fee task order has a 36-month performance period and a value of $11.3 million. CDM will continue to assist DOE in chemical sampling, the preparation of a chemical data gap analysis and preparing a soils remediation action

349

Promoting decision making through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the steps taken in a decision making process through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM). The development of the SRAM deals with Complex, Large-scale Interconnected, Open, and Socio-technical System (CLIOS). For both large and small contaminated areas, considers potential impacts on neighbouring areas, the contribution to air emissions from the materials of the proposed project and the energy to be consumed. Along this line, the research focused on setting up a model under a systems perspective. A systemigram, from remedial investigation to project closeout, has been developed. For each stage of the remediation project, the process to identify stakeholders has been outlined. Moreover, and as an illustrative example, environmental, social, and economic aspects of remedial operations have been addressed on a specific case using the US Air Force Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT).

Aspasia Kalomoiri; Washington Braida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - active chemical remediation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.405 Discovery or notification. 300.410 Removal site evaluation. 300.415 Removal action. 300.420 Remedial site... evaluation. 300.425 Establishing remedial...

351

Verification of Active and Passive Ground-Water Contamination Remediation Efforts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The verification of ground-water contamination remediation efforts requires thorough documentation of subsurface conditions ... comprehensive approach to the design and operation of remediation efforts with an em...

M. J. Barcelona

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

An investigation of school factors related to enrollment in remedial writing at postsecondary institutions in Montana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Remedial postsecondary coursework, while ubiquitous, is a high cost means for students to become prepared to complete the rigors of postsecondary education. Remedial coursework… (more)

Shipman, Dustin Harry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

An investigation of school factors related to enrollment in remedial writing at postsecondary institutions in Montana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Remedial postsecondary coursework, while ubiquitous, is a high cost means for students to become prepared to complete the rigors of postsecondary education. Remedial coursework represents… (more)

Shipman, Dustin Harry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

355

Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofermentation System Technology Assistance Program Licensing Staff Search For Technologies Available Technologies Licensing Opportunity Announcements Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Technology Licensing | Technology Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial readiness. TIP projects are proposed by ORNL scientists and engineers and selected competitively based on their potential for near-term societal or economic impact. TIP technologies are advanced through research and development and outreach to industry. TIP is funded by UT-Battelle licensing royalties. When a technology enters the TIP process, it is initially made unavailable

356

DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental remediation and waste management information systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

362

Discovery & Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Science The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {8C4B6798-0A4D-4B36-AF69-02F3EFA94CD1}http://science.energy.gov/discovery-and-innovation/stories/2013/127045/ Observing the Sparks of Life EFRC researchers isolate a photosynthetic complex - arguably the most important bit of organic chemistry on the planet - in its complete

363

Innovative Separations Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Remediation technology needs and applied R D initiatives  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently consolidated its environmental restoration and waste management activities. Within that new organization, DOE has committed to support Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and, Evaluation (RDDT E) activities with the following objectives: rapidly advance beyond currently available technologies; provide solutions to key technical issues that will improve effectiveness, efficiency, and safety; and enhance DOE's ability to meet its 30-year compliance and cleanup goals. Four general categories have been identified where R D (and DT E) efforts need to be focused. These include: waste minimization technologies, site characterization and assessment methods, waste treatment technologies, and remediation technologies with emphasis on in-situ methods. The DOE has already supported a number of R D activities in these areas and plans to continue that support in the future. For technology development, the DOE is committed to forming cooperative partnerships and eliciting broad participation from qualified organizations who can contribute to RDDT E activities. The new technologies resulting from these R D initiatives will enhance DOE's ability to meet its 30-year cleanup goal, reduce environmental risk, and provide significant cost savings over existing technologies. Even modest investments in these emerging technologies now can be expected to generate a high rate of return. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Lien, S.C.T.; Levine, R.S. (USDOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States). Research and Development Div.); Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Erickson, M.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Webster, S.L. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Expedited approach to a carbon tetrachloride spill interim remedial action  

SciTech Connect

Monitored natural attenuation was selected as an interim measure for a carbon tetrachloride spill site where source removal or in situ treatment cannot currently be implemented due to the surrounding infrastructure. Rather than delay action until the site is more accessible to an interim action, this more expedited approach would support a final action. Individual Hazard Substance Site (IHSS) 118.1 is a former underground storage tank at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) that stored carbon tetrachloride for process use. Inadvertent releases associated with filling and failure of the tank system resulted in an accumulation of carbon tetrachloride in a bedrock depression around a group of former process waste tanks. Access to the source of contamination is obstructed by numerous utilities, the process waste tanks, and other components of the site infrastructure that limit the ability to conduct an effective remedial action. A preremedial field investigation was conducted in September 1997 to identify and delineate the extent of the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. Data collected from the investigation revealed that natural processes might be limiting the migration of contaminants from the source area.

Cowdery, C.; Primrose, A. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Castaneda, N. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CPR_RemedialAction_flowchart_final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

needed No Yes Is development successful? 4b No Yes Is it appropriate to invest time and money in new treatment technologies? (consider risk) 4a Yes No Are treatment technologies...

367

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Innovations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Innovations Energy Innovations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Innovations Name Energy Innovations Address 130 W. Union St Place Pasadena, California Zip 91103 Sector Solar Product Small-scale concentrated PV Year founded 2000 Number of employees 11-50 Website http://www.energyinnovations.c Coordinates 34.146436°, -118.153136° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.146436,"lon":-118.153136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

American business cycles and innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduces the concepts of innovation and invention. The second section discusses the business cycles and highlights general causes of business cycles. The final section details the history of the iron, steel, aluminum, and pharmaceutical industries...

Hood, Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

Introduction Innovation Collaboration Education Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Introduction Innovation Collaboration Education Policy Program Profile #12;i Introduction Table to use this strength to support university, industry, and government collaborations in research;2 Introduction The Water Sustainability Program (WSP) is creating a collaborative environment to leverage

Fay, Noah

371

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Groundwater Treatment at the Fernald Preserve: Status and Path Forward for the Water Treatment Facility - 12320  

SciTech Connect

Operating a water treatment facility at the Fernald Preserve in Cincinnati, Ohio-to support groundwater remediation and other wastewater treatment needs-has become increasingly unnecessary. The Fernald Preserve became a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) site in November 2006, once most of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act environmental remediation and site restoration had been completed. Groundwater remediation is anticipated to continue beyond 2020. A portion of the wastewater treatment facility that operated during the CERCLA cleanup continued to operate after the site was transferred to LM, to support the remaining groundwater remediation effort. The treatment facility handles the site's remaining water treatment needs (for groundwater, storm water, and wastewater) as necessary, to ensure that uranium discharge limits specified in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision are met. As anticipated, the need to treat groundwater to meet uranium discharge limits has greatly diminished over the last several years. Data indicate that the groundwater treatment facility is no longer needed to support the ongoing aquifer remediation effort. (authors)

Powel, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Hertel, B.; Glassmeyer, C.; Broberg, K. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Draft Innovative Exploration Technologies Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A draft needs assessment for the Geothermal Technologies Programs Innovative Exploration Technologies Subprogram.

375

Lignol Innovations, Inc. Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Lignol Innovations, Inc., biorefinery will produce cellulosic ethanol, high purity lignin, and furfural from hardwoods.

376

SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Solar Innovation Timeline on AddThis.com... Publications Newsletter Resource Center Multimedia Meetings & Workshops Solar Innovation Timeline Solar Career Map Glossary Solar Innovation Timeline This timeline features the key innovations that have advanced the solar

377

Housing Innovation Awards at the Solar Decathlon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Housing Innovation Awards at the Solar Decathlon Housing Innovation Awards at the Solar Decathlon Breakfast Presented by BASF Friday, October 4, 2013 8:30-10:30 a.m. Historic Hanger 244 Orange County Great Park in Irvine, CA Friday, October 4, 2013 8:30 AM-10:30 PM 2 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Housing Innovation Awards Christine Barbour Master of Ceremonies 3 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Housing Innovation Awards 4 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Thank you for making the Housing Innovation Awards breakfast possible! Housing Innovation Awards 5 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov

378

FORMERLY REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(' (' . . FORMERLY REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES VITRO CORPORATION VITRO CORPORATION WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY SEP 30 1985 SEP 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Waste Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Deconxnissioning Projects . CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii Page 7 3 4 - _- mI _---. ELSMINATION REPORT FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES, VITRO CORPORATION, WEST ORAN6E, NEW JERSEY INTRODUCTION . The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site

379

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM . ELIMINATION REPORT FOR AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) _ WATERYLIET, NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK SEP 301985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects ----- ----_l_.._- .._. _- CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii .- --- .- Page . 1 4 ELIMINATION REPORT AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) WATERYLIET, NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK 1 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office

380

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I c. ,..I -. i FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY HAVENS LABORATORY (REACTIVE METALS, INC.) KOSSUTH AND PULASKI STREETS BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT i Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decomnissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 . 2 ii .-_. _.--_- "~ ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY HAVENS LABORATORY (REACTIVE METALS, INC. 1 KOSSUTH AND PULASKI STREETS BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and kaste Technology, Division of Facility and Site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources

382

Protecting Lake Ontario - Treating Wastewater from the Remediated Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Facility - 13227  

SciTech Connect

The Port Granby Project is part of the larger Port Hope Area Initiative, a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and marginally contaminated soils (MCS). The Port Granby Project involves the relocation and remediation of up to 0.45 million cubic metres of such waste from the current Port Granby Waste Management Facility located in the Municipality of Clarington, Ontario, adjacent to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. The waste material will be transferred to a new suitably engineered Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) to be located inland approximately 700 m from the existing site. The development of the LTWMF will include construction and commissioning of a new Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) designed to treat wastewater consisting of contaminated surface run off and leachate generated during the site remediation process at the Port Granby Waste Management Facility as well as long-term leachate generated at the new LTWMF. Numerous factors will influence the variable wastewater flow rates and influent loads to the new WWTP during remediation. The treatment processes will be comprised of equalization to minimize impacts from hydraulic peaks, fine screening, membrane bioreactor technology, and reverse osmosis. The residuals treatment will comprise of lime precipitation, thickening, dewatering, evaporation and drying. The distribution of the concentration of uranium and radium - 226 over the various process streams in the WWTP was estimated. This information was used to assess potential worker exposure to radioactivity in the various process areas. A mass balance approach was used to assess the distribution of uranium and radium - 226, by applying individual contaminant removal rates for each process element of the WTP, based on pilot scale results and experience-based assumptions. The mass balance calculations were repeated for various flow and load scenarios. (authors)

Freihammer, Till; Chaput, Barb [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada)] [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada); Vandergaast, Gary [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Arey, Jimi [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lessons for Climate Stabilizing Innovation from Experience with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons for Climate Stabilizing Innovation from Experience with Lessons for Climate Stabilizing Innovation from Experience with Cap-and-Trade Programs Speaker(s): Margaret Taylor Date: October 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 There are serious technological obstacles to achieving climate stabilization by 2050, and climate policy will need to be designed with the appropriate incentives for innovation to overcome these obstacles. The most dominant climate policy instrument today is emissions trading, or cap-and-trade programs (CTPs). This paper synthesizes existing research and presents new data on technology adoption and invention under the two most successful CTPs that share with climate CTPs a focus on reducing emissions from fossil fuel combustion and have had long-enough operations for such an assessment (climate CTPs are too recent for a similar treatment). Emissions

384

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Remedial Design/ Remedial Action PassAPPENDIX F THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL PROCESS, AND THE RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESS This appendix presents a discussion

386

Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2008)

387

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

388

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION ( FORMER HOOKER ELECTROCHEMICAL COMPANY ) NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK SEP 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects ELIMINATION REPORT FOR OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION (FORMER HOOKER ELECTROCHEMICAL COMPANY) L NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK- INTRODUCTION The Department ' of Energy (DDE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or the predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions), has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) at

389

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Surveillance Report S-11-SED-CHP~C-PFP-002, Planning and Execution of Radiological Work. S-11-SED-CHPRC-PFP-002 documented four examples where inadequate hazard analysis resulted in airborne radioactivity that exceeded the limits of the controlling radiological work permit.

390

Oak Ridge Associated Universities OF Preparedfor REMEDIAL ACTIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-7 8,-7 C 7 I 2o.1-1o 1 ORAU 891-29 Prepared by VERIFICATION Oak Ridge Associated Universities OF Preparedfor REMEDIAL ACTIONS ecommissioning ALBANY RESEARCH CENTER...

391

Groundwater remediation at a former oil service site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not only because I spent more time on it than any other project, but also because it represents the broadness and depth of a typical URS remediation project. In this report, findings from previous environmental investigations were summarized and used...

Han, Liping

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

DRAFT HAB Advice: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HAB Advice: Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan for the 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-FR-3, 100-IU-2 and 100-IU-6 Operable Units; DOERL Authors; Shelley Cimon,...

393

300 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Hudson Page 1 of 2 300 Area Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan Deconstruct Advice Points (paragraph number ) 4-1 The Board believes the Tri-Party...

394

Uranium mining legacies remediation and renaissance development: an international overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The uranium mining industry has a record of environmental management that has been very variable over the past 50 years. Although there have been examples of good remediation in some countries, sadly there are...

Peter Waggitt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) On June 6, 1997, the U.S. Department...

396

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & Information/Admin Support SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & Information/Admin Support December 12, 2012 - 10:22am Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Earlier this week, the U.S. Small Business Administration announced that they have revised size definitions for small businesses in Administrative and Support & Waste Management and Remediation Services categories, saying these revisions "reflect changes in marketplace conditions." The new standards are published in the Federal Register. Increases to size standards will enable some growing small businesses in these sectors to retain their small business status; will give federal

397

The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Remediation of Uranium Impacted Sediments in a Watercourse - 12486  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, remediation was initiated for a non-operational fuel cycle facility previously used for government contract work. Between 2009 and the spring of 2011, remediation efforts were focused on demolition of contaminated buildings and removal of contaminated soil. In the late spring of 2011, the last phase of remediation commenced involving the removal of contaminated sediments from portions of a 1,200 meter long gaining stream. Planning and preparation for remediation of the stream began in 2009 with submittal of permit applications to undertake construction activities in a wetland area. The permitting process was lengthy and involved securing permits from multiple agencies. However, early and frequent communication with stakeholders played an integral role in efficiently obtaining the permit approvals. Frequent communication with stakeholders throughout the planning and remediation process also proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. The remediation of the stream involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation and disposal. Many safeguards were employed to protect several species of concern in the work area, water management during project activities, challenges encountered during the project, methods of Final Status Survey, and stream restoration. The planning and permitting effort for the Site Brook remediation began in May 2009 and permits were approved and in place by February 2011. The remediation and restoration of the Site Brook began in April 2011 and was completed in November 2011. The remediation of the Site Brook involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation, disposal, FSS, and restoration. Early and frequent communications with stakeholders proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. Challenges encountered during the remediation effort were overcome by proper planning and having preparedness procedures in place prior to executing the work. With the remediation and restoration successfully completed, the only remaining task is to monitor/maintain the restoration for 10 years. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB, Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report - Volume I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

494-VOL I/REV 1 494-VOL I/REV 1 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on D i v i s i on N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on Pr oj ect S al m on S i t e R em edi al Inv es t i gat i on R epor t Vol u m e I R ev i s i on N o. : 1 S ept em ber 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE/NV--494-VOL I/REV 1 SALMON SITE REMEDIAL INVESTIGATION REPORT DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Revision No.: 1 September 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from -

400

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Remedial Investigation. summary report  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes work complete under the U.S. EPA/WDOE Cooperative Agreement for the Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Remedial Investigation of the Waterways/Shoreline area. The Commencement Bay Superfund Investigation includes various integrated program management and technical components. These include assessments of chemical contamination, biological effects, toxicity, and public health concerns; identification of sources; and identification of potential remedial actions and technologies.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top Innovations 2012 to Top Innovations 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Top Innovations 2012 on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

404

Innovations for a secure nation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for a Secure Nation Innovations for a Secure Nation /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Innovations for a Secure Nation LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. image description Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL APJeT received a $100,000 Venture Acceleration Fund award from LANS helping to complete design and engineering of a commercial-scale production unit. - 4/3/12 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells.

405

NETL: Innovations for Existing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for Existing Plants Innovations for Existing Plants Coal and Power Systems Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Previous Next Chemical Looping Summary Chemical Looping Summary (July 2013) This summary provides a technical description of this advanced technology, describes its advantages, examines the R&D areas of need, and summarizes DOE's R&D efforts. DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (June 2013) This comprehensive handbook provides an update on DOE/NETL R&D efforts on advanced CO2 capture technologies for coal-based power systems. CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations (July 2013) This meeting highlighted DOE/NETL RD&D efforts to develop advanced pre-, post-, and oxy-combustion CO2 capture technologies.

406

Luna Innovations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Luna Innovations Luna Innovations Jump to: navigation, search Name Luna Innovations Place Roanoke, Virginia Zip 24016 Product Virginia-based materials and general technology company. The firm is developing organic photovoltaic cell materials. Coordinates 37.271525°, -79.940534° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.271525,"lon":-79.940534,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

408

2014 Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application 2014 Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application The U.S. Department of Energy's Housing Innovation...

409

A Comparative Approach to the Protection of Fashion Innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of creating new innovations in line with social trends. Thethe new innovations and thereby maintain social status. Thusa fashion innovation that can suggest a high social standing

Wulf, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels PNNL report-out presentation at the CTAB webinar on innovative topics for advanced biofuels....

411

Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Creating a League of Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creating a Creating a League of Innovation Amos Auringer, Gartner Inc. DOE IM Conference 2012 Communicating the Business Value of Innovation 2 Competitive Advantages in IT  -Our culture is our competitive advantage.‖  Ultralow back-office costs  Effective IT/OT management to reduce risks Diminishing returns on cost cutting will ensure no enterprise will achieve competitive advantage by cutting IT spending. Tablet Devices - 1969 5 Best Intentions 6 Mobility 7 Digitalization 8 Information Management 9 Information, Context, Location 10 -The achievement of excellence can only occur if the organization promotes a culture of creative dissatisfaction.‖ - Lawrence Miller

413

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Reclamation and groundwater remediation at a hydrocarbon site in Alaska  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint hydrocarbon cleanup project between Unocal and Marathon, we have initiated the use of constructed wetlands for restoration of the 40-acre Poppy Lane gravel pit located near Kenai, Alaska. Gravel excavated from this site was used to construct roads and drilling pads in the 1960`-70`s. During this period it was also used as a refuse dump for waste from the Kenai gas field and from local residents. The bulk wastes were removed and pockets of oily sand were removed, treated and returned to a stockpile on the site. This left the site with residual pockets of hydrocarbon-impacted sand (<1000 TPH) plus traces of hydrocarbon contamination in the uppermost shallow groundwater flowing through the outwash gravels. The final part of the cleanup will be land restoration and bioremediation of the final traces of hydrocarbons, which are predominantly diesel-range. High resolution gas chromatography analysis indicated that common plants already growing on the site (willow, cottonwood, and alder) did not concentrate diesel-range petroleum hydrocarbons in their foliage when growing in soils containing these contaminants. As part of the planned restoration and shallow groundwater remediation, two 1/3 acre test plots were constructed to promote in-situ biodegradation processes. In spring 1995, the first test, a tree root-barrier plot, was planted with dormant cuttings of four native wetland tree and shrub species, which were planted to depths up to five feet. Alder and elderberry did not succeed under any conditions, nor did any species planted in standing water. For cottonwood and willow species, approximately one half of each rooted and survived. When the water table dropped the second year, the willow cuttings rooted deeper in the vadose zone, while cottonwood did not. As a result of these findings, a tree root-barrier wetland is not considered to be a viable option for groundwater treatment at Poppy Lane.

Ririe, G.T. [Unocal, Brea, CA (United States); Drake, L.D. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Olson, S.S. [Marathon Oil, Tyler, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Remediation of asbestos containing materials by Joule heating vitrification performed in a pre-pilot apparatus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remediation method for asbestos containing materials based on vitrification by Joule heating is presented. Crystal phase transformations of several asbestos minerals were investigated. The vitrification technology on a pre-pilot scale was applied to cement-asbestos pipes containing simultaneously chrysotile and crocidolite. The progressive heating up to 1600 °C led to the complete melting of fibrous minerals and the rapid cooling of the melt formed a monolithic glass. Mineralogical (XRD) and morphological (SEM) analysis showed absence of crystalline phases within the glass. The external part of the Joule heated volume was not melted but lacked asbestos because of an irreversible thermal conversion of asbestos and silicate minerals into high temperature silicates (enstatite and diopside). An absolute filter integrated in the gas effluent treatment system avoided the release of asbestos fibres during the vitrification process. This process assured the complete remediation of asbestos containing materials and its scaling up to the field application could be a suitable industrial treatment of tons of material.

Francesco Dellisanti; Piermaria L. Rossi; Giovanni Valdrè

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Remediation of Abandoned Metal Mine Drainage using Dealginated Seaweed .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis develops and demonstrates an innovative method for adsorbing metals from metal mine drainage in mid-Wales and northern Italy using dealginated seaweed (DS) as… (more)

Hartley, Suzanne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit is an annual conference and technology showcase that brings together experts from different technical disciplines and professional communities to think about America’s energy challenges in new and innovative ways.

419

Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure November 4, 2014 1:00PM to 2:30PM EST Topic Overview Financing green infrastructure is...

420

DuPont Energy Innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21 1 6 2 9 9 U. S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion BTU) Source energy flat with 1990 levels. Progress: · Consumption down 7 percent overall as compared to 1990. · SinceDuPont Energy Innovations University of Delaware Energy Institute Inauguration September 19, 2008

Firestone, Jeremy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Recent innovations in paper recycling  

SciTech Connect

From many process steps in paper recycling systems, two have been selected for discussion, namely washing deinking and flotation deinking flotation deinking. Recent innovations are reviewed, in the context of the basic mechanisms responsible for the functioning of these machines. An update is also given for their application in the processing of used office papers.

Seifert, P. (Black Clawson Co., Middletown, OH (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Patents and Innovation: Friends or Foes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that SMEs license 26% of their patented technologies againstSMEs than for innovative large companies. Transfer of technology

Lévêque, François

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Centre for Innovation Incubation and Entrepreneurship | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector: Services Product: Services & Support (Clean Energy) ( Academic Research foundation ) References: Centre for Innovation, Incubation and Entrepreneurship1 This article...

424

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior to deployment and a second ITR to evaluate Phase I performance in September 2010. In this report, these ITR efforts are referenced as the '2007 ITR' and the 'current ITR', respectively. The 2007 ITR document (Looney et al., 2007) provided a detailed technical evaluation that remains relevant and this report builds on that analysis. The primary objective of the current ITR is to provide an expedited assessment of the available Phase I data to assist the PGDP team as they develop the lessons learned from Phase I and prepare plans for Phase II.

Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Emerging Innovations Fund (EIF) The Emerging Innovations Fund (EIF) is a philanthropically fed, integrated approach to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Medtric Biotech Wound care healing and disinfection $100,000 Microfluidic Innovations Programmable lab

Ginzel, Matthew

426

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evaluation of previous remedial construction along the Duquesne Bluff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulevard of the Allies is a major four lane roadway in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that is constructed atop a near vertical, 35 meter high rock slope known locally as the Duquesne Bluff. Stratigraphic relief observed on the bluff consists of alternating sequences of flat lying sedimentary deposits of sandstone, siltstone, shale, carbonaceous shale, claystone and limestone. Expsoure of alternating sequences of durable and less durable rock has resulted in differential weathering and the formation of precarious overhanging conditions. In the interest of motorist safety and roadway improvement, a major remedial program was undertaken by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) in the mid 1980s. Primary remedial activities included rock trimming, rock bolting, the construction of dental concrete buttressing for overhanging rock support and shotcrete slope facing to arrest continued weathering of less durable claystone and carbonaceous shale exposures. As part of a current roadway improvement project, PennDOT and their consultant, Gannett Fleming, Inc., are evaluating the performance of previous remedial construction and are developing preliminary alternatives for future remediation. This paper will discuss the slope geology, overall favorable performance of the previous remedial construction and unfavorable slope conditions that may have resulted from large scale trimming operations.

J.W. Kovacs; W.R. Adams Jr.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

NONE

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Managing Innovation: A Multidisciplinary Scenario Development Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prescribed innovation methods, inovation is as much about a social process and context as it is a systematicManaging Innovation: A Multidisciplinary Scenario Development Approach Esmond Urwin1 , Michael Henshaw1 1 Systems Engineering Innovation Centre, Holywell Park, Loughborough University, Loughborough

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

430

NAC Technology and Innovation Committee Meeting Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAC Technology and Innovation Committee Meeting Report Esther Dyson Chair, NAC Technology and Innovation Committee August 6, 2010 0 #12;Technology and Innovation Agenda Aug. 3rd Meeting · OCT Update ­ R programs ­ P. Desai · OCT/ESMD Technology Coordination ­ J. Reuther · Overview of ESMD New Technology

Christian, Eric

431

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

432

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

itI.2 -2 itI.2 -2 FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER BRUSH BERYLLIUM COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects __I__,_-. - ---.. ____- .- CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Pa e -5 2 2 2 4 4 4 ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER BRUSH BERYLLIUM COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Oepartment of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decorrnnissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisionsa has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer

433

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Accelerated melting of Greenland ice is a clear indication that consequences of global warming are real and impending. The underlying causes of global warming are well enough understood, but the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases to prevent irreversible climate change is unlikely to happen before the point of no return is reached. To reverse the impending sea level rise, geoengineering counter- measures may be required to counter the current global energy imbalance due to global warming. Of the many proposed remedies, deploying aerosols within the stratosphere offers realistic prospects. Sulfur injections in the lower stratosphere would have the cooling effect of naturally occurring volcanic aerosols. Soot at

434

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

fi.q 2, fi.q 2, I: * FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 4 iii ELIMINATION REPORT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decormnissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and

435

Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

82-TAC 82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13- 02GJ79491 Document Number N0065200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 Page iii

436

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of protecting surface water, groundwater, and ecological receptors. For more information, contact: Eric Pierce Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS 6038 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 pierceem@ornl.gov (865) 574-9968 Kurt Gerdes DOE-EM Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation kurt.gerdes@em.doe.gov (301) 903-7289 Sediment Biota Groundwater Flow Fluctuating Water Table Hg in building structures and rubble Waterborne mercury (mercury being transported via water being released from the facilities to the creeks) Hg currently present in the creek and sediments along the base of the creek

437

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-p,l-I -p,l-I . . FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR MOBIL MINING AND MINERALS COMPANY (THE FORMER MATHIESON CHEMICAL COMPANY) PASADENA, TEXAS D Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 ii --. ELIMINATION REPORT MOBIL MINING AND MINERALS COMPANY (THE FORMER MATHIESON CHEMICAL COMPANY) PASADENA, TEXAS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions),

438

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance » Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Technical Assistance » Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge October 10, 2013 - 12:01pm Addthis The Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (Accelerator) is a multi-agency sponsored competition established to enhance existing regional networks of firms and institutions that accelerate technology-related innovation, business formation, and job creation. Funding provided to these regional networks (also called clusters) help academia, utilities, local governments, and private industry and investors expand partnerships, share strategic information more efficiently, and reduce costs by leveraging existing assets and resources (like physical facilities and equipment).

440

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,: /A (,) i_ - z ,: /A (,) i_ - z FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR FORMERLY UTILIZED PORTIONS OF THE WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decotwnissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS Findings and Recommendation 6 REFERENCES iii Page 1 1 1 3 4 7 "..*.w..,, -. ._ ..- ". --. AUTHORITY REVIEW WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this review is to present information pertaining to work performed under the sponsorship of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the facts and circum-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SENECA ARMY DEPOT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and kaste Technology. Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION t3ACKGROUND CONTENTS . -Page Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 1 4 ii .___ -_-_..--. ._.".. ELIMINATION REPORT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK . INTRODUCTION The Department pf Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) at Seneca Army Depot, Romulus, hew York. Based on the

442

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\ \ ,.-c , 2 2 a. . FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM . ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE 1716 PERSHING ROAD CHICAGO, ILLINOIS SEP301985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects __--... -_ -._.-_- _"_-. .___.. -... .._ ..-. .-. ..--- . , ' , CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii 4 __-.I ._-----.- --- ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE 1716 PERSHING ROAD CHICAGO, ILLINOIS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office

443

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CF INDUSTRIES, INC. CF INDUSTRIES, INC. ( THE FORMER INTERNATIONAL MI NERALS AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION) BARTON, FLORIDA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects - - .._. ..--.. . . I."__ . - INTRODUCTION CONTENTS Page BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological. History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Summary of Findings ii 7 8 --..I--- - ..-___-_--.___-"-- -- ' . ELIMINATION REPORT CF INDUSTRIES, INC. (THE FORMER INTERNATIONAL MINERALS AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION) BARTOW, FLORIDA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and

444

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ROHM & HAAS COMPANY ROHM & HAAS COMPANY PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLYANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTIOk BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 2 2 2 2 3 3 iii ELIMINATION REPORT ROHM & HAAS COMPANY PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANXA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Rohm & Haas Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Based on a

445

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects P bl@ C.' , 1 & cr INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 5 iii ELIMINATION REPORT BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions), has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Lackawanna, New

446

Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

T: T: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Armory, 0: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and that Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) should conduct appropriate comprehensive characterization studies to determine the extent'and magnitude of contamination on properties. Site Location Priority Former Bridgeport Brass Co. (General Motors) Adrian, MI Low Former Bridgeport Brass Co.

447

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects -- --- .- _- --__ CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii - ,. -- Page 1 4 4 ..I___ - ~-___- ELIMINATION REPORT UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)

448

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS BUILDINGS NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS BUILDINGS VAN NESS STREET WASHINGTON, D.C. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects - __-~---- -._.. .._ .-. .- INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status CONTENTS ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Paqe 1 4 INiRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities conducted for the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) (DOE predecessors) at

449

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) implementation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Engineering (SE) policy provided in Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Policy, DOE/RL letter, 95-RTI-107, Oct. 31, 1995. This SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Program to accomplish SE objectives. This TWRS SEMP is applicable to all aspects of the TWRS Program and will be used as the basis for tailoring SE to apply necessary concepts and principles to develop and mature the processes and physical systems necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program.

Peck, L.G.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

450

Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling  

SciTech Connect

Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Top Innovations 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Innovations 2012 Top Innovations 2012 Top Innovations 2012 On this page, you will find Building America's Top Innovations from 1995 through 2012, with links to a profile describing each innovation. Note that some categories may not have a top innovation each year. Flow chart graphic 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices Top Innovations in this category cover research in thermal enclosure improvements, HVAC components, ventilation and other health and safety issues. 1.1 Building Science Solutions Thermal Enclosure: Basement Insulation Systems Advanced Framing Systems and Packages Unvented, Conditioned Attics Unvented, Conditioned Crawlspaces High-R Walls Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning: Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution Ducts in Conditioned Space

452

Innovative Rates Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Reduce the high level of risk during the early stages of geothermal project development by conducting a multi-faceted and innovative exploration and drilling program at Silver Peak. Determine the combination of techniques that are most useful and cost-effective in identifying the geothermal resource through a detailed, post-project evaluation of the exploration and drilling program.

454

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INNOVATIVE UTILITY PRICING FOR INDUSTRY James A. Ross Drazen-Brubaker &Associates, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri ABSTRACT The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Al though the monopolistic... structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to in dustry. Electric utilities face increased compe tition, both from other utilities...

Ross, J. A.

455

Tank waste remediation system program plan  

SciTech Connect

This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

Powell, R.W.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes radiological conditions at sites remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for...

457

Integrated Remediation Process for a High Salinity Industrial Soil Sample Contaminated with Heavy Oil and Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly saline industrial soil sample contaminated with heavy oils and several heavy metals, was tested for remediation using NRC’s Solvent Extraction Soil Remediation (SESR) process. The sample was provided ...

Abdul Majid; Bryan D. Sparks

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal-based folk remedies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 Determinants of the success of remedy offers W: www.uea.ac.ukccp T... : +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Determinants of the success of remedy offers:...

459

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services- EA-97-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04)

460

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Gorm Heron, Steven Carroll, Hank Sowers, Bruce McGee, Randall Juhlin, Joe Daniel, David S. Ingle Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center More Documents & Publications Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "innovative treatment remediation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - SAND2005-1909C.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and program management of the U.S. DOE Innovative Treatment and Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) program. He is the author of...

462

An overview of permeable reactive barriers for in situ sustainable groundwater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are one of the innovative technologies widely accepted as an alternative to the ‘pump and treat’ (P&T) for sustainable in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The concept of the technology involves the emplacement of a permeable barrier containing reactive materials across the flow path of the contaminated groundwater to intercept and treat the contaminants as the plume flows through it under the influence of the natural hydraulic gradient. Since the invention of \\{PRBs\\} in the early 1990s, a variety of materials has been employed to remove contaminants including heavy metals, chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. Contaminant removal is usually accomplished via processes such as adsorption, precipitation, denitrification and biodegradation. Despite wide acknowledgment, there are still unresolved issues about long term-performance of PRBs, which have somewhat affected their acceptability and full-scale implementation. The current paper presents an overview of the PRB technology, which includes the state of art, the merits and limitations, the reactive media used so far, and the mechanisms employed to transform or immobilize contaminants. The paper also looks at the design, construction and the long-term performance of PRBs.

Franklin Obiri-Nyarko; S. Johana Grajales-Mesa; Grzegorz Malina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

In-situ remediation of nitrate-contaminated ground water by electrokinetics/iron wall processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of using electrokinetics coupled with a zero valent iron (Fe0) treatment wall to abiotically remediate nitrate-contaminated soils was investigated. Upon completion of each test run, the contaminated soil specimen was sliced into five parts and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen. Nitrogen mass balance was used to determine the major transformation products. In control experiments where only electrokinetics was used at various constant voltages, 25 to 37% of the nitrate-nitrogen was transformed. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed improved when a Fe0 wall (20 g or about 8–10% by weight) was placed near the anode. For test runs at various constant voltages, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed ranged from 54 to 87%. By switching to constant currents, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen — transformed was about 84 to 88%. The major transformation products were ammonia-nitrogen and nitrogen gases. Nitrite-nitrogen was less than 1% in all experimental runs. Two localized pH conditions exist in the system, a low pH region near the anode and a high pH region near the cathode. Placing of an iron wall near the anode increases the pH in that area as time increases. Movement of the acid front did not flush across the cathode. This research has demonstrated that the electrokinetics/iron wall process can be used to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

Chin F. Chew; Tian C. Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

465

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

466

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

467

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program (Waste Management Conference 2007)

468

Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect

The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A large scale environmental assessment: The Clinch River Remedial Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The USEPA identified the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee as a Superfund National Priorities List site in 1989. Facilities at the ORR have released a variety of radiological, organic, and inorganic contaminants to the local aquatic environment as a result of nuclear weapons production, uranium enrichment, and energy research and development activities from the mid 1940s to the present. The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) was initiated to meet the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to determine the nature and extent of hazardous releases to the aquatic environment. Phase 1 of the CRRI consisted of sampling and analysis of selected sites representing differing levels of contamination to determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in off-site water, sediment, and fish. Sampling activities in support of Phase 2 of the remedial investigation were designed to assist in defining the nature and extent of the contaminants of concern in sediment, water and biota, and to provide information for assessing the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with those contaminants. A concurrent study evaluated potential remedial alternatives and identified effective and acceptable corrective measures. An overview of the CRRI, including a history of the facilities and their contaminant releases, and the regulatory context in which the remedial investigation occurred is presented.

LeHew, R.; Harris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Adapting Advances in Remediation Science to Long-Term Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Several facets of groundwater remediation stand to gain from the advances made during recent years in disciplines that contribute to remediation science. Engineered remedies designed to aggressively remove subsurface contamination should benefit from this progress, and more passive cleanup methods and the long-term monitoring of such passive approaches may benefit equally well if not more. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) has adopted a strategic plan that is designed to take advantage of technological improvements in the monitoring and assessment of both active and passive groundwater remedies. Flexible adaptation of new technologies, as they become available, to long-term surveillance at LM sites is expected to reduce site stewardship costs while ensuring the future protection of human health and the environment. Some of the technologies are expected to come from government initiatives that focus on the needs of subsurface monitoring. Additional progress in monitoring science will likely result from continual improvements in our understanding of contaminant fate-and-transport processes in the groundwater and the vadose zone.

Peterson, Dave [S.M. Stoller Corporation

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Managing Complex Environmental Remediation amidst Aggressive Facility Revitalization Milestones  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the final closure projects at Rocky Flats and Fernald, many of the Department of Energy's future CERCLA and RCRA closure challenges will take place at active facilities, such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) central campus. ORNL has aggressive growth plans for a Research Technology Park and cleanup must address and integrate D and D, soil and groundwater remediation, and on-going and future business plans for the Park. Different planning and tracking tools are needed to support closures at active facilities. To support some large Airport redevelopment efforts, we created tools that allowed the Airline lease-holder to perform environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and new building construction, which in turn allowed them to migrate real estate from unusable to usable within an aggressive schedule. In summary: The FIM and OpenGate{sup TM} spatial analysis system were two primary tools developed to support simultaneous environmental remediation, D and D, and construction efforts at an operating facility. These tools helped redevelopers to deal with environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and construction, thereby meeting their goals of opening gates, restarting their revenue streams, at the same time complying with all environmental regulations. (authors)

Richter Pack, S. [PMP Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

474

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Application of groundwater modeling in remedial action development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development and implementation of a remedial program usually is a costly process. Available scientific and engineering data should be used to optimize the investigation program which will lead to the development of a cost-effective remedial action. As part of the scope of the Remedial Investigation (RI), the data needs and significance of the key parameters as related to the final remedial design should be assessed and determined to obtain necessary data in a timely and cost-effective manner. Properly verified groundwater computer models are powerful tools for both identifying data gaps which must be filled before an appropriate design can be prepared and for assessing the significance of site features on the problem and solution. These models can be used effectively during both the RI and Feasibility Study (FS) phases. In the RI phase, the models can be used for optimization of field and laboratory testing programs and in data analysis to assess adequateness of the field investigation and provide basic data for

Sirous H. Djafari; David E. Troxell

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities for Graduates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. – Savannah River Remediation (SRR), the liquid waste contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), requires workers with unique skills to protect employees from radiation as the company works safely toward completing its mission.

477

Remedial action work plan for the Colonie site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Colonie site is a DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site located in the Town of Colonie, New York, and consisting of an interim storage site and several vicinity properties. The Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) is the former National Lead (NL) Industries plant located at 1130 Central Avenue. There are 11 vicinity properties that received remedial action in 1984: 7 located south of the site on Yardboro and Palmer Avenues just across the Colonie-Albany town limits in Albany, and 4 located northwest of the site along Central Avenue in Colonie. Of these properties, nine are residences and two are commercial properties. This document describes the engineering design, construction, and associated plans for remedial action on the vicinity properties and the interim storage site. These plans include both radiological and chemical work. Radiological work includes: excavating the above-guideline radioactive wastes on the vicinity properties; designing required facilities for the interim storage site; preparing the interim storage site to receive these contaminated materials; transporting the contaminated materials to the interim waste storage stockpile; and preparing necessary schedules for accomplishing the remedial actions. Chemical work involves: developing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure plans; neutralizing chemical hazards associated with plating solutions; inventorying on-site chemicals; and disposal of chemicals and/or residues. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

479

Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash M. Melih for retardation of petroleum contaminants in barrier applications. Sorbed amounts measured in batch scale tests on remediation efficiency. INTRODUCTION Remediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum-based products has

Aydilek, Ahmet

480

CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................................5 9.0 Ground- and Surface-Water MonitoringCSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TASK PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 .............................................................................................5 FIGURES #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Task Plan March 31, 2004 TASK PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION 1

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